Author Topic: ISRO Mars Orbiter Mission - Nov 2013 launch to September 2014 arrival - UPDATES  (Read 437697 times)

Online LouScheffer

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For international projects like this, does NASA "donate" the time in a spirit of encouraging more space science?  Or do the projects need to rent time just like anyone else?

My suspicion--I don't have any hard data on this--that NASA has some kind of agreement with ISRO that they will provide DSN time in return for access to data eventually. But it could also be a goodwill gesture to foster future ties. The cost probably comes out of a DSN discretionary budget.

[...]

ISRO is paying 70 Crore rupees for DSN access, it's equivalent to $11.49 Million.
Given the basic DSN rates and overheads (for which you can find a spreadsheet  on http://deepspace.jpl.nasa.gov/advmiss/index.html , labelled "Aperture Fee Tool"), and an expected mission duration of a year and a half or so, it would seem they are paying roughly the usual rates.

Offline robertross

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An very passionate post on MOM's success by Emily @planetary.org

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2014/09240910-reflecting-on-the-success-of-mom.html

Quite some reflections on the "first country" arguments and how that should indeed be irrelevant in the larger context of ISRO's achievement. Found it quite moving.  :)

Yes, quite a moving post; thanks for the link.

I too found this a great moment for India, much like the days of Apollo inspired not only a generation to do great things, but advanced the country as a whole. Of course there needs to be support at home to continue that inspriration, and investment in that generation, but in the infrastructure for the nation to help carry it through future generations.

Looking forward to those first images!
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline albatros68

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Cheers for ISRO succsess in this mission

Offline Dalhousie

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For international projects like this, does NASA "donate" the time in a spirit of encouraging more space science?  Or do the projects need to rent time just like anyone else?

My suspicion--I don't have any hard data on this--that NASA has some kind of agreement with ISRO that they will provide DSN time in return for access to data eventually. But it could also be a goodwill gesture to foster future ties. The cost probably comes out of a DSN discretionary budget.

[...]

MOM's primary mission is six months.  For non critical events they can probably use their own tracking stations.  So I don't think they are getting a discount. If the mission is extended no doubt they will pay more.

ISRO is paying 70 Crore rupees for DSN access, it's equivalent to $11.49 Million.
Given the basic DSN rates and overheads (for which you can find a spreadsheet  on http://deepspace.jpl.nasa.gov/advmiss/index.html , labelled "Aperture Fee Tool"), and an expected mission duration of a year and a half or so, it would seem they are paying roughly the usual rates.
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline rickl

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I neglected to say it last night, but congratulations to India and ISRO.  This was exciting to watch.

I also remember setting my alarm and getting up early to watch the launch last November.
Nominal now means "Yeehah!!"

Offline vineethgk

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Orbiter sends back first pictures

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/orbiter-sends-back-first-pictures/article6443567.ece?homepage=true

Quote
The colour camera, on board India’s spacecraft to Mars, has beamed back about 10 pictures of the Red Planet’s surface which show some craters.

Quote
The other instruments will become operational one by one in the next few days.

Quote
Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) officials said the pictures were of “good quality.” They will be presented to Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Thursday before being released to the press, the officials said.

So, Big Boss gets to see it first.  ;)


Offline robertross

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Orbiter sends back first pictures

Quote
Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) officials said the pictures were of “good quality.” They will be presented to Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Thursday before being released to the press, the officials said.

So, Big Boss gets to see it first.  ;)


Thanks. I was wondering what the hold up was.
I have no issue with waiting.
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline Vultur

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For international projects like this, does NASA "donate" the time in a spirit of encouraging more space science?  Or do the projects need to rent time just like anyone else?

My suspicion--I don't have any hard data on this--that NASA has some kind of agreement with ISRO that they will provide DSN time in return for access to data eventually. But it could also be a goodwill gesture to foster future ties. The cost probably comes out of a DSN discretionary budget.

[...]

ISRO is paying 70 Crore rupees for DSN access, it's equivalent to $11.49 Million.
Given the basic DSN rates and overheads (for which you can find a spreadsheet  on http://deepspace.jpl.nasa.gov/advmiss/index.html , labelled "Aperture Fee Tool"), and an expected mission duration of a year and a half or so, it would seem they are paying roughly the usual rates.

Is this included in the often mentioned $73 million cost of the mission? What about the launch vehicle? That seems incredibly cheap even with much lower labor costs, etc.

Offline vyoma

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For international projects like this, does NASA "donate" the time in a spirit of encouraging more space science?  Or do the projects need to rent time just like anyone else?

My suspicion--I don't have any hard data on this--that NASA has some kind of agreement with ISRO that they will provide DSN time in return for access to data eventually. But it could also be a goodwill gesture to foster future ties. The cost probably comes out of a DSN discretionary budget.

[...]

ISRO is paying 70 Crore rupees for DSN access, it's equivalent to $11.49 Million.
Given the basic DSN rates and overheads (for which you can find a spreadsheet  on http://deepspace.jpl.nasa.gov/advmiss/index.html , labelled "Aperture Fee Tool"), and an expected mission duration of a year and a half or so, it would seem they are paying roughly the usual rates.

Is this included in the often mentioned $73 million cost of the mission? What about the launch vehicle? That seems incredibly cheap even with much lower labor costs, etc.



Here's the available cost breakdown of mission:
  • Spacecraft and payloads: ₹150 crore ($24 million)
  • Launch vehicle (PSLV-XL): ₹110 crore ($18 million)
  • Augmenting ground stations for mission operations: ₹190 crore ($31 million)
  • Total: ₹450 crore ($73 million)

  • However, I couldn't find any info on whether or not the ₹70 crore ($11 million) NASA DSN cost is included in the mission cost mentioned above. I guess it might be included in "₹190 crore to augment the ground stations" part.
    « Last Edit: 09/25/2014 04:04 AM by vyoma »

    Offline antriksh

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    Mars Orbiter Mission to spawn a generation of smart satellites

    Quote
    All through its journey MOM has controlled its temperature and cruised in the direction of Mars with very little prodding from Earth. While speeding at more than 82,000kmph, it never lost direction, thanks to the star-gazing equipment on board.

    "It's not like driving on a highway, you know," says Alex. "In space, everything around you looks the same." To stay on course, MOM used the star-gazer to look at constellations of six to 10 stars every microsecond and compare them with preloaded patterns. "Distant stars are relatively stationary," he says. MOM continuously matched the patterns and, in relation to the constellations, determined its position and direction. That's autonomy.
    Nasadiya Sukta:
    Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

    From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

    Offline NovaSilisko

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    Looking back at the beginning of this thread amuses me - so much skepticism that the mission would even happen!

    Great job everyone working on this program.

    Offline vineethgk

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    Quote
    Is this included in the often mentioned $73 million cost of the mission? What about the launch vehicle? That seems incredibly cheap even with much lower labor costs, etc.

    Its quite possible that when you take into account many additional hidden costs associated, the actual amount just might come to be a bit higher than this. Still, I would expect this to be much cheaper than equivalent missions attempted so far for a variety of reasons like lower labour costs, manufacturing costs and also by the fact that this is a technology demonstrator mission with limited scientific payload.

    On the other hand, its easy to see why ISRO tries to highlight this "$73 million" so much if you see the intention behind it.

    1. Its an advertisement. Its like saying "If we can build a reliable Mars orbiter and launch them successfully at such low costs, we can build your spacecrafts with equivalent reliability and launch them dirt cheap too". And like all advertisements, you can expect a wee bit of exaggeration to stress the point.  ;)

    2. For a developing nation like India, with its pressing socio-economic needs, it would be hard for its space agency to sell an expensive excursion to the public. Never mind the long-term benefits that such a mission brings to the economy and society. Never mind the country spends more money on fire-crackers for its festivals. Never mind that much, much greater amount of money gets wasted through graft, inefficiencies and other wastages. People almost always look for the immediate expenditure.

    Just like the remarkable ability of a space program to ignite minds and inspire a new generation, it also has the misfortune of being the favorite target for bashing when it comes to 'cost'. ISRO faces the same challenges in an even greater magnitude in India, and this "$73 million" can be best described as its best weapon in its defence.  :)
    « Last Edit: 09/25/2014 05:18 AM by vineethgk »

    Offline antriksh

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      ;D  ;D  :P

    Mars Orbiter Mission Project chief Arunan’s wife wants him back on earth



    Quote
    “Arunan left for his office on Tuesday at 6 am and came back by 11 pm. He then slept intermittently for one-and-a-half hours and by 2 am (Wednesday) he had already left.

    Isros agent Mars The name is Arunan
    Quote
    Insiders say when Isro suggested the idea of launching a Mars mission at Rs450 crore, some foreign scientists smirked. Today, some of them have offered Arunan jobs that he is not keen on. Arunan and his team of 200 scientists virtually lived at mission control in Bangalore for 300 days. "He would come home well past midnight and leave before dawn. I wondered if he was sleepwalking," says Arunan's wife Geetha

    Quote
    How did he fight stress? "Watching Bond movies, of course," laughs Arunan.
    « Last Edit: 09/25/2014 04:53 AM by antriksh »
    Nasadiya Sukta:
    Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

    From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

    Offline vyoma

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    First picture is here :)

    https://twitter.com/MarsOrbiter

    Edit:
    Some info on this picture:
    Quote
    ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission captures its first image of Mars.
    Taken from a height of 7300 km; with 376 m spatial resolution.
    « Last Edit: 09/25/2014 05:58 AM by vyoma »

    Offline vineethgk

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    First picture is here :)

    https://twitter.com/MarsOrbiter

    Wowww... Thanks.. The lower right corner gives me the impression that this has been taken at the periapsis at very high speed. Doesn't the camera have something like an image stabilization?

    Offline antriksh

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    « Last Edit: 09/25/2014 05:39 AM by antriksh »
    Nasadiya Sukta:
    Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

    From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

    Offline antriksh

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    First picture is here :)



    Some info[/url] on this picture:
    Quote
    ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission captures its first image of Mars.
    Taken from a height of 7.3 km; with 376 m spatial resolution.

    7.3 km??  :P wth? zooming?
    « Last Edit: 09/25/2014 05:50 AM by antriksh »
    Nasadiya Sukta:
    Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

    From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

    Offline NovaSilisko

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    FB post has been corrected and now reads 7300 km.

    Offline atnanda

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    Syrtis Major crater

    First picture is here :)

    https://twitter.com/MarsOrbiter

    Edit:
    Some info on this picture:
    Quote
    ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission captures its first image of Mars.
    Taken from a height of 7.3 km; with 376 m spatial resolution.
    « Last Edit: 09/25/2014 05:56 AM by atnanda »

    Offline vyoma

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    First picture is here :)



    Some info[/url] on this picture:
    Quote
    ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission captures its first image of Mars.
    Taken from a height of 7.3 km; with 376 m spatial resolution.

    7.3 km??  :P wth? zooming?

    They corrected now. It's 7300 km ;D

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