Author Topic: VV at USOS  (Read 90901 times)

Offline manboy

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #220 on: 07/30/2014 04:10 AM »
If you buy a spacestation the type of connectors fitted may be an option.
Probably not if it's going to be serviced by Dragon/CST-100. Plus it doesn't make sense not to use an IDSS-compatible system unless they can build a significantly cheaper design or buy APAS for really cheap and get around the trade restrictions.

Cargo Dragon uses CBM, which has a bigger hole, where as Dragonrider uses NDS.
I know but I doubt Bigelow will use two different attachment mechanisms due to the added cost that it would result in. And again, if you use CBMs then you will need strategically placed RMSs.
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Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #221 on: 07/30/2014 02:34 PM »

Cargo Dragon uses CBM, which has a bigger hole, where as Dragonrider uses NDS.
I know but I doubt Bigelow will use two different attachment mechanisms due to the added cost that it would result in. And again, if you use CBMs then you will need strategically placed RMSs.

An additional cost to be remembered when buying.

Offline manboy

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #222 on: 08/28/2014 04:25 AM »
The critical design review for the NASA Docking System Block-1 (NDSB-1) was recently completed.

Press release doesn't seem that well written, the image included appears to show an outdated version of NDS.

http://boeing.mediaroom.com/2014-8-26-Boeing-Continues-Progress-on-Improved-Space-Station-Docking-System#assets_117
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Offline manboy

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #223 on: 08/28/2014 04:50 AM »
"Pursuit of the SIMAC as the NASA Docking System
 
In April 2012, NASA directed Boeing to conduct a study to assess the feasibility of
implementing a simplified soft capture system, as a possible replacement for the soft
capture system portion of the baseline NASA Docking System. This paper describes the
study conducted and conclusions drawn that supported the selection of the Soft Impact
Mating and Attenuation Concept (SIMAC) as the replacement of the International Low
Impact Docking System's (iLIDS) soft capture system."


Paper will be presented in early May at the SpaceOps 2014 International Conference on Space Operations in Pasedena, California.
(Quoting myself here just so it's easier for other people to find the earlier comment.)
The paper has been uploaded onto NTRS, here's the key info

In April 2012, NASA International Space Station (ISS) Program management initiated a Change Directive to Boeing that authorized and funded a study to determine if a less complex docking system could be implemented for use as the NASA Docking System that both met the international community’s desire for a narrow soft capture system ring width, as well as providing the ISS a simpler active docking system compared to the then-current iLIDS design.

While the focus of NASA’s Change Directive was clearly on an alternate for the soft capture system portion of the entire docking system, the overall goal was to create a complete, integrated system that worked well together. NASA’s guidance and direction for the study included a number of requirements and goals, listed below:

* The Soft Capture System (SCS) shall be compatible with a passive or active Androgynous Peripheral
Attachment System (APAS) style SCS
* Hard mate assembly/hard capture system shall be per the International Docking System Standard IDSS Interface
Definition Document (IDSS IDD)
* Use of Technology Readiness Level 6 or higher technologies is required
* Design, development, qualification and certification of a final design is required to be completed by June 2015
* The design shall contain no proprietary features
* Loads are as documented in IDSS Interface IDD Revision A
* The design shall be as simple and robust as possible
* The design shall allow build-to-print capability by third parties (must use publically available process and data)

The SIMAC design was originally conceived in 2003 for the Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Program. The rest of the paper just talks about various technical aspects of the design.
« Last Edit: 09/27/2014 10:22 PM by manboy »
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Offline manboy

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Offline manboy

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #225 on: 12/03/2014 10:56 PM »
The International Docking System Standard website (http://internationaldockingstandard.com) is offline along with the website's email ([email protected]).
« Last Edit: 03/25/2015 05:12 AM by manboy »
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Offline manboy

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #226 on: 12/16/2014 01:54 AM »
Image from a presentation dated 20 October 2014.

http://www.ispcs.com/content/files/Shannon-ISPCS2014.pdf
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Offline manboy

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Offline manboy

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #228 on: 02/21/2015 05:13 AM »


Notes: IDA-1 is now at KSC. IDA-2 is behind them at the Boeing facility in Houston. The primary structure was from Energia. IDA weighs about 1150 lbs (522 kg), has a length of about 30 in. Dextre would remove it from Dragon's trunk and then be connected to the PMAs during an EVA (?).

A mock-up of the active portion of the docking system is shown.

EDIT: I had some free time so I decided to make a wikipedia page for IDA using all the public-side (i.e. not export restricted) info I have.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Docking_Adapter
« Last Edit: 02/28/2015 06:39 AM by manboy »
"Cheese has been sent into space before. But the same cheese has never been sent into space twice." - StephenB

Offline manboy

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #229 on: 03/02/2015 09:29 PM »
On SpaceX's implementation of IDSS.

"Docking system qualification hardware is already in process to support full qualification testing utilizing two test units. One docking adapter will undergo complete environmental testing including vibration, thermal, and shock testing, while a second unit will be utilized for extensive docking simulations including a test at NASA’s Johnson Space Center with a 6-degree of freedom simulator to minimize a docking issue with the ISS."

http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/ast/environmental/nepa_docs/review/launch/media/fonsi_dragon_pad_abort.pdf
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Offline PahTo

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #230 on: 06/29/2015 02:08 AM »

...and I imagine these test units will be used in the fabrication of another IDA to replace that which was lost today.

Offline woods170

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #231 on: 06/29/2015 06:38 AM »

...and I imagine these test units will be used in the fabrication of another IDA to replace that which was lost today.
Structural spares were constructed for one more IDA. Those will be used to build a replacement IDA. IMO it is a safe bet that another set of structural spares will be procured. Those IDA's are not exactly flying on class A missions. The risk of another one being lost in a launch mishap is real.
« Last Edit: 06/29/2015 06:38 AM by woods170 »

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #232 on: 07/30/2015 07:03 PM »
IDA-2 Goes Horizontal for Pre-Launch Testing
July 30, 2015 at 1:15 pm - Stephanie Martin

Engineers in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida recently tested the mechanisms that will connect future commercial crew spacecraft with the second International Docking Adapter. IDA-2, as it’s called, will be taken to the space station on a future cargo resupply mission. It will be one of two connection points for commercial crew spacecraft visiting the orbiting laboratory. The systems and targets for IDA-2 are set to be put through extensive tests with both Boeing’s CST-100 and SpaceX’s Crew Dragon before the adapter is loaded for launch.

“We set IDA-2 up horizontally for the alignment checks with the CST-100 to more closely mirror how the two would connect in space,” said Steve Bigos, project manager for orbital replacement unit processing at Kennedy. “There is a lot of new technology, so it’s very interesting.”

The targets are much more sophisticated than previous docking systems and include lasers and sensors that allow the station and spacecraft to autonomously communicate distance cues and enable alignment and connection. Think of it as a car that can park itself.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcrew/2015/07/30/cst-100-docking-system-tested-with-ida-2/

Offline Space Pete

Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #233 on: 08/01/2015 07:34 PM »
I wonder whether IDA-2 will now be installed on PMA-2 as opposed to PMA-3? Or will its designation change to IDA-1? I guess we'll see.
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Offline PahTo

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #234 on: 08/02/2015 12:07 AM »
I wonder whether IDA-2 will now be installed on PMA-2 as opposed to PMA-3? Or will its designation change to IDA-1? I guess we'll see.

I was wondering the same thing and figured you would know!  I imagine IDA-2 will go on N2 forward/PMA-2 and IDA-3 will go on N2 zenith/PMA-3.

Offline manboy

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #235 on: 08/04/2015 01:47 AM »
IDA mock-up at the NBL.
« Last Edit: 08/07/2015 10:09 PM by manboy »
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Offline Space Pete

Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #236 on: 08/05/2015 08:03 PM »
I wonder whether IDA-2 will now be installed on PMA-2 as opposed to PMA-3? Or will its designation change to IDA-1? I guess we'll see.

I was wondering the same thing and figured you would know!  I imagine IDA-2 will go on N2 forward/PMA-2 and IDA-3 will go on N2 zenith/PMA-3.

Now confirmed via L2 - IDA-2 will be going on PMA-2.

I still don't know whether the PMA-3 IDA will be called IDA-3, or whether it will be called IDA-1. It may be easier to call it IDA-3, and keep the IDA numbering in line with the PMA numbering.
« Last Edit: 08/05/2015 08:04 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline manboy

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #237 on: 10/11/2015 10:31 PM »
NASA:

October 05, 2015
RELEASE 15-197
International Space Station Partners Release Major Update to Docking Standard

The International Space Station Multilateral Coordination Board (MCB) has approved a major update to the station docking system standard. First released in 2010, the docking standard established a common station-to-spacecraft equipment interface to enable spacecraft of multiple types to dock to the space station.

"The latest additions to the docking standard further open the door for contributions by international agencies, as well as commercial enterprises for the International Space Station and exploration,” said William Gerstenmaier, MCB chair and NASA’s associate administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. “We have already seen benefits of this standard, creating the opportunity to develop additional standards for spacecraft design. The International Docking Adapters that will soon be installed on the space station are fully compatible with the docking standard, which means that any spacecraft can use the adapters in the future – from new commercial spacecraft to other international spacecraft yet to be designed.”

The update more than doubles the content in the guidelines, which enable in-orbit crew rescue by a range of spacecraft types and international collaborative exploration with future spacecraft -- from crewed to autonomous vehicles, and low-Earth orbit to deep-space missions. Limited to describing physical features and design parameters of a standard docking interface, the docking standards help ensure a common interface without dictating a particular design.

With this revision, the standard now includes a full range of rendezvous operations, with information on passive rendezvous targets used by spacecraft to locate the space station and lock on for approach. The addition of content related to rendezvous operations will provide the greatest possible access to information for active rendezvous sensor developers, while providing full compatibility for all current rendezvous sensor technologies.

The space station's senior level management board, the MCB includes senior representatives from NASA; the Russian Federal Space Agency; the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, assisted by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency; ESA (European Space Agency); and the Canadian Space Agency. This group coordinates the orbiting laboratory's operations and activities among the partners.

The Multilateral Coordination Board released the document to allow non-partner agencies and commercial developers to review the new standard and provide feedback. Technical teams from the five space station partner agencies will continue to work on additional refinements and revisions to the standard.

The International Docking Standard interface definition document is available at:

http://www.internationaldockingstandard.com

Interested parties may send comments to:

[email protected]
"Cheese has been sent into space before. But the same cheese has never been sent into space twice." - StephenB

Offline manboy

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Re: VV at USOS
« Reply #238 on: 10/30/2015 08:44 PM »
Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20150019634.pdf
"Cheese has been sent into space before. But the same cheese has never been sent into space twice." - StephenB

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