Author Topic: The (planned) Soyuz 7 and 8 docking  (Read 1893 times)

Offline TALsite

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The (planned) Soyuz 7 and 8 docking
« on: 02/28/2012 10:20 AM »
Everybody knows that in the “Troika Mission” it was expected a docking between Soyuz 7 (passive vehicle) and Soyuz 8 (active), with Soyuz 6 close, documenting the docking.

http://www.astronautix.com/flights/soyuz8.htm
“The spacecraft was to have docked with Soyuz 7 and exchanged one crew member from each spacecraft while Soyuz 6 took film from nearby.”

As posted above it was expected a crew exchange between the two Soyuz, so my question is: who was scheduled to do this exchange?

I suppose that Gorbatko, that was backup for Khrunov in Soyuz 5 was one of them (moving towards Soyuz 8 ), probably being Yeliseyev (that made the EVA in Soyuz 5) the other, moving towards Soyuz 7.  But I’m not sure if V. Volkov was scheduled to do the EVA instead of Gorbatko….
Any info?

These movements leads to other question:
-Soyuz 4 (launched with Shatalov only) probably had the personalized Kazbek couches for Yeliseyev and Khrunov inside DM since launch… but Soyuz 7 had the three couches for the initial launch crew, so if the exchange of crewmen would had been accomplished...
How the “new” crewmen would had landed? In a non-personalised couch?
Or the custom couch is only needed for cosmonauts wearing Sokol suits?
Or maybe they had extra contoured couchs in the OM for the newcomers?

Thanks.

Offline DMeader

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Re: The (planned) Soyuz 7 and 8 docking
« Reply #1 on: 02/28/2012 11:09 AM »
The first version of the Sokol suit didn't even fly until Soyuz 12 in 1973.

Offline anik

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Re: The (planned) Soyuz 7 and 8 docking
« Reply #2 on: 02/28/2012 12:07 PM »
http://www.astronautix.com/flights/soyuz8.htm
“The spacecraft was to have docked with Soyuz 7 and exchanged one crew member from each spacecraft while Soyuz 6 took film from nearby.”

Information about exchange is pure fantasy.

Offline Ben E

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Re: The (planned) Soyuz 7 and 8 docking
« Reply #3 on: 02/28/2012 02:10 PM »
As I understand it, the whole troika flight was a first response to the Apollo 11 landing. In the wake of the Soyuz 4/5 docking in January 1969, the original plan was for Soyuz 6 to be a solo flight in May and Soyuz 7/8 to rendezvous and dock in August. However, this was deemed too conservative and a plan was set in motion to fly all three Soyuz at the same time. Soyuz 8 (originally to be piloted by Nikolayev and Sevastyanov, later replaced by Shatalov and Yeliseyev) would dock with Soyuz 7 (carrying Filipchenko, Volkov and Gorbatko), whilst Soyuz 6 (Shonin and Kubasov) filmed the event from about 50 metres away. I'm not aware that a crew exchange was ever planned.

Offline Proponent

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Re: The (planned) Soyuz 7 and 8 docking
« Reply #4 on: 02/28/2012 05:04 PM »
Had Soyuz 6 flown solo, what was it to have accomplished?

Offline Kyra's kosmos

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Re: The (planned) Soyuz 7 and 8 docking
« Reply #5 on: 02/29/2012 03:31 AM »
In addition to general spacecraft testing we see a list from:
http://www.astronautix.com/flights/soyuz6.htm
"The technical experiments include: A-1, observation and photography of the process of rendezvous, docking, crew transfer, and undocking of Soyuz 7 and 8 from Soyuz 6; A-6, development of systems for orientation and translation of the spacecraft; A-15, development of methods for autonomous navigation. Scientific experiments include: B-1, observation and photography of clouds and cyclones; B-5, photography of geological and geographic surface features; B-10, welding methods in vacuum and weightlessness; B-13, observation of space glow phenomena (Gegenschein, zodiacal light, etc); B-19, micrometeoroid erosion of windows; B-19, arterial pressure before and after exercise. Military experiments include: V-15, observations of earth's surface under both light and dark conditions; V-19, receiving of middle-range radio waves through the ionosphere; V-20, measurement of energetic medium-energy rays tunnelling through the engine section; V-22, research into the possibility of targeted and aimed photography. There will also be television sessions and observation of ballistic missile launches using the Svinets device."

Minus A1, These could be performed whether the spacecraft was flown solo or not, although the list would likely have been shorter. By itself the mission would have been relatively mundane, not scoring any major new firsts.
« Last Edit: 02/29/2012 03:38 AM by Kyra's kosmos »

Offline TALsite

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Re: The (planned) Soyuz 7 and 8 docking
« Reply #6 on: 02/29/2012 09:47 AM »
Had Soyuz 6 flown solo, what was it to have accomplished?

Main objective: Vacuum welding in space using "Vulkan" furnace.
V. Fartushny from the Paton Institute (designers of the experiment) was scheduled to fly, but later Kubasov replaced him.

Offline Ben E

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Re: The (planned) Soyuz 7 and 8 docking
« Reply #7 on: 02/29/2012 10:56 AM »
Had Soyuz 6 flown in May 1969, it was scheduled to last around seven days. Vulkan was the main experiment, a welding furnace housed in the orbital module. The experiment was provided by Moscow's Paton Institute. The Soyuz 7/8 mission would have occurred in August 1969 and the two craft would have remained docked for up to three days. This changed on 26 April 1969, when the State Commission's report into the Soyuz 5 re-entry problems was completed and Dmitri Ustinov (head of the Military-Industrial Commission) merged the three missions into one. By May 1969, the plan was for a troika flight in August 1969. The flight eventually took place in October, due to delays caused by defects in the Soyuz spacecraft.

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