Author Topic: LIVE: Orbital Pegasus XL/NuSTAR - June 13, 2012  (Read 98211 times)

Offline sdsds

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #40 on: 03/17/2012 07:07 AM »
"qualify software associated with a new Pegasus flight computer."

What was wrong with the old Pegasus flight computer?
-- sdsds --

Offline Nate_Trost

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #41 on: 03/17/2012 02:13 PM »
I can only presume, obsolete components that could no longer easily be procured.

Offline Kabloona

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #42 on: 03/17/2012 09:20 PM »
IIRC, the original Pegasus flight computer was an off-the-shelf Israeli tank fire control computer...or something like that. So maybe it was time for a computer that was actually designed to fly.

Offline Kim Keller

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #43 on: 03/18/2012 10:52 PM »
I can only presume, obsolete components that could no longer easily be procured.

Exactly. This new computer is really only new to Pegasus - it's been used in various modular forms on other Orbital rockets. Eventually, all of their product lines will use variants of this common computer, lowering costs.

BTW, the software errors were in simulation code, not flight code. That called into question the accuracy of modeling runs.
« Last Edit: 03/19/2012 12:42 PM by Kim Keller »

Offline Kim Keller

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #44 on: 03/25/2012 01:49 PM »
There will probably be some news on the new launch date on or around Friday, Mar. 30. One option being considered is targeting April 27, but depends on a successful RF link budget analysis for the FTS system. The primary FTS site is down for work, so the use of a back-up site is being explored to see if the look angles available to it will support the required Pegasus trajectory.

If the results of the analysis are negative, we may have to wait until early June for an opening on the RTS range.

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #45 on: 04/03/2012 01:00 PM »
NASA KSC:

"Launch of NASA's NuSTAR spacecraft aboard an Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL rocket is now currently planned for June."

Offline Salo Ukr

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #46 on: 04/19/2012 05:34 PM »
http://msdb.gsfc.nasa.gov/change_log.php
Quote
2012-04-19   NuSTAR   Launch date set at 6/14/2012.   GSFC MCE Devin Bitner 6/14/2012.

Offline Kim Keller

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #47 on: 04/19/2012 08:05 PM »
These guys are going to fool around and screw up my favorite weekend of the year: the 24 Hours of Le Mans!

Offline robertross

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #48 on: 04/20/2012 02:10 AM »
These guys are going to fool around and screw up my favorite weekend of the year: the 24 Hours of Le Mans!

still lots of time yet
(Love that race too. Will one day travel to see it in person, along with the 24 hrs of Daytona)
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline Kim Keller

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #49 on: 04/20/2012 01:03 PM »
BTW, that 6/14 date is the Kwajalein date. It's the 13th for US and Europe. Also, it's a request only at this point, pending range approval.

Gee, I dunno - does Kwaj get "Speed" channel?

Offline TheMightyM

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #50 on: 04/26/2012 05:31 PM »
NASA's Consolidated Launch Schedule is now listing a no earlier than date of June 13. Not sure if that's a Kwajalein date or US date.

And Kim, don’t forget about the 12 Hours of Sebring…

Offline Kim Keller

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #51 on: 04/27/2012 08:57 PM »
That's the US date. June 14 (Kwaj date) is now confirmed by the range.

Went to Sebring 12H for the last two years (and I've been attending Petit Le Mans since 2006). Quite a party...Le Mans is near the top of my bucket list.

Offline TheMightyM

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #52 on: 05/05/2012 01:28 PM »
The latest update from the NASA launching rockets page:

Quote
Testing has been completed between the NuSTAR spacecraft and the additional Hawaii ground tracking station that will be used during the Pegasus XL flight. During the added time before launch, the spacecraft performed a reaction wheel assembly spin procedure to exercise the reaction wheels. Technicians will reinstall the Pegasus fairing around the spacecraft during the third week of May, after a planned flight simulation has been completed.

 

Offline corrodedNut

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #53 on: 05/10/2012 09:08 PM »
Is this NuSTAR processing on the KSC video feed, channel 14?

http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/video/video45m.html


Offline Mapperuo

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #54 on: 05/11/2012 09:12 AM »
Is this NuSTAR processing on the KSC video feed, channel 14?

http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/video/video45m.html



Fairly sure it is aye.
- Aaron

Online Robotbeat

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #55 on: 05/15/2012 01:28 AM »
Awesome.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Garrett

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #56 on: 05/15/2012 11:03 AM »
These guys are going to fool around and screw up my favorite weekend of the year: the 24 Hours of Le Mans!

still lots of time yet
(Love that race too. Will one day travel to see it in person, along with the 24 hrs of Daytona)
My in-laws are from Le Mans, so let me know if you do go and I'll see if I can organize a BBQ ;)
- "Nothing shocks me. I'm a scientist." - Indiana Jones

Offline TheMightyM

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #57 on: 05/23/2012 07:44 PM »
The latest as of Monday, May 21 per NASA's launching rockets page:

Quote
Final prelaunch preparations are under way as technicians reinstall the payload fairing around NASA's NuSTAR spacecraft. A flight computer software evaluation is nearing completion and should be finished before the Flight Readiness Review, which is scheduled for June 1. A successful launch simulation of the Orbital Sciences' Pegasus XL rocket was conducted last week. This paved the way for a planned launch on June 13 if a "go" is given at the conclusion of the review.

The L-1011 carrier aircraft is set to arrive at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on May 24, with rollout of the rocket to the flight line for attachment to the aircraft planned for June 2. The aircraft would depart California on June 5, arriving at the Kwajalein launch site June 6. Following the June 13 launch of the Pegasus from the aircraft, the deployment of NuSTAR is targeted for 11:30 a.m. EDT.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #58 on: 05/24/2012 08:07 PM »
MEDIA ADVISORY: M12-096

NASA TO HOLD NEWS CONFERENCE ABOUT UPCOMING NUSTAR LAUNCH

WASHINGTON -- NASA will hold a news conference on Wednesday, May 30 at
1 p.m. EDT to discuss the upcoming launch of the Nuclear
Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), a mission to hunt for black
holes. The event will be held in the James E. Webb Auditorium at NASA
Headquarters located at 300 E St. SW in Washington.

The event will be broadcast live on NASA Television and streamed on
the agency's website.

NuSTAR will observe some of the hottest, densest and most energetic
objects in the universe, including black holes, their high-speed
particle jets, ultra-dense neutron stars, supernova remnants and our
sun. It will observe high-energy X-rays with much greater sensitivity
and clarity than any mission flown to date. Among its several goals,
NuSTAR will address the puzzle of how black holes and galaxies evolve
together over time.

NuSTAR is scheduled to launch no earlier than 11:30 a.m. EDT on June
13 from Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The spacecraft will
lift off on an Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL launch vehicle, released
from an aircraft flying south of Kwajalein.

News conference participants are:

-- Paul Hertz, Astrophysics Division director at NASA Headquarters in
Washington
-- Fiona Harrison, NuSTAR principal investigator at the California
Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif. -- Daniel Stern, NuSTAR
project scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena
-- Yunjin Kim, NuSTAR project manager at JPL

Reporters unable to attend the briefing in-person can ask questions
from other NASA centers, by telephone or via Twitter using the
hashtag #asknasa.

For dial-in information, reporters should send their name, media
affiliation and telephone number to [email protected] by Noon
on May 30.

For NASA TV streaming video, downlink and scheduling information,
visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

For more information about the NuStar mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nustar

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Pegasus XL/NuSTAR
« Reply #59 on: 05/30/2012 05:27 PM »
RELEASE: 12-177

NASA PREPARING TO LAUNCH ITS NEWEST X-RAY EYES

WASHINGTON -- NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR,
is being prepared for the final journey to its launch pad on
Kwajalein Atoll in the central Pacific Ocean. The mission will study
everything from massive black holes to our own sun. It is scheduled
to launch no earlier than June 13.

"We will see the hottest, densest and most energetic objects with a
fundamentally new high-energy X-ray telescope that can obtain much
deeper and crisper images than before," said Fiona Harrison, the
NuSTAR principal investigator at the California Institute of
Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, Calif., who first conceived of the
mission 20 years ago.

The observatory is perched atop an Orbital Sciences Corporation
Pegasus XL rocket. If the mission passes its Flight Readiness Review
on June 1, the rocket will be strapped to the bottom of an aircraft,
the L-1011 Stargazer, also operated by Orbital, on June 2. The
Stargazer is scheduled to fly from Vandenberg Air Force Base in
central California to Kwajalein June 5-6.

On launch day, the Stargazer will take off and at around 11:30 a.m.
EDT (8:30 a.m. PDT) will drop the rocket, which will then ignite and
carry NuSTAR to a low orbit around Earth.

"NuSTAR uses several innovations for its unprecedented imaging
capability and was made possible by many partners," said Yunjin Kim,
the project manager for the mission at NASA's Jet Propulsion
Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. "We're all really excited to see
the fruition of our work begin its mission in space."

NuSTAR will be the first space telescope to create focused images of
cosmic X-rays with the highest energies. These are the same types of
X-rays that doctors use to see your bones and airports use to scan
your bags. The telescope will have more than 10 times the resolution,
and more than 100 times the sensitivity, of its predecessors while
operating in a similar energy range.

The mission will work with other telescopes in space now, including
NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, which observes lower-energy X-rays.
Together, they will provide a more complete picture of the most
energetic and exotic objects in space, such as black holes, dead
stars and jets traveling near the speed of light.

"NuSTAR truly demonstrates the value that NASA's research and
development programs provide in advancing the nation's science
agenda," said Paul Hertz, NASA's Astrophysics Division director.
"Taking just over four years from receiving the project go-ahead to
launch, this low-cost Explorer mission will use new mirror and
detector technology that was developed in NASA's basic research
program and tested in NASA's scientific ballooning program. The
result of these modest investments is a small space telescope that
will provide world-class science in an important but relatively
unexplored band of the electromagnetic spectrum."

NuSTAR will study black holes that are big and small, far and near,
answering questions about the formation and physics behind these
wonders of the cosmos. The observatory will also investigate how
exploding stars forge the elements that make up planets and people,
and it will even study our own sun's atmosphere.

The observatory is able to focus the high-energy X-ray light into
sharp images because of a complex, innovative telescope design.
High-energy light is difficult to focus because it only reflects off
mirrors when hitting at nearly parallel angles. NuSTAR solves this
problem with nested shells of mirrors. It has the most nested shells
ever used in a space telescope, 133 in each of two optic units. The
mirrors were molded from ultra-thin glass similar to that found in
laptop screens and glazed with even thinner layers of reflective
coating.

The telescope also consists of state-of-the-art detectors and a
lengthy 33-foot (10-meter) mast, which connects the detectors to the
nested mirrors, providing the long distance required to focus the
X-rays. This mast is folded up into a canister small enough to fit
atop the Pegasus launch vehicle. It will unfurl about seven days
after launch. About 23 days later, science operations will begin.

NuSTAR is a Small Explorer mission led by Caltech and managed by JPL
for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The spacecraft
was built by Orbital Sciences Corporation in Dulles, Va. Its
instrument was built by a consortium including Caltech; JPL;
University of California at Berkeley (UC Berkeley); Columbia
University in New York; NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in
Greenbelt, Md.; the Danish Technical University in Denmark; Lawrence
Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif.; and ATK Aerospace
Systems in Goleta, Calif. NuSTAR will be operated by UC Berkeley,
with the Italian Space Agency providing its equatorial ground station
located at Malindi, Kenya. The mission's outreach program is based at
Sonoma State University in Rohnert Park, Calif. NASA's Explorer
Program is managed by Goddard. JPL is managed by Caltech for NASA.

For more information, visit

http://www.nasa.gov/nustar


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