Author Topic: Thunder Well to bring materials to orbit (or further)  (Read 6110 times)

Offline go4mars

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http://atomicrockets.posterous.com/thunder-well

I heard that nuclear bombs have improved to the point that some of the more modern ones release a relatively small amount of radiation.   Is that true?   (I'm thinking about Thunder wells and project orion).

Also, It seems to me that an enormous chunk of metal (perhaps coated in Pica-X could be sent into a desired orbit for reformation and use in space.  Would an enormous pile of conventional explosives get the job done in a "thunder well" approach?  Or would a nuclear blast be essential?

As an example of the utility, a large, orbital parabolic mirror could be made in this way from silver for use in search and rescue around the world, or to help warm the polar areas of Mars, snow removal in northern cities.  Huge tanks for depots could be made, large space stations, etc.
« Last Edit: 08/30/2011 03:08 PM by go4mars »
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Offline RanulfC

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Re: Thunder Well to bring materials to orbit (or further)
« Reply #1 on: 08/30/2011 03:15 PM »
http://atomicrockets.posterous.com/thunder-well

I heard that nuclear bombs have improved to the point that some of the more modern ones release a relatively small amount of radiation.   Is that true?   (I'm thinking about Thunder wells and project orion).

Also, It seems to me that an enormous chunk of metal (perhaps coated in Pica-X could be sent into a desired orbit for reformation and use in space.  Would an enormous pile of conventional explosives get the job done in a "thunder well" approach?  Or would a nuclear blast be essential?

As an example of the utility, a large, orbital parabolic mirror could be made in this way from silver for use in search and rescue around the world, or to help warm the polar areas of Mars.  Huge tanks for depots could be made, large space stations, etc.

The "problem" is the "desired-orbit" part of the concept, you have a "fixed-gun" so your ability to shoot the payload into the "desired" orbit are few and far between. Without an extensive on-orbit infrastructure capable of "catching" and moving payloads between inclinations and orbits cost effectivly it's of limited use.

(You MIGHT be able to use conventional or Super-High-Explosives to get the effect of a nuclear "Thunder-Well" but you'd need literally "mega-tons" of explosives and highly complicated and dangerous packing and timing gear to get the same effect)

Randy

Offline alexterrell

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Re: Thunder Well to bring materials to orbit (or further)
« Reply #2 on: 08/30/2011 09:21 PM »

 Would an enormous pile of conventional explosives get the job done in a "thunder well" approach?  Or would a nuclear blast be essential?


An enormous pile of explosives could do the job, if:
1. Instead of conventional explosives, use something more energetic like liquid hydrogen and oxygen.
2. Control the explosion so it lasts longer and creates thrust in the right direction,

Then you have a rocket.



Offline mlorrey

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Re: Thunder Well to bring materials to orbit (or further)
« Reply #3 on: 09/07/2011 08:40 AM »
I still think that launching a couple of Orions into orbit is worth the atmospheric fallout that would result.

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