Author Topic: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision candidates  (Read 21863 times)

Offline bolun

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ESA - L class Cosmic Vision candidates
« on: 11/27/2010 09:30 PM »
Cosmic Vision L-class missions presentation event 2011

Three "Large" (L-class) mission concepts, originally proposed to ESA in response to the Call for Missions for the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 plan issued in 2007, are currently studied as candidates for a launch opportunity in 2020. Details of the three mission concepts (EJSM/Laplace, IXO/XEUS and LISA) are available at http://sci.esa.int/cosmicvision.

All three mission concepts are nearing the completion of their Assessment Phase study activities, and the Advisory Structure to the ESA Science Programme will be asked, in May of 2011, to recommend which of the three should be carried forward for Definition Phase activities. The Science Programme Committee will then decide on the matter in June of 2011.

As a first step in this process, the three L-class mission concepts EJSM/Laplace, IXO/XEUS and LISA will be presented to the scientific community on 3 February 2011, at the Institut Océanographique de Paris

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=47796

« Last Edit: 02/13/2016 02:38 PM by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #1 on: 11/27/2010 09:34 PM »
EJSM/Laplace - Europa Jupiter System Mission

Mission Summary: A mission to Europa & Jupiter System
Theme: How does the Solar System work?
Primary Goals:
- What have been the conditions for the formation of the Jupiter system?
- How does Jupiter work?
- Is Europa habitable?
Spacecraft
- JGO: Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (ESA-led)
- JEO: Jupiter Europa Orbiter (NASA-led)
Lifetime: 5-7 year cruise & 2-years in orbit
Partners: ESA-NASA-JAXA
Type: L-class mission

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/area/index.cfm?fareaid=107
http://opfm.jpl.nasa.gov/europajupitersystemmissionejsm/
« Last Edit: 11/30/2010 08:48 PM by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #2 on: 11/27/2010 09:37 PM »
IXO - International X-ray Observatory

Themes:
- What are the fundamental physical laws of the Universe?
- How did the Universe originate and what is it made of?
Primary Goals:
- Black holes and matter under extreme conditions
- Formation and evolution of galaxies, clusters and large scale structure
- Life cycles of matter and energy
Targets:
- High redshift AGN
- Clusters of galaxies
- Neutron stars & black holes
Wavelength: X-ray (0.1 - 40 keV)
Telescope: 3.3 m diameter mirror with 20 m focal length
Orbit: Halo orbit at L2
Lifetime: 5 years
Partners: ESA-NASA-JAXA
Type: L-class Mission

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/area/index.cfm?fareaid=103
http://ixo.gsfc.nasa.gov/
« Last Edit: 11/30/2010 08:49 PM by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #3 on: 11/27/2010 09:44 PM »
LISA - Laser Interferometer Space Antenna

Theme:
- What are the fundamental physical laws of the Universe?
- How did the Universe originate and what is it made of?
Primary Goal:
-  Detect and observe gravitational waves from astronomical sources in a frequency range of 10-4 to 10-1 Hz
Spacecraft:
- Three identical spacecraft, each carrying two telescopes with associated lasers and optical systems that together act as an interferometer
Orbit:
- The three spacecraft fly in a near-equilateral triangular formation separated from each other by 5 million kilometres. Together they trail behind the Earth at a distance of 50 million km in the planet's orbit around the Sun
Partners: NASA
Type: L-class Mission

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/area/index.cfm?fareaid=27
http://lisa.nasa.gov/
« Last Edit: 11/30/2010 08:50 PM by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #4 on: 02/09/2011 04:28 PM »
http://www.spacenews.com/civil/110204-europe-mission-depends-us-japan.html

Quote
European scientists on Feb. 3 auditioned three teams competing to carry out Europe’s next billion-dollar mission but acknowledged that for all three the selection will depend on decisions to be made not in Europe, but in Washington and Tokyo.

Representatives of NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) were present to lend moral support to the three projects, but said they were unable to commit to any of them yet. Whether they will be able to do so by June 21, the date Europe’s science mission selection body is scheduled to meet, was unclear.

“What will be decided depends on the selection made by [European] science advisory bodies and on the outcome of discussions with NASA and JAXA,” said Fabio Favata, head of the science planning office at the 18-nation European Space Agency (ESA). “We may not be able to get a firm engagement by NASA or JAXA by then, but we will have further indications of their priorities. The fact is that all three of these missions transcend the capability of any one agency and will require major international collaboration.”

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #5 on: 04/15/2011 05:04 PM »
http://constellation.gsfc.nasa.gov/news/index.html#04112011

Quote
04.11.2011
An update on IXO from Nick White and Jay Bookbinder

US IXO Team,

This is an update on the discussions with the European Space Agency (ESA) at the recent ESA-NASA bilateral meeting. This was reported by Jon Morse (HQ Astrophysics Division Director), first, to the IXO and LISA teams on Tuesday, and then, at the Astrophysics NASA Advisory Committee (NAC) sub-committee meeting on Thursday afternoon.

IXO was one of three candidates competing for the L1 opportunity in ESA´s Cosmic Vision Program (2015-2025). The Astrophysics and Planetary decadal rankings and NASA´s constrained out-year resources projected in the President's FY12 budget request led ESA to conclude that none of the three mission concepts were feasible within the Cosmic Vision L1 schedule. Consequently, ESA has ended consideration of IXO and the other concepts as partnerships at the scale proposed in the New Worlds New Horizons decadal survey (NWNH) and EJSM/Laplace in Visions and Voyages for Planetary Science. Instead, ESA has begun a rapid definition effort that includes the formation of a new science team (to be announced shortly). That effort will identify science goals and a mission concept that can be implemented as part of an ESA-led mission launching in the early 2020´s for a cost to ESA of about 800M Euro. Revised mission concepts from the three science areas will be considered in a selection process tentatively foreseen in February 2012.

A future minor role for NASA in the new ESA-led X-ray mission, in particular contributions at the instrument level, has not been ruled out. NASA will participate in the new ESA science team through a "NASA HQ-empowered scientist." This will be a NASA civil servant scientist who will be the conduit for any engagement with the new ESA team.

Offline Skylab

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #6 on: 04/15/2011 08:25 PM »
With international partners like this, perhaps Europe should start an upper stage programme...

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #7 on: 04/29/2011 03:22 PM »
http://www.spacenews.com/civil/110425-esa-halts-exomars-orbiter.html

Quote
Southwood was referring to NASA’s March announcement that it could not participate in any substantial way in any of the three Large (L)-class science missions that ESA was considering for the next decade. Of the three missions that reached ESA’s final competition, two depend heavily on NASA participation.

ESA has now given all three L-class mission teams until early 2012 to regroup and reconsider their projects in light of NASA’s decision. But for two of the three missions, NASA’s absence may be equivalent to running a race with only one leg.

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #8 on: 06/02/2011 04:54 PM »
New approach for L-class mission candidates

19 Apr 2011

ESA has decided on a new way forward for L-class mission candidates in the Cosmic Vision programme. This new approach takes account of recent developments with ESA's international partners.

All three L1 mission candidates have been proposed to ESA, and have been studied, as cooperative enterprises with international partners, with NASA in a key role in all three. As a consequence, decisions on the future of these missions cannot be taken in isolation from the prospective partners.

Recently, the US National Research Council (NRC) has released 'decadal' surveys for both astronomy and planetary science. While both surveys recommended continued cooperation with ESA, and ranked highly all three L1 mission concepts, none of them were ranked as top priority. The US budget outlook also became known in February 2011, and in ESA's recent discussions with NASA it became clear that it is quite unlikely that any of the L-class mission candidates can be implemented as a joint Europe-US mission in the planned timeframe of the early 2020's.

New, European-led science teams have been formed, and, with the support of ESA's engineering teams, they have been asked to examine if, and to what extent, the science case of each of the three original L1 mission concepts could be implemented in the context of affordable European-led missions with possible limited international participation to be launched in the early 2020's. ESA is jointly assessing with its international partners if, and at what level, international participation would be possible on these new mission concepts.

As is customary for programmatic decisions, ESA will request the Space Science Advisory Committee to review and assess the science case of each of the three new mission concepts resulting from this activity, prior to a recommendation on the new mission concepts being proposed to the Science Programme Committee in February 2012.

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=48661

Offline simonbp

With international partners like this, perhaps Europe should start an upper stage programme...

Well, a large part of the reason that NASA Astrophysics is broke is because JWST is massively overbudget and sucking up all available funds. And one of the major reasons it got so overbudget was dramatically underestimating the costs to launch JWST on the ESA Ariane 5...

It's popular to talk up the benefits of international cooperation, but in execution it can be a nightmare....

Offline mmeijeri

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #10 on: 06/02/2011 08:19 PM »
With international partners like this, perhaps Europe should start an upper stage programme...

Why? And of course, they are working on a new upper stage...
We will be vic-toooooo-ri-ous!!!

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #11 on: 12/15/2011 08:05 PM »
It looks like L-Class Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 candidates selection goes on with ESA led missions.

Quote
NGO (ex-LISA) will track for the first time the elusive ‘gravity waves’ predicted by General Relativity, thus giving birth to a new kind of astronomy from space. Complementing the traditional astronomy studying the electromagnetic spectrum, NGO will attempt to detect the tiny ripples of space-time due to the fundamental force of gravity. The mission is currently undergoing reformulation activities as ESA led mission.

JUICE (ex-Laplace) is a mission to Jupiter. The mission concept is based on multiple flybys of a number of Galilean Moons prior to eventually entering into orbit around Ganymede. A payload suite of 11 instruments including remote-sensing and in-situ suites will provide new insight into the Jovian system. The mission is currently undergoing reformulation activities as ESA led mission.

ATHENA (ex-IXO) has evolved from the IXO mission concept following the L class reformulation exercise and is the next-generation X-ray space observatory designed to study the hot, million-degree universe (e.g. supermassive black holes, evolution of galaxies and large-scale structures and matter under extreme conditions). The ATHENA concept is based on a fixed structure connecting two identical telescope optics with the focal plane instrumentation consisting of a Wide Field Imager (WFI) and X-ray Microcalorimeter (XMS). The mission is currently undergoing reformulation activities as ESA led mission.

Note: pages 10-11
« Last Edit: 12/15/2011 08:25 PM by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #12 on: 03/02/2012 01:00 PM »
The JUICE (JUpiter ICy moon Explorer) concept results from the reformulation of the EJSM-Laplace mission into a European-led mission:
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=49837

Yellow books for the other two Cosmic Vision L1 missions are also available.

ATHENA (ex-IXO):
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=49835

NGO (ex-LISA):
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=49839

They are also planning to use ESA launchers. Of course, only one of the three missions will be chosen. In a couple of months we'll know which one...

Better in this thread.
« Last Edit: 03/02/2012 01:20 PM by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #13 on: 04/03/2012 08:07 AM »
Time to choose a billion-euro space mission

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-17586110

Offline as58

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Online Alpha_Centauri

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #15 on: 04/18/2012 12:03 PM »
Not yet, that is a proposal, decision in May.  Certainly the front-runner though based on the report.

Juice mission leads billion-euro space race

Quote
A proposal to study Jupiter's icy moons is now the front runner for selection as a billion-euro space mission.

However, formal selection of the mission will have to wait until a European space committee meets to discuss the contenders in May.
« Last Edit: 04/18/2012 12:06 PM by Alpha_Centauri »

Offline as58

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #16 on: 04/18/2012 12:23 PM »
True, but it would be a big surprise if JUICE weren't selected on May 2.

The comments in this blog post, especially the one by Per Lilje (who is a member of the SPC), provide some information about the selection process:

http://telescoper.wordpress.com/2012/04/18/bad-news-for-astrophysics-from-esa/#comments

Offline bolun

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #17 on: 05/02/2012 04:28 PM »
Esa selects 1bn-euro Juice probe to Jupiter

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-17917102

Quote
The European Space Agency (Esa) is to mount a billion-euro mission to Jupiter and its icy moons.

The probe, called Juice, has just been approved at a meeting of member state delegations in Paris.

It would be built in time for a launch in 2022, although it would be a further eight years before it reached the Jovian system.

Quote
The mission will cost Esa on the order of 830m euros (£695m; $1.1bn) over its entire life cycle. This includes the cost of manufacturing the spacecraft bus, or chassis, launching the satellite and operating it until 2033.

This sum does not however include Juice's 11 instruments. Funding for these comes from the member states. When this money is taken into account, the final budget for Juice is expected to be just short of 1.1bn euros.

It has not yet been decided which European nations will provide which instruments. An Announcement of Opportunity will be released this summer with a view to identifying the instrument providers by the start of next year.

The final and formal go-ahead for Juice should be given in 2014. In Esa-speak, this stage is referred to as "adoption".

It is the moment when all the elements required to build the satellite are in place and the full costings are established.

It is also the point at which any international participation is recognised.

At the moment, Juice is a Europe-only venture, but there is every possibility that the Americans will get on board.

The US space agency (Nasa) walked away from the idea of producing a companion satellite to Juice - a spacecraft that would orbit Europa rather than Ganymede - due to programmatic differences and budget concerns.

Nonetheless, there is a strong desire among the American scientific community to have some involvement in Juice, especially in those aspects that concern Europa.

Offline woods170

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #18 on: 05/02/2012 05:50 PM »
Esa selects 1bn-euro Juice probe to Jupiter

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-17917102

Quote
The European Space Agency (Esa) is to mount a billion-euro mission to Jupiter and its icy moons.

The probe, called Juice, has just been approved at a meeting of member state delegations in Paris.

It would be built in time for a launch in 2022, although it would be a further eight years before it reached the Jovian system.

Quote
The mission will cost Esa on the order of 830m euros (£695m; $1.1bn) over its entire life cycle. This includes the cost of manufacturing the spacecraft bus, or chassis, launching the satellite and operating it until 2033.

This sum does not however include Juice's 11 instruments. Funding for these comes from the member states. When this money is taken into account, the final budget for Juice is expected to be just short of 1.1bn euros.

It has not yet been decided which European nations will provide which instruments. An Announcement of Opportunity will be released this summer with a view to identifying the instrument providers by the start of next year.

The final and formal go-ahead for Juice should be given in 2014. In Esa-speak, this stage is referred to as "adoption".

It is the moment when all the elements required to build the satellite are in place and the full costings are established.

It is also the point at which any international participation is recognised.

At the moment, Juice is a Europe-only venture, but there is every possibility that the Americans will get on board.

The US space agency (Nasa) walked away from the idea of producing a companion satellite to Juice - a spacecraft that would orbit Europa rather than Ganymede - due to programmatic differences and budget concerns.

Nonetheless, there is a strong desire among the American scientific community to have some involvement in Juice, especially in those aspects that concern Europa.

That's a bit of let down. So, it will take another ten years before it launches, and after that it will take an additional eight years to reach Jupiter? Sounds to me it will take the Galileo-route: all over the inner solar system before heading out to Jupiter.
Arrival in 2030. Eightteen years from now! It better be worth the wait... :(

Oh wait, the wait isn't over in 2030. After arrival at Jupiter, it will take another 2 years and 8 months before JUICE enters orbit around Ganymede. And then, only 9 months after that: end of nominal mission.
That's really depressing... :'(

Sorry for the rant people...
« Last Edit: 05/02/2012 05:55 PM by woods170 »

Offline as58

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Re: ESA - L class Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025 candidates
« Reply #19 on: 05/02/2012 06:05 PM »
In the end, L2 mission will probably return science results sooner than L1...

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