Author Topic: LIVE: Delta IV Heavy: L-32 - Nov 21, 2010  (Read 106755 times)

Offline Jim

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LIVE: Delta IV Heavy: L-32 - Nov 21, 2010
« on: 08/04/2010 03:04 PM »
Here is the logo.


The vehicle went vertical today.

http://countdown.ksc.nasa.gov/elv/
« Last Edit: 11/20/2010 07:58 PM by Chris Bergin »

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #1 on: 08/04/2010 05:34 PM »
Cool logo.

Still tracking October 19?

Offline Ben the Space Brit

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #2 on: 08/04/2010 06:27 PM »
Cool logo.

Speak for yourself, Chris.  I find it disturbing in a Dali-esque way. :P
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Offline Pheogh

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #3 on: 08/04/2010 06:56 PM »
Cool logo.

Still tracking October 19?

That is awesome, have no idea what it is but know I should be afraid of it, GREAT!! Where can i sign up for graphic designer at the DOD

Online ugordan

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #4 on: 08/04/2010 07:04 PM »
Is this likely to be another night launch of the Heavy?

Offline William Graham

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #5 on: 08/04/2010 07:21 PM »
Two things of interest about that patch. Firstly the general layout of the patch and the appearance of the numbers are very similar to L-21. Secondly, the eye. I'm not an expert at biology, but I'd say it looks vaguely owl-like. Owl eyes have been a symbol used on several Lacrosse and Onyx launches.

There has not been a launch of a US RADINT satellite (with the possible exception of the failed L-21 spacecraft) in the last five years, and the oldest of the four operational satellites has been in orbit for over 19 years. The second newest satellite is less than two weeks away from the tenth anniversary of its launch, and its design life is believed to be less than that. It has been noted that ULA were given additional funding to ensure this launches on time, perhaps this is to ensure that it reaches orbit before the existing spacecraft start failing.

I suspect that this will be the first in a new series of RADINT satellites, which will use technology which was supposed to have been demonstrated by L-21 had it not failed immediately after launch. Obviously since it is launching on a DIVH, it will be a larger spacecraft than L-21. In the absence of an official designation for such missions, I will refer to them as "Improved Onyx". Another possibility is that it is one final Onyx satellite, as I had been expecting next-generation RADINT satellites to be smaller and lighter.
« Last Edit: 08/04/2010 07:33 PM by GW_Simulations »

Offline Jim

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #6 on: 08/04/2010 10:01 PM »
Your opinion differs from most of the experts

Offline Nick L.

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #7 on: 08/05/2010 07:30 AM »
That looks kinda like an eagle eye to me...
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Offline Hauerg

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #8 on: 08/05/2010 08:33 AM »
Here is the logo.


The vehicle went vertical today.

http://countdown.ksc.nasa.gov/elv/

Will it stay at the pad for almost a quarter of a year (!!!)  or is this only some kind of thest and it will roll back after it?

Offline Antares

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #9 on: 08/05/2010 01:15 PM »
They stay at the pad.
If I like something on NSF, it's probably because I know it to be accurate.  Every once in a while, it's just something I agree with.  Facts generally receive the former.

Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #10 on: 08/06/2010 01:37 AM »
Cool logo.

Still tracking October 19?

Reminds me of the pyramid/eye on the one dollar bill that conspiracy "theorists" like to go nuts over

Here is the logo.


The vehicle went vertical today.

http://countdown.ksc.nasa.gov/elv/

Will it stay at the pad for almost a quarter of a year (!!!)  or is this only some kind of thest and it will roll back after it?

Delta IV is stacked on the pad within a mobile service structure that is then moved away (think of it like a smaller VAB on rails)
« Last Edit: 08/06/2010 01:39 AM by Ronsmytheiii »
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Offline Antares

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #11 on: 08/06/2010 04:52 AM »
Well, splitting hairs maybe, the only thing stacked/integrated at the pad is the payload.  The common booster cores and the second stage are joined in the integration building, still horizontal.  The whole thing is tilted up at the pad.
If I like something on NSF, it's probably because I know it to be accurate.  Every once in a while, it's just something I agree with.  Facts generally receive the former.

Offline William Graham

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #12 on: 08/06/2010 09:01 AM »
Reminds me of the pyramid/eye on the one dollar bill that conspiracy "theorists" like to go nuts over

Interestingly, that pyramid has appeared on an NRO patch before. If I recall correctly, that was a RADINT satellite.

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #13 on: 08/06/2010 06:15 PM »
I bet it's an optical spy sat of some kind. Total guess is that it's used for constant, real-time surveillance of an entire region.

Just a guess, really. I have absolutely zero insider knowledge and very, very little insight.
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Offline Jim

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #14 on: 08/06/2010 07:59 PM »
I bet it's an optical spy sat of some kind. Total guess is that it's used for constant, real-time surveillance of an entire region.


Not for an east coast launch

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #15 on: 08/06/2010 09:07 PM »
Unless they are looking for frequent overflights of a low inclination region... But that is an unlikely stretch. Jim's more likely correct and it is something else.
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Offline Robotbeat

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #16 on: 08/06/2010 09:18 PM »
I bet it's an optical spy sat of some kind. Total guess is that it's used for constant, real-time surveillance of an entire region.


Not for an east coast launch
I was thinking it would be in GSO, allowing constant, medium-resolution (5-10m resolution) coverage of a whole area. I guess mil-sat would be closer to what I was thinking, not spy sat. It's still just a guess, and admittedly a wild one.
More likely: ELINT or a radar imaging satellite. Could be a communications satellite, but that probably wouldn't need the throw-weight of a DIVH.
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Offline stockman

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #17 on: 08/12/2010 01:48 PM »
Assuming this is a sneak peak at the Delta here on the KSC webcams.. ??
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Offline Antares

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #18 on: 08/12/2010 01:57 PM »
The camera indicates it's from the Delta Operations Center (DOC).
If I like something on NSF, it's probably because I know it to be accurate.  Every once in a while, it's just something I agree with.  Facts generally receive the former.

Online DaveS

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Re: Delta IV Heavy: L-32
« Reply #19 on: 08/12/2010 03:10 PM »
When is the standard pre-launch tanking test planned for? Sometime this month or the next?
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