Author Topic: LIVE: Pegasus XL - IRIS - NET June 27, 2013  (Read 91029 times)

Online Chris Bergin

RELEASE: C10-033

NASA AWARDS LAUNCH SERVICES CONTRACT FOR IRIS MISSION

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA has selected Orbital Sciences Corporation
of Dulles, Va., to launch the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph
spacecraft known as IRIS. The spacecraft will fly in December 2012
aboard a Pegasus XL rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.

The total cost of the IRIS launch services is approximately $40
million. This estimated cost includes the task ordered launch service
for a Pegasus XL, plus additional services for launch site support,
integrated services, and support unique to the mission.

IRIS will make detailed measurements of the flow of energy and plasma
through the sun's atmosphere and heliosphere. The IRIS mission will
open a window of discovery into a crucial gap in current solar
observational capabilities.

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., manages the IRIS
project. NASA's Launch Services Program at Kennedy Space Center is
responsible for program management of the launch services.
« Last Edit: 06/27/2013 05:38 PM by Chris Bergin »

Offline Jim

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #1 on: 06/09/2010 01:07 AM »
Just to point out to people, that despite Spacex's recent success's with Falcon 1 and Falcon 9 does not always translate into contracts.  This is the 2nd opportunity that  Falcon 1 didn't get a contract with NASA.

Offline Antares

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #2 on: 06/09/2010 03:58 AM »
Did Falcon 1 have sufficient mass to orbit for IRIS?
If I like something on NSF, it's probably because I know it to be accurate.  Every once in a while, it's just something I agree with.  Facts generally receive the former.

Offline simonth

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #3 on: 06/09/2010 10:10 AM »
Did Falcon 1 have sufficient mass to orbit for IRIS?

According to SpaceX, yes Falcon 1e has sufficient payload capabilities.

IRIS estimates a launch mass of 167kg with a 41% launch margin (236kg) to a sun-synchronous orbit at  an inclination of 98į. http://iris.lmsal.com/iris_csr_exec.pdf SpaceX quotes a ~550kg capability to a 700km circularized orbit at 100į inclination for Falcon 1e.

It should be noted that the IRIS team anticipated a Pegasus XL launch from the start of the program.

Offline Jim

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #4 on: 06/09/2010 12:14 PM »

It should be noted that the IRIS team anticipated a Pegasus XL launch from the start of the program.

That has no bearing in the matter

Offline Antares

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #5 on: 06/10/2010 05:00 AM »
Falcon 1e has never launched before.  It couldn't be offered.
If I like something on NSF, it's probably because I know it to be accurate.  Every once in a while, it's just something I agree with.  Facts generally receive the former.

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #6 on: 06/10/2010 03:29 PM »
Also, Pegasus has an excellent track record of late. Its last 25+ launches have been successful. It hasn't had a failure of any kind since 1996. That's pretty good, especially compared to other small launch vehicles.

It should be noted, though, that of the first 10 launches, only 6 reached their intended orbit.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

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Online kevin-rf

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #7 on: 06/10/2010 07:07 PM »
Also, Pegasus has an excellent track record of late. Its last 25+ launches have been successful. It hasn't had a failure of any kind since 1996. That's pretty good, especially compared to other small launch vehicles.

It should be noted, though, that of the first 10 launches, only 6 reached their intended orbit.

June 2, 2001

Funny how X-43 flights are missing from the Orbital's list (Along with the  X-43 flights on March 27,2004 and November 16,2004) http://www.orbital.com/SpaceLaunch/Pegasus/pegasus_history.shtml


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Offline Lee Jay

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #8 on: 06/10/2010 07:56 PM »
Just to point out to people, that despite Spacex's recent success's with Falcon 1 and Falcon 9 does not always translate into contracts.  This is the 2nd opportunity that  Falcon 1 didn't get a contract with NASA.

Is this a "best value" or a "low bidder meeting specifications" type of evaluation?  Assuming it's "best value" or some variant thereof, are the evaluation criteria published?

Offline simonth

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #9 on: 06/10/2010 08:17 PM »
Just to point out to people, that despite Spacex's recent success's with Falcon 1 and Falcon 9 does not always translate into contracts.  This is the 2nd opportunity that  Falcon 1 didn't get a contract with NASA.

Is this a "best value" or a "low bidder meeting specifications" type of evaluation?  Assuming it's "best value" or some variant thereof, are the evaluation criteria published?

As it is the case with all launch contracts, it is never just "lowest price", but "the best bidder gets the contract". Requirements are specific and quite extensive for every NASA payload.

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #10 on: 06/10/2010 08:39 PM »
Also, Pegasus has an excellent track record of late. Its last 25+ launches have been successful. It hasn't had a failure of any kind since 1996. That's pretty good, especially compared to other small launch vehicles.

It should be noted, though, that of the first 10 launches, only 6 reached their intended orbit.

June 2, 2001

Funny how X-43 flights are missing from the Orbital's list (Along with the  X-43 flights on March 27,2004 and November 16,2004) http://www.orbital.com/SpaceLaunch/Pegasus/pegasus_history.shtml
Those flights were suborbital, so why would you include them in a list of orbital launches?
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To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Online kevin-rf

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #11 on: 06/11/2010 12:35 AM »


Because they are Pegasus launches and it is disingenuous to say the last Pegasus failure was in 1996, when a Pegasus failed in 2001.
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Offline yinzer

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #12 on: 06/11/2010 01:14 AM »
It was the first stage of a Pegasus used in a highly nonstandard configuration, and the failure was completely a result of the new configuration.  I see no reason why anyone looking to launch a satellite on a Pegasus should care.
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Online AnalogMan

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #13 on: 09/27/2012 09:40 PM »
Update:

Technicians Continue Prepping for IRIS Launch
Thu, 27 Sep 2012 01:34:38 PM GMT

Preparations continue at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California to prepare the Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL rocket for the launch of NASAís IRIS spacecraft. On September 26, the avionics shelf, the primary element of the launch vehicle guidance system was installed on the rocketís third stage. The launch of IRIS, which stands for the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and will conduct solar studies, is currently planned to occur no earlier than February 27, 2013.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/launchingrockets/rss_feed_collex_archive_1.html

Offline Comga

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - NET February 27, 2013
« Reply #14 on: 09/27/2012 11:06 PM »
Technicians Continue Prepping for IRIS Launch
Thu, 27 Sep 2012 01:34:38 PM GMT

Preparations continue at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California to prepare the Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL rocket for the launch of NASAís IRIS spacecraft. On September 26, the avionics shelf, the primary element of the launch vehicle guidance system was installed on the rocketís third stage. The launch of IRIS, which stands for the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and will conduct solar studies, is currently planned to occur no earlier than February 27, 2013.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/launchingrockets/rss_feed_collex_archive_1.html

Shouldn't we change the title to reflect this NET launch date?
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Online AnalogMan

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - December, 2012
« Reply #15 on: 10/19/2012 03:18 PM »
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. October 9. 2012

Top Photo
At Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, technicians install the wing on the Orbital Sciences Corp. Pegasus XL rocket which will launch the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS, spacecraft. Scheduled for launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base no earlier than Feb. 27, 2013, IRIS will open a new window of discovery by tracing the flow of energy and plasma through the chromospheres and transition region into the sunís corona using spectrometry and imaging. IRIS fills a crucial gap in our ability to advance studies of the sun-to-Earth connection by tracing the flow of energy and plasma through the foundation of the corona and the region around the sun known as the heliosphere. For more information, visit http://iris.gsfc.nasa.gov

Bottom Photo
At Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, technicians install the aft skirt on the Orbital Sciences Corp. Pegasus XL rocket which will launch the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS, spacecraft.

High-res versions and eleven more photographs taken at the same time can be found at the Kennedy Media Gallery by searching for "IRIS"
http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/

Online Chris Bergin

Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - NET Feb 27, 2013
« Reply #16 on: 10/19/2012 03:23 PM »
Launch date realigned.

Offline edkyle99

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - NET Feb 27, 2013
« Reply #17 on: 10/19/2012 04:00 PM »
Will this be the last Pegasus?

 - Ed Kyle

Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - NET Feb 27, 2013
« Reply #18 on: 10/19/2012 06:36 PM »
And this is a good reminder that just because one of your fellow space enthusiasts occasionally voices doubts about the SpaceX schedule announcements or is cautious about believing SpaceX has licked a problem before actually seeing proof that's true, it doesn't mean they hate SpaceX.

Offline baldusi

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Re: Pegasus XL - IRIS - NET Feb 27, 2013
« Reply #19 on: 10/19/2012 07:56 PM »
Will this be the last Pegasus?

 - Ed Kyle
I understand it is. They had planned GEMS, but after that cancellation this might well be the last Pegasus.

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