Author Topic: LIVE: Ariane 5 - ATV-2 "Johannes Kepler" launch/docking/undocking, 2011  (Read 178914 times)

Offline anik

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Astrium ships ATV “Johannes Kepler”
http://www.astrium.eads.net/node.php?articleid=5072

Second ATV en route to Kourou

“Johannes Kepler” scheduled to fly to the ISS at the end of 2010

ATV plays an indispensable role in carrying supplies to the ISS

Bremen, 11 May 2010 – “Johannes Kepler”, the second European spacecraft for the International Space Station (ISS), is on its way to the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. The Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) has undergone extensive system testing at Astrium’s Bremen site over the last few months and has now been given the go-ahead for the final preparation stage prior to the cargo spacecraft’s flight to the ISS. “Johannes Kepler” is slated for launch at the end of 2010. On behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA), Astrium is responsible for both the development and production of the ATV. The production of ATV units two to five – as well as mission preparation and operations support – is covered by the contract, which governs the operation and provision of the European components of the ISS. Astrium is responsible for carrying out these activities on behalf of ESA.

“Johannes Kepler” is the first production unit, following on from the highly successful first flight model “Jules Verne”, explained Dr. Michael Menking, Senior Vice President of Orbital Systems and Space Exploration at Astrium, as the ATV will set off from Bremen tomorrow. “At present Astrium has orders for a total of four ATV production units from ESA, which is testimony to the high reliability Astrium has shown as ESA’s prime contractor for the development of ATV and also the Columbus space laboratory. The extension of the ISS mission until 2020 presents Astrium with further opportunities in regard to both the supply and operation of the ISS. For example, two further ATVs will be needed for supply operations between now and 2020.” Dr Menking also confirmed that production of the ATV units is currently running according to schedule: Johannes Kepler is on its way to Kourou, ATV 3 “Edoardo Amaldi” has reached the integration stage in Bremen, ATV 4 integration is set to start shortly and ATV 5 is entering the equipment manufacturing stage.

“After an internal review of the status of ATV ‘Johannes Kepler’ we have given Astrium the “consent-to-ship” certificate which is an important milestone. This demonstrates the ability of European industry under the leadership of Astrium to provide the vehicle on time and with the required quality.”, said Simonetta di Pippo, ESA Director for Human Space Flight.

“When the US Space Shuttle will be retired at the end of the year ATV will be the largest vehicle supplying the ISS. Considering its technological challenges, like automatic rendezvous & docking, ATV is the most sophisticated space vehicle ever built in Europe. The technology and experience gained with the development of the ATV represents an asset for Europe and its industrial competitiveness. It also provides a solid basis to further develop Europe’s position among the leaders in the exploitation and exploration of space, in LEO and beyond,” added Di Pippo.

ATV must comply with the safety requirements for human spaceflight. Thus ATV’s digital and electronic architecture features double and triple redundancies. A fault-tolerant computer – consisting of three computer modules – ensures the reliable and smooth execution of the ATV mission.

“Johannes Kepler” will be shipped in several parts to the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, accompanied by 59 sea containers filled with test equipment. At Kourou’s space port final assembly will be performed on the spacecraft, Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC), solar panels and the Separation and Distancing Module (SDM), which forms the interface between the ATV and Ariane. The ATV will then be subjected to further extensive tests on site before being loaded, fuelled and installed within the payload fairing of an Ariane 5. “According to our planning schedule we will be ready to launch this second mission to the ISS at the end of 2010”, added Dr Menking. It is planned to produce the other ATVs in a programme of one per year.

With the ATV, Europe provides its contribution to supply the International Space Station. On a typical mission, the ATV carries water, fuel, food and scientific equipment to the ISS. Once its mission is over, the ATV is loaded with waste, undocked from the ISS and burns up during a controlled re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere. The ATV is also responsible for regularly boosting the ISS to its operational orbit of around 400 km and performs manoeuvres to avoid collisions with space debris.

The 20 tonnes ATV has a maximum net cargo capacity of up to 7 metric tons. The composition of this load can vary depending on the mission: 1.5 to 5.5 metric tons of freight and supplies (food, research instruments, tools, etc.), up to 840 kilograms of drinking water, up to 100 kilograms of gases (air, oxygen and nitrogen), up to four metric tons of fuel for orbit correction and up to 860 kilograms of propellant to refuel the space station.

As part of an ESA study, Astrium is conducting research into a reusable Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) based on ATV technology. The work will examine the requirements placed on a system designed to transport freight to the International Space Station and back to Earth. A total of €21 million is being invested in this preliminary phase of ESA’s ARV programme. There are many good reasons for pursuing this line of development, given that there will only be limited capacity for bringing back materials from the space station to Earth once the Americans retire the Space Shuttles at the end of 2010. After that, the only available vehicle for transporting materials and crew to and from the ISS to Earth will be the Russian Soyuz capsule.
« Last Edit: 06/16/2011 08:12 PM by jacqmans »

Offline bolun

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Second ATV heading to Kourou for launch

The second of ESA’s ATV automated cargo craft has been cleared for shipping to the launch site in Kourou. Its launch on an Ariane 5 to the International Space Station is scheduled for late this year.

It will be dispatched to Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana in several sections, accompanied by 59 containers with test equipment. In Kourou, it will be assembled and extensively tested before being loaded with cargo and fuelled. The launch is now planned for the end of 2010. 

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMMYA19Y8G_index_0.html

Offline erioladastra

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There is not an official launch date yet.  It will probably be Dec 6 but still to be worked out.

Offline Nicolas PILLET

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Offline jacqmans

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The no. 2 Automated Transfer Vehicle begins its checkout for Arianespace’s launch to the International Space Station

June 30, 2010

The second Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) for servicing of the International Space Station has entered its final assembly and checkout in French Guiana for a liftoff on a future Ariane 5 mission.  Ongoing activity is shown in the following images from the Spaceport’s S5 payload processing building, where the ATV is currently located in the S5C high bay – the largest of this facility’s three main preparation halls.

http://www.arianespace.com/news-feature-story/2010/06-30-2010-atv2-keppler-update.asp

Offline Space Pete

Here's some fantastic hi-res images I found at the ESA website showing ATV-2's pressurised compartment arriving at Kourou. :)

http://www.esa.int/esa-mmg/mmg.pl?mission=Automated+Transfer+Vehicle+%28ATV%29&type=I
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Offline mr. mark

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The last part of the article is a sort of half truth saying that after the shuttle retires their will only be the Russian progress ship and the European ATV for cargo deliveries. Spacex's Dragon and Orbital's Cygnus should also be flying cargo in the 2011 early 2012 time frame and at much lower prices although they can't hall as much cargo. So it really depends when the shuttle retires. A current estimate would be that the shuttle retires mid 2011 private US cargo starts a few months later. Not much of a US cargo gap as far as I can see. 

Online Ronsmytheiii

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The last part of the article is a sort of half truth saying that after the shuttle retires their will only be the Russian progress ship and the European ATV for cargo deliveries. Spacex's Dragon and Orbital's Cygnus should also be flying cargo in the 2011 early 2012 time frame and at much lower prices although they can't hall as much cargo. So it really depends when the shuttle retires. A current estimate would be that the shuttle retires mid 2011 private US cargo starts a few months later. Not much of a US cargo gap as far as I can see. 

Dont forget HTV......
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Offline hop

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The last part of the article is a sort of half truth saying that after the shuttle retires their will only be the Russian progress ship and the European ATV for cargo deliveries.
Read it again (assuming you are talking about what anik posted). The last part refers to cargo return in the context of the possible development of ARV. Dragon might be ready to bring stuff back before ARV, but AFAIK return is not a requirement for the early flights.

And yes, HTV.
« Last Edit: 07/10/2010 02:19 AM by hop »

Offline Tahii

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The tracking folks are due here in Invercargill, New Zealand, next month to begin setting up, and testing their gear, looking towards a December launch. Hope to catch up with them and say hi again.

Offline MikeMi.

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I hope this is a good place to put here my question - why is ATV transported to Guiana in parts, so the engineers must assemble it in South America? Is it related to vibrations on ship during travel from Europe?

Offline arkaska

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I hope this is a good place to put here my question - why is ATV transported to Guiana in parts, so the engineers must assemble it in South America? Is it related to vibrations on ship during travel from Europe?

I'm not sure in how "small" parts it's being transported in but I assume the SM and the pressurized section is transported separately because you can't access the fuel and oxygen tanks when the two parts are mounted together.

Offline anik

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There was report that ATV-2 launch is planned on December 17th. Also yesterday's ISS On-Orbit Status tells that ATV-2 arrival on ISS is planned next year.

Offline Hauerg

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There was report that ATV-2 launch is planned on December 17th. Also yesterday's ISS On-Orbit Status tells that ATV-2 arrival on ISS is planned next year.
"Seconf half of december" as told by somebody involved in testing the motors of the solar paddles and for helium leaks. He also mentioned that the launch might be delayed because of an additional commercial launch Arianaespace might squeeze in.

Offline catfry

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I hope this is a good place to put here my question - why is ATV transported to Guiana in parts, so the engineers must assemble it in South America? Is it related to vibrations on ship during travel from Europe?

I'm not sure in how "small" parts it's being transported in but I assume the SM and the pressurized section is transported separately because you can't access the fuel and oxygen tanks when the two parts are mounted together.

Also, dry cargo is loaded in Kourou I think, and is done through the 'backside' of the pressurized module, i.e. the side that mates to the service module.

Offline bolun

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There was report that ATV-2 launch is planned on December 17th. Also yesterday's ISS On-Orbit Status tells that ATV-2 arrival on ISS is planned next year.
"Seconf half of december" as told by somebody involved in testing the motors of the solar paddles and for helium leaks. He also mentioned that the launch might be delayed because of an additional commercial launch Arianaespace might squeeze in.

And.....

Quote
Finally, about 18 days after launch, the final approach and rendezvous is commanded, and following checks at each station-keeping point, ATV ultimately performs a fully automatic docking with the ISS.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Operations/SEMW6K161YF_0.html
« Last Edit: 08/12/2010 01:34 PM by bolun »

Offline erioladastra

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There was report that ATV-2 launch is planned on December 17th. Also yesterday's ISS On-Orbit Status tells that ATV-2 arrival on ISS is planned next year.
"Seconf half of december" as told by somebody involved in testing the motors of the solar paddles and for helium leaks. He also mentioned that the launch might be delayed because of an additional commercial launch Arianaespace might squeeze in.

And.....

Quote
Finally, about 18 days after launch, the final approach and rendezvous is commanded, and following checks at each station-keeping point, ATV ultimately performs a fully automatic docking with the ISS.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Operations/SEMW6K161YF_0.html


The date is still being reviewed but will have to be the second half of December.  That second link is wrong.  The phasing will be 11 days (potentially 8-11 depending on launch/docking windows with arianspace) but the baseline is 11.

Offline Joffan

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There's a lot of stuff on that ESA link that relates to ATV-1, rather than ATV-2. I assume that there won't be quite as much system-proving in the approach of ATV-2 to ISS, although I'm such the functions will still get checked over somehow prior to station approach.
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Offline mmeijeri

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They're stripping some stuff to increase upmass. Not so much on the ATV-2, but on later models. There will be less demand for reboost and propellant transfer, so that means more dry mass can be brought up.
We will be vic-toooooo-ri-ous!!!

Offline Space Pete

Does anyone know/have a link to the pressurised cargo manifest for ATV-2?

Thanks.
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