Author Topic: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010) - Includes ETCS Updates  (Read 182189 times)

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #60 on: 06/25/2010 03:12 AM »
A question for any ISS folks: Any idea why ARS is being relocated from Node 3 to the Lab? And any idea what location it will go to in the Lab? Thanks.
« Last Edit: 06/25/2010 03:17 AM by Space Pete »
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Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #61 on: 06/25/2010 06:29 PM »
MEDIA ADVISORY: M10-096

SPACE STATION CREW VEHICLE WILL MOVE JUNE 28 FOR CARGO SHIP ARRIVAL

HOUSTON -- NASA Television will broadcast live the repositioning of a
Soyuz spacecraft docked to the International Space Station on Monday,
June 28. The capsule's half-hour journey from the Zvezda Service
Module to the Rassvet Module will begin at 12:58 p.m. CDT.

Expedition 24 Flight Engineer and Soyuz Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin
and NASA Flight Engineers Doug Wheelock and Shannon Walker will board
the Soyuz TMA-19 vehicle that docked to Zvezda on June 18. They will
fly the Soyuz vehicle a short distance to Rassvet. NASA TV coverage
of the event will begin at 12:30 p.m.

The change of location will free the Zvezda port for the docking of a
new Progress resupply vehicle on Friday, July 2. That port is the
preferred location for the Progress, so it can help reboost the
station and adjust its altitude. The Progress will carry 2.5 tons of
food, fuel and supplies.

The resupply vehicle will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in
Kazakhstan on June 30. NASA TV will not broadcast the launch, but
will show the live coverage of Progress' docking at 11:55 a.m. on
July 2. Live coverage will begin at 11:30 a.m.

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #62 on: 06/25/2010 06:35 PM »
Space Weather News for June 25, 2010
http://spaceweather.com

SPACE STATION IN CONSTANT SUNLIGHT:  For the next few days, the  International Space Station (ISS) will be orbiting Earth in constant sunlight.  This sets the stage for a remarkable sky show.  Because the ISS is constantly illuminated, it shines brightly in the night sky every single time it passes overhead.  Some observers can see the space station 3, 4, even 5 times a night.  More information and flybys predictions may be found at http://spaceweather.com

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #63 on: 06/25/2010 09:21 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 25/06/2010:

FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson did more troubleshooting of the T2 COLBERT treadmill which yesterday exhibited a "rubbing" noise during its unmanned ACO (Activation & Checkout) speed characterization test, caused by the tread belt contacting one of the 4 closeout panels. After Tracy readjusted closeout panels today and conducted a second unmanned ACO, the clicking noise was gone. The crew is GO for T2 exercise.

FE-5 Yurchikhin, FE-4 Wheelock & FE-6 Walker, who will fly the Soyuz TMA-19/23S spacecraft relocation next Monday (28/06), went ("very successfully") through a 3 hour rehearsal of the flight in a formal training drill comprising a procedures review, flight data review, tag-up with ground instructor and onboard simulator training on the RSK1 laptop. [Due to the currently very high solar Beta angle period with its increased thermal loads on the station, the standard relocation maneuver profile/template was changed for the new Beta-caused ISS attitude mode. The latter will be "earth-fixed" LVLH attitude instead of the usual "space-fixed" Inertial mode, i.e., with the ISS continuing to pitch down in orbit rate (~4 deg/minute) to remain "locally horizontal". For the docking, 23S will have to match the station's very slow pitch-down rotation. Mission events will be tied to RGS (Russian Groundsite) comm windows. Soyuz activation on 28/06 is scheduled on DO13 (Daily Orbit 13, ~11:45 AM GMT), followed by hatch closure on DO14 (1:20 PM GMT) and manual undocking command on DO2 (5:55 PM GMT). Physical separation from the SM Aft port occurs at ~5:58 PM GMT with a pushrod delta-V of ~0.12 m/s, in sunshine. Flyaround to the MRM-1 Nadir port, starting at ~6:05 PM GMT, will be at a range of 30-50m from the station, ending at station-keeping (~6:15 PM GMT). Final approach begins at ~6:19 PM GMT, concluding with contact & capture at ~6:23 PM GMT. Orbital sunset is at 6:29 PM GMT.]

Later, after Wheels had closed the protective shutters of the JPM, Lab and Cupola windows, Fyodor Yurchikhin spent an hour in the Soyuz TMA-19 Descent Module (SA) supporting a ground-commanded checkout of the MCS (Motion Control System) SUD, Mode 2/"Docked" for Monday’s spacecraft relocation. The checkout involved pressurization of the KDU (Combined Propulsion System) Section 2 & Tank 2, a test of the pilot's translational hand controller (RUD), and a 1 minute hot firing of the DPO braking thrusters (4:57 PM GMT to 4:58 PM GMT), for which the ISS was put in free drift for ~25 minute DPO lateral thrusters were not fired. The Soyuz GA (Gas Analyzer) was left on until after the relocation. The thruster firing required several additional temporary powerdowns, e.g., some DDCUs (DC to DC Converter Units), Node 3 shell heaters & two ARCUs (American to Russian Converter Units). [For the PRST (perestykovkoi/redocking) test, station attitude control authority was handed over to Russian thruster control at 4:48 PM GMT, then back to LVLH XVV attitude. The 1 minute firing took place on DO3 during an RGS pass via VHF. Attitude control was returned to the USOS at 6:10 PM GMT.]

CEO photo targets uplinked for today were Epsilon Aurigae & Comet NcNaught (looking left of track, above the limb of the Earth, to observe the brightness of this star as compared to other stars in the Auriga constellation, as described above. Because of the current seasonal lighting conditions during the northern portion of each of the station's orbits, the crew has several roughly 40 minute periods today to view the star. The times of the periods were uplinked for the mid-way point for viewing during two selected periods).
« Last Edit: 06/25/2010 09:24 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Fuji

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #64 on: 06/25/2010 11:47 PM »
A question for any ISS folks: Any idea why ARS is being relocated from Node 3 to the Lab? And any idea what location it will go to in the Lab? Thanks.

I think it will go to LAB1D6. May be return to the original configulation.
This ARS(AR1) is originally installed in the Lab. Due to the CDRA failure before the STS-130, newly launched N3 ARS (AR2) was relocated to the Lab from the Node-3.

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #65 on: 06/26/2010 02:47 PM »
A question for any ISS folks: Any idea why ARS is being relocated from Node 3 to the Lab? And any idea what location it will go to in the Lab? Thanks.

I think it will go to LAB1D6. May be return to the original configulation.
This ARS(AR1) is originally installed in the Lab. Due to the CDRA failure before the STS-130, newly launched N3 ARS (AR2) was relocated to the Lab from the Node-3.

There is already an ARS rack at LAB1D6, so it would be impossible to put another one there. The ARS currently in Node 3 was launched on STS-128 and temporarily located in the JPM. When Node 3 arrived on STS-130 the ARS was relocated from the JPM to Node 3, which was supposed to be its permanent location.
« Last Edit: 06/26/2010 06:45 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #66 on: 06/26/2010 06:45 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 26/06/2010:

Ku Band Outage:
In the current high Beta angle environment (left side of orbit track always in darkness), the backside of the Ku antenna gets too cold if not kept turned sunward until temperatures return to normal. While so "parked", Ku band is lost.
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #67 on: 06/28/2010 09:34 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 28/06/2010:

Terminal Computing Device (TVU) Issue:
TsUP/Energia-Moscow reported on work completed on the TVU Terminal Computing Device (installed in the SM in February this year), using a new software patch to get TVU2 100% operational and assure its full capability. Recovery efforts on TVU1 have not been successful to date.

Elektron Issue:
After a planned shutdown of the Elektron O2 generator last Friday to allow other electronics maintenance on board, the system could not be restarted. Activities to analyze this failure have been delayed until tomorrow due to the Soyuz TMA-19/23S relocation today.
« Last Edit: 06/29/2010 08:49 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #68 on: 06/29/2010 08:49 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 29/06/2010:

During her work day, FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson supported a ground-controlled checkout of the SSRMS Hot Backup mode in the Lab. [This was to test a new software solution to the arm's joint problems that prevented full Hot Backup functionality for the HTV-1 berthing in September last year. Tracy first connected the UOP (Utility Outlet Panel) DCP (Display & Control Panel) power bypass cable at the Cupola RWS (Robotic Workstation), then threw switches between "Main" and "Backup" at both RWSs (CUP & Lab), altogether four switch throws (for two steps executed twice) during the day in order to gather multiple data points. Afterwards, she took down the bypass cable again.]

Fyodor Yurchikhin performed maintenance on the Elektron O2 generator which had failed to restart after being deactivated last Friday. [With the old Elektron nemesis, gas bubbles, suspected blocking the system, Fyodor tested the BZh-009 Liquid Unit's main & backup circulation pumps, then activated Elektron in 50 Amp mode for checking pump pressure sensors and removing gas bubbles by operating valves from the Elektron control panel. By running the system in 50 Amp mode, it was hoped that the higher amperage will force the bubbles through the pump.]

Post-Soyuz TMA-19/23S Relocation Assessment:
Yesterday's 4B SAW (Solar Array Wing) anomaly unexpectedly set off a large amount of hard, real-time work on the ground. Teams were able to accomplish the load in truly outstanding fashion, thanks to having built data tables for cases of degraded solar arrays ahead of time which allowed pressing on. ISS was in free drift for about 3 hours, without any power problems. When the 4B array went out of position by as much as 200°, it was recovered in time to complete the Soyuz relocation. It appears that due to a disturbance (possibly inadvertent impingement from a thruster), the 4B array turned, which the software erroneously interpreted as a motor trip. Due an earlier corrective OFF/ON command to the motor (when the array "dithered" around the commanded set angle), the BGA firmware had switched to "manual free control" mode, in which the motor does not control which way the SAW is pointing. Procedures are being updated to prevent a reoccurrence.

During relocation with ISS in "earth-fixed" LVLH mode, three arrays (4A, 4B, 2A) entered into the critical LS (Longeron Shadowing) condition. With Progress M-06M/38P arrival ahead, this condition needs to be reconstructed quickly, to determine the thermal impact on the arrays. Until the arrays are cleared, the Port & Starboard SARJ are limited to Autotrack with no desaturations (by thrusters). When the LS analysis is complete for the three arrays and the impact of LS to the arrays determined to be acceptable, desats will be re-enabled. Reconstruction is underway. Also, specialists are now discussing whether vehicle dockings should be allowed at all in the future under such high Beta angles.

Conjunction Alert:
NASA FCT (Flight Control Team) is working a conjunction of the ISS with an H-2A rocket body (Object 30588). TCA (Time of Closest Approach) is 02/07 (Friday) morning at 2:04 AM GMT. Until the current ISS orbit, after the 23S disturbances, has been tracked more precisely, the conjunction is currently classified as of medium concern.
« Last Edit: 06/29/2010 09:10 PM by Space Pete »
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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #69 on: 06/30/2010 01:04 PM »
MEDIA ADVISORY: M10-097

NEXT INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION RESIDENTS HOLD NEWS CONFERENCE

HOUSTON -- The next trio of International Space Station residents will
hold a news conference at 1 p.m. CDT on Tuesday, July 13, at NASA's
Johnson Space Center in Houston. The news conference will be
broadcast live on NASA Television and the agency's website. Questions
will be taken from participating NASA centers.

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and his crewmates, Russian cosmonauts
Alexander Kaleri and Oleg Skripochka, will participate in individual
round-robin interviews, in person or by phone, following the news
conference. The Expedition 25 crew also will participate in a photo
opportunity for reporters at Johnson.

U.S. and foreign media representatives planning to attend the briefing
must contact the Johnson newsroom at 281-483-5111 by 4 p.m. on July
6. To participate in the round-robin interviews, reporters should
contact the Johnson newsroom by 4 p.m. on July 9.

Kelly, Kaleri and Skripochka are scheduled to launch to the station
aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in
Kazakhstan Oct. 7 (Oct. 8 at the launch site) and arrive on the
complex two days later. They will join NASA astronauts Doug Wheelock
and Shannon Walker and Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin, who have
been aboard the orbiting laboratory since June 18.

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #70 on: 06/30/2010 07:46 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 30/06/2010:

Progress M-06M/38P was launched on time today at 3:35 PM GMT. Ascent was nominal, and all spacecraft systems are without issues. Docking to the ISS at the SM Aft port is planned for Friday (02/07) at ~4:58 PM GMT. 38P carries 2230 kg (4916 lbs) of cargo, specifically: 870 kg (1918 lbs) propellants, 50 kg (110 lbs) oxygen & air, 100 kg (220 lbs) water and 1210 kg (2667 lbs) spare parts & experiment hardware.

FE-5 Fyodor Yurchikhin set up the NIKON cameras at the DC-1 EVA hatch 1 window to take pictures of the MLI (Multi Layer Insulation) material on the Soyuz TMA-19 SA (Descent Module) and PkhO (Transfer Compartment). [To assess MLI condition, both full and close-up views were taken, looking for anomalies where SA MLI blankets are fastened with spring clips and PkhO MLI contains vents.]

In Node 3 at location Aft 4 (NOD3A4), Doug Wheelock returned to the ARS (Atmosphere Revitalization System) rack to complete the repair started on 24/06 of a ground strap that could not be installed on the rack. [After rack rotation away from the shell wall, the hardware was to be repaired or replaced as required. Afterwards, the grounding strap was to be left disconnected pending the planned relocation of the ARS rack to the US Lab.]

FE-6 Shannon Walker is scheduled to spend some time on a careful video inspection of the T2 COLBERT treadmill and its VIS (Vibration Isolation System). [After the crew's inadvertent unisolated exercise on the T2 (i.e., exercise with three of four snubber alignment guides left installed), the treadmill was declared NO GO until engineering specialists can review Shannon's inspection data and rule out hardware damage.]

Conjunction Alert:
NASA FCT (Flight Control Team) continues to work a conjunction of the ISS with an H-2A rocket body (Object 30588). The TCA (Time of Closest Approach) is Friday (02/07) morning at 2:04 AM GMT. A ballistic update is expected later tonight. As of now, the conjunction is still classified as of moderate concern.
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Offline JimO

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #71 on: 07/01/2010 08:22 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 30/06/2010:
....
FE-6 Shannon Walker is scheduled to spend some time on a careful video inspection of the T2 COLBERT treadmill and its VIS (Vibration Isolation System). [After the crew's inadvertent unisolated exercise on the T2 (i.e., exercise with three of four snubber alignment guides left installed), the treadmill was declared NO GO until engineering specialists can review Shannon's inspection data and rule out hardware damage.]

Are we to deduce from this that it was Shannon who forgot to remove the guides and thereby potentially broke the machine?

Not to make a pattern out of two data points, because most crew flubs never get reported -- but she was the crewmember who flunked the pre-flight exam, also -- correct?

In the real world such bad luck usually results in a much MORE careful and reliable crewmember. Here's hoping!!


Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #72 on: 07/01/2010 08:53 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 01/07/2010:

Conjunction Update:
Improved orbit determination of the ISS after the Soyuz TMA-19/23S relocation perturbations, coupled with continued tracking updates on the H-2A rocket body (Object 30588) has shown that this conjunction is of no longer of any concern.

SAW Update:
Engineering teams have completed the reconstruction of the loading events that occurred on the 4A, 4B & 2A SAWs (Solar Array Wings) during the 23S relocation, which created thermal loads from longeron shadowing and structural loads from the thruster firings. Analysis shows that loads from both sources were within limits. Any post-event constraints have been lifted and CMG (Control Moment Gyroscope) desaturations have been re-enabled.

Elektron Update:
As reported before, the Elektron O2 generator failed to the backup pump within two minutes after the crew switched Elektron to 50 Amps, followed by failure of the backup pump shortly thereafter. The crew then performed additional troubleshooting to flush the BE buffer tank using the BPA N2 tank. The Elektron successfully started up on the backup pump.
« Last Edit: 07/01/2010 08:53 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline rdale

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #73 on: 07/01/2010 10:37 PM »
Are we to deduce from this that it was Shannon who forgot to remove the guides and thereby potentially broke the machine?

Just curious how that deduction was made? It's possible she had the most training on the T2 while on the ground?

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #74 on: 07/02/2010 09:47 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 02/07/2010:

In Node 3 at location Aft 4 (NOD3A4), FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson worked on the installation of the grounding strap at the ARS (Atmosphere Revitalization System) rack, deferred from an earlier date, that originally couldn't be connected on the rack. [After rack rotation away from the shell wall, the hardware was to be repaired or replaced as required. Afterwards, the grounding strap was to be left disconnected pending the planned relocation of the ARS rack to the US Lab.]

Also in Node 3, Caldwell-Dyson was scheduled to service the US OGA (Oxygen Generation Assembly) in the OGS (Oxygen Generator System) rack at location Aft 5 (NOD3A5) by removing & replacing its H2 sensor ORU. Later, on MCC-H GO, Tracy will complete connecting the sensor for OGS rack activation.

When FE-6 Shannon Walker has finished exercising on the CEVIS (Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation System) in the Lab, Caldwell-Dyson will disconnect & remove the cycle temporarily (to gain work space) and then continue the outfitting of the WORF rack at the science window, mating still disconnected umbilicals. Afterwards, the cycle will be re-installed.

Progress Docking Abort:
Docking of Progress M-06M/38P was aborted about 20 minutes before its scheduled linkup with ISS at 4:58 PM GMT due to loss of radio lock between KURS-P (KURS-Passive) on the SM and KURS-A (KURS-Active) on Progress. The cargo drone passed by ISS at a safe distance and continues to be in its safe fly-by mode, circling Earth along with ISS every 92 minutes. Docking will not be re-attempted today. ISS systems are being reconfigured back to nominal stage operations configuration. Evaluations are underway for subsequent docking attempts.

T2 Treadmill Update:
Final consensus at the third technical evaluation meeting on the T2 Unisolated Exercise investigation was that T2 is GO for the crew, with the constraint that inspections are required between exercise sessions.
« Last Edit: 07/02/2010 09:52 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline John44

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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #76 on: 07/04/2010 07:36 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 04/07/2010:

Conjunction Advisory:
NASA FCT (Flight Control Team) is following a conjunction of the ISS with a piece of orbital debris (Object 31822). The TCA (Time of Closest Approach) is Tuesday 07/06 at 6:18 PM GMT. Until the current ISS orbit has been tracked more precisely, the conjunction is currently classified as a low risk, and no action is necessary at this time.
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #77 on: 07/05/2010 06:13 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 05/07/2010:

FE-3 Mikhail Kornienko offloaded water from the newly arrived Progress M-06M/38P to Progress M-05M/37P. [After setting up the transfer system with hoses & compressor, Mikhail started the pump to transfer water from the BV1 Rodnik tank of 38P (#406), loaded with 150 liters, to the empty BV1 tank of 37P (#405) via the SM. BV2 of 37P still contains ~50 liters of water. The transfer took several compressor restarts.]

Conjunction Update:
The conjunction continues to be classified as a low risk, and no action is necessary at this time.
« Last Edit: 07/05/2010 08:41 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #78 on: 07/06/2010 04:09 PM »
Roscosmos PAO: "Magic Anti-Radiation Curtain to be Installed in the ISS".
Quote
Progress M-06M cargo supply vehicle has delivered a so-called ‘magic curtain’ to the International Space Station. Flight engineer Fiodor Yurchikhin will install the curtain in the starboard’s cabin of the Zvezda module.
 The curtain designed by IBMP has special pockets for special wet hygienic towels used by cosmonauts onboard the station. The towels are saturated with hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, which mitigate space radiation effects. The curtain is equipped with the radiation doze meters. Additional anti-radiation crew protection may be provided by three-layer wet towels on the walls of the cabins, thus mitigating radiation effects for cosmonauts, scientists believe.
Result of Matreshka experiment carried out in the station since 2004 show that the radiation is about two times weaker in the center of the station then near the walls.
Phantom Matreshka-R is to monitor anti-radiation effectiveness of the wet towels.
Experiment Matreshka is to study and to analyze radiation dose distribution in cosmonaut's body during long-term mission aboard the International space station (ISS). Dose from ionizing space radiation was determined with the help of thermoluminescent dosimeters mounted in conditional depths of critical organs in human body modeled in a dosimetric device, i.e.--a ball-like tissue-equivalent phantom designed and manufactured in Russia for international space experiment Matreshka-R.
www.roscosmos.ru/main.php?id=2&nid=9814&lang=en


Roscosmos PAO: "Teens Get Interested in Space and Its Heroes: ISS Commander Receives a Love Letter ".
Quote
Commander of the International Space Station Russian Alexander Skvortsov received a love letter from a 17-year-old teenager of Moscow. The girl sent her declaration of love through the ISS mailbox installed in Memorial Space Museum, RIA Novosti informs.

The project supported by Roscosmos PAO has started on June 18. Any visitor of the Museum can drop his letter to the ISS cosmonauts into the box. The mail is sent to the ISS electronically, and the answers are acquired in the same manner.

An official of Roscosmos comments that the love letter is a good sign. “A 17-year-old girl needs someone to love. It’s good she has chosen not a millionaire, but a romantic hero cosmonaut”, he said.
www.roscosmos.ru/main.php?id=2&nid=9815&lang=en
« Last Edit: 07/06/2010 04:09 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Nicolas PILLET

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #79 on: 07/06/2010 04:43 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 05/07/2010:

FE-3 Mikhail Kornienko offloaded water from the newly arrived Progress M-06M/38P to Progress M-05M/37P. [After setting up the transfer system with hoses & compressor, Mikhail started the pump to transfer water from the BV1 Rodnik tank of 38P (#406), loaded with 150 liters, to the empty BV1 tank of 37P (#405) via the SM. BV2 of 37P still contains ~50 liters of water. The transfer took several compressor restarts.]

I don't understand why he did this ?
Nicolas PILLET
Kosmonavtika : The French site on Russian Space

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