Author Topic: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010) - Includes ETCS Updates  (Read 187222 times)

Offline Space Pete

The ZSR in LAB1P1 has been rotated away from the pressure shell to allow access to the Lab FWD-PORT closeout (which has been removed). Doug is installing a jumper to provide power from the lab to the Node 1 Nadir CBM for the PMM.

I asked STS-133 ISS Lead Flight Director Royce Renfrew about this via Twitter.
Quote
Tungsten_Flight:
On Monday Wheels will install a jumper in the US LAB on ISS that we need to get power to the PMM during STS-133.

Space_Pete (me):
@Tungsten_Flight Cool! Will that jumper go thru the CBM or will it be a hatch drag-through?

Tungsten_Flight:
@Space_Pete The jumper is entirely contained in the LAB. It connects to some existing cables to get power into Node 1.
« Last Edit: 09/20/2010 03:48 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 20/09/2010:

FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson & FE-6 Shannon Walker joined forces to relocate the CHeCS (Crew Health Care System) RSR (Resupply Stowage Rack) from rack bay LAB1O5 (Lab Overhead 5) to LAB1D4 (Lab Deck 5).

FE-4 Doug Wheelock had ~2.5 hours set aside for IFM (Inflight Maintenance) preparatory to the arrival of the PMM on STS-133/ULF-5 in November, installing a power jumper for the PMM Mod Kit.

Wheels also cleared out rack bay NOD2D5 (Node 2 Deck 5) for the CQ-3 (Crew Quarters-3) relocation from JPM1D3 (JPM Deck 3) by relocating stowed cargo bags.

In COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), Tracy restored the stowage to its original state before the temporary cargo removal to allow MARES (Muscle Atrophy Resistive Exercise System) Commissioning. [Restored were front stowage bags from bays D1 & D2 to their original positions at O3 (Overhead 3), O4, D3 (Deck 3) & D4.]
« Last Edit: 09/20/2010 07:42 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

ISS Cosmonauts Study Polymer Production Methods.

On Sept. 20, Russian crew members of the International Space Station have a rather tough schedule. This day, the cosmonauts are preparing for the landing scheduled for Sept. 24, and perform different experiments.
Biotechnology is the main activity in the today’s scientific program of the crew. Among the experiments, there is Membrane, which is devoted to studying production methods of porous polymers with proper structures. These materials can be used as filters, membranes, sorbents.  The polymers are grown in special tubes in microgravity.
Flight engineer Fiodor Yurchikhin today will work with the first kit of the experiment, and continue with the second one tomorrow. On Wednesday, he will accommodate the kits in the Soyuz TMA-18 vehicle for return early in the morning on Sept. 24.
Alexander Skvortsov and Mikhail Kornienko go on with physical training to restore muscles and adjust themselves for gravity after the long-term mission.

Roscosmos PAO.

www.roscosmos.ru/main.php?id=2&nid=10375&lang=en
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Offline John44

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Expedition 24 - Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson Talks About Her Mission
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6161

Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 21/09/2010:

With the protective shutters of the JPM, Lab and Cupola windows closed, CDR Alexander Skvortsov prepared for Soyuz TMA-18/22S undocking next Thursday evening by spending an hour in the 22S Descent Module (SA) supporting a ground-commanded checkout of the Soyuz MCS (Motion Control System SUD, Mode 2/"Docked") which included pressurization of the KDU (Combined Propulsion System) Section 2 and Tank 2, a test of the pilot's translational hand controller (RUD), and a hot firing of the DPO braking thrusters (7:51 AM to 8:17 AM GMT). DPO lateral thrusters were not fired. [For the RST (rasstjkovkoy/undocking) test, station attitude was handed over to Russian thruster control at 7:30 AM GMT, commanded to free drift at 7:51 AM, then back to LVLH XVV attitude. The one-minute firing started on Daily Orbit 2 during an RGS (Russian Groundsite) pass. Attitude control was returned to the USOS at 8:18 AM GMT.]

Afterwards, FE-4 Doug Wheelock spent several hours in Node 2, installing a rack grounding strap in the D5 (Deck 5) location and making other necessary preparations in support of tomorrow's scheduled relocation of the CQ-3 (Crew Quarters-3) rack from JPM1D3 (JPM Deck 3) to NOD2D5 (Node 2 Deck 5).
« Last Edit: 09/21/2010 08:55 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

Some great photos of the MARES commissioning are now up at the Expedition 24 Image Gallery (see pages 24 & 25).
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Offline Space Pete

A note about tomorrow's CQ-3 relo from JPM1D3 to NOD2D5: Upon completion of the relo, the ISS's USOS CQ system will be fully assembled (all 4 CQs will be arranged in a circumferential fashion around Node 2 bay 5)!

I'll be away from my PC all day, so if anyone can keep an eye out for NTV coverage, that'd be great. :)
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Offline Space Pete

I flicked on NTV just in time! :)

CQ-3 has been relocated to NOD2D5! Tracy is currently hooking it up to power & data lines. The CQ-3 bumpout still needs to be installed.
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Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 22/09/2010:

FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson removed the "bump-out" structural elements on the Portside & Overhead CQs (Crew Quarters) in Node 2, in preparation for the subsequent CQ-3 installation by FE-4 Doug Wheelock.

Wheels, in parts assisted by FE-6 Shannon Walker, transferred the CQ-3 rack from JPM1D3 and installed it in NOD2D5. [Wheels had made necessary preparations in Node 2 yesterday.]

With ISS command now being transferred from Alexander Skvortsov to Douglas Wheelock for Increment 25, beginning this week, and Fyodor Yurchikhin remaining aboard as the sole Russian cosmonauts, Alexander & Fyodor, at ~2:00 PM GMT, signed two copies of the formal Russian handover protocol document certifying RS (Russian Segment) handover/acceptance, including the contents of Progress M-05M/37P (#405), currently docked at DC-1 Nadir, and Progress M-07M/39P (#407), docked at SM Aft. [The first copy remains on ISS, the second copy will be returned to the ground on Soyuz TMA-18. "We, the Undersigned, have executed this Protocol to the effect that Skvortsov Alexander Alexandrovich, a crew member in charge of ISS RS E23/24, handed over and, Yurchikhin Fyodor Nikolayevich, a crew member in charge of ISS RS E24/25 accepted the ISS RS, including:- operation specifics, - onboard systems and hardware anomaly report,- Progress 405 and Progress 407 items (per IMS data)."]

The traditional "Change of Command" ceremony is scheduled later today, at ~9:05 PM to 9:20 PM GMT, with all crewmembers, officially marking the transfer of the baton from Increment 24 to Increment 25. [The official "count" for I-25 begins on Monday 27/09 (GMT 270).]

Soyuz TMA-18/22S Descent Timeline Overview:
If everything proceeds nominally, the return to Earth of the TMA-18 spacecraft tomorrow, 23/09, will proceed along the following approximate event sequence (all times GMT):
• ISS attitude control handover to RS --- 12:30 AM.
• ISS to free drift for undocking --- 1:31 AM.
• Undock command --- 1:32 AM.
• Separation springs action/physical sep (delta-V ~0.12 m/sec) --- 1:35 AM.
• Separation burn #1 (15 sec, ~0.63 m/sec) --- 1:38 AM.
• ISS maneuvers to Relaxation experiment attitude --- 3:48 AM.
• Deorbit Burn start (delta-V 115.2 m/sec) --- 4:04:23 AM.
• Deorbit Burn complete --- 4:09:44 AM.
• Tri-Module separation (140 km alt) --- 4:29:15 AM.
• ISS maneuvers to duty attitude --- 4:32 AM.
• Atmospheric entry (99.5 km alt, with ~170 m/sec) --- 4:32:22 AM.
• Entry Guidance start (80.5 km alt) --- 4:33:57 AM.
• Max G-load (34.5 km alt) --- 4:38:49 AM.
• Parachute deploy command (10.8 km alt) --- 4:40:44 AM.
• 22S Landing (DO1) --- 4:55:44 AM GMT; 7:55:44 AM Moscow DMT; 10:55:44 AM local
  Kazakhstan; (loc. 47deg 22min N, 69deg 35min E).
• ISS attitude control handover to US --- 5:10 AM.
[Note: Kazakhstan time = GMT+6h; = EDT+10h. Moscow DMT = EDT+7h.]

What the Soyuz TMA-18 crew will experience during their reentry/descent on Thursday evening:
• For the reentry, Alexander Skvortsov, Mikhail Kornienko & Tracy Caldwell-Dyson will
  wear the Russian Kentavr anti-G suit under their Sokol suits. [The Kentavr garment is a
  protective anti-G suit ensemble to facilitate the return of a long-duration crewmember
  into the Earth gravity. Consisting of shorts, gaiters, underpants, jersey and socks, it
  acts as countermeasure for circulatory disturbance, prevents crewmember from
  overloading during descent and increases orthostatic tolerance during post-flight
  adaptation. Russian crewmembers are also advised to ingest fluid-electrolyte additives,
  viz., three sodium chloride tablets during breakfast and after the midday meal, each
  time with 300 ml of fluid, and two pills during the meal aboard Soyuz before deorbit.]
• Before descent:
  o Special attention will be paid to the need for careful donning of the medical belt with
     sensors and securing tight contact between sensors and body.
  o During preparation for descent, before atmosphere reentry, crewmembers settle
     down comfortably in the Kazbek couches, fasten the belts, securing tight contact
     between body and the seat liner in the couch.
• During de-orbit:
  o Dust particles starting to sink in the Descent Module (SA) cabin is the first indication
     of atmosphere reentry and beginning of G-load effect. From that time on, special
     attention is required as the loads increase rapidly.
  o Under G-load effect during atmosphere reentry the crew expects the following
     experience:
     . Sensation of G-load pressure on the body, burden in the body, labored breathing
       and speech. These are normal sensations, and the advice is to "take them coolly".
       In case of the feeling of a lump in the throat, this is no cause to "be nervous". This
       is frequent and should not be fought. Best is to "try not to swallow and talk at this
       moment". Crew should check vision and, if any disturbances occur, create additional
       tension of abdominal pressure and leg muscles (strain +abdomen by pulling in), in
       addition to the Kentavr anti-G suit.
     . During deployment of pilot parachute (0.62 & 4.5 square meters), drogue chute
       (16 sq.m.) and main (518 sq.m.) chutes the impact accelerations will be perceived
       as a "strong snatch". No reason to become concerned about this but one should be
       prepared that during the parachutes deployment and change ("rehook") of prime
       parachute to symmetrical suspension, swinging and spinning motion of the SA
       occurs, which involves vestibular (middle ear) irritations.
• It is important to tighten restrain system to fasten pelvis and pectoral arch.
  Vestibular irritation can occur in the form of different referred sensations such as
  vertigo, hyperhidrosis, postural illusions, general discomfort and nausea. To prevent
  vestibular irritation the crew should "limit head movement and eyes movement", as well
  as fix their sight on motionless objects.
• Just before the landing (softened by six small rocket engines behind the heat shield):
  o Crew will be prepared for the vehicle impact with the ground, with their bodies fixed
     along the surface of the seat liner in advance. "Special attention should be paid to
     arm fixation to avoid the elbow and hand squat" (instruction).
     Landing speed: ~9.9 m/sec.
• After landing:
  o Crew should not get up quickly from their seats to leave the SA. They were advised
     to stay in the couch for several minutes and only then stand up. In doing that, they
     should limit head and eyes movement and avoid excessive motions, proceeding
     slowly. Their body should not take up earth gravity in the upright position too quickly.
« Last Edit: 09/22/2010 07:41 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline John44

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Offline Space Pete

Did anyone manage to get a recording of the CQ-3 xfer (John44)? ;)
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Offline jacqmans

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MEDIA ADVISORY: M10-134

NASA ASTRONAUTS ON SPACE STATION CONNECT WITH HOUSTON STUDENTS

HOUSTON -- International Space Station astronaut Shannon Walker will
speak on Wednesday, Sept. 29 to students from three schools she
attended while growing up in Houston. Students from Parker Elementary
and Westbury High School will join those gathered at Johnston Middle
School to ask questions of Flight Engineer Walker and station
Commander Doug Wheelock from 10:30 a.m. - 10:50 a.m. CDT.

Media planning to attend should contact Norm Uhl via email at
nuhl@houstonisd.org .

Walker is the first native Houstonian astronaut. She has been living
on the International Space Station since June. Walker was assigned to
Expedition 24/25 for a six-month stay and will return to Earth in
late November. She has been employed at NASA's Johnson Space Center
since 1987 and was selected as an astronaut in May 2004.

Students have been preparing for the downlink by participating in
science lessons and studying the space station. To determine who will
have the opportunity to ask questions, Johnston students filled out
applications where they explained the impact the space station has
had on society and their interest in science, technology, engineering
and mathematics.

This live, in-flight education downlink is one in a series with
educational organizations in the U.S. and abroad to improve teaching
and learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. It
is an integral component of Teaching From Space, a NASA Education
office. Teaching From Space promotes learning opportunities and
builds partnerships with the education community using the unique
environment of human spaceflight.

Offline Space Pete

NASA TV Video: Space Station Command Changes Hands.

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Offline Space Pete

The hatches between TMA-18 & MRM-2 are now closed.
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Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 23/09/2010:

Crew Sleep Cycle Shift:
To accommodate tomorrow morning's Soyuz TMA-18/22S undocking (1:34 AM GMT), crew workday began at 1:30 PM GMT (shifted 7.5 hours) and ends with sleep at 6:30 AM GMT tomorrow morning. Wakeup on 24/09: 2:30 PM GMT, sleep: 9:30 PM GMT, returning to normal.

CDR Doug Wheelock worked several hours with FE-6 Shannon Walker on the MARES (Muscle Atrophy Resistive Exercise System) payload hardware, performing troubleshooting including re-checking cable connections and power verification.

Later, cleaning up after yesterday's relocation of the CQ-3 (Crew Quarters-3) rack from the JPM to Node 2, Shannon reconfigured the JPM1D3 rack bay space with its nominal stowage contents.

Preparations for the Soyuz TMA-18/22S undocking began at ~9:20 PM GMT, with the activation of the Soyuz spacecraft by FE-1 Alexander Skvortsov.

Before ingress, FE-3 Mikhail Kornienko switches the Russian STTS comm. system to "undocking" mode and verifies that the onboard amateur radio stations in the SM and FGB are deactivated, to prevent RFI (Radio Frequency Interference) with the departing spacecraft.

Mikhail & FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson then enter the Descent Module, while Alexander performs the regular communications check from TMA-18.

Next, Mikhail activates the spacecraft's GA gas analyzer, after which Alexander inside and Doug outside will close the Soyuz & MRM-2 hatches. The departing Soyuz crew then starts the standard one-hour leak check on the Soyuz to MRM-2 vestibule.

After attitude control authority has been handed over to the RS MCS (Motion Control System) at ~12:20 AM GMT, the ISS will go into Free Drift at 1:30 AM to 1:39 AM GMT for MRM-2 hooks opening and Soyuz undocking at 1:37 AM. Attitude control will return to US Momentum Management with CMGs (Control Moment Gyroscopes) at ~4:40 AM GMT.
« Last Edit: 09/24/2010 09:44 PM by Space Pete »
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Online DaveS

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Seems like they're having quite a bit of troubles tonight with MRM-2. First there was microswitch for the hatch between the Soyuz and MRM-2 that failed to indicate a good latch and seal of the hatch.

Now they're having problem opening the MRM-2 hooks. Undocking is 12 minutes away.
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Online DaveS

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MCC-M have asked Fyodor to listen for actual mechanical motion of the latches in an effort to determine whether or not this is yet another sensor malfunction.
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Online DaveS

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NO-GO for undocking on this orbit. Trying again on the next. Beyond the next one, they have two more attempts based on the Soyuz' ballistic capability to reach the targeted landing site.
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Offline Space Pete

Just an observation, TMA-18 is the first spacecraft to have been docked to MRM-2 for a 6 month period.
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Online DaveS

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They're going for the last undocking opportunity of the day, so ISS is being moved back to the nominal attitude for the time being. So the new de-orbit burn time would be 3:10 am EDT with landing at 4:06 am EDT.

Undocking would be at 12:35 am EDT.
« Last Edit: 09/24/2010 01:58 AM by DaveS »
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

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