Author Topic: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010) - Includes ETCS Updates  (Read 181706 times)

Offline John44

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« Last Edit: 09/15/2010 04:48 PM by John44 »

Offline anik

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Tomorrow's ISS orbit's reboost by eight DPO engines of Progress M-07M cargo ship is planned at 09:04 UTC. The duration of manoeuvre will be 526 seconds. The mean altitude of ISS orbit will be raised by 2 kilometres to 356 kilometres.

Source: MCC-M.

Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 14/09/2010:

With the Lab CDRA restored to full service yesterday and the Node 3 CDRA not now required, FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson supported its deactivation by disconnecting its LTL (Low Temperature Loop) return line at the AR-2 (Atmosphere Revitalization-2) rack.

Reboost:
A one-burn reboost of ISS is scheduled tomorrow morning at 9:04 AM GMT using the Progress M-07M/39P DPO rendezvous & docking thrusters. Planned burn duration: 8 minutes 46 seconds; delta-V: 1.2 m/s (3.94 ft/s). Expected mean altitude gain: 2.1 km (1.13 nmi). Purpose: Set up phasing for Soyuz TMA-18/22S landing on 23/09 (Eastern) and Soyuz TMA-01M/24S launch conditions on 07/10. This reboost along with another in mid-October will set up phasing for Progress M-08M/40P launch on 27/10 and a string of consecutive FD-3 launch opportunities for STS-133/ULF-5 starting on 01/11.
« Last Edit: 09/14/2010 08:33 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

NASA TV Video: Space Station Cameras Capture Igor.

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Offline John44

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Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 15/09/2010:

CDR Alexander Skvortsov & FE-3 Mikhail Kornienko spent several hours with prepacking cargo and loading it on the Soyuz TMA-18/22S spacecraft for their 23/09 departure.

In the COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), FE-4 Doug Wheelock temporarily relocated cargo bags from specific locations to make room for the planned MARES (Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System) commissioning.

Reboost Update:
A one-burn reboost of ISS was performed successfully this morning at 9:04 AM GMT using the Progress M-07M/39P DPO rendezvous & docking thrusters. Burn duration was 8 minutes 46 seconds; delta-V: 1.25 m/s (4.09 ft/s). Mean altitude gain: 2.19 km (1.18 nmi). Purpose: Set up phasing for Soyuz TMA-18/22S landing on 23/09 (Eastern) and Soyuz TMA-01M/24S launch conditions on 07/10. This reboost along with another one in mid-October sets up phasing for Progress M-08M/40P launch on 27/10 and a string of consecutive FD-3 launch opportunities for STS-133/ULF-5 starting on 01/11.
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Offline Space Pete

Fruit Flies Tested in the ISS Russian Segment.

After a rather long calm period with biotechnology in the Russian segment of the International Space Station, fruit flies returned to the ISS, flight engineer Fiodor Yurchikhin said answering the question from the ISS Mail Box in Memorial Space Museum. The project devoted to the Year of Russian Space Exploration- 2011 – is supported by Roscosmos PAO.
There were several questions about living organisms onboard the ISS in the Mail Box. It’s true, insects or small animals were not tested in the Russian segment for a rather long time.
Fruit flies in special containers – Polygen experiment - were brought by Progress M-07M docked to the station last Sunday.
The insects will spend some time in microgravity, until their return in Soyuz TMA-18 on Sept. 24, in order to give scientists the opportunity to verify their capabilities in zero-g, with the further on purpose to use the results for similar evaluations of the human body, Yurchikhin explained.
According to him, several other biotechnological experiments to be carried out by Russian cosmonauts within next week are to be returned to the Earth on Sept. 24.

Roscosmos PAO.

www.roscosmos.ru/main.php?id=2&nid=10345&lang=en
« Last Edit: 09/15/2010 09:54 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

NASA TV Video: "Dual Hurricanes in the Atlantic".


NASA TV Video: "Expedition 24 Discusses Mission with Media".
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Offline Space Pete

Two nice images from Doug Wheelock via Twitter.

Quote
'Igor the Terrible'…It was about 2:00pm GMT today…out over the Atlantic, and we came upon the monster, Hurricane Igor. This storm is enormous with an impressive eye wall. Seeing the blue water down through the eye of the storm is so surreal. I can scratch that off my bucket list. Go quietly, Igor, and remember what peace there may be in silence…

Quote
Tropical Storm Julia departing the 'Birthplace of Atlantic Hurricanes', the Cape Verde Islands, and beginning the relentless journey westward, away from the southern islands of Maio, Sao Tiago, Fogo and Brava. Currently only a tropical storm, but showing tremendous organization and rotation. I think we may hear more from Julia in the coming days…
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Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 16/09/2010:

In COL, FE-4 Doug Wheelock & FE-6 Shannon Walker began with the long-awaited assembly and installation of the extensive MARES (Muscle Atrophy Resistive Exercise System) payload hardware. [First steps today included setting up the VCA (Video Camera Assembly) and digital still camera to support documentary video & photography, unstowing the MARES components from the launch configuration (most of it stowed in the JLP, assembling the electronics into the Main Box and configuring other components. Background: The ESA MARES will be used for research on musculoskeletal, biomechanical, and neuromuscular human physiology to better understand the effects of microgravity on the muscular system. MARES hardware comprises an adjustable chair and human restraint system, a pantograph (an articulated arm supporting the chair, used to properly position the user), a direct drive motor, associated electronics and experiment programming software, a linear adapter that translates motor rotation into linear movements, and a vibration isolation frame. It is capable of supporting measurements & exercise on seven different human joints, encompassing nine different angular movements, as well as two additional linear movements (arms and legs). It is considerably more advanced than current ground-based medical dynamometers (devices used to measure force or torque) and a vast improvement over existing ISS muscle research facilities. MARES may be used together with an associated device called the PEMS II (Percutaneous Electrical Muscle Stimulator II).]
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Offline stockman

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Sounds like they had a caution alarm on one of the experiments in the Columbus module - the experiment powered itself down according to the chatter. The crew was just sent back to bed after some initial t/s'ing with the ground
« Last Edit: 09/17/2010 02:32 AM by stockman »
One Percent for Space!!!

Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 17/09/2010:

CDR Alexander Skvortsov & FE-3 Mikhail Kornienko retreated for two hours into the Soyuz TMA-18/22S spacecraft's SA (Descent Module) to conduct the Soyuz descent drill, a standard training exercise for every crew returning on a Soyuz. Results of the exercise, which strictly forbids any command activation (except for switching the InPU display), were subsequently reported to ground control at TsUP/Moscow. [The session includes a review of the pertinent ODFs (Operational Data Files), specifically the books on Soyuz Ascent & Descent Procedures, Emergency Descents, and Off-Nominal Situations, crew responsibilities when executing the flight program, visual crew recognition of SUS (Entry Control System) failures, spacesuit procedures, etc., with special emphasis on operations with the Neptune-ME cockpit console. The training uses a Descent Simulator application (Trenasher Spusk ="descent trainer") on the RSK1  laptop. During the actual descent, Alexander, as Soyuz CDR, will occupy the middle couch, with Mikhail in the left & FE-3 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson in the right Kazbek couch. Pending the final State Commission decision at about 3.5 hours before undocking, 22S return is expected on 24/09 (next Friday).]

In COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), FE-6 Shannon Walker finished up on the extensive assembly and installation of the MARES (Muscle Atrophy Resistive Exercise System) payload hardware, assisted by Wheels. [Steps today included setting up the VCA (Video Camera Assembly) and digital still camera to support documentary video & photography, installing the VIF (Vibration Isolation Frame) onto the MARES Rack, preparing & cabling the PIU, performing power verification, finally disconnecting and stowing the equipment.

PAS-4 Checkout:
Ground controllers were to conduct a remote-controlled checkout of the PAS-4 (Payload Attach System-4) located on the S3 Truss lower inboard, at ~3:45 PM GMT, using the S1 lower inboard camera for monitoring. No crew involvement required.
Pete's note: I assumed this was to verify PAS-4 functionality for ELC-4 install during STS-133/ULF-5. However, upon checking, I learned that ELC-4 will be installed on PAS-3, not PAS-4. Also, PAS-4 is located on the S3 Truss lower outboard, not inboard, and is currently occupied by ESP-3. So I'm assuming that PAS-4 was written in error, and that PAS-3 has actually been checked out.
« Last Edit: 09/18/2010 12:28 AM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 17/09/2010:
PAS-4 Checkout:
Ground controllers were to conduct a remote-controlled checkout of the PAS-4 (Payload Attach System-4) located on the S3 Truss lower inboard, at ~3:45 PM GMT, using the S1 lower inboard camera for monitoring. No crew involvement required.
Pete's note: I assumed this was to verify PAS-4 functionality for ELC-4 install during STS-133/ULF-5. However, upon checking, I learned that ELC-4 will be installed on PAS-3, not PAS-4. Also, PAS-4 is located on the S3 Truss lower outboard, not inboard, and is currently occupied by ESP-3. So I'm assuming that PAS-4 was written in error, and that PAS-3 has actually been checked out.

After a conversation with STS-133 ISS Lead Flight Director Royce Renfrew via Twitter, I have learned that my drawings are in fact incorrect, and that the ISS report was correct. PAS-3 is located on S1 lower outboard, and is currently occupied by ESP-3. PAS-4 is located on S1 lower inboard, and will be the install location for ELC-4. Renfrew says the PAS-4 checkout was successful.
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Offline Space Pete

NASA TV Video: Three Hurricanes Tracked by Station Cameras.


NASA TV Video: ISS Crew Gives Perspective on Huricanes to Weather Channel.
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Offline Space Pete

Quote from: Doug Wheelock via Twitter
The time has come to transition to Expedition 25 aboard the International Space Station, and honor the tradition of the Change of Command of this incredible spaceship. We wish good luck, safe journey and a soft landing to our friends and crewmates Alexander 'Sasha' Skvortsov; Mikhail 'Misha' Kornienko; and Tracy Caldwell Dyson.
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Offline Space Pete

Cosmonauts and Astronauts Can Visit Any ISS Segment.

Russian cosmonauts and NASA astronauts can visit Russian and US segments of the International Space Station, GCTC Chief Sergey Krikalev said questioned by RIA Novosti during traditional press conference of Soyuz TMA-01M crew.
Asked about 'segmenting' of the ISS, Krikalev said that there were no borders onboard the station, so cosmonauts and astronauts can move freely in the ISS.
Soyuz commander Alexander Kaleri added that ISS crews have meals together in one or the other segment. The crews are not inclined to violate this tradition.

www.roscosmos.ru/main.php?id=2&nid=10369&lang=en
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Offline Targeteer

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While they can move freely, it's obvious from monitoring of voice and video from the station that Cosmonauts work almost exclusively in the Russian segment and visa versa for the US/European/Canadian/Japanese astronauts. Roles in the ISS are definitely segmented.  Spacewalks on the Russian segment are conducted in Russian suits from the Russian airlocks.  Russian crews talk to Moscow controllers.  While the ISS is international, sometimes it looks more like a Russian station that happens to be attached to a western one...
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Space Pete

While they can move freely, it's obvious from monitoring of voice and video from the station that Cosmonauts work almost exclusively in the Russian segment and visa versa for the US/European/Canadian/Japanese astronauts. Roles in the ISS are definitely segmented.  Spacewalks on the Russian segment are conducted in Russian suits from the Russian airlocks.  Russian crews talk to Moscow controllers.  While the ISS is international, sometimes it looks more like a Russian station that happens to be attached to a western one...

That is merely done to save time on training - Russian crewmembers are highly trained in Russian systems, but only broadly trained in US systems, and vice-versa for US crewmembers. JAXA/ESA crewmembers often do lots of work in their respective modules as they are highly trained in those modules, and JAXA/ESA have more control over the timelines of their own crewmembers.

Back in early 2009, there was some controversy when Russian crewmembers were banned from using USOS equipment, and US crewmembers were banned from using RS equipment. That situation was successfully resolved, and Russian crewmembers now exercise on the US CEVIS, T2 & ARED exercise equipment daily. US crewmembers also use the Russian TVIS on a daily basis (TVIS was designed by JSC, and is serviced by Russian crewmembers under the direction of MCC-H). One Russian crewmember also sleeps in the USOS CQs.

The Quest A/L was originally supposed to support both US EMU and Russian Orlan EVAs, but that capability was never pursued/funded due to the fact that it is now unneeded (in the original ISS plan, no dedicated Russian A/L was to be present at assembly complete. However, now that the SPP has been cancelled and MRM-2 has been added, the RS will always have its own dedicated A/L).

A few weeks ago, Expedition 24 was behind on science due the ETCS problems. The US traded something with Russia and Russian crewmembers were brought into the USOS to help catch up on science.

So, while I would agree that most ISS operations are segmented, I don't think it's through lack of co-operation.
« Last Edit: 09/19/2010 10:13 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline erioladastra

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While they can move freely, it's obvious from monitoring of voice and video from the station that Cosmonauts work almost exclusively in the Russian segment and visa versa for the US/European/Canadian/Japanese astronauts. Roles in the ISS are definitely segmented.  Spacewalks on the Russian segment are conducted in Russian suits from the Russian airlocks.  Russian crews talk to Moscow controllers.  While the ISS is international, sometimes it looks more like a Russian station that happens to be attached to a western one...

Yes, because generally there are enough Russians onboard ot take care of the RS and enough "USOS" astronauts (hate the term but what we are stuck with) for the USOS.  But there is cross training and they do things on both sides.  Right now, in the crew time billing accounting the Russian crew owes NASA some time and therefore they are doing some basic activities in the USOS as training allows.  Segemented ops really means how crew time is allocated and who is responsible for what.  If you go outside of that then something has to be traded somewhere.

Offline Targeteer

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It would seem the Cosmonauts will permanently "owe" the USOS because they will have 3 members for the forseeable future to work in 2 functionally critical but limited (science particularly) modules compared to the USOS segment. I've heard ISS leadership mention the crew percentage makeup but I would be intrigued to see an explanation of how a station dominated by non russian partner components (mass, functionality, and internal volume) has a 50% russian crew.  Dependence on, and extensive use by the Russians of the US developed and funded TDRS network only increases the disparity.  Progress and Soyuz are vital but use of those missions is paid for by non russian users...  Purchase of Soyuz seats probably has a lot to do with the crew makeup.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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