Author Topic: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010) - Includes ETCS Updates  (Read 181658 times)

Offline Space Pete

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Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 04/09/2010:

COL WOOV-8 Update:
FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson's attempt yesterday to "unstick" the LTL (Low Temperature Loop) WOOV-8 (Water On/Off Valve-8) in the COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory) was not successful. Tracy also reported a greenish substance on the bolt of the valve, which may or may not be precipitate from a slow water leak. When dissolved in a fluid the substance is Tox level 0; as a solid residue it is generally considered Tox level 1. To be on the safe side, Tracy was advised to don goggles, a dust mask and silver shield gloves when deciding to clean the valve.
« Last Edit: 09/04/2010 07:24 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

A shot of the LTL WOOV-8 activities in COL.

Here we can see ER-3 (in COL1A1) rotated away from the module shell to allow access to WOOV-8. The Aft-Port module closeout has also been removed.
« Last Edit: 09/05/2010 04:19 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline anik

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Progress M-06M cargo ship was successfully deorbited today at 15:13:50.5 UTC after the performing of Radar-Progress experiment.

Offline Space Pete

A shot of activities on the ARS rack in NOD3A4. This image is unique as it shows Node 3 with the WHC "Kabin" removed, allowing for a rare full view of Node 3's interior.
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Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 07/09/2010:

In preparation for Progress M-07M/39P docking on Friday, CDR Alexander Skvortsov & FE-3 Mikhail Kornienko went through the standard 3 hour refresher training for the TORU teleoperator system, which provides a manual backup mode to the Progress' KURS automated rendezvous radar system. A tagup with a TORU instructor at TsUP/Moscow via S-band audio supported the training. [The drill included procedure review, rendezvous, docking data and rendezvous math modeling data review, fly-around, final approach, docking and off-nominal situations (e.g., video or comm. loss). Three different flight conditions were simulated on the RSK1 laptop. The TORU teleoperator control system lets a SM-based crewmember perform the approach and docking of automated Progress vehicles in case of KURS failure. During spacecraft approach, TORU is in "hot standby" mode. Receiving a video image of the approaching ISS, as seen from a Progress-mounted docking television camera ("Klest"), on a color monitor ("Simvol-Ts", i.e. "symbol center") which also displays an overlay of rendezvous data from the onboard digital computer, the CDR would steer the Progress to mechanical contact by means of two hand controllers, one for rotation (RUO), the other for translation (RUD), on adjustable armrests. The controller-generated commands are transmitted from the SM's TORU control panel to the Progress via VHF (Very High Frequency) radio. In addition to the Simvol-Ts color monitor, range, range rate (approach velocity) and relative angular position data are displayed on the "Klest-M" video monitor (VKU) which starts picking up signals from Progress when it is still approximately 8 km away. TORU is monitored in real time from TsUP over RGSs (Russian Ground Sites) and via Ku-band from Houston, but its control cannot be taken over from the ground. On 10/09, Progress KURS-A (active) will be activated at 10:59 AM GMT on Daily Orbit 1 (DO-1), SM KURS-P (passive) two minutes later. Progress floodlight will be switched on at a range of ~8 km. Progress TORU will activate at 3 km range. Flyaround to the SM aft (+X) port (~400 m range, in sunlight) starts at 12:12 PM GMT, followed by station keeping at 170 m at ~12:22 PM. Start of final approach: ~12:26 PM (DO-2) in sunlight, contact: ~12:37 PM. SM Kurs-P deactivation on mechanical capture. Sunset: 12:42 PM.]

FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson & FE-4 Doug Wheelock worked several hours jointly swapping the ARS (Atmosphere Revitalization System) racks to their permanent locations: AR-1 was returned to the US Lab and AR-2 was moved into Node 3. This provides the station with two active CDRAs (Carbon Dioxide Removal Assemblies). [To make room for the transfers, the WHC (Waste & Hygiene Compartment) Kabin and the CEVIS (Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation System) were removed temporarily, with FE-6 Shannon Walker taking Wheels' place for the Kabin re-installation. The crew was able to move the racks without disconnecting the ALTEA (Anomalous Long Term Effects on Astronauts Dosimetry) hardware.]

If the MCA (Major Constituent Analyzer) on AR-2 required a pumpout/calibration (per ground determination), Shannon was to open the manual valve (HV01) and later close it again. [The MCA is used as primary device for accurately monitoring O2 and CO2 (carbon dioxide) in the cabin air.]

To prepare and make room for the upcoming relocation of the CHeCS (Crew Health Care System) RSR (Resupply Stowage Rack) to LAB1D4 (Lab rack bay Deck 4), Shannon had about an hour to shuffle stowage items, i.e., clean out cargo stowed at D4 and transfer it to other locations.

Progress M-05M/37P Thruster Control:
US-21 Matching Unit control of 37P thrusters via SM was successfully restored last night. This re-established roll control of the ISS using 37P thrusters instead of SM jets (which were disabled). 37P is docked to DC-1 Nadir, most efficient for roll control.

Progress M-07M/39P Launch Preps:
At the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, preparations continue for the launch of the 39P cargo vehicle to the ISS. Countdown is proceeding nominally toward a launch tomorrow (08/09) at 11:11 AM GMT for a 12:37 PM GMT docking on Friday (10/09). L-1 activities are currently being conducted. 39P will deliver 1,918 pounds of propellant, 110 pounds of oxygen & air, 375 pounds of water and 2,645 pounds of spare parts & experiment hardware.
« Last Edit: 09/07/2010 08:00 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

ISS Crew is Looking Forward to Receiving New Movies.

International Space Station flight engineer Fyodor Yurchikhin likes andventures and comedies, he said answering the question sent through the ISS Mail Box in Memorial Space Museum with support of Roscosmos PAO.
Yurchikhin and his colleagues aboard the ISS are looking forward to arrival of Progress M-07M to get new movies to watch in the station.
According the Fyodor, there is a big film collection in the station, and normally the crew gets together on week-ends to watch brand-new films.
On the other days, Yurchikhin says, cosmonauts watch movies during their daily sport training.
He himself likes old Russian movies, comedies and adventures, Interfax informs.

Source.

-----

The Number of ISS RS Experiments Increased ISS Flight Engineer.

The scientific program of the International Space Station Russian segment is enlarged, flight engineer Fyodor Yurchikhin said answering the question sent through the ISS Mail Box in Memorial Space Museum with support of Roscosmos PAO.
Yurchikhin states that there are more Russian experiments carried out on board the station now, due to increased number of the crew members and integration of the new modules.
"Compare to my previous mission a couple of years ago, the program improved a lot. We got new scientific equipment, for example Glovebox and photospectrometers", Yurchikhin says.
According to Fyodor, many experiments are getting to new high-quality level, like Pilot, for which less time is needed today, Interfax informs.

Source.
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Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 08/09/2010:

Progress M-07M/39P Launch Delay:
The launch of Progress 39P, planned for this morning at 11:11 AM GMT has been delayed until Friday (10/09) due to high winds over the Baikonur launch site. Launch time: 10:22 AM GMT. Docking is planned for Sunday (12/09) at ~11:57 AM GMT. This is a First for the ISS Program.

In preparation for their return on Soyuz TMA-18/22S on 24/09, CDR Alexander Skvortsov, FE-3 Mikhail Kornienko & FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson donned their Sokol flight suits and conducted the periodic 30 minute fit check of their Kazbek couches in the 22S spacecraft, i.e., the three contoured shock absorbing seats in the Descent Module. [For the fit check, crewmembers remove their cabin apparel and don Sokol KV-2 suit and comm caps, get into in their seats and assess the degree of comfort and uniform body support provided by the seat liner. Using a ruler, they then measure the gap between the top of the head and the top edge of the structure facing the head crown. The results are reported to TsUP. Kazbek-UM couches are designed to withstand G-loads during launch and orbital insertion as well as during reentry and brake-rocket-assisted landing. Each seat has two positions: cocked (armed) and noncocked. In cocked position, they are raised to allow the shock absorbers to function during touchdown. The fit check assures that the crewmembers, whose bodies gain in length during longer-term stay in zero-G, will still be adequately protected by the seat liners for their touchdown in Kazakhstan, either emergency or regular return.]

For ground monitoring of the Progress rendezvous & docking on Sunday, Tracy & Alexander set up the Ku-band video "scheme" for a communications test of converting the RS (Russian Segment) video signal from the SONY HDV camera to US NTSC format and Ku-band from FGB & SM, for downlinking "streaming video" packets via US OpsLAN and Ku-band. [For the test, Tracy configured the SSC-1 (Station Support Computer-1) A31p laptop in the FGB and activated the VWS (Video Streaming Workstation) laptop for both the conversion and the "streaming" MPEG-2 (Moving Pictures Expert Group-2) encoding, with Alexander running the video test from the RS. The previously used ESA MPEG2 Encoder in the SM was not used, in favor of the more stable VWS.]

Tracy & FE-4 Doug Wheelock worked a newly-added troubleshooting task on the ARED (Advanced Resistive Exercise Device). [The exercise device yesterday was reported to have its cable arms popping out of the detents, due to the pulley rope prevented from full retraction into the frame by some tuft (cluster of threads). For the troubleshooting, the crewmembers were to cut the tuft off and remove the belt pulley cover to confirm the rope was still routed properly on the pulleys.]
« Last Edit: 09/08/2010 08:19 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline TJL

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Wow...can't remember the last time a Soyuz launch was delayed due to weather.

Offline Fequalsma

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PMA cost is $3.9M, according to an AvWeek article, August 23-27, 2010, page 40.

Sounds like the Big 14 list is on the way :)

...

What is the cost of each PM ORU?

TBD


Offline jcm

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Progress M-06M cargo ship was successfully deorbited today at 15:13:50.5 UTC after the performing of Radar-Progress experiment.

err.... I think you mean 12:13:50.5 UTC?
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 09/09/2010:

CDR Alexander Skvortsov, FE-3 Mikhail Kornienko & FE-5 Fyodor joined for a 30 minute review & discussion of a concentrated program of biotechnical experiments to be conducted throughout the month of September in the RS, focusing on a large number of biotech payloads due to arrive on Progress M-07M/39P on Sunday (12/09), including:
BTKh-6 ARIL.
BTKh-7 OChB.
BTKh-8 BIOTREK.
BTKh-10 KONYUGATSIYA.
BTKh-14 BIOEMULSIYA.
BTKh-26 KASKAD.
BTKh-27 ASTROVAKTSINA.
BTKh-40 BIF.
BTKh-41 BACTERIOFAG.
BIO-10 POLIGEN.
TKhN-9 KRISTALLISATOR.
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Offline John44

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« Last Edit: 09/15/2010 04:49 PM by John44 »

Offline anik

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err.... I think you mean 12:13:50.5 UTC?

Yes, I am sorry. dT = 198 seconds. dV = 101.75 meters per second.

Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 10/09/2010:

At the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the new cargo ship Progress M-07M/39P was launched today on time at 11:22 AM GMT (4:22 PM local time) on a Soyuz-U rocket. Ascent was nominal, and all spacecraft systems are without issues. Docking to the ISS at the SM Aft port is planned for Sunday (12/09) at ~11:58 AM GMT. 39P carries 2290 kg (5048 lbs) of cargo, specifically: 870 kg (1918 lbs) of propellants, 50 kg (110 lbs) of oxygen & air, 170 kg (375 lbs) of water and 1200 kg (2645 lbs) of spare parts & experiment hardware.
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Offline Space Pete

Shannon Walker's latest blog entry from the ISS, featuring a personal perspective on the ETCS problems. :)

First person perspective from orbit: What happens when a critical part breaks and we have to go fix it.
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Offline Space Pete

NASA Opens Space Station For Biological Research From NIH Grants.

NASA is enabling biomedical research with National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants that take advantage of the unique microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station to explore fundamental questions about important health issues.

The NIH Biomedical Research on the International Space Station (BioMed-ISS) awards are the next step in a new partnership to apply the national laboratory to research that complements NASA's own space studies. The NIH studies include research on how bones and the immune system weaken in space.

"This marks the beginning of a new era in microgravity-based research with the International Space Station turning the corner from construction to use as a new national laboratory," said Mark Uhran, assistant associate administrator for space station, NASA Headquarters in Washington.

In 2005 Congress recognized the immense promise the station holds for U.S.-led science and technology efforts. It opened the U.S. portion of the facility to federal agencies, university and private sector researchers by designating the station as a national laboratory. In addition to NIH, NASA has similar research agreements with the Departments of Defense, Agriculture and Energy and the National Science Foundation.

Scientists will conduct their experiments under a two-stage mechanism. The first is a ground-based preparatory phase to allow investigators to meet select milestones and technical requirements. The second is an experimental phase on the space station that will include preparing the experiments for launch, working with astronauts to conduct them on orbit and performing subsequent data analyses on Earth.

"BioMed-ISS offers a novel opportunity for gaining scientific insights that would not otherwise be possible through ground-based means," said Stephen I. Katz, M.D., Ph.D., director of the NIH's National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and NIH liaison to NASA. "The beauty of this initiative is that it offers an unprecedented opportunity for benefitting human health on earth, while leveraging the American public's investment in the ISS."

NIH is hosting three rounds of competition for the initiative. The first round of grants for the ground-based phase, totaling an estimated $1,323,000, has been awarded as follows:

Paola Divieti, M.D., Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston: Weight-bearing activities contribute to the development and maintenance of bone mass, while weightlessness and immobility, as experienced by the astronauts and bedridden and immobilized patients, can result in bone loss and a weakened skeleton. Osteocytes, the most common type of bone cell, are believed to have gravity-sensing abilities. These cells play a key role in bone remodeling, a process that is vital to skeletal health. In studying osteocytes in a gravity-free environment, Divieti aims to uncover new therapeutic targets for osteoporosis and related bone diseases.

Millie Hughes-Fulford, Ph.D., Northern California Institute for Research and Education, San Francisco: The immune system, which protects the body against foreign substances, is suppressed in space. A reduction in the immune response also occurs in the elderly, who, like the astronauts, are at increased risk for infection. As a former astronaut, Hughes-Fulford, a former payload specialist on the STS-40 Spacelab Life Sciences shuttle mission in 1991, aims to apply lessons learned from studies of immune cells in microgravity to a new model for investigating the loss of immune response in older women and men.

Declan McCole, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego: The movement of toxins from intestines to other organs in the body is a major source of illness in the United States. A major factor in disease stems from the ability of toxins to compromise the natural barrier function of cells in the gastrointestinal tract. Using microgravity based three-dimensional cell culture models, McCole plans to generate insights regarding the barrier properties of the intestines, and explore how the absence of gravity affects a toxin's ability to diminish this barrier.

For more information about NIH and NASA activities, visit:
www.niams.nih.gov/News_and_Events/NIH_NASA_Activities

For information about the International Space Station, visit:
www.nasa.gov/station

For more information about NIH and its programs, visit:
www.nih.gov

Source.
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Offline John44

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« Last Edit: 09/15/2010 04:49 PM by John44 »

Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 12/09/2010:

Yest kasaniye! At 11:57 AM GMT, Progress M-07M/39P docked  successfully to the SM Aft port under automatic KURS control, followed by a final DPO post-contact thrusting burn, docking probe retraction and hook closure ("sborka", ~12:04 PM GMT) after motion damp-out while the ISS was in free drift for 20 minutes (11:58 AM to 12:18 PM GMT). At "hooks closed" signal, the SM returned to active attitude control, maneuvering the ISS to LVLH TEA (Torque Equilibrium Attitude) at ~12:18 PM GMT. Control authority returned to US Momentum Management at ~1:00 PM GMT. Russian thrusters were disabled temporarily during clamps install and leak check (1:30 PM to 3:25 PM GMT). All Progress systems operated nominally from automated rendezvous start at approximately 9:32 AM GMT, Progress KURS-A activation and testing, KURS antenna retraction, and ending with successful approach & docking.

For monitoring 39P maneuvering and docking, CDR Alexander Skvortsov & FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson set up the Ku-band video "scheme". [The crew configured the SSC-1 (Station Support Computer-1) A31p laptop in the FGB and activated the VWS (Video Streaming Workstation) laptop for both the conversion and the "streaming" MPEG-2 (Moving Pictures Expert Group-2) encoding in order to downlink "streaming video" packets via US OpsLAN and Ku-band. The previously used ESA MPEG-2 Encoder in the SM was not used, in favor of the more stable VWS.]

Also before docking, the amateur/ham radio equipment was deactivated to prevent RF interference with the Progress KURS radio control system.

Tracy installed the four snubber alignment guides on the T2 treadmill to protect the exercise device. After the docking and before first exercise run, FE-4 Doug Wheelock removed the guides.

In addition, Tracy closed the protective shutters of the Lab, JPM & Cupola science windows.

After the 39P docking, Alexander & FE-3 Mikhail Kornienko shut off the TORU teleoperated rendezvous & docking system, used as manual standby, and reconfigured the STTS telephone/telegraph subsystem to normal ops. [The "Voskhod-M" STTS enables telephone communications between the SM, FGB, DC-1 and USOS, and also with users on the ground over VHF (Very High Frequency) channels selected by an operator at an SM comm. panel, via STTS antennas on the SM's outside. There are six comm. panels in the SM with pushbuttons for accessing any of three audio channels, plus an intercom channel. Other modes of the STTS include telegraphy (teletype), EVA voice, emergency alarms, Packet/Email, and TORU docking support].

The crewmembers then conducted the standard 1 hour leak checking of the docking vestibule and fuel/oxidizer transfer line interface between Progress and the SM PKhO (Transfer Compartment).

Later today, the Russian crewmembers:
• Opened the hatches (~3:00 PM GMT) and installed the QD
  screw clamps (BZV) of the docking & internal transfer mechanism
  (SSVP) to rigidize the coupling (CDR).
• Performed the standard air sampling inside Progress with the Russian
  AK-1M air sampler (FE-5 Fyodor Yurchikhin).
• Powered down the spacecraft and installing the ventilation/heating
  air duct (CDR).
• Took photographs of the internal docking surfaces for subsequent
  downlinking (FE-5).
• Dismantled the docking mechanism (StM, Stykovochnovo mekhanizma)
  between Progress and the SM (~4:00 PM GMT) [the StM is the
  "classic" probe-and-cone type, consisting of an active docking
  assembly (ASA) with a probe (SSh), which fits into the cone (SK) on
  the passive docking assembly (PSA) for initial soft dock and
  subsequent retraction to hard dock. The ASA is mounted on the
  Progress' cargo module (GrO), while the PSA sits on the docking ports
  of the SM, FGB, DC-1, MRM-2 & MRM-1].
• Transferred a number of Russian high priority biotechnology payloads
  to the ISS, setting them up in the RS (Russian Segment) and taking
  documentary photography of each:
  o BTKh-5/LAKTOLEN (to Bioecology container in SM).
  o BTKh-6/ARIL (to the TBU thermostat-controlled incubator at +29°C).
  o BTKh-7/OChB.
  o BTKh-14/BIOEMULSIYA.
  o BTKh-26/KASKAD (Cascade), (to KRIOGEM-03M at +4°C).
  o BTKh-40/BIF (to MRM-2, then to TBU at +29°C).
  o BTKh-41/BACTERIOFAG (Bakteriophag, to container and TBU).
  o BTKh-10/KONYUGATSIYA (to KRIOGEM-03M at +4°C).
  o BIO-1/POLIGENE.
  o TkhN-9/KRISTALLIZATOR.

FE-6 Shannon Walker handled the high-priority transfer & installation of two critical science payloads from Progress:
• ESA SODI (Selectable Optical Diagnostics Instrument) experiment.
• JAXA PCG (Protein Crystal Growth) canister – installed in the
  PCRF (Protein Crystallization Research Facility) and PCRF cable
  connected.

Fyodor then had ~1.5 hours reserved on his timeline for the first cargo transfers from the Progress to the ISS.

On the US side, Tracy disassembled & removed the RS video "scheme" while Doug powered up the amateur/ham radio equipment in the SM.
« Last Edit: 09/13/2010 12:15 PM by Space Pete »
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Offline Space Pete

From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 13/09/2010:

FE-5 Fyodor Yurchikhin worked in the Progress M-07M/39P vehicle to install the electronic LKT local temperature sensor commutator (TA251MB) of the BITS2-12 onboard telemetry measurement system and its PZU-1M ROM (Read Only Memory), using recycled boxes from stowage. This completes the integration of the cargo ship into the ISS RS MCS (Motion Control System).

Working on the CDRA in the Lab AR-1 (Atmosphere Revitalization-1) rack, FE-4 Doug Wheelock performed a leak inspection on the Hydraflow connectors of its Bed 201 and installed the MCA (Major Constituent Analyzer) DCA (Data & Control Assembly), assisted by FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson. [After some issues with the AR-2 CDRA in Node 3, which ground controllers recovered OK, today's maintenance on the Lab CDRA, focusing on the Hydraflow connectors and the MCA, is intended to restore the second CDRA to operation.]
« Last Edit: 09/13/2010 07:54 PM by Space Pete »
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