Author Topic: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010) - Includes ETCS Updates  (Read 182152 times)

Online Nicolas PILLET

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #40 on: 06/17/2010 05:37 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 15/06/2010:

Elektron Shutdown Update:
The automatic shutdown of the Russian Elektron O2 generator on 11/06 evening was commanded by the controlling software due to a high temperature reading from the KOB-1 internal thermal control loop.

I don't understand what is written here. KOBs loops are part of STR (thermal regulation), what is the link with Elektron ?

I think Elektron was shut down either because it got too hot, or because it was introducing too much heat into the overloaded KOB-1 loop.

That was what I thought first, but I've been surprised by the word internal ("KOB-1 internal thermal control loop")...
Nicolas PILLET
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Online Nicolas PILLET

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #41 on: 06/17/2010 05:43 PM »
Some elements are in the 16th june's status report :

Quote
Working in the SM (Service Module) on the SOTR Thermal Control System’s KOB1 loop, Skvortsov replaced the N2 micropump on the 3SPN1 pump panel and its K-90 switching unit with new spares, supported by ground specialist tagup (S-band), then tested the system with the N2 power feed. [KOB1 had caused the shutdown of the Elektron on 6/11. The two SOTR KOB thermal loops control the removal of metabolic heat and heat emitted by working equipment; they also establish specific temperature conditions for the cabin atmosphere. The excess heat is passed from the coolant through liquid-liquid heat exchangers (ZhZhT) into the active external thermal control system (KOKh) for subsequent radiation into open space. Each loop contains 118 liters of "Triol" coolant fluid, i.e., water with a 30 percent solution of glycerin (to lower the freezing point to 7 degC) plus biocide and UV-light-sensitive additives to aid in leak detection. One liter of Triol, which is nontoxic and poses no hazard to the crew, can absorb about 14 cubic cm of air. Each of the two KOB loops is served by two nominally redundant pump panels (SPN), each equipped with two redundant replaceable electric pumps (ENA). While in the early years of Mir and ISS the pumps were integral to the SPN  panels, the more advanced current design allows them to be replaced without requiring a swap-out of an entire SPN block.]
« Last Edit: 06/17/2010 05:45 PM by Nicolas PILLET »
Nicolas PILLET
Kosmonavtika : The French site on Russian Space

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #42 on: 06/17/2010 08:15 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 15/06/2010:

Elektron Shutdown Update:
The automatic shutdown of the Russian Elektron O2 generator on 11/06 evening was commanded by the controlling software due to a high temperature reading from the KOB-1 internal thermal control loop.

I don't understand what is written here. KOBs loops are part of STR (thermal regulation), what is the link with Elektron ?

I think Elektron was shut down either because it got too hot, or because it was introducing too much heat into the overloaded KOB-1 loop.

That was what I thought first, but I've been surprised by the word internal ("KOB-1 internal thermal control loop")...

That simply means that the KOB-1 loop controls the temperature of the interior of the ISS.
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #43 on: 06/17/2010 08:22 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 17/06/2010:

Conjunction Advisory:
MCC-H flight controllers are currently monitoring four conjunctions with four different objects:
. Object 36444 (Cosmos 2251), TCA (Time of Closest Approach) = Friday 18/06 @ 6:19 PM GMT.
. Object 14277 (SL-12 R/B Aux Motor), TCA = Sunday 20/06 @ 8:11 AM GMT.
. Object 33141 (Cosmos 2421 Debris), TCA = Sunday 20/06 @ 11:05 AM GMT.
. Object 31004 (Fengyun 1c Debris), TCA = Sunday 20/06 @ 12:52 PM GMT.
All conjunctions will be re-evaluated tomorrow morning as soon as perturbations to the ISS's orbit from the Soyuz TMA-19/23S docking activities have been tracked out. If a DAM (Debris Avoidance Maneuver) is necessary for any of these objects, it would be performed using Progress M-05M/37P (docked at DC-1 "Pirs" Nadir) mid-ring thrusters. The effects of such a maneuver on the other conjunctions will be analyzed as necessary, with appropriate action taken.
« Last Edit: 06/20/2010 10:45 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline John44

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« Last Edit: 06/18/2010 07:00 AM by John44 »

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #45 on: 06/18/2010 08:31 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 18/06/2010:

Conjunction Update:
For the remaining three different objects, conjunction data was updated this morning taking into account the small ISS orbit perturbations resulting from last night’s Soyuz TMA-19/23S docking:
. Object 14277 (SL-12 R/B Aux Motor), TCA (Time of Closest Approach) = Sunday 20/06 @ 8:11 AM GMT.
. Object 33141 (Cosmos 2421 Debris), TCA = Sunday 20/06 @ 11:05 AM GMT.
. Object 31004 (Fengyun 1C Debris), TCA = Sunday 20/06 @ 12:52 PM GMT.

If a DAM (Debris Avoidance Maneuver) is required for any of these objects, it would be performed using Progress M-05M/37P (docked at DC-1 "Pirs" Nadir) mid-ring thrusters. The effects of such a maneuver on the other conjunctions are being analyzed as necessary, with appropriate action taken.

Based on the first TCA (Object 14277), three preliminary maneuver options are under evaluation for early morning on Sunday 20/06:
. Option 1: TIG = 5:55 AM GMT.
. Option 2: TIG = 5:36 AM GMT.
. Option 3: TIG = 6:06 AM GMT.

Decision timeline for Object 14277:
. PC (Probability of Collision) becoming valid = Saturday 19/06 @ 2:12 AM GMT.
. Go/No-Go for command sequence development by TsUP-Moscow (cyclogram)
  = Saturday 19/06 @ 8:42 AM GMT.
. DAM = Sunday 20/06 @ 5:55 AM GMT.
. TCA = Sunday 20/06 @ 8:11 AM GMT.

Maneuver data:
. Burn duration = 369 sec.
. Delta-V = 0.5 m/s.
« Last Edit: 06/20/2010 10:44 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline dickgold

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #46 on: 06/19/2010 05:29 PM »
About when will the crew move the crew quarter in kibo to
its place in nobe 2 harmony?

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #47 on: 06/19/2010 08:21 PM »
About when will the crew move the crew quarter in kibo to
its place in nobe 2 harmony?

I don't know the exact date, but it should be sometime during the coming weeks.
« Last Edit: 06/19/2010 08:25 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #48 on: 06/19/2010 08:26 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 19/06/2010:

In COL, FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson worked on the MARES (Muscle Atrophy Resistive Exercise System) Rack, going over the rack to confirm the presence and proper installation of a number of bolts at various places. [After return to Earth of STS-131/19A, a number of loose MARES launch lock bolts were found in the Leonardo MPLM. Tracy’s activity today was to verify all bolts currently installed in the rack, which should also ensure that there are no more loose bolts in the Leonardo MPLM/PMM as it is readied for its next launch.]

CDR Alexander Skvortsov completed the routine task of shooting two photos of the docking cone of the passive docking assembly (ASP-B) of the SM Aft port occupied by the Soyuz TMA-19/23S, a standard practice after Russian dockings. These images are used to refine current understanding of docking conditions. Skvortsov subsequently downlinked the pictures via OCA assets. [The objective is to take photo imagery of the scratch or scuff marks left by the head of the docking probe on the internal surface of the drogue (docking cone/ASP), now rotated out of the passageway. Before shooting the picture, the cosmonaut highlights the scuffmark with a marker and writes the date next to it. As other crewmembers before him, Alex used the Nikon D2X digital still camera to take two pictures with the hatch partially closed.]

Conjunction Update:
Flight controllers are continuing to monitor the three different objects:
. Object 14277 (SL-12 R/B Aux Motor), TCA (Time of Closest Approach) = Sunday 20/06 @ 8:11 AM GMT.
. Object 33141 (Cosmos 2421 Debris), TCA = Sunday 20/06 @ 11:05 AM GMT.
. Object 31004 (Fengyun 1C Debris), TCA = Sunday 20/06 @ 12:52 AM GMT.
As of this morning, the PC (Probability of Collision) for all objects was "Green", i.e., zero or negligible.
« Last Edit: 06/19/2010 08:30 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #49 on: 06/20/2010 10:40 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 20/06/2010:

Conjunction Advisory:
Flight controllers have been notified of a new conjunction (Object 81875, Unknown) with a TCA (Time of Closest Approach) today at 6:38 PM GMT. This late notification conjunction is currently an unofficial “red threshold” violation. A DAM (Debris Avoidance Maneuver) cannot be planned in the time remaining, so the only option, if required, is to put the ISS crew in their respective Soyuz vehicles.

NOTE: At the time of posting, the TCA for this object had already occurred. Thus, the outcome of this conjunction is currently unknown.
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Offline JimO

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #50 on: 06/21/2010 12:41 PM »
We might need to closely monitor Monday's 11 AM EDT ISS update on NASA TV for news of what happened. Nothing was mentioned in the Russian press over the weekend, that I could see.

Offline dsmillman

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #51 on: 06/21/2010 03:04 PM »
We might need to closely monitor Monday's 11 AM EDT ISS update on NASA TV for news of what happened. Nothing was mentioned in the Russian press over the weekend, that I could see.
According to the NASA-TV schedule there is no ISS update today.

Offline JimO

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #52 on: 06/21/2010 03:19 PM »
Yeah, I'm now watching an STS-131 mission overview. Big thrill.

Any speculation on WHY there is no update? Isn't it a pretty standard Monday feature?

Is anybody monitoring current A/G??




Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #53 on: 06/21/2010 07:33 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 21/06/2010:

Conjunction Update:
All conjunctions "turned green and went away" without requiring evasive action. Yesterday's late notification conjunction did not require crew retreat to the Soyuz vehicles.
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Offline psloss

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #54 on: 06/22/2010 01:17 PM »
We might need to closely monitor Monday's 11 AM EDT ISS update on NASA TV for news of what happened. Nothing was mentioned in the Russian press over the weekend, that I could see.
According to the NASA-TV schedule there is no ISS update today.
TV schedule has been updated to say that there will be no update hour this week.

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #55 on: 06/22/2010 06:48 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 22/06/2010:

Today's scheduled installation of the WORF at the science window in the US Lab represented a major outfitting task for Doug Wheelock & Shannon Walker, requiring about a total of 6 hours 5 minutes of man-hours. [For Part 1, both crewmembers were needed for the major WORF rack installation, such as rack rotation down to install seals, removing SAM (Shutter Actuator Mechanism) cover plus Air Knife cotter pins & launch restraint bolts, installing knee brace, etc. Afterwards, Shannon continued alone with Part 2, installing a lower restraint & bumpshield, adjusting SAM & Air Knife, wrapping up with post-maintenance, etc.
Background: WORF, which surrounds the 20-inch Lab science window, serves for attaching sensors (cameras, multispectral scanners, and other instruments). It provides attachment points and power & data transfer capability for instruments to be mounted in the window. Multiple instruments can be mounted at the same time. The rack is designed to allow rapid changes of equipment by the crew. WORF has a bracket for small cameras such as 35mm, 70mm and camcorders. Larger payloads requiring nonstandard attachment or additional instrument isolation must supply their own brackets or platforms which mount to the WORF using available attachment points. WORF also provides protection for the interior of the Lab window and can control stray light exchange between the Lab interior and the external station environment.]
« Last Edit: 06/22/2010 06:48 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #56 on: 06/22/2010 07:30 PM »
Just as a note for all of you who miss Soichi Noguchi's beautiful photos, Doug Wheelock is now sending some real nice "TwitPics" from the ISS via his Twitter account!

http://twitter.com/Astro_Wheels
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #57 on: 06/23/2010 08:37 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 23/06/2010:

FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson had ~30 minutes set aside for US cargo transfers from Soyuz TMA-19/23S, unpacking & stowing items aboard ISS, going by an uplinked Cargo Unpack list. [US equipment items delivered on 23S include a new eBox (electronics box) for the KUBIK-3, a medical accessory kit, prescription eyewear, ear plug sets (Etymotics & Prophonics), EMU gloves, LED headlamp, book clip & crew preference bag.]

FE-6 Shannon Walker wrapped up the Lab science window outfitting with WORF started by Doug Wheelock & herself yesterday, today connecting remaining umbilicals and installing a T61p laptop on the WORF Rack, finishing up with a 5 minute checkup by the ground via S-band.
Afterwards, Tracy reinstalled the CEVIS cycle ergometer exercise machine in the Lab, which had been moved out of the way yesterday for the WORF outfitting.

Wheelock, Walker & Caldwell-Dyson had ~10 minutes set aside to familiarize themselves with procedures associated with CQ (Crew Quarters) QD drag-through operations in the JPM. [With Shannon’s CQ located in JPM but connected to Node 2, there is a jumper "hatch drag-through" requiring a special waiver which now allows for the continued use of the drag-through until the end of the ULF-4 stage (currently Sept. 2010).]

High Beta Angle Power Restrictions:
Due to the current high solar Beta angle regime (ISS is always in sunlight), the SARJ for the portside array wing was feathered this morning for thermal reasons, turning the solar panels away from the sun and thus reducing the output of the photovoltaic cells. The reduced power requires carefully orchestrated power management by the ISS partners within assigned levels of an agreed-upon powerdown plan for onboard systems, which started this morning and runs through 29/06. Special events such as the Soyuz TMA-19/23S thruster test, 23S relocation & Progress M-06M/38P docking may require additional powerdown considerations.

CEO (Crew Earth Observation):
Over the next week or so there will be fewer CEO targets in the target list. This is due to the crew's daylight/awake orbits paralleling the terminator. This phenomenon occurs at least twice a year, sometimes more – during the high-Beta angle period. During this time the sun elevations for nadir targets will be too low to meet requirements for many, but not all, of the targets. The crew sees darkness if they look to the left of the orbit tracks; to the right they see sunlight. This typically lasts for about a week before sun angles improve for CEO nadir targets. For the station, high Beta also means critically increased solar thermal input.

Epsilon Aurigae Eclipse Observation:
ISS is participating in a significant astronomical observation program just getting underway, followed by thousands of amateur & professional astronomers: the Epsilon Aurigae Eclipse. A specific star in the Constellation Auriga (Charioteer) called Epsilon Aurigae undergoes an eclipse (being occulted) every 27.1 years. This has puzzled astronomers for nearly 200 years. The eclipse lasts nearly two years which, with the 27.1 year period, means the eclipsing body must be gigantic. There may be a temporary brightening at mid-eclipse. There have been no satisfactory explanations to date for this. Is it a giant cloud of gas with a doughnut-like hole, permitting the star to brighten during mid-eclipse? The Sun's proximity to Epsilon Aurigae, as seen from the ground, prevents observations by ground-based astronomers during mid-eclipse, but astronauts on the ISS, having a different aspect angle, can observe and note changes in relative brightness, as suggested by the AAVSO (American Association of Variable Star Observers) following a talk by NASA Astronaut John Grunsfeld. The method used by the crew is to compare the brightness of Epsilon Aurigae weekly with three other nearby stars of known & unchanging brightness.
« Last Edit: 06/23/2010 08:39 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline racshot65

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #58 on: 06/24/2010 08:56 AM »
Shannon Walkers description of launching to the ISS -

http://blogs.chron.com/inorbit/2010/06/the_launch_was_amazing.html

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #59 on: 06/24/2010 09:42 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 24/06/2010:

FE-6 Walker's activities today focused mostly on the T2 advanced treadmill machine, first working her way through a procedure to troubleshoot the T2's wireless connectivity issue which has prevented wireless transfer of prescription files from an SSC (Station Support Computer) to the T2 display. [After swapping the WAP (Wireless Access Point) card and Pacebook wireless cards in the T2 display, Shannon manually transferred the T2 prescription files from the SSC. Afterwards, FE-6 was to relabel the T2 MTL (Moderate Temperature Loop) umbilical panel and jumpers, followed by verifying resolution settings on the T2 display necessary for a properly calibrated touchscreen.]

In Node 3 at the Aft 4 location (NOD3A4), Wheels worked on the ARS (Atmosphere Revitalization System) rack to determine why a ground strap could not be installed on the rack and to correct the situation. [After rack rotation away from the shell wall, the hardware was to be repaired or replaced as required. Afterwards, the grounding strap was to be left disconnected pending the planned relocation of the ARS rack to the US Lab.]

Soyuz TMA-19/23S Relocation:
The scheduled 23S relocation on 28/06 from the SM Aft port to the new MRM-1 will require a change in the attitude plan for ISS during the transfer, due to the high-Beta period. Load and LS (Longeron Shadowing) considerations make it necessary to keep ISS in earth-fixed LVLH attitude instead of the usual "space-fixed" Inertial mode. This means, that the station will continue to slowly torque at orbit rate with its "belly" kept downward in "Local Vertical", i.e. toward Earth. This requires a change in Soyuz relocation maneuvering which has been worked by MCC-Houston with TsUP-Moscow. The LVLH solution is fully supported by engineering analyses and is acceptable to all. Soyuz CDR Yurchikhin has been trained in both Inertial and LVLH attitudes, and the Relocation OBT (Onboard Training) drill scheduled tomorrow will accommodate this change. The Go/No-Go review will be held afterwards.
« Last Edit: 06/24/2010 09:42 PM by Space Pete »
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