Author Topic: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010) - Includes ETCS Updates  (Read 181647 times)

Offline rdale

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6:55am EDT start per NASA.gov/station with NTV coverage at 6:00

Online dsmillman

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Online robertross

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Looks like we're up to date with the info we have, so publishing:

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2010/08/two-evas-etcs-coolant-pump-module-changeout/

Great article Chris.

A big thanks to all who pitched in with coverage on this serious issue, especially rdale.
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline Antares

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Echoing, really nice job on the transcriptions, fellas.  Very useful.
If I like something on NSF, it's probably because I know it to be accurate.  Every once in a while, it's just something I agree with.  Facts generally receive the former.

Offline jcm

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I'm trying to get the pump module ORUs straight, do we have serial numbers on them?

I have seen two naming schemes, the ELC-2 PM called both PM-3 and PM S/N 07

ORU               Location        Launch   S/N
PM (failed)       S1                STS-112  Unknown
PM (working)    P1                STS-113  Unknown
PM-1               AL/ESP-2      STS-121  Unknown
PM-2               S3/ESP-3      STS-127  Unknown
PM-3               S3/ELC-2      STS-129  S/N 07
PM-4               P3/ELC-1      STS-129  S/N 05

Corrections and amplifications solicited.
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Online Chris Bergin

Looks like we're up to date with the info we have, so publishing:

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2010/08/two-evas-etcs-coolant-pump-module-changeout/

Great article Chris.

A big thanks to all who pitched in with coverage on this serious issue, especially rdale.


Thanks :) Was just coming back on to note the EVAs slipped 24 hours each, but notice Bill Harwood's already published that. Updated the article.

Offline rdale

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Casually checked to see if the delay news got up before they went to sleep and that did not happen. Interestingly they did wake up someone on the Russian side for a minute to tell him (translator was horrible) something about finding the schematic and now you're an expert in this.

Offline marshallsplace

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Will there be capability to return the faulty pump module, using one of the remaining shuttle flights, for evaluation?

Offline arkaska

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Will there be capability to return the faulty pump module, using one of the remaining shuttle flights, for evaluation?

If you had read trough the thread you would have seen that this is already answered. There won't be any room on 133 or 134 but maybe on 135 if that gets approved.

Offline jacqmans

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MEDIA ADVISORY: M10-107

NASA MOVES SPACE STATION REPAIR SPACEWALK TO FRIDAY, SETS BRIEFINGS

HOUSTON -- The first of two spacewalks by NASA astronauts to replace a
failed ammonia pump on the International Space Station has been
delayed by 24 hours to Friday, Aug. 6. A second spacewalk is planned
for Monday, Aug. 9, to complete the repairs.

Flight controllers and station managers made the decision Monday night
after reviewing proposed timelines, final procedures for the repair
work, and the results from a spacewalk dress rehearsal conducted in
the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory near NASA's Johnson Space Center in
Houston.

Expedition 24 Flight Engineers Doug Wheelock and Tracy Caldwell Dyson
are scheduled to perform the spacewalks. The two NASA astronauts will
replace an ammonia coolant pump that failed July 31.

NASA Television coverage of both spacewalks will begin at 5 a.m. CDT.
Wheelock and Caldwell Dyson are expected to begin the spacewalks from
the Quest airlock at 5:55 a.m. Friday's spacewalk will be the fourth
for Wheelock and Caldwell Dyson's first.

Approximately two hours after the conclusion of each spacewalk, NASA
TV will broadcast a briefing from Johnson. The briefing participants
will be Mike Suffredini, International Space Station program manager;
Courtenay McMillan, Expedition 24 spacewalk flight director; and
David Beaver, Expedition 24 spacewalk officer.

Reporters may ask questions from participating NASA locations, and
should contact their preferred NASA center to confirm participation.
Johnson will operate a telephone bridge for reporters with valid
media credentials issued by a NASA center. Journalists planning to
use the service must contact the Johnson newsroom at 281-483-5111 no
later than 15 minutes prior to the start of a briefing. Phone bridge
capacity is limited and will be available on a first-come,
first-serve basis.

Engineers and flight controllers continue to review data on the
failure, which resulted in the loss of one of two cooling loops
aboard the station. This caused a significant power down and required
adjustments to provide the maximum redundancy possible for station
systems. The systems are stable, and the six crew members aboard are
not in any danger.

Wheelock and Caldwell Dyson originally were scheduled to perform a
spacewalk to outfit the Russian Zarya module for future robotics work
and prepare the station for the installation of a new U.S. permanent
multipurpose module. However, because of the importance of restoring
redundancy to the station's cooling and power systems, the two new
spacewalks will be dedicated to the pump module replacement.

Offline JimO

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ISS On-Orbit Status 08/03/10 -- All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below. [snip]

   In preparation for the two emergency EVAs on 8/6 & 8/9 to replace the failed ETCS (External Thermal Control System) Loop-A NH3 (ammonia) pump module, Caldwell-Dyson, Wheelock & Walker jointly conducted a 1-hr review of NH3 decontamination procedures uplinked overnight. [NH3, a toxic substance, in vapor form will not stick to the EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) spacesuits; solid contamination will likely bounce off, but may be caught in fabric folds; liquid contamination freezes on the EMUs. Mechanical removal (i.e., brushing off) is useless for ammonia. Instead, sublimation through conductive heat transfer is the most effective way to eliminate NH3 contamination. A heated tool pressed against a contaminated EMU surface area, then removed, will allow NH3 to sublimate. After removal of all visible ammonia, the EMU must be “baked out” for the equivalent of 30 minutes in the C/L (Crewlock). Sometime after the bakeout, the crewmember must ingress the A/L (Airlock) again for about 2h20m to allow for testing and an additional A/L depress/repress cycle, if the contamination test in the C/L indicates more bakeout is needed.]
   Afterwards, Tracy & Wheels prepared the A/L for the spacewalks and also worked on the EVA tools, reconfiguring/restowing the equipment originally intended for EVA-15 and unstowing tools needed for the PM R&Rs.

Offline Space Pete

Going through my files last night, I managed to find some good images of the PM on ESP-2.
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Online Chris Bergin

Just to keep the public thread updated, one of the latest memos we have in L2 is talking about a potential third EVA to R&R a RPCM due to concern that this may also be damaged from what was seen from today’s test.


Offline mtakala24

Would the RPCM task take a full spacewalk duration? Could they possible do the RPCM and most of the other previously scheduled stage EVA tasks sometime next week as well?

Online Chris Bergin

Sounds like the Big 14 list is on the way :)

And thanks to James Oberg....

What’s the list of “Big 14” International Space Station EVA Tasks?
   (Excerpt from Increment Definition and Requirements Document)
   ISS critical maintenance tasks as follows.  This list is not in order of priority.  The criteria for tasks being added to this list are that the failure of the function provided by the ORU causes a situation placing the ISS in a configuration that is zero tolerant, or effectively zero fault tolerant, to survival.
1.   Maintain ISS Primary Electrical Power System (EPS) Survivability
a.   External (EXT) Multiplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM) Remove and Replace (R&R)
b.   Battery Charge/Discharge Unit (BCDU) Backout
c.   Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) R&R
d.   Sequential Shunt Unit (SSU) R&R
e.   Direct Current Switching Unit (DCSU) R&R
f.   R&R of DC to DC Converter Units (DDCUs) 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A, 3B, 4A, 4B, S01A, S02B
g.   Solar Array Wing (SAW) Manual Positioning
h.   Pump Flow Control Subassembly (PFCS) R&R
i.   Photovoltaic Controller Unit (PVCU) MDM R&R
j.   R&R of External Remote Power Control Modules (RPCMs) S01A_C, S02B_C, S01A_A, S11A_D, S02B_A, and P12B_D
2.   Maintain ISS Thermal Control System (TCS) Survivability
a.   Interface Heat Exchanger (IFHX) R&R
b.   External Thermal Control System (ETCS) Pump Module (PM) R&R
c.   Flex Hose Rotary Coupler (FHRC) R&R
d.   Ammonia (NH3) Leak Isolation and Recovery
The DDCUs listed provide power to the ORUs on this list.  The RPCMs listed provide power to the EXT MDMs and ETCS PMs). The loss of these Secondary Power System (SPS) ORUs would be equivalent to the loss of function of the downstream ORUs themselves.  Thus these SPS ORUs are critical to ISS survivability.  All other ORUs on this list either receive power from ORUs already on this list (e.g. PVCU MDM receives power from DCSU) or does not require power (e.g. FHRC or NH3 Leak Isolation and Recovery).
For additional information on these systems, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/167129main_Systems.pdf

What is the cost of each PM ORU?

TBD

What are the actual dimensions of PM ORU?

Each pump module weighs 780 pounds and is 5 ½ feet long (69 inches) by 4 feet wide (50 inches), and is 3 feet tall (36 inches).

Number of electrical connections required for R&R?

The spacewalkers will need to disconnect and reconnect five electrical connectors, four fluid quick-disconnect devices, one fixed grapple bar and four bolts.

Describe functions of two jumpers crew put in place?

Contingency jumper from S3 to P3 for additional electrical loads.
American to Russian Converter Unit 53 – 54 power jumper to give some redundancy for powering Russian Segment.

What were the PM failure’s impacts on station research?

MELFI 1 had to be shut down because we lost Low Temp Loop capability in the JEM.  The crew transferred all samples to MELFI 2 in US Destiny Lab. No science lost.
Express Rack 4 in Japanese Experiment Module “Kibo”  was turned off because JAXA lost smoke detection capability for JEM Express Racks.  No science loss here as the rack was only on to power a SAMS sensor at the time.
JAXA SEDA-AP and SMILES external payloads had to powered down to standby mode and are currently not collecting science data.
Many planned payload operations (MDCA/Flex experiment maintenance [CIR Rack], SPHERES, VO2Max) were cancelled this week to make room for EVA preparation tasks. Crew time off between and following EVAs will result in additional postponements.
In general, many racks and experiments can’t be activated because either crew time or other resources are not available.

When did this PM spare fly to ISS?

The spare pump module that will be used to replace the failed unit was delivered to the station on the STS-121/Utilization Logistics Flight-1 mission in July 2006.

Online robertross

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Oh excellent!  Thanks muchly!
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline rdale

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Great work Jim! To "prequel" the Big 14, here are the requirements from the IDRD (now that I know where to look!):

MCC-H AND MCC-M SHALL BUILD TASK SPECIFIC PROCEDURES, CONTINGENCY TIMELINES, AND CONDUCT TRAINING TO A HIGH LEVEL SUFFICIENT TO MEET THE FOLLOWING OBJECTIVES:

• Identify task specific technical and safety issues.
• Identify on-board equipment required to perform the task.
• Determine the scope of effort required to prepare for the specific configurations,
locations, and environmental conditions for the EVA.
• Provide the crew with the proper skill set required to perform the tasks given the on-board proficiency training assets available.

The readiness of these tasks will be based upon the generic development of the task procedures and timelines to a level that can be validated against a set of criteria defined in SSP 50261-01, paragraph 3.9.1, “Process for EVA Readiness”. For contingency tasks not listed below, the ISS Program has determined that until the contingency is invoked, resources will not be applied to develop products or plans and the feasibility to perform those tasks on this flight/increment will be undetermined.

[I'm trying to find that SSP document just to add a little more background.]
« Last Edit: 08/04/2010 02:07 AM by rdale »

Offline psloss

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Sounds like the Big 14 list is on the way :)

And thanks to James Oberg....
Ditto -- thanks, Jim.

Offline rdale

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The weekly crew conference and EVA task conferences just took place with the ISS crew (but they were private.) Our next potential for hearing more words on the loop comes with the evening Daily Planning Conference at 230pm EDT (1830Z).

Offline psloss

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Today's ISS update hour is on NASA TV; PAO Kyle Herring noting that today's NBL run is being done by astronauts Robert Satcher and Rick Sturckow.

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