Author Topic: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010) - Includes ETCS Updates  (Read 181999 times)

Offline erioladastra

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #240 on: 08/02/2010 02:21 AM »
Has a pump module been replaced before?  Does anyone know if there is a published EVA checklist for replacement of the the pump module?

This will be the first time.  But we have trained and planned for it for years.

Offline erioladastra

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #241 on: 08/02/2010 02:23 AM »
One of two ammonia-fed cooling loops on the International Space Station shut down at 8 p.m. EST Saturday night

Thanks for the update, but I'm pretty sure you are off by an hour (we use Daylight Saving Time in the US.) It was around 8pm EDT / 00 UTC.

Sounds like the retest of the pump is what woke up the crew early, as it triggered some alarms that the ground did not expect. Fairly quiet otherwise, private family conference going on as scheduled this morning.

I'm not sure what the issue with the audio archive server would be (I just provided the files.) I am saving them locally and will upload elsewhere later today.

No it was still part of the massive reconfiguration.  Retesting the pump produced no alarms.

Offline Chris Bergin

Updated the thread title, as some people don't seem to realize the issue would be in this thread....linking the opening post to Rob's first note on the issue.

We'll have standalone live coverage threads for the EVAs.

Offline rdale

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Good news for tonight is that their sleep period hasn't been interrupted ;) I did hear comm checks which sounded like MCC Houston <> Moscow briefly this evening around the time they were expecting to get the comm reconfig completed, so that must have gone well.

Offline Antares

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #244 on: 08/02/2010 04:27 AM »
What I meant was, is there a long-term solution to this in the plans of any of the current or future (ATV/HTV/OSC/SpaceX, not including any future NASA HLV) providers of services to the ISS?

No.  It would be interesting to see an RFI for a barebones external ORU return vehicle.
If I like something on NSF, it's probably because I know it to be accurate.  Every once in a while, it's just something I agree with.  Facts generally receive the former.

Offline rdale

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Morning DPC: EVA QD review and preliminary NBL procedure are onboard. Still working on big briefing package but will have that by afternoon.

Offline JosephB

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #246 on: 08/02/2010 12:15 PM »

It would be interesting to see an RFI for a barebones external ORU return vehicle.
[/quote]

HL-42 of course.
(wishful thinking on my part)

Offline anik

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #247 on: 08/02/2010 01:25 PM »
NASA announced that both spacewalkers had blue stripes. But according to these pictures from Roskosmos, this is not true. Yurtchikhin's Orlan-MK n°4 had blue stripes, Kornienko's Orlan-MK n°6 had red stripes

Is it your joke? Where are red stripes on Kornienko's spacesuit? I see only blue stripes on suit's arms and trouser legs. If Russian EVA spacesuit have the last even digit in serial number then suit has blue stripes, if odd digit - then red stripes. It is tradition, so #4 and #6 have blue stripes, #5 - red stripes.

Offline MikeMi.

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #248 on: 08/02/2010 01:30 PM »
Payload Milestone:
An important milestone was completed today when 12 utilization racks were active at one time. Over the course of the day a combination of 12 of the following 13 payload racks were active and conducting or preparing to conduct weekly science operations: ER-1 (ExPrESS Rack-1), ER-2, ER-3, ER-4, ER-6, CIR (Combustion Integration Rack), FIR (Fluids Integrated Rack), MSG (Microgravity Science Glovebox), MELFI-1, MELFI-2, MELFI-3, SAIBO and RYUTAI.

Wondering if it is connected with that circuit short during saturday evening...

Offline rdale

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #249 on: 08/02/2010 01:31 PM »
Wondering if it is connected with that circuit short during saturday evening...

I'm not sure I know how that would be connected? The pump module is on the exterior of the space station and part of the cooling system.

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #250 on: 08/02/2010 01:50 PM »
Payload Milestone:
An important milestone was completed today when 12 utilization racks were active at one time. Over the course of the day a combination of 12 of the following 13 payload racks were active and conducting or preparing to conduct weekly science operations: ER-1 (ExPrESS Rack-1), ER-2, ER-3, ER-4, ER-6, CIR (Combustion Integration Rack), FIR (Fluids Integrated Rack), MSG (Microgravity Science Glovebox), MELFI-1, MELFI-2, MELFI-3, SAIBO and RYUTAI.

Wondering if it is connected with that circuit short during saturday evening...

No, I doubt it.

According to NASA, possible causes of the trip are:
• An electrical fault in the cabling between the RPCM and ammonia pump.
• An electrical fault in the EMI (Electro Magnetic Interference) filter.
• An electrical fault in the pump control board.
• An electrical fault in the pump itself.

However, The RPC tripped due to an overcurrent. This means that the fault probably occurred in a device that does not have internal current limiting, such as:
• The EMI filter.
• The pump control board.
• The pump itself (however, a mechanical failure of the pump itself is
  considered unlikly).
[All of the above get their current limiting function from the RPCM.]

Therefore, the two most likely causes of the trip are:
• The EMI filter.
• The pump control board.

My own thoughts:
• Could the RPCM have failed, taking with it the current limiting
  function? If this was the case, the PM might actually be in 100%
  working order, and the RPCM needs to be replaced?
• What about an MMOD strike of the PM?
« Last Edit: 08/02/2010 01:52 PM by Space Pete »
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Offline Antares

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #251 on: 08/02/2010 01:52 PM »
HL-42 of course.

That's far from a barebones external ORU return vehicle.  Aeroshell/TPS, mounting structure, guidance, bags/chutes, control with prop or aero.  Only sized for 1 ORU, more if it can be done cheap.
If I like something on NSF, it's probably because I know it to be accurate.  Every once in a while, it's just something I agree with.  Facts generally receive the former.

Offline JosephB

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Very true. Very expensive. I meant it more tongue in cheek.
If Shuttle has to go it would be a cool replacement (imho).
I think there were ideas to make a couple versions, one with payload bay doors?
I'll have to check out the NTRS pdf on it again.

Offline rdale

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #253 on: 08/02/2010 02:36 PM »
• Could the RPCM have failed, taking with it the current limiting
  function? If this was the case, the PM might actually be in 100%
  working order, and the RPCM needs to be replaced?

From what I understand they are still able to control it and that's what they received the data dump from... I imagine somewhere in that data would be a sign that the RPC is alive and well?

Offline Space Pete

Cady Coleman is going to be rehearsing PM R&R procedures in the NBL today.

Quote from: Cady Coleman via Twitter
Some days training seems more real than others on E26. Today in the pool I'll practice the spacewalk for the pump module changeout for E24.
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Offline psloss

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Another status update on NASA.gov's main station page:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/

Quote
Analysis, Spacewalk Preparations Continue After Loss of Cooling Loop

Teams of flight controllers are continuing engineering analysis and refining spacewalk procedures to replace a failed International Space Station ammonia pump module later this week. Expedition 24 astronauts Doug Wheelock and Tracy Caldwell Dyson currently are scheduled to start the repairs on the station’s starboard truss Thursday.

A briefing to discuss the current station status and to preview the upcoming spacewalks will be broadcast on NASA Television at 4 p.m. EDT today. Briefers will include Michael Suffredini, the International Space Station Program Manager, and Flight Director Courtenay McMillan, who will lead the team supporting the spacewalks.

The pump failed Saturday night after a spike in electrical current tripped a circuit breaker. When the 780-pound pump failed, it shut down half of the station’s cooling system. Efforts to restart the pump, which feeds ammonia coolant into the cooling loops to maintain the proper temperature for the station’s electrical systems and avionics, were not successful. The station’s crew worked with Mission Control to put the station in a stable configuration. The crew, which is in no danger, has resumed normal work activities. A tag-up to review procedures with spacewalk specialists is planned later today.

Mission Control also is preparing procedures for venting excess ammonia from the failed pump Tuesday in preparation for its removal. On Wednesday, flight controllers plan to move the Mobile Transporter, which will be used to support robotics operations for the spacewalks, into position at the replacement worksite.

Current planning continues to support an initial spacewalk on Thursday beginning just before 7 a.m. by Wheelock and Caldwell Dyson to unbolt and remove the failed pump module, and to install the spare. NASA TV coverage will begin at 6 a.m. A second spacewalk to hook up a variety of electrical and fluid connections for the new pump module could occur two or three days after the first spacewalk.

Wheelock, who will be designated as EV1, or extravehicular crew member 1, wearing the spacesuit bearing the red stripes, will be making the fourth spacewalk of his career, while Caldwell Dyson, designated as EV2, wearing the unmarked spacesuit, will be making her first spacewalk.

Offline rdale

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Cady Coleman is going to be rehearsing PM R&R procedures in the NBL today.

I'd lay good odds we'll have some nice video in today's ISS hour?

Offline Space Pete

Cady Coleman is going to be rehearsing PM R&R procedures in the NBL today.

I'd lay good odds we'll have some nice video in today's ISS hour?

I hope so!

I was thinking that maybe rehearsing "critical" EVAs (like PM, ATA & NTA R&Rs) should be a requirement for all future ISS crews in future? Maybe every ISS crew should have designated "Contingency EV Crewmembers"?
« Last Edit: 08/02/2010 02:50 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline MikeMi.

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Thanks Pete for explanation. Just took to consideration other factors, but seems that your types are truly most connected with problem.

Offline psloss

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I was thinking that maybe rehearsing "critical" EVAs (like PM, ATA & NTA R&Rs) should be a requirement for all future ISS crews in future? Maybe every ISS crew should have designated "Contingency EV Crewmembers"?
I believe it already is a part of their training, since this is one of "Big Fourteen" as Jim Oberg pointed out yesterday:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=16584.msg624090#msg624090

ISS Update hour starting; Kyle Herring is providing commentary this morning.
« Last Edit: 08/02/2010 03:03 PM by psloss »

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