Author Topic: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010) - Includes ETCS Updates  (Read 187515 times)

Offline John44

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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #121 on: 07/21/2010 06:52 PM »
Here's a photo of the CDRA maintenance in Node 3 from Doug Wheelock via Twitter.

The caption reads:
Quote
Just finishing up the final 'balancing' of the CDRA before installation. Newtonian physics still at work here in space and F=ma still…so glad that 'a' is zero here…don't try this at home!
« Last Edit: 07/21/2010 06:53 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline John44

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« Last Edit: 07/21/2010 07:57 PM by John44 »

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #123 on: 07/21/2010 09:53 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 21/07/2010:

FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson had several hours to perform Day 2 activities of repairing the USOS OGS (Oxygen Generation System) which performed an unexpected "Fast Shutdown" on 05/07, probably due to blockage in several cells within the H2 Dome ORU. [Yesterday's Day 1 activities were delayed by an RPCM trip. Today, Tracy started off with a set-up activity to prepare for the OGS forward flush. After the ground completed this flush, Tracy configured for the reverse flush which was increased in duration due to the lower than expected flow rate. After the reverse flush was complete, Tracy was to put everything in a good overnight configuration. The H2 Dome R&R activities planned for today were moved to FE-6 Shannon Walker's timeline tomorrow (22/07). This should get OGS ready for activation, which will be attempted with the spare Pump ORU installed, but a second Pump ORU R&R was to be conducted if the reverse flush has not recovered the spare Pump.]

FE-3 Mikhail Kornienko & FE-5 Fyodor Yurchikhin continued their preparations for Russian EVA-25 in the Orlan spacesuits on 26/07 and the suited training exercise on 23/07, performing further Orlan spacesuit activities in DC-1 "Pirs".
After configuring the DC-1 STTS communications link to support their presence, Mikhail & Fyodor:
• Readied Orlan spacesuit replaceable elements & equipment (SMEG).
• Installed the BNP portable repress O2 tank in the SM RO
  (Working Compartment).
• Completed individual fit sizing (central strap, lateral strap, hip strap,
  calf strap, arm cable and shoulder size, front & rear) on their Orlan-MK
  spacesuits.
• Ran leak checks & valve functionality tests on the Orlans and thei
  BSS interface units in the DC-1 & SM PkhO (Transfer Compartment)
  from the EVA support panels (POV).
• Conducted pressure checks on the SM BK-3 O2 tanks and the BNP
  portable repress O2 tank in DC-1.
• Restored DC-1 STTS communications to nominal settings.

Yurchikhin installed the second set of 825M3 Orlan batteries in the battery chargers and initiated the charging.

CDR Alexander Skvortsov readied Progress M-05M/37P, docked at DC-1 Nadir, for undocking if required in a Russian EVA-25 contingency. Steps included:
• Installing the docking probe (StM, Stykovochnovo mekhanizma) on
  Progress' hatch.
• Activating Progress' electronics and taking out the ventilation/heating
  air duct.
• Closing the hatches.
• Removing the QDscrew clamps (BZV) of the docking & internal transfer
  mechanism (SSVP) which rigidized the joint.
• Starting the standard one-hour leak checking of the SU docking
  vestibule and fuel/oxidizer transfer line interface between Progress
  and DC-1.
• Downlinking Sasha's formal report on loading completion and the video
  depicting the close-out activities, for review by ground specialists.
  [During hatch closure, leak checking and initial clamp installation,
  Russian thrusters were inhibited due to load constraints from
  ~10:20 AM to 12:00 PM GMT.]

After deconfiguring the CEVIS (Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation System) in the Lab to make room, Shannon performed Part 4 of WORF outfitting. CEVIS was later re-installed. [This was the final outfitting activity for WORF until it is handed over to the Payloads community for use. During today's task Shannon configured/adjusted the Bumpshield, Shutter Actuator Mechanism (SAM) and Air Knife for nominal operations, performed photo documentation, installed the WORF hatch and completed final closeouts. Background: WORF, which surrounds the 20 inch Lab science window, serves for attaching sensors (cameras, multispectral scanners, and other instruments). It provides attachment points and power & data transfer capability for instruments to be mounted in the window. Multiple instruments can be mounted at the same time. The rack is designed to allow rapid changes of equipment by the crew. WORF has a bracket for small cameras such as 35mm, 70mm and camcorders. Larger payloads requiring nonstandard attachment or additional instrument isolation must supply their own brackets or platforms which mount to the WORF using available attachment points. WORF also provides protection for the interior of the Lab window and can control stray light exchange between the Lab interior and the external station environment.]

In the US A/L, FE-4 Doug Wheelock terminated the recharge of the first batch of EVA batteries in the BSA (Battery Stowage Assembly) and initiated the second round.

Also in the A/L, Doug conducted the standard one-hour scrub of EMUs (Extravehicular Mobility Units) #3005 & #3009 cooling loops with their SCUs (Service & Cooling Umbilicals), filtering ionic & particulate matter (via a 3-micron filter), then reconfigured the cooling loops and started the ~2 hour biocide filtering. The activity included leak checking on the loops, with remedial actions to be taken if required. [Loop scrubbing, incl. iodination of the LCVGs (Liquid Cooling & Ventilation Garments) for biocidal maintenance is done to eliminate any biomass and particulate matter that may have accumulated in the loops.]

Additionally, Doug performed an inspection of the EVA BRTs (Body Restraint Tethers) to be used in US EVA-15.

SLAMMD Postponement:
Today's body mass measurement activities of Tracy Caldwell-Dyson, Doug Wheelock & Shannon Walker with the SLAMMD (Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device) BMM (Bode Mass Measurement) equipment were postponed due to a missing deceleration pad (of two required). [Background: SLAMMD, performed first on Expedition 12 in December 2005, provides an accurate means of determining the on-orbit mass of humans spanning the range from the 5th percentile Japanese female to the 95th percentile American male. The procedure, in accordance with Newton's 2nd Law of Motion, finds the mass by dividing force, generated by two springs inside the SLAMMD drawer, by acceleration measured with a precise optical instrument that detects the position versus time trajectory of the SLAMMD guide arm and a micro controller which collects the raw data and provides the precise timing. The final computation is done via portable laptop computer with SLAMMD unique software. To calculate their mass, crewmembers wrap their legs around a leg support assembly, align the stomach against a belly pad and either rest the head or chin on a head rest. For calibration, an 18 lbs mass is used at different lengths from the pivot point, to simulate different mass values. Crew mass range is from 90 to 240 lbs.]

SPDM Checkout Activities:
Today's operations have stopped. Robotics ground controllers have been operating the SPDM "Dextre" through a functionality & robotic maintenance demonstration program of grasping, unbolting, extracting, reseating & installing an RPCM (P11A). Yesterday's (Day 2) extraction step jammed the RPCM in its soft dock position due to an underestimated pulling force applied by metal spring finger gaskets used for EMI (Electromagnetic Interference) shielding (34 lbf instead of expected 20 lbf). A plan has been proposed to reattempt the operations later with and without FMA (Force/Moment Accommodation) or line tracking enabled. [Russian thrusters are disabled during SPDM operations.] The test extraction may be reattempted tomorrow (22/07), but a new date for the RPCM replacement has not been set.
« Last Edit: 07/21/2010 11:01 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline psloss

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #124 on: 07/21/2010 09:57 PM »
Expedition 24 - EVA Preview Briefing - July 21
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6091
Some ISS program level items were covered during today's preview briefing by Kirk Shireman.

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #125 on: 07/21/2010 11:13 PM »
Shannon Walker's 3rd Blog Post: "After two alarms, finally, I take a flight around the space station".
http://blogs.chron.com/inorbit/2010/07/post.html
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #126 on: 07/22/2010 02:24 PM »
CSA: "Dextre's final exam postponed".
Quote
On July 20, 2010, Dextre was powered up and began conducting a "dress rehearsal" of its first official task on board the ISS. While working at the end of the SSRMS, Dextre's objective was to partially remove a failed circuit-breaker box (RPCM) by extracting it 15 cm, then putting it back into place. Dextre operated flawlessly during the test, but the RPCM was just not ready to make its debut. After several attempts to remove it, the RPCM could not be extracted by more than 5 cm. Flight controllers on the ground then instructed Dextre to put the RPCM back into place and reconnect it.

"We must remind ourselves that this was a rehearsal for a reason," says Pierre Jean, head of the ISS program at the Canadian Space Agency. "There could be many reasons why we saw yesterday's results but the good news is that we know from our data that Dextre executed his task perfectly."

Engineering teams will spend the next few days reviewing the data from the test to better understand why the RPCM could not be fully extracted and what changes may be required for future operations.
www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/iss/dextre/news_2010-07-21.asp
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Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #127 on: 07/22/2010 02:31 PM »
Here's the overview of Russian EVA-25 on YouTube.
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Offline stockman

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #128 on: 07/22/2010 03:21 PM »
Must be raining on ISS today... Got the Rubber boots and the winter coat on.. :)
« Last Edit: 07/22/2010 03:22 PM by stockman »
One Percent for Space!!!

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #129 on: 07/23/2010 02:40 AM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 22/07/2010:

FE-6 Shannon Walker worked on the USOS OGS (Oxygen Generation System) to replace the failed H2 Dome ORU, followed by removing equipment which provided thermal compliance to allow closing the rack rear. After installing an older, sized pump, it did not start up, and the crew replaced it with the previously-installed pump. At the completion of the R&Rs, ground controllers vented the H2 dome and began the vent line leak check and standby warm-up. Specialists expect the system to begin O2 production later tonight. [The OGS suffered an unexpected "Fast Shutdown" on 05/07, probably due to blockage in several cells within the H2 ORU. Yesterday's Day 2 activities, by FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson, dealt with the forward and reverse flush delayed on Day 1 by an RPCM trip. The Dome repair should get OGS ready for activation.]

FE-3 Mikhail Kornienko & FE-5 Fyodor Yurchikhin continued their preparations for Russian EVA-25 in the Orlan spacesuits on 26/07 and the suited training exercise on 23/07. Specifically, Mikhail & Fyodor:
• Performed pressure checks on the portable O2 tanks (BK-3) and
  portable air repress bottles (BNP), including the additional BNP in DC-1
  (Docking Compartment-1).
• Conducted BRTA (radio telemetry unit) checkouts for the Orlans & BSS
  interface units.
• Set up Orlan BRTK "Korona" comm. configuration, ran voice checks and
  tested medical parameter acquisition of the BETA-08
  ECG (Electrocardiograph) harnesses with the "Gamma-1M" med
  complex from the PKO med. exam panel for vital signs & equipment
  monitoring.
• Installed US EMU equipment (lights, wireless video camera) on the
  Orlan-M suits.
• Installed Orlan attached hardware (OTA) plus taking photos of the
  outfitted Orlans for downlink (OTA equipment includes: right-hand
  swing arm with tool caddy, small trash bag, wire ties, tethers, camera,
  wrench and cutters).
• Prepared auxiliary NASA equipment to be used in Orlan plus taking
  photos of the outfitted Orlans for downlink.
• Filled the DIDBs (Disposable In-suit Drink Bags) and installed them in
  the suits.
• Unstowed EVA emergency first-aid medical packs and stowed them in
  DC-1.
• Tested the proper function of the hatch Pressure Equalization Valve
  (PEV, Russian: KVD) from the POV panels in the SM PkhO (Transfer
  Compartment) and DC-1.

On Monday, a data dump was performed to test capability to send Russian data through the US-23 unit via US assets to TsUP-Moscow. The test was successful, but the Orlan wasn't activated at the time, so no Orlan data were included in the data stream. Today they repeated the data dump while the Orlan suits were activated allowing TsUP specialists to see real-time Orlan data on their displays for the first time through US assets. Preliminary results for this test were also nominal.

Joined by FE-4 Doug Wheelock, the designated IVA (Intravehicular Activity) crewmember, Mikhail & Fyodor spent about an hour reviewing the uplinked EVA (VKD) flight procedures material. Earlier, Mikhail & Fyodor reviewed special spacewalk procedures and discussed them with a VKD expert on the ground.

Continuing his preparations for US EVA-15 on 05/06, Doug:
• "Degassed" EMU PWR (Payload Water Reservoir) #1023.
• Topped off the water supply in EMUs #3005 (EV-1) & #3009 (EV-2) as
  well as in PWR #1023 and CWC #1059.
• Terminated recharge of the second round of EVA batteries in the
  BSA (Battery Stowage Assembly).
• Readied & checked out three PGTs, including installing battery #1004 in PGT #04,
  battery #1006 in PGT #06, and battery #1008 in PGT #01.

Conjunction Alert:
Flight controllers are tracking a conjunction with a piece of a Chinese satellite. The TCA (Time of Closest Approach) is tomorrow (23/07) at 10:09 PM GMT. A valid PC (Probability of Collision) number was expected at ~4:00 PM GMT today. This debris is being tracked as a medium concern.
« Last Edit: 07/23/2010 02:42 AM by Space Pete »
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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #130 on: 07/23/2010 07:39 PM »
RELEASE: 10-178

NASA ASTRONAUT SENDS FIRST SIGNED MESSAGE FROM ORBIT

WASHINGTON -- The number of languages used on the International Space
Station has recently increased. In addition to those spoken in the 15
countries that have had representatives aboard the space station,
American Sign Language, or ASL, is now included. NASA astronaut Tracy
Caldwell Dyson has sent a message in ASL from the station to the deaf
community.

In the video, Caldwell Dyson answered several questions about living
and working aboard the station and how she became interested in sign
language.

"I am truly grateful for this opportunity on behalf of the deaf
community and the multitudes of students who will benefit from seeing
their language spoken in space," Caldwell Dyson said. "It is my hope
that this video will help inspire our next generation of scientists
and explorers."

As NASA's missions advance beyond Earth's orbit, the agency will
continue its efforts to highlight its diverse workforce. NASA strives
to assist the next generation of researchers to gain access to
science-related fields.

Caldwell Dyson will work on several other videos targeted to users of
ASL. When the videos are completed, they will be posted on the
agency's website at:

http://www.nasa.gov


To view Caldwell Dyson's message and learn more about the space
station, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #131 on: 07/23/2010 10:18 PM »
From ISS On-Orbit Status Report for 23/07/2010:

After yesterday's completion of all Orlan-MK suit preparations, Russian EVA-25 dry-run activities began today with FE-3 Mikhail Kornienko tearing down and removing the air ducts between the SM PkhO (Transfer Compartment) and DC-1 (Docking Compartment-1), including their V3 ventilation fan, to make room for the subsequent suited exercise.

At the same time, FE-4 Fyodor Yurchikhin worked on configuring the STTS communications systems in DC-1 for the exercise. [The suited run requires wireless Tranzit-B suit radio telemetry on both semi-sets and temporary deactivation of the Russian VHF (Very High Frequency, Russian: UKV1, for ultra-shortwave) channel 1  to avoid interference from extraneous radio stations to the Orlans while over Russian Ground Stations (RGS, DO 3). All EVA preps were monitored by the ground via audio. Tranzit-B TM was turned off after the checkout.]

After another functionality & leak check of the Orlan-MK suits, their equipment and their BSS interface units in DC-1 & SM PkhO, the crewmembers began donning EVA gear, i.e., putting on personal gear bags, biomed harness, thermal underwear, LCG (Liquid Cooling Garment), low-noise headset, gloves, etc.

After more checkouts of comm. hookups & biomedical parameter telemetry via the BSS Orlan interface system for vital signs & equipment monitoring, suiting up then culminated in ingress in the Orlans through their "backdoors" and sealing off of the backpacks.

Next in line were:
• More functionality checkouts of the suits and their BSS controls
  (e.g., temperature control handling, water cooling system ops,
  preliminary Orlan & BSS leak checks).
• Preliminary dimensional suit fit checks at reduced suit pressure
  of 0.4 atm (5.9 psi).
• About an hour of testing/training of suited mobility & translation
  inside DC-1.
[These "intramural" exercises included translation to all DC-1 work stations with mated fluid umbilical, assessment of how the interior DC-1 config. impacts operations with various gear & accessories such as the POV (EVA support panel) and BSS, moving the BRT with a CLB (Crew Lock Bag) and securing the BRT on a handrail, retrieving the Kodak 760 camera from the KPU tool carrier and stowing it temporarily on the OTA swing arm, etc.]

Mikhail & Fyodor's egress from their Orlan-MKs was followed by restoration of comm. settings in DC-1 to nominal ops. and post-training close-out activities, including air duct assembly.

CDR Alexander Skvortsov installed a rigid air duct in the hatch between MRM-1 & the FGB.

FE-2 Tracy Caldwell-Dyson, FE-6 Shannon Walker & FE-4 Doug Wheelock got together for a joint 2.5 hour review of the upcoming US EVA-15 on 05/08, followed by a teleconference on spacewalk details with ground specialists via S-band and Ku-band.

OGS Update:
The USOS OGS (Oxygen Generation System) has been successfully activated and is producing O2 at 100%.

Conjunction Update:
The conjunction with Object 29729 (debris of Chinese satellite FENGYUN 1C) has dropped to a very low PC (Probability of Collision). Planning for a DAM (Debris Avoidance Maneuver) has been cancelled.

Russian EVA-25 Overview:
DC-1 is prime A/L, SM PkhO is backup A/L.
EV Crew:
• EV-1 – Fyodor Yurchikhin, Orlan-MK #4.
• EV-2 – Mikhail Kornienko, Orlan-MK #6.
Timeline:
• Wakeup: 26/07 @ 6:40 PM GMT (sleep shifted 12 hours 40 minutes).
• DC-1 hatch open: 27/07 @ 3:45 AM GMT.
• Repress: 27/07 @ 9:45 AM GMT.
• Sleep: 27/07 @ 3:00 PM GMT.
EVA Objectives (total 6 hours):
• SM ATV docking camera R&R.
• MRM-1 C&DH (Command & Data Handling) & Kurs-P external cable
  routing.
• Jettison old SM ATV docking camera and empty cable reels.
IV Crew:
• Soyuz TMA-18/22S crew (Alexander & Tracy) isolated in MRM-2
  (22S is docked to MRM-2).
• Soyuz TMA-19/23S crew (Doug & Shannon) in FGB & USOS
  (23S is docked to MRM-1).
« Last Edit: 07/24/2010 04:22 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline Suzy

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #132 on: 07/24/2010 12:53 AM »
What are the serial numbers of the Orlan-MK suits being used for EVA-25?

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #133 on: 07/24/2010 01:16 PM »
DC-1 is prime A/L, SM PkhO is backup A/L.

How can this be? The SM PkhO (Transfer Compartment) would be useless as an A/L, as there is no hatch that opens into space. They could not use MRM-2 either, as Tracy & Mikhail would be in there, and it is not yet set up for EVAs.
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Offline anik

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #134 on: 07/24/2010 01:28 PM »
How can this be?

The transfer compartment of Zvezda module will be used as backup airlock in case of impossibility of repressurization of Pirs airlock.

Offline Nicolas PILLET

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #135 on: 07/24/2010 01:32 PM »
Do you know when the KL-154 TV camera has been installed at this place ?
Nicolas PILLET
Kosmonavtika : The French site on Russian Space

Offline anik

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #136 on: 07/24/2010 01:50 PM »
Do you know when the KL-154 TV camera has been installed at this place?

On August 18th, 2005.

Offline Nicolas PILLET

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #137 on: 07/24/2010 01:53 PM »
Do you know when the KL-154 TV camera has been installed at this place?

On August 18th, 2005.

Thank you anik !
It was an EVA by Krikalyov and Phillips during MKS-11.
Nicolas PILLET
Kosmonavtika : The French site on Russian Space

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #138 on: 07/24/2010 04:41 PM »
Just a quick question:

Why does the SM PkhO need to be depressurised during Russian EVAs? Why not just close the hatch between DC-1 & the PkhO, and only depressurise DC-1? I assume the hatches are left open because the depressurisation equipment is located in the PkhO, which eliminates the need to have it located in both DC-1 and MRM-2?
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Offline anik

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Re: Expedition 24 thread (June 2 - September 24, 2010)
« Reply #139 on: 07/24/2010 05:01 PM »
Why does the SM PkhO need to be depressurised during Russian EVAs?

Again, the transfer compartment of Zvezda module is not depressurising during Russian spacewalks. It will be used as backup airlock only in case of emergency (after returning of cosmonauts into Pirs airlock, if its repressurization is impossible).

The hatches between the transfer compartment and Pirs airlock are closed during EVA.

There was one case (during EVA-2) in past when we have depressurized both airlocks (Pirs airlock and the transfer compartment) simultaneously. It was related to equipment, which had big sizes and could not be housed in Pirs airlock.

What are the serial numbers of the Orlan-MK suits being used for EVA-25?

Both cosmonauts will be in spacesuits with blue stripes.

EV Crew:
EV-1 Fyodor Yurchikhin, Orlan-MK #4.
EV-2 Mikhail Kornienko, Orlan-MK #6
« Last Edit: 07/24/2010 05:29 PM by anik »

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