Author Topic: NASA - Kepler updates  (Read 170440 times)

Offline _INTER_

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #400 on: 07/23/2015 04:39 PM »
I don't get it, if it was more earth-like than other discoveries it would be higher in ESI scale.

Online ugordan

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #401 on: 07/23/2015 04:44 PM »
Who said it was more earth-like than other discoveries?

Online Eer

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #402 on: 07/23/2015 04:46 PM »
Why is this announceworthy? The new exoplanet doesnt even reach no. 1 on the ESI scale:
http://phl.upr.edu/projects/habitable-exoplanets-catalog

They made a point that this is the first earth-like planet in habitable zone around another G-type star.

Online jgoldader

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #403 on: 07/23/2015 04:49 PM »
It's around a G-type star with orbital period of nearly one year.  The other planets with higher scores on that scale are around K/M stars with shorter periods.  So this planet sounds more like "home" than the others.

Not sure I'd want to try to walk around on Kepler 452-b with that surface gravity.  Ugh.  Definitely would want to lose some weight.
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Offline K-P

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #404 on: 07/23/2015 04:51 PM »
Why is this announceworthy? The new exoplanet doesnt even reach no. 1 on the ESI scale:
http://phl.upr.edu/projects/habitable-exoplanets-catalog

They made a point that this is the first earth-like planet in habitable zone around another G-type star.

And because of the fact that it is so far from the star (orbital period of 300+ days) I find it much better place to live (in my imagination) than those other ESI Top-10 planets, which have orbital period of about 30 days. No matter if the star they orbit is small, it still might have harmful flares etc. scorching the nearby planets... Also tidal locking is guaranteed with those planets.


Offline _INTER_

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #405 on: 07/23/2015 04:53 PM »
Quote
Who said it was more earth-like than other discoveries?
Quote
They made a point that this is the first earth-like planet in habitable zone around another G-type star.
An announcement of this category does raise expectation and together with media calling it the discovery of an Earth 2.0... rather underwhelming to me to be honest.

Quote
And because of the fact that it is so far from the star (orbital period of 300+ days) I find it much better place to live (in my imagination) than those other ESI Top-10 planets, which have orbital period of about 30 days. No matter if the star they orbit is small, it still might have harmful flares etc. scorching the nearby planets... Also tidal locking is guaranteed with those planets.
Kepler-442 b and Kepler-62 e orbit a K-Star in about 112 to 120 days and are smaller. Also those planets are probably older.
« Last Edit: 07/23/2015 04:59 PM by _INTER_ »

Offline Jeff Lerner

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #406 on: 07/23/2015 05:35 PM »
Maybe I missed it during the Q&A but are there plans to follow up with current technology to gather more info on this planet ??...I heard there is some thought of volcanos on this planet...does that make it more likely Venus like (covered in clouds. Too hot  ) vs. Earth (some active volcanos but water, vegitation, etc)...

Offline _INTER_

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #407 on: 07/23/2015 06:04 PM »
Quote
Maybe I missed it during the Q&A but are there plans to follow up with current technology to gather more info on this planet ??...I heard there is some thought of volcanos on this planet...does that make it more likely Venus like (covered in clouds. Too hot  ) vs. Earth (some active volcanos but water, vegitation, etc)...
In general anything beyond mass, volume, density, size, period and other physical values are more or less unfounded speculations for now. However I assume atmosphere analysis can be done in the near future.
« Last Edit: 07/23/2015 06:05 PM by _INTER_ »

Offline Orbiter

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #408 on: 07/23/2015 06:06 PM »
Why is this announceworthy? The new exoplanet doesnt even reach no. 1 on the ESI scale:
http://phl.upr.edu/projects/habitable-exoplanets-catalog

There's only one object that will have a 1.00 ESI, that's the Earth.

This is a major find, although long expected, Kepler-452 is a G2V sequence star as our own is, and Kepler-452 b is the first rocky object found in the habitable zone of a G2V sequence star.
« Last Edit: 07/23/2015 06:10 PM by Orbiter »
Attended space missions: STS-114, STS-124, STS-128, STS-135, Atlas V "Curiosity", Delta IV Heavy NROL-15, Atlas V MUOS-2, Delta IV Heavy NROL-37, SpaceX CRS-9, SpaceX JCSAT-16, Atlas V GOES-R, SpaceX SES-11.

Offline K-P

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #409 on: 07/23/2015 06:15 PM »
Kepler-442 b and Kepler-62 e orbit a K-Star in about 112 to 120 days and are smaller. Also those planets are probably older.

So older dead world is less dead?

Offline notsorandom

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #410 on: 07/23/2015 06:19 PM »
At 1,400 light years away I don't think any planed future telescopes will be able to do spectroscopy on the planet. That is too bad because the atmosphere of a planet like this has got to be interesting. At the press conference they mentioned that it should still be very volcanically active. I'd bet that it has a magnetic field, perhaps even stronger than Earth's. Those things and the increased gravity compared to Earth makes me think this planet must have a pretty thick atmosphere.

Online ugordan

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #411 on: 07/23/2015 06:19 PM »
Maybe I missed it during the Q&A but are there plans to follow up with current technology to gather more info on this planet ??

At 1400 ly distance, I don't believe so. Most of the stars Kepler watches are really far away because it's deliberately watching a packed starfield roughly in the galactic plane. You have to remember that its primary purpose was to give us an idea on statistical distributions of planets around other stars and the more stars it observes, the better. It's not well-suited for followup observations.

When TESS launches, it will focus on stars much closer to us where followup observations will be possible.

Offline _INTER_

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #412 on: 07/23/2015 06:32 PM »
Quote
So older dead world is less dead?
Look I'm not disagreeing with the discovery worth of a G-Warm Superearth with about same period as Earth. What I'm disagreeing with is how this is communicated by Nasa (announcement type, choice and hype) and especially by the media. People associate "Earth 2.0" with "Alien life or colonialization potential". That's what infuriates me.
« Last Edit: 07/23/2015 06:33 PM by _INTER_ »

Offline Orbiter

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #413 on: 07/23/2015 06:37 PM »
NASA isn't doing that, the media is, as they do with every exoplanetary discovery. NASA just called it "Earth's cousin". A cousin is hardly the same thing as a twin.
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Offline _INTER_

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #414 on: 07/23/2015 06:42 PM »
Some sources measure Kepler-452b ESI of 0.862, which would somewhat repeal my arguments.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_potentially_habitable_exoplanets

Offline Star One

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NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #415 on: 07/23/2015 06:50 PM »
Quote
So older dead world is less dead?
Look I'm not disagreeing with the discovery worth of a G-Warm Superearth with about same period as Earth. What I'm disagreeing with is how this is communicated by Nasa (announcement type, choice and hype) and especially by the media. People associate "Earth 2.0" with "Alien life or colonialization potential". That's what infuriates me.

Don't blame NASA for bad reporting.

This doesn't have the highest ESI that's still Kepler-438b.
« Last Edit: 07/23/2015 06:55 PM by Star One »

Offline Orbiter

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #416 on: 07/23/2015 07:00 PM »
Quote
So older dead world is less dead?
Look I'm not disagreeing with the discovery worth of a G-Warm Superearth with about same period as Earth. What I'm disagreeing with is how this is communicated by Nasa (announcement type, choice and hype) and especially by the media. People associate "Earth 2.0" with "Alien life or colonialization potential". That's what infuriates me.

Don't blame NASA for bad reporting.

This doesn't have the highest ESI that's still Kepler-438b.

True, but Kepler-438b orbits an M-sequence star, so there's a good chance it's tidally locked.
Attended space missions: STS-114, STS-124, STS-128, STS-135, Atlas V "Curiosity", Delta IV Heavy NROL-15, Atlas V MUOS-2, Delta IV Heavy NROL-37, SpaceX CRS-9, SpaceX JCSAT-16, Atlas V GOES-R, SpaceX SES-11.

Offline JasonAW3

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #417 on: 07/23/2015 07:02 PM »
Why is this announceworthy? The new exoplanet doesnt even reach no. 1 on the ESI scale:
http://phl.upr.edu/projects/habitable-exoplanets-catalog

There's only one object that will have a 1.00 ESI, that's the Earth.

This is a major find, although long expected, Kepler-452 is a G2V sequence star as our own is, and Kepler-452 b is the first rocky object found in the habitable zone of a G2V sequence star.

You should worry if we ever find a world with a higher ESI than Earth!

     (More Earth like than Earth?)
My God!  It's full of universes!

Offline _INTER_

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #418 on: 07/23/2015 07:06 PM »
Quote
You should worry if we ever find a world with a higher ESI than Earth!
Yea because then, math has changed dramatically (False Vacuum bubble?).
No, the way ESI is calculated with normalizing, its impossible to get values bigger than 1.

---
ESI calculation compared:
habitable-exoplanets-catalog:
Considers stellar flux, mass, and radius

WIKI ESI:
Considers radius, bulk density, escape velocity and surface temperature.

So does the lower value in the catalog come from high stellar radiation?
« Last Edit: 07/23/2015 07:12 PM by _INTER_ »

Offline meekGee

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Re: NASA - Kepler updates
« Reply #419 on: 07/23/2015 08:28 PM »
Quote
You should worry if we ever find a world with a higher ESI than Earth!
Yea because then, math has changed dramatically (False Vacuum bubble?).
No, the way ESI is calculated with normalizing, its impossible to get values bigger than 1.

---
ESI calculation compared:
habitable-exoplanets-catalog:
Considers stellar flux, mass, and radius

WIKI ESI:
Considers radius, bulk density, escape velocity and surface temperature.

So does the lower value in the catalog come from high stellar radiation?

He wasn't being Sirius.
ABCD - Always Be Counting Down

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