Author Topic: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part  (Read 3424 times)

Offline 7Forty7

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Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« on: 02/05/2009 10:03 AM »
Hi Folks,
First of all a quick hello to you all as I'm new to this forum. Now I wondered if anyone might be able to help me identify the location on the Orbiter of the following part?
The scrap tag idents it as V070-197123-002, INBD FWD INSULATOR, DOOR # 9.
I've attached a photo of the item.
Thanks in advance to you all for your help,
Best wishes,
Bill

Online Chris Bergin

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #1 on: 02/05/2009 10:20 AM »
Welcome to the site's forum Bill.

Hmmmm, first thought was "can't be" as orbiter parts are US government property, assuming this part is actually in your possession?

However, "V070..." - that sounds about right!

Searching L2 processing, the nearest I could find to the number was "V070-613695-002 - return air duct mid-deck ceiling panel" on a processing report. Might need to scan some FRR presentations.

I'd pop back on when the Americans are out of bed, and I'll go ask some of the numerous orbiter engineers we have here (unless one seems this and posts anyway).

I'm guessing your part is something to do with the thermal doors on the Main Landing Gear (MLG) just from its name....but I'm guessing out of a couple of million parts ;) First person I'll ask is one of the MEQ engineers, as the MLG is their system.

Sit tight :)

Offline Justin Space

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #2 on: 02/05/2009 10:25 AM »
It's going to be a race between Bob and Jim I reckon ;D If anyone knows, they will.

And yeah, won't the FBI come knocking on/down your door if you have orbiter hardware in your front room? ;)

Offline 7Forty7

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #3 on: 02/05/2009 10:41 AM »
Thanks Guys! I'd spotted it on one of the various collectors sites on the web. As there was very little info on it I thought this is definately the place to ask.
Justin, are those the Guys generally dressed in black suits and shades??

Bill

Offline SimonShuttle

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #4 on: 02/05/2009 10:45 AM »
I'll be shocked if one of the United Space Alliance or NASA guys won't know. They might be able to just type in the VO number into a computer in an OPF for starters.

Bit early anyway, site's very quiet as it's not even 7am at KSC.

Offline gomorrha

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #5 on: 02/05/2009 10:54 AM »
Google says:

High Temperature Insulator flown on Orbiter Columbia (OV-102)
This Inboard Forward High Temperature Insulator was flown on STS - 94 (Columbia - OV102) from 7/1 - 7/17/1997.  It may well have  flown on  prior  flights as the NASA documentation indicates it was removed from the orbiter one month following STS - 94 and prior to the flight of STS-87 in November of that year. This substantial piece of flown material measures  6.75" long x 2" high x .75" thick.   It is accompanied by a NASA Unserviceable Tag along with matching serial nos.


Offline rsnellenberger

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #6 on: 02/05/2009 12:58 PM »
"S/N 001" on the part -- interesting.

Offline collectSPACE

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #7 on: 02/05/2009 02:09 PM »
Hmmmm, first thought was "can't be" as orbiter parts are US government property, assuming this part is actually in your possession?

Spent shuttle parts are scrapped and sold off through surplus sales: http://surplus.ksc.nasa.gov/

It used to be more common that the parts were scrapped with their tags intact, allowing knowledgeable scrap metal dealers and collectors to at least learn when the part was removed and from what orbiter, allowing a "last flight" status as described in the Google result above.

So as long as a part was obtained legally, is documented as scrapped and you have the deaccession paperwork, it is legal to own. (There may be further limitations preventing export of the part outside of the U.S., but that's a separate issue.)
« Last Edit: 02/05/2009 02:17 PM by collectSPACE »

Online robertross

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #8 on: 02/05/2009 03:42 PM »
Hmmmm, first thought was "can't be" as orbiter parts are US government property, assuming this part is actually in your possession?

Spent shuttle parts are scrapped and sold off through surplus sales: http://surplus.ksc.nasa.gov/

It used to be more common that the parts were scrapped with their tags intact, allowing knowledgeable scrap metal dealers and collectors to at least learn when the part was removed and from what orbiter, allowing a "last flight" status as described in the Google result above.

So as long as a part was obtained legally, is documented as scrapped and you have the deaccession paperwork, it is legal to own. (There may be further limitations preventing export of the part outside of the U.S., but that's a separate issue.)

Wow, didn't know you could get that kind of stuff.
Of course, being from Canada, I don't have a chance of getting it. Still good to know.
My thoughts and prayers for the families of loved ones on Malaysian flight MH17

Online Chris Bergin

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #9 on: 02/05/2009 05:55 PM »
Hmmmm, first thought was "can't be" as orbiter parts are US government property, assuming this part is actually in your possession?

Spent shuttle parts are scrapped and sold off through surplus sales: http://surplus.ksc.nasa.gov/

It used to be more common that the parts were scrapped with their tags intact, allowing knowledgeable scrap metal dealers and collectors to at least learn when the part was removed and from what orbiter, allowing a "last flight" status as described in the Google result above.

So as long as a part was obtained legally, is documented as scrapped and you have the deaccession paperwork, it is legal to own. (There may be further limitations preventing export of the part outside of the U.S., but that's a separate issue.)

Thanks Robert, had no idea there was such a site!

Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #10 on: 02/05/2009 06:08 PM »
How about scrap material?  Say an exhibit with a NASA educator included a shuttle tile that was flaking off material, would it be illegal to collect that material instead of letting it go into the trash?
« Last Edit: 02/05/2009 06:52 PM by Ronsmytheiii »

Offline gomorrha

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #11 on: 02/05/2009 06:44 PM »
If I understand it correctly that part belongs to vent door no. 9.

Maybe some of the guys who know more than "The Shuttle is a spaceship" can put the link below into something understandable for earthbound people.

http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/technology/sts-newsref/stsref-toc.html#sts_purge

Offline DMeader

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #12 on: 02/05/2009 07:09 PM »
If I understand it correctly that part belongs to vent door no. 9.

Maybe some of the guys who know more than "The Shuttle is a spaceship" can put the link below into something understandable for earthbound people.

http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/technology/sts-newsref/stsref-toc.html#sts_purge

Pretty simple actually. As the first paragraph states, any interior void space not designed for the pressure differential needs to be vented to vacuum on the way up,  and matching pressure must be restored on the way down. Also there has to be a way to purge said void spaces of accumulations of potentially hazardous gases and provide thermal control. That's what the vent doors (usually seen as several black rectangles on the sides of the spacecraft below the payload bay doors in drawings) are for.
« Last Edit: 02/05/2009 07:42 PM by DMeader »

Offline gomorrha

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #13 on: 02/05/2009 07:37 PM »
So here for another link:

http://www.raumfahrer.net/forum/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl?num=1189932711/135

Itīs in german but just scroll down till you see a picture of the Shuttle with the "United States" flag, letters and NASA logo and three small black squares in a red circle.

There you see (text says so) the opened doors 3, 5 and 6. Doors 1 and 2 are below the cockpit and 8 and 9 at the aft compartment (not in the picture). Function of the doors as described in earlier postings. Text also says that it has been determined that only 14 of the originally 18 doors are necessary to do the vent job. (18 doors = 9 on each side). So 4 doors (4, 7 (text) and 13, 16 if correctly calculated) are permanently closed.

Vent door No. 9 should be easily identified on a side view of the shuttle as it is one of only a few black squares on white background.

Offline collectSPACE

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Re: Help needed Identifying Orbiter part
« Reply #14 on: 02/05/2009 09:14 PM »
Say an exhibit with a NASA educator included a shuttle tile that was flaking off material, would it be illegal to collect that material instead of letting it go into the trash?

Technically, all government property remains government property until the government declares it is not government property. So, in theory, the government could come looking for those scraps and demand their return.

While this may seem a bit like overkill in the cited example, change the parameters a bit and you will see where it comes into play: instead of a shuttle tile, substitute a moon rock. And instead of a NASA educator, substitute a lab researcher.

Now suppose that researcher is authorized to do destructive testing on a sample Apollo moon rock and in the process creates shavings. At the end of his/her loan period, the rock -- and all the shavings -- must be returned to NASA. The researcher cannot keep the dust s/he created, no matter how small.

NASA's Office of the Inspector General has used the same general premise to reclaim moon dust that was removed by spacesuit technicians using pieces of tape from the Apollo suits that they were trusted with to service post-flight.

Now that said, there was a case where a flown command module accessories bag was legally transferred from the government to a contractor, which in turn then gifted the bag to an employee. The transfer was legal and documented. Years later, the former employee sold the bag at auction and the buyer noticed a gray substance staining the corners of the bag. Testing confirmed the dirt to be of lunar origin and because NASA legally relinquished the bag and its contents, the moon dust was the buyer's to own.

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