Author Topic: U.S. Department of Labor-Led Taskforce Releases Report on Aerospace Workforce  (Read 1637 times)

Offline Chris Bergin

This is very interesting:

Presser:

U.S. Department of Labor-Led Taskforce Releases Report on Aerospace Workforce

Multi-year effort offers strategies to attract and retain talent

WASHINGTON, March 19 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Interagency Aerospace Revitalization Taskforce, led by the U.S. Department of Labor, today released the first of five annual reports to Congress. The report offers strategies for meeting the aerospace industry's growing talent demands in an environment where young people are neither prepared nor inclined to enter it.


"America's world-leading aerospace industry is as vital today to our nation's security and prosperity as it was half a century ago when it was building the first satellites and rockets that launched us into the Space Age," said U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao. "This report outlines several strategies for increasing the pool of workers qualified for high skill aerospace careers and makes it clear that this will require a coordinated and sustained effort by the private and public sectors."


Following a legislative request of a year ago, the taskforce spent 2007 reviewing the challenges associated with aerospace workforce development and has recommended next steps for meeting the industry's talent needs. Among the report's findings, the taskforce recognizes that establishing clear lines of communication with all parties is a critical step in building the aerospace talent pipeline. It plans to create a cyber community designed to allow users to share information on promising practices in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and training; outreach to and mentoring of students and prospective hires; and industry recruiting successes.


The report recommends streamlining the security clearance process and increasing the portability of such clearances from one job and agency to the next. A coordinated industry investment strategy is also recommended to replicate model STEM education practices and to support apprenticeship models and the entry of transitioning adults into the industry.


In addition to broad participation from the aerospace industry and educators, the taskforce includes representatives from the U.S. Departments of Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Homeland Security and Transportation's Federal Aviation Administration; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration; the National Science Foundation; the President's Council of Economic Advisors; and the President's Office of Science and Technology Policy.


To view the full report and for more information on the Department of Labor's employment and training initiatives, visit www.doleta.gov.



Offline JonSBerndt

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Jon S. Berndt
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JonSBerndt - 19/3/2008  6:34 PM

Related to this, and to serve as a counterpoint:

"Is There a Shortage of Scientists and Engineers? How Would We Know?" (Rand Corp, 2003)

and here:

Aviation Week's Latest A&D Job Market Overview Shows Pay And Benefits Not Deciding Factors For Aerospace Engineers (AvWeek, 2006)

There's a bunch of other studies, if you're interested.  There was an NRC study on the NASA workforce that came out last year.  There was also a GAO study on the same issue.  And there was a NAPA study as well.

I think that links to all of them are on the web.  Maybe somebody could link them here.

Offline JonSBerndt

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Blackstar - 19/3/2008  10:00 PM
There's a bunch of other studies, if you're interested.  There was an NRC study on the NASA workforce that came out last year.  There was also a GAO study on the same issue.  And there was a NAPA study as well.

I think that links to all of them are on the web.  Maybe somebody could link them here.

Did you see a concensus in the various studies?

Jon
Jon S. Berndt
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JonSBerndt - 19/3/2008  10:32 PM

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Blackstar - 19/3/2008  10:00 PM
There's a bunch of other studies, if you're interested.  There was an NRC study on the NASA workforce that came out last year.  There was also a GAO study on the same issue.  And there was a NAPA study as well.

I think that links to all of them are on the web.  Maybe somebody could link them here.

Did you see a concensus in the various studies?

To be honest, I have not read all of them, although I was the study director for the NRC report.  I believe (it's been awhile since I've read them) that the NRC, NAPA (National Academy of Public Administration) and GAO studies all generally agreed with each other that there was no "crisis" in the aerospace workforce available to NASA.  In terms of sheer numbers, there are enough people out there.  The key issue is getting good ones, which is harder to do because the salaries and work are no longer as attractive as they used to be.  In short, the best people go to other fields.  The NRC study had a number of recommendations about how NASA could not only recruit, but _train_ the people it needs most.

I'm not a workforce expert; I just helped with the study, and I've since moved on to other issues.

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