Author Topic: Science Experiments in the ISS  (Read 173278 times)

Offline pm1823

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #120 on: 02/18/2009 12:51 PM »
Wow, BIORISK gives result - African mosquito can survive in open space 1.5 year.
Sorry, for machine translation.
http://translate.google.com/translate?prev=hp&hl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rian.ru%2Fanalytics%2F20090217%2F162374293.html&sl=ru&tl=en

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #121 on: 02/21/2009 06:52 PM »
Thanks a lot for that report, pm! Impressive result for that mosquito. That's one suprising experiment!

Meanwhile, the science program moves on in orbit. Lots of updates for this week, starting with more BioLab troubleshooting:

"BIOLAB (BLB):    “Sandy did the verification of the Rotor B Experiment Containers alignment on 2/17. Thank you Sandy for releasing all the levers and reengaging them.  This will be verified by a ground activity planned for 2/23.  A picture of the BIOS page of the BIOLAB laptop was also taken so that ground teams can troubleshoot the laptop boot-up problem.  Thank you Sandy and Mike for solving the depleted battery problem to get us that picture.”"

GEOFLOW has been removed from the FSL, and its mounting secured, for return in Discovery to investigate the cause of its anomaly after many months of operation:

FSL (Fluid Science Laboratory):    FSL FCE (Facility Core Element)  locking was successfully performed on 2/4.
GEOFLOW:    “Thank you for removing the GEOFLOW EC so that it can be returned on 15A for investigation on its anomaly.  Crew also performed the FCE lock and the video by-pass installation.”"

ICE-Crystal is on hold pending solving a temperature control issue. At the time at this report, troubleshooting was expected after STS-119, but will probably get bumped up after the recent delay.

ICE CRYSTAL  (JAXA):   “2/17: It was observed that one of the three thermo modules in SCOF Ice Crystal Cell was not working correctly.  When TM3 (one of the thermo module) was set at temperate of 20 degree Celsius, however, able to reach at 13 degC.  Same situation was observed on 2/18.  On 2/19: since TM3 (Peltier device) is not working correctly, JAXA decided to not continue SCOF Ice Crystal experiments.  However, background data, which will be used for the analysis of Ice Crystallization process, was obtained on this day.  Next troubleshoot will be performed after 15A flight.”"

Lots of SPICE and SOLO work by Sandy and Mike, apparently very appreciated by their respective teams. Lots of CEO observations, and some appreciations about EuTEF's ongoing problems:

"EuTEF (European  Technology Exposure Facility):    DOSTEL, MEDET, EXPOSE and FIPEX are acquiring science.  The DEBIE-2 team is changing the thresholds limits in order to solve the problem of empty science packets after a certain amount of time.  And TRIBOLAB is not currently acquiring science due to a shaft motor anomaly.  EVC did not acquire any pictures due to a high rate data problem."

And finally, news about the American educational program, with Buzzlightyear and the likes featuring some videoclips for Disney:

"EPO (Educational Payload Operations):   “The Buzz Lightyear and SPHERES EPO-Demos conducted were fantastic!  You did a great job of matching the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics to their grade level.  Disney is currently in the process of implementing the Buzz video into a joint NASA/Disney education product for the web.  Awesome job!  Wonderful job completing the Careers, ARISS, and Spacesuits EPO-Demos.  Thank you for taking the extra time to film Mike conducting an ARISS ham radio contact.  All videos are currently in the process of being edited to compliment and enhance existing NASA education products.  You are great at speaking to grades K-12 students and educators and helping them understand what it is like to live and work in space.”"
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« Last Edit: 02/21/2009 06:53 PM by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #122 on: 02/22/2009 02:05 PM »
Thanks for all the updates eeergo, they're great!

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #123 on: 02/24/2009 03:16 PM »
Thought that this report posted on NASA website today might be of interest - its 269 pages long (!):

International Space Station
Science Research Accomplishments During
the Assembly Years: An Analysis of Results
from 2000-2008


http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20090006763_2009004076.pdf

Offline cb6785

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #124 on: 02/24/2009 04:28 PM »
Thought that this report posted on NASA website today might be of interest - its 269 pages long (!):

International Space Station
Science Research Accomplishments During
the Assembly Years: An Analysis of Results
from 2000-2008


http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20090006763_2009004076.pdf

Thank you very much! Always interested in what's coming out of ISS research!
You know, if I’d had a seat you wouldn’t still see me in this thing. - Chuck Yeager

-------------------------------------------------------
Carsten Banach

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #125 on: 02/24/2009 04:47 PM »
Thought that this report posted on NASA website today might be of interest - its 269 pages long (!):

International Space Station
Science Research Accomplishments During
the Assembly Years: An Analysis of Results
from 2000-2008


http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20090006763_2009004076.pdf

That's some serious wealth of information... you've given me the means to keep me busy and pronouncedly unproductive in my academic and proffesional life for some time :)

Thank you very much, great to see updated documents like these are coming along again after the post-Columbia lull.
-DaviD-

Offline spaceamillion

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #126 on: 02/24/2009 10:34 PM »
Thought that this report posted on NASA website today might be of interest - its 269 pages long (!):

International Space Station
Science Research Accomplishments During
the Assembly Years: An Analysis of Results
from 2000-2008


http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20090006763_2009004076.pdf


That looks very interesting. Great spot, thanks !!!!

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #127 on: 03/01/2009 07:15 PM »
Continuing with some of this week's highlights: the first run of RadGene (Japanese experiment) has been completed and the samples are probably in MELFI by now.

"In JAXA’s Kibo JPM (JEM Pressurized Module), FE-2 Magnus supported SSIPC/Tsukuba (Space Station Integration & Promotion Center)’s with the RadGene payload by terminating the experiment’s first operation after seven days of incubation in the CBEF (Cell Biology Experiment Facility) without crew intervention.    [Today’s supportive steps included removing four sets of MEUs (Measurement Experiment Units) from the CBEF Micro-G Incubator, mixing the culture medium and reagent in the CBs (Culture Bags), then stowing the CBs in their holders in the MELFI (Minus-Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS) after cell fixture treatment for storage.  Afterwards, RadGene and LOH post-incubation ops were closed out in the SAIBO Rack.  RadGene is a two-part investigation addressing genetic alterations in immature immune cells: The first part, LOH, uses lymphoblastoid (immature immune) cells to detect potential changes on the chromosome after exposure to cosmic radiation.  The second, RadGene, looks for changes in gene expression of p53 (a tumor suppressive protein) after cosmic radiation exposure.  Future crewmembers will benefit from the data obtained in this investigation by understanding the effects of radiation on human cells, which can lead to the development of new countermeasures.  The data is also applicable in the medical field in the areas of immunology and cancer research.  A cell line from the human lymphoblastoid family of TK6 which can be grown as a suspension culture, was frozen on Earth in plastic bags.  After the launch in the freezer, the cells were kept frozen in MELFI, then defrosted and cultivated using CBEF at 37 degC for 7 days, then frozen again today up to recovery.  After recovery, cells will be analyzed for radiation effects with microgravity with DNA array assay and LOH mutation assay.]"


http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-18/html/iss018e034555.html

EuTEF's status continues to evolve, apparently with a positive trend:

"EuTEF (European  Technology Exposure Facility):    DOSTEL, MEDET, EXPOSE and FIPEX are acquiring science. The DEBIE-2 team has recreated the problem of the empty science packets with the ground model. This is under investigation.  EVC has been commanded on 2/26.  MEDET is performing a campaign of increased micro-calorimeter data acquisition frequency."

There've been encouraging reports from SPICE all over the week, and everything appears to be flowing gently along, with lots of runs. As a summary:

"SPICE  (Smoke Point In Co-flow Experiment):    “Mike and Sandy - your continued efficiency, enthusiasm and flexibility has resulted in completion of all planned nominal test points thus far plus nearly as many bonus test points in the same crew time.”"

There's an interesting "experiment" (more of a technology demonstration, but interesting nontheless) being performed by Mike:

"The CDR continued the sessions with CRE-1 (Component Repair Equipment 1) hardware, performing R&R of a component (U4) on an integrated circuit board and also attempting removal of Fine Pitch components U6 & U7.     [Background & Objective:  In an effort to minimize the logistical footprint required to support space exploration, NASA-wide studies are being conducted to determine practicality & feasibility of repairing failed hardware in space at the lowest possible hardware level.  The current ISS electronics repair plan is to replace an entire ORU.  However, ORU-level replacements will be logistically challenging for programs such as Constellation; thus, electrical repairs at a component level are seen as highly desirable.  Electrical repair in microgravity using solder is the focus of this experiment.  To help gather data needed to develop a capability of repairs with a smaller logistical footprint, this CRE-1 activity will use the materials in the CRE-1 Kit to attempt repairs to functional circuit cards, which will be returned to Ground for analysis.  The procedure uses the US Soldering Iron Kit, ISS IVA Vacuum and the CRE-1 Kit contents (delivered on ULF2) to be set up on the MWA Work Surface Area, complete with the MWA Containment System. CRE-1 is SDTO (Station Development Test Objective) 17012-U.]"


http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-18/html/iss018e033818.html

An extensive congratulatory message from the CEO team, now Expedition 18 is close to handing over to 19:

"
CEO (Crew Earth Observations):    Through 2/24, the ground has received a total of 21,575 of ISS CEO imagery for review and cataloguing.  “Kudos to the crew as you continue to complete your increment’s requirements for even more of our targets!  Photos with times corresponding to our CEO target times are reviewed first and this week includes:  Mount Vesuvius – 24 frames – target acquired – excellent images – seasonal requirements met for this increment, checked off the list; Florida Coastal Everglades – 96 frames in three sessions – seasonal requirements met for this increment, checked off the list; Foelsche Impact Crater, NT, Australia – 35 frames – target not acquired; Bosumtwi Impact Crater, Ghana – 8 frames – target not acquired; Volcan Colima, Mexico – 42 frames – partial coverage of target – under review; and Villarrica Volcano, Chile – 36 frames – target acquired – spectacular session of context photos of a number of Chilean Volcanoes including our previously unphotographed Chaiten (post-eruption) target – we can use these to help specify for detailed views in the future – Kudos again!  This weekend your early January view of MacMurdo and Howe Islands in the Kerguelen Archipelago of the southern Indian Ocean will be published on NASA/GSFC’s Earth Observatory website.  In this requested image of one of our CEO targets a fortuitous set of circumstances with winds and sun glint allowed detection of adjacent giant kelp beds in your image.  Thanks for your diligence in acquiring useful imagery of this challenging target area.”"

Many experiments are pending an STS-119 resolution, like SLEEP, GEOFLOW, CCISS... and of course all the ones already completed, whose samples are waiting for coming back to Earth.

To finish, some miscellaneous Russian experiment Yuri has been working on throughout the week:

"FE-1 Lonchakov set up the Russian TKhN-7 SVS (Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis) experiment equipment and ran the scheduled hardware test, using the SM (Service Module) DVCAM-5 video camera instead of the originally planned HDV (High Definition Video) cam.     [SVS uses its own camera, “Telescience” hardware from PK-3 (Plasma Crystallization) and the onboard Klest TV system for researching self-propagating high-temperature fusion of samples in space.]"

"Mike & Yuri had 10 min set aside to fill out their surgeon-provided BRASLET-Anketa (bracelet questionnaire) for yesterday’s sessions with BRASLET (Validation of On-Orbit Methodology for the Assessment of Cardiac Function and Changes in the Circulating Volume Using Ultrasound and BRASLET-M Occlusion Cuffs).     [BRASLET (bracelet), SDTO 17011, is sponsored by NASA and FSA/IBMP (Russian Federal Space Agency/Institute of Bio-Medical Problems, Russian: IMBP, Dr. Valery Bogomolov).  Objective: to test the performance of occlusion cuffs in modifying fluid shifts that occur early during physiological transition into the space environment and to establish a valid ultrasound methodology for assessing a number of aspects of central and peripheral hemodynamics and cardiovascular function, specifically in rapid changes in intravascular circulating volume.  The BRASLET-M occlusion cuffs are a Russian-made operational countermeasure already pre-calibrated and available onboard for each ISS crewmember.  The assessment involves multiple modes of ultrasound imaging and measurements, in combination with short-term application of BRASLET-M occlusive cuffs and cardiopulmonary maneuvers (Valsalva, Mueller) to demonstrate and to evaluate the degree of changes in the circulating volume on orbit.  This is accomplished by performing echocardiographic examinations in multiple modes (including Tissue Doppler mode), ultrasound measurements of lower extremity venous and arterial vascular responses to BRASLET-M device under nominal conditions and also during cardiopulmonary Mueller and Valsalva maneuvers.  Identical measurements are being repeated without BRASLET-M, with BRASLET-M applied, and immediately after releasing the occlusion device.]"

Performing regular service on the MATRYOSHKA-R (RBO-3-2) radiation instrumentation in the SM (panel 326), FE-1 Lonchakov changed the position of the AST Spectrometer and kits containing passive dosimeters on Panel 326 (rotation around their axes), installed the ALC-961 PCMCIA (Portable Computer Memory Card International Adapter) memory card and activated the Spectrometer, making sure that the memory card is actually recording data.  The setup was then photographed.    [The Spectrometer was rotated 90° around its Y axis so that its ports now face along the SM’s X axis.  RBO-3-2 is using the ESA/RSC-Energia experiment ALTCRISS (ALC/Alteino Long Term monitoring of Cosmic Rays on the ISS) with its Spectrometer (AST) and ALC equipment, which is periodically moved around and now located again in the SM.]"
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« Last Edit: 03/01/2009 07:17 PM by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline John44

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #128 on: 03/02/2009 07:19 PM »

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #129 on: 03/11/2009 05:36 PM »
Some news I took during the Exp 19-20 briefing this evening:

Talk about how the 6 person crew phase coming up in May means a change from an assembly-centered phase to a boost in research.

SPICE shown as an example of the kind of more elaborate experiments aimed at for this new stage.

Crew time for research scheduled to rise up quite rapidly compared to the pace till now (from 10000 to 45000 cumulative)

At assembly complete, still many racks left empty. Didn't have time to count but about 1/3 between all the lab modules capacity. Let's hope some Shuttle extension, COTS, HTVs or whatever fills this gap. UPDATE: Here's the graphic: http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/317810main_2_robinson.jpg

4 active crewmembers in terms of research (boost for science hours: 1400 vs 400, proportions for each country more or less unchanged)

98 investigations scheduled during Exp 19/20 timeframe.

Integrated Cardiovascular experiment with ultrasounds, 24 hour sensors: important experiment for understanding degradation of the cardiovascular function, there hasn't been one as thorough as this, as there wasn't enough crew time or capability for sensors.

Cambium: experiment to grow a tree in the Station, to see how woody plants develop (Canadian experiment)

TAGES experiment uses genetically-modified plants which flouresce when they feel agression.

STS-128: brings 3 science racks (Material Science, Fluids and MELFI freezer) Alredady noted in the 128 thread.

Commissioning of the 126 racks:
         -Combustion Integrated Rack: combustion already has taken place a week ago. Fuel droplet suspended in a needle. First experiment: flame extinguishment experiment (still hasn't started)
         -SHERE as an example of the physics experiments previewed for the 6 person crew stage.

Important result: Salmonella research in space (previous research showed more virulent, new study controlled the environment and mediated in the virulence, inhibiting the effect)

Strength of ISS: capability for rapid follow-ons. Really?

Briefing materials (thanks anik ;) ) here: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/expeditions/expedition19/preflight_briefing_031109.html
« Last Edit: 03/11/2009 09:07 PM by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Online gospacex

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #130 on: 03/11/2009 11:26 PM »
"the space station has been up for seven years and we haven't seen much in the way of science."

Sort of like living in a partly-finished house with no kitchen yet, and complaining that all you get is a bar-b-que and occasional picnics.

Try 10 years. 10 years and $50 billion dollars later and this ignorant general public has guts to complain?

Quote
The space station's full laboratory and scientific capabilities are still not THERE.

Somehow I don't think it's ok that the station is up there for 10 years and is not complete yet!

Quote
The other thing to remember is that NASA's research plans and use for the ISS are rather narrow in the VSE context, and focused on long-duration human spaceflight issues,

Like "how much $$$ we will manage to spend on water distillation apparatus and still manage to get it not work correctly"? Is water distillation such a breakthrough in science today?

Quote
Just wanted to throw this in to help keep this kind of discussion in perspective.

The perspective is that this thing will rust through before it is completed and producing results as advertised.

Offline robertross

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #131 on: 03/12/2009 12:29 AM »
Okay let's not start the blame game wrt the ISS. It's there to develop technologies and gain more research on the human body in space. We have it, let's use it. Unless you want to toss it out in favour of a hope to go to the moon (because we're not there yet, nor can it be argued we would have the money to maintain continued manned missions there).

The post-Columbia world is directly linked to timeframe issues and added costs. Let's just accept it get on with it.

They're still building hardware, so that's part of it too.

And to top it off, we're only now looking to make full use of it for science.

All in all, politics, poor planning, lack of funding, and the risks of spacelight are at play here.

I'd rather be happy for what we DO have, not what we MIGHT have.

Thanks to DaviD for posting our regular science updates, and keeping those who care in the loop. :)
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #132 on: 03/12/2009 12:37 PM »

Try 10 years. 10 years and $50 billion dollars later and this ignorant general public has guts to complain?

ISS is not the best managed program in the world, granted. It's not the worst either, not even close, in spite of the propaganda against it.

To give an example of something I know first-hand: I live in the North of Spain, and they've been trying to build a coastal highway for about 10 years to have a fast lane interconnecting the whole region. It's still about 75% complete. Vastly overbudget. Poorly mismanaged, granted, but it happens too in some other projects in Spain, even in the EU as a whole. This is far from an ideal situation, but not a reason to abandon the project now, just because you have to take secondary roads.

I see this project as something similar, and scrapping it or wildly limiting its budget would be a shame now. Anyway, I wouldn't want to clutter this thread with these discussions, most of all when this subject has been raised time and again in other threads.

Quote
Like "how much $$$ we will manage to spend on water distillation apparatus and still manage to get it not work correctly"? Is water distillation such a breakthrough in science today?

Yes in space. The problems with this, however, are much exacerbated by Shuttle delays, not by the system itself.

Quote
The perspective is that this thing will rust through before it is completed and producing results as advertised.

I'm afraid this will be true in some way, but they should just try to make the best of it instead of despairing and switching to a promising, new paper project which will follow a similar path (see Ares/Orion)

I'd rather be happy for what we DO have, not what we MIGHT have.

Thanks to DaviD for posting our regular science updates, and keeping those who care in the loop. :)

Great wording, and appreciated, Robert :)
-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS (STS-119)
« Reply #133 on: 03/18/2009 08:36 PM »
Summary of the research objectives for the docked phase of STS-119:

ISS Science Highlight: STS-119/15A
 
 The Space Shuttle Discovery lifted off from the Kennedy Space Center on March 15th carrying the STS-119/15A crew to the International Space Station. The crew will be delivering and installing the last solar array on the ISS. The crew is also bringing new experiments and participating, along with the Expedition 18 crew, in several experiments.
 
 One of the experiments that will be operated on the Space Shuttle is the NLP-Vaccine-3 (National Lab Pathfinder - Vaccine - 3). This exciting experiment will be using microgravity environment, which is known to increase the virulence of bacteria, to study the following microorganisms: MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), Listeria monocytogenesis (food borne pathogen), Enterococcus faecalis (found in the human gastrointestinal tract) and Candida albicans (yeast). The researchers hope to discover potential targets that may lead to vaccine development.
 
 The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) sponsored experiment, BISE (Bodies In the Space Environment: Relative Contributions of Internal and External Cues to Self-Orientation, During and After Zero Gravity Exposure), is new to the ISS. This experiment evaluates how crewmembers adapt to microgravity and then re-adapt to normal gravity conditions upon return to Earth. BISE uses imagery to determine how the crewmember perceives up or down. On Earth, direction is perceived by visual reference (floor, ceiling), self-perception (feeling gravity's pull) and by the vestibular system (located in the inner ear, responsible for balance). In microgravity, the vestibular system adapts to overcome the lack of normal gravity conditions. BISE will test how crewmembers perceive up and down by using images containing a character that can be recognized as either a 'p' or 'd' which is superimposed over a background image.
 
 The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) sponsored experiment DomeGene (Dome Gene Experiment) will be initiated during the flight to the ISS. DomeGene uses two kinds of amphibian cell cultures -- a cell line derived from kidney and a cell line derived from liver -- to examine gene expression.
 
 Additional Experiments Conducted During the STS-119/15A Mission:
 
 Integrated Immune-SDBI (Validation of Procedures for Monitoring Crew Member Immune Function - Short Duration Biological Investigation)
 Visual Performance (Human Factors Assessment of Vibration Effects on Visual Performance During Launch)
 LOCAD-PTS-Exploration (Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System -- Exploration)
 Sleep-Short (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight-Short)
 Sleep-Long (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight-Long)
 MOP (Motion Perception: Vestibular Adaptation to G-Transitions)
 Mus (Study of Lower Back Pain in Crewmembers During Space Flight)
 
 Experiments Being Delivered to the ISS
 
 JAXA-Commercial (Commercial Payload Program)
 JAXA-EPO (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency - Education Payload Observation)
 
Payloads of Opportunity
 
 SEITE (Shuttle Exhaust Ion Turbulence Experiments)
 SIMPLEX (Shuttle Ionospheric Modification with Pulsed Localized Exhaust Experiments)
 MAUI (Maui Analysis of Upper Atmospheric Injections)
 

Found in NASA's Science page.
« Last Edit: 03/18/2009 08:39 PM by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #134 on: 03/20/2009 07:51 PM »
Some interesting images of the Matroshka experiment, with Yuri setting up the phantoms in Zvezda (more here: http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-18/html/iss018e040944.html)
-DaviD-

Offline Norm Hartnett

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #135 on: 03/25/2009 03:52 PM »
Like "how much $$$ we will manage to spend on water distillation apparatus and still manage to get it not work correctly"? Is water distillation such a breakthrough in science today?

About $185 million so far not counting two shuttle flights to test segments of the ECLSS, STS-89 and STS-107 nor the cost of STS-126 to bring the system up and the repair parts on STS-119.

Actually, yes, water distillation in micro gravity is breakthrough science. Think about it, distillation depends, in part, on convection and convection performance is gravity dependent. That's only one of several processes that are affected by gravity, there are, I believe several experiments examining fluid dynamics on going on ISS and fluid dynamics is critical to not only distillation but also filtration.

Here is a little thought experiment for you. Imagine building a still at home, now spin the still so that it works (hopefully) in micro gravity, now set it up so that it processes half a gallon a day, every day with little hands on help. Get the picture? Now tie your still into a urinal (which is sealed so you don't have globs of urine floating around) and some way of pumping the urine to your spinning still, add in a way of transferring wastewater from spacesuits, and then add in a dehumidifier that adds in yet more wastewater from the atmosphere. You will want to filter all these sources which means cleaning/changing filters regularly. OK, got all that working? Now you will want to take some of the cleaned water and, using electrolysis, produce oxygen.

This is only part of what the ECLSS does. It is hard core engineering and science and a functional system like this is vital to any exploration of space, either in LEO, on the way to other planets or, on other planets. This is the US's first attempt to build and deploy such a system.

Why is it important to have such a system working? If the current ECLSS system is successful it will reduce the consumables needed by the station by 15,000 pounds per year (for six crew). At about $2,500 per pound to LEO this works out to an annual savings of $37.5 million per year so the system would pay for itself in about five years. Of course, with our current capabilities, we would not be able to keep the station supplied with all this for the next five years in any case so the capability is really priceless.

Consider what the costs of getting that pound of consumables to the moon would be, let alone to Mars. This type of breakthrough science is what will make space exploration possible. It is what the ISS was built to do.

Sources;
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/30oct_eclss.htm
http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/pdf/104840main_eclss.pdf
http://www.futron.com/pdf/resource_center/white_papers/FutronLaunchCostWP.pdf
« Last Edit: 03/25/2009 04:33 PM by Norm Hartnett »
“You can’t take a traditional approach and expect anything but the traditional results, which has been broken budgets and not fielding any flight hardware.” Mike Gold - Apollo, STS, CxP; those that don't learn from history are condemned to repeat it: SLS.

Offline Riley1066

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #136 on: 03/25/2009 06:54 PM »
Are the External Logistics Carriers still going to host two active science experiments, alongside the ORUs?
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Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #137 on: 03/29/2009 09:03 PM »
Ok, some new science updates after all the Shuttle rush (and my own rush, which hasn't allowed me to follow the program as much as I'd have liked)

First a post with this week's developments. Much of the work is being performed by Koichi, who appears to be undertaking a major science effort (JAXA seems very focused in its science program) with lots of runs of different experiments. Even the Soyuz hatch opening had to be postponed so that he could finish a Dome-Gene run!

One of the experiments he's very active with is 3D-Space:

3-D SPACE:    First session for Koichi was successfully performed on 3/23.  “Thank you for alerting us before you began, that you had to attend to robotic operations during the experiment protocol.  We have confirmed with the scientist(s) that this has no consequences to the experiment objectives.  Also, ground teams greatly appreciated Koichi’s feedback at the end of the session about the digital table pen.”

He's also acting as the test subject for BioPhosphonates:

BISPHOSPHONATES:   “Koichi, thanks for completing your first in-flight pill ingestion.  Your only Bisphosphonates exclusive activities are the weekly pill ingestion.  The urine collection session will be completed as a data share with the Nutrition experiment.  Congratulations on being our first subject!”

This week's update in Dome-Gene:

DomeGene  (JAXA):   “DomeGene is going nominal, and we are looking forward  to the final process this Saturday.”

There appear to be some anomalies in BioLab (again?!?):

BIOLAB  (BLB):    Two anomalies are being investigated: 1) leak of the Life Support System (LSS) loop; 2) bad alignment of bellow door for Rotor B.

The Protein Crystallization experiment is proceeding quite smoothly:

EDR  (European Drawer Rack):    The rack is continuously active in support of the PCDF (Protein Crystallization Diagnostic Facility) experiment. EDR is providing power/data and temperature control (via cooling loop) to PCDF. Some initial glitches have been encountered with the EDR Video Management Unit (VMU), via which high-rate science data is routed and recorded (contingency imagery data storage). Science data is nevertheless transmitted to ground.

Some work on FSL, focusing on microaccelerations:

FSL  (Fluid Science Laboratory):    Microgravity measurements were successfully performed on 3/17 during the 15A docking and on 3/25 during the 15A undocking. Additional measurements are also planned on 3/28 for the Soyuz 18S docking.

As I'd noted before, GEOFLOW has been returned on Discovery after its anomaly earlier in the year. The physiology experiments (cardiovascular, SLEEP, Immune...) are drawing to a close with the end of Expedition 18.

SOLAR is continuing its observations when windows allow:

SOLAR  (Solar Monitoring Observatory):   The on-going Sun observation window started on 3/23, slightly later than predicted (i.e. on 3/22), due to high Yaw, Pitch, Roll angles for ISS. On 3/25, SOLAR platform was put in safing mode for the 15A undocking, and put back into Pointing Mode afterwards. No anomalies so far. The Sun observation window is expected to end on 4/2.

And two interesting updates on the status of LOCAD-PTS and all of Eu-TEF's payloads:LOCAD-PTS (Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System):    “Mike, thanks for continuing support of LOCAD.  During STS-119, Sandy did a super job swabbing the EVA gloves. It was great to watch her swab the gloves as Swanny and Ricky came through the hatch, with Tony and Mike helping support.  This kind of procedure could help future crews perform valuable scientific tasks on the Moon and Mars.  The results were very interesting. Gloves were clean, ranging from 1 to 3 ng/ml glucan (a fungal molecule), well below the CEVIS (>100ng/ml) and WHC (66ng/ml). Patterns observed were remarkably consistent - a good reflection on your technique.  Swanny's gloves dropped from 3.11 ng/ml pre-EVA to 1.54 ng/mL post-EVA (50% drop); Ricky's gloves dropped from 3.13 pre-EVA to 1.26 ng/mL post-EVA(60% drop).  Swanny and Ricky touched many S6 sites which tested high for glucan at KSC before launch, such as the gap spanners and ECU/SSU shrouds, but much of the glucan may have been destroyed after a few days in space.  That information is very useful to us as we design strategies for Moon/Mars missions.  The observed drop from pre-EVA to post-EVA may be due to the low level of glucan already on the glove 'shaking loose' during EVA.  Our goal now is to develop a special swab that can be used during EVA, capped, stored in a tool bag, and then analyzed back inside.  This has been a valuable first step toward that goal.  Thanks again and great job!”

EuTEF (European Technology Exposure Facility):    On 3/20, the ISS Attitude was reoriented to support the deployment of the newly installed S6 Solar Array. This has caused a change of the thermal environment of the EuTEF platform, with a consequent automatic deployment of thermal protection (see status of EXPOSE below). The platform has again experienced a MIL Bus error on 3/21. After each MIL Bus occurrence, the instruments have to be reconfigured.-- DEBIE-2: the instrument continues to start generating empty science packets at regular intervals (of 30 to 34hrs). Science acquisition is pursued with regular power cycling of the instrument (work-around);-- DOSTEL: On-going science acquisition - nominal;-- EuTEMP: Currently inactive as planned;-- EXPOSE: on 3/20, the tray lids automatically closed as the temperature of the instrument reached the upper limit. The purpose of this automatic behaviour is to protect the exobiology samples from harsh temperatures. On 3/21, EXPOSE operators have successfully re-opened these lids via ground commanding.-- EVC: EVC instrument is too cold to be operated;-- FIPEX: weekly script has been successfully uplinked on 3/25.- MEDET: On-going science acquisition – nominal. On 3/24, some commanding was successfully performed to modify the acquisition parameters of the instrument.- PLEGPAY: Inactive, “Experiment 1” memory has been erased on 10/30/08.  Plasma generation capability was disabled;-- TRIBOLAB: Instrument in stand-by mode (SBM).

Finally, some miscellaneous updates on the most recent work on Russian payloads:

    *  BTKh-14 BIOEMULSION (insertion of Bioreactor in CRYOGEM-03),
    * BTKh-10 CONJUGATION (RECOMB-K activity),
    * BTKh-26 KASKAD (deactivation & stowage), and
    * TEKh-15 DAKON IZGIB (Bend) hardware (closeout activity).
[/i][/i]
« Last Edit: 03/29/2009 09:09 PM by eeergo »
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Offline eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #138 on: 03/29/2009 09:56 PM »
And now, a summary of the new experiments to be performed during Expedition 19/20, according to the Press Kit recently released. I will only list the additions, as many of the experiments are continuing from Exp 18. Links to the experiment site are provided on each name.

United States

-VO2max: cryptic name for a pretty standard experiment, focusing on the aerobic capacity of crewmembers when in long-duration flights.

-MCDA-FLEX: The long awaited flame extinguishing experiment :) continuing the use of the Combustion Rack started by SPICE.

-SNFM: Will monitor the behaviour of the computer network established over the last few years on ISS.

-SpaceDRUMS: To study material sciences in space, without the materials touching the walls (space is certainly cool!) Check the images on the experiment site, quite futuristic-looking :)

-TAGES: More Arabipdosis studies, now focusing on its perception of drought, light, temperature...

-LADA-VPU-P3R: Really cryptic name for a plant experiment in collaboration with Russia's incubator, for food growth in space.

-HREP-HICO: Earth observation experiment focusing on coasts.

-HREP-RAIDS: Termosphere and ionosphere observations, gaining more knowledge about these largely unknown reaches.

The Shuttle also has some experiments of its own, though they remain largely the same as in previous expeditions. There has been some talk in the recent mission, towards the end, about a so-called SIMPLEX burn. Well, it appears to be an experiment with radar detection of the OMS burns, similar to SEITE.

Some more experiments are on reserve too, but all of them have been performed during Exp18.

Russia

Many repeats too, but some new additions, where old experiments give way to newer ones:

- Vzaimodeystviye: Behavioural study focusing on the crew's interaction.

- Poligen: To be performed during the present crew rotation, to study a fly's genetic variances beneficial for spaceflight conditions.

- Seiner: To monitor fisheries (one would think by now automatic satellites would be able to do this, however...  :-\ pretty Cold War kind of experiment)

- Biorisk: New run of the famous exposure experiment.

- BIF: Research about microorganisms in space and their medical applications.

- Astrovakstina: E. Colli study with an antigen.

- Bacteriophages: As the name suggests, some research about the impact of spaceflight conditions on bacteriophages.

- Fizika-Obrazovanie: Educational experiment about not-so-trivial physical phenomena in orbit, with even a simulation of the vestibular channels in the human ear :)

- Kontur: Interesting study concerning teleoperation (through the Internet, it seems) of robotic mechanisms. I wonder what "Robotic arm" they will be controlling, given ERA is still not there... perhaps the Japanese? Or perhaps the US has some deal with the Russians to experiment with Canadarm2? One would think the Lunokhod rovers would have given the Russians enough practice with time-delay robotic operations ;)

Overall, a slight decrease in experiments (compare Exp 18 and 19/20) but a great increase in sessions (from 218 to 330!)


Many more European and Japanese experiments, I'll comment on them another day when I find the time :)
« Last Edit: 03/29/2009 10:01 PM by eeergo »
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Offline robertross

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #139 on: 03/30/2009 12:50 AM »
Thanks DaviD. So many neat experiments. I need to find time to review them all!

It is great to see such enthusiasm from the crewmembers when performing these experiments. I'm really glad the Japanese are on board with the ISS (as a member), and also great to see Koichi taking it so seriously (as they all seem to).

I'm still disappointed to see these continuing errors with EuTEF's MIL bus. There has to be some interconnect issue or wiring failure. Darn it.

I am so pumped to see MCDA-FLEX results. These should be fascinating (and slightly scarry).

As for Seiner, this is more about exploiting the ocean resources for a diminishing food supply than anything else. If China was on board, it would have been one of the first experiments, methinks. A global reality: scarce commodities for a growing population. We are close to another drought cycle, with water shortages increasingly common, foodstuffs being threatened, and a global meltdown which will soon lead to crazy inflation. I call it the perfect storm.

Interesting on the Kontur experiment. It doesn't specify which arm, though it does mention "monoblock of ROBOTIK manipulator". I'm thinking it's the European arm, as they would want to do teleoperation of science experiments for the exposed facility, and it has a fixed point, whereas the Canadarm2 has no fixed point. Guess we'll find out soon enough!
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