Author Topic: Science Experiments in the ISS  (Read 116703 times)

Offline Danny Dot

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #140 on: 03/30/2009 02:32 AM »
You guys keep feeding this thread with all this info.  This site should do all it can to get ISS up and running as the lab that can do things that can't be done on the Earth.  Now that we have the power and soon to have the people, lets crank up the science from ISS!!!

Danny Deger
Danny Deger

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #141 on: 03/30/2009 02:46 PM »
I wonder what "Robotic arm" they will be controlling, given ERA is still not there...

Manipulator of Rokviss experiment.

Offline robertross

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #142 on: 03/30/2009 08:38 PM »
I wonder what "Robotic arm" they will be controlling, given ERA is still not there...

Manipulator of Rokviss experiment.

Ah, good man! Thanks.
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Offline robertross

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #143 on: 03/30/2009 08:50 PM »
You guys keep feeding this thread with all this info.  This site should do all it can to get ISS up and running as the lab that can do things that can't be done on the Earth.  Now that we have the power and soon to have the people, lets crank up the science from ISS!!!

Danny Deger

That's a good idea.

Calling Chris: We need to start a second header under the ISS section for experiments/science.  :)
RIP Justin Wilson

Offline missinglink

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #144 on: 04/02/2009 09:08 PM »
I read somewhere that one of the upcoming ISS experiments will be in the field of quantum mechanics, does anyone have more info on that?

Offline Norm Hartnett

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #145 on: 04/05/2009 05:17 PM »
I read somewhere that one of the upcoming ISS experiments will be in the field of quantum mechanics, does anyone have more info on that?

Possibly http://www.infn.it/csn2/schede_2003/ams2_mor.htm?
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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #146 on: 04/18/2009 02:47 PM »
Ok, finally I got some time to complete the list of experiments planned for the Exp19-20 increment. So here we go with Europe's:

Europe

Lots and lots of experiments, with many new ones (only listing those), for this increment, possibly thanks to DeWinne's incorporation:

- ArtEMISS (algae development in microgravity)
- WAICO (as we know, the second run for finding out when plants start to feel gravity)
- YING (cell adhesion in zero-G)
- Colored fungi (as the name suggests, colored fungi growth)
- GENARA (study of gravity-dependent gene expression)
- Sample (sampling microbial growth in the ISS)
- Experiments using KUBIK (Gravigen: more plant growth; Polca: distribution of calcium in plant's roots depending on gravity levels)

Some Human Physiology experiments are follow-ons or repeats, to get as many sampling individuals as possible, but some are new:

- MOP (space sickness study)
- Muscle (study of a certain muscle that is suspected to atrophy in space)
- NeuroSpat (two experiments concerning visual and space perception, similar to 3DSpace)
- PADIAC (immunological study)
- EKE (aerobic capacity of astronauts)
- Thermolab (changes in body temperature distribution)
- EDOS, Otolith, Spin, Zag and Skin Properties are investigations to be performed before and after the space mission.

- New runs on GEOFLOW and Foam Stability (the only Fluid Sciences experiments)
- SODI experiments in the glovebox, concerning petroleum modelling and diffusion coefficients in microgravity.

- CETSOL & MICAST, to be performed after the Material Sciences Rack is delivered in STS-128, studying metal smelting in space (welcome addition after the prolific programmes in Salyut and Mir)

- Many ongoing radiation and educational experiments (more details about those in the Press Kit)

- The external experiments continue to be the same with EuTEF, EXPOSE-R and SOLAR.

Japan

First, let me note the new website JAXA has created devoted entirely to ISS science (something in which ESA is still VERY weak, as you can note by the lack of links to the experiments I provided above, as I couldn't find most of them easily) I've been able to find links to awesome explanations provided by JAXA; with the basics of the experiments I list below:

- Two experiments about Marangoni convection.
- FACET (which has started just two days ago), concerning growth of faceted crystals in organic solutions.
- Space Seed, to study plant growth (appears to be just a test-run experiment)
- RadSilk, to study adaptation to the space environment by silk worm eggs.
- Microbe-I, similar to Sample, to study microbial growth inside Kibo.
- JAXA PCG (protein crystal growth)

- External facilities to be delivered during STS-127, including MAXI (X-ray detector), SMILES (atmospheric observatory), SEDA-AP (particle, radiation and magnetic studies of the space environment)

-Some technology development trials concerning physiological experimental apparatus (dosimeters and electrocardiographs) and some educational experiments like ICE Crystals, Moon Score and Dewey's Forest (quite original and imaginative!)

I think there are still some experiments unlisted in the Press Kit but appearing in NASA's site, so not sure if those are reserve...
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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #147 on: 04/26/2009 08:54 PM »
Some new science updates for this week:Weekly Science Update (Expedition Nineteen -- Week 3) 

AgCAM (the camera experiment taking photos for agricultural purposes) is now installed in the Lab's window, see attached photo for reference.

"AgCam (Agricultural Camera):   “AgCam team reports your installation was successful and the system appears to be operating normally, except for a problem with measuring some of their Health and Status data.  They expect to be able to do some additional testing of the system from the ground, hopefully next week.  If that doesn't resolve the problem, we may need your assistance to help recover. More next week.”

BCAT appears to be exceeding expectations, with very precise criticality situations being managed by Barratt.

BCAT-3/4 (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test 3/4):   “We are particularly grateful to you, Dr. Mike, for your continued extra effort to make sure the setup is providing excellent images in the most challenging samples of BCAT4.  We are looking at phase separation closer to the liquid-gas critical point than we think anyone else has seen---which is evidenced by the fact that, three weeks into the run, we're only about halfway to complete separation.  As a result, the contrast within the sample itself is lower than anywhere else we have observed, increasing the need for greater precision and care in the photography, both in focusing, alignment and lighting.  You have risen to the challenge in an incredible way, delivering textbook-perfect photographs that are allowing us to observe structures that previously would not have been possible to see.  We very much appreciate your attention to these small, but ultimately crucial-to-our-science details.”

Some VolSci news:

VolSci Preview:   Two optional activities for the Voluntary Science program on 5/2 (Saturday) were suggested to Dr. Mike for his choice.    [The choices are: (1) BCAT (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test): Find & photograph crystals (different colors) in samples 8, 9 and 10, then set up image on sample 4, verify focus and take multiple flash angle photos of sample 4.  Next, homogenize sample 4 and take test photos. Sample 4 will run with automated EarthKAM photography for about 8 days.  (2) BISE (Bodies In the Space Environment): Relative Contributions of Internal and External Cues to Self – Orientation, During and After Zero Gravity Exposure.]

They're currently troubleshooting a leaky water valve in the combustion facility. When they finish, FLEX can begin:CIR (Combustion Integrated Rack):  “CIR has developed a maintenance procedure for the leaking water QD (quick disconnect) which involves isolating the QD from the system and exercising the poppets.  This will be executed in conjunction with the MDCA Fuel reservoir change out when all procedure sign-offs and scheduling are completed.  Once this is successfully completed, CIR will be able to perform the preparation steps to begin FLEX operations.”

Wakata has been performing some JAXA commercial and educational experiments that slipped from Exp18, like the clothing experiment.The latest flagship Japanese experiment, FACET, is proceeding well:FACET (JAXA):    “Beautiful facet crystal growth is observed.  We will finish the experiments using Cell1 after 8 more experiments.  We are planning a crew task to rotate the Experiment Cell to Start with Cell #2 which contains different composition of solution to explore more science.”

This Japanese-related tidbit is also quite interesting for us, armchair observers avid for nice, clean and detailed images ;) HDTV System (JAXA):   To be launched by HTV1.

The latest protein crystallization cycle has ended a few days ago:
PCDF-PU (Protein Crystallization Diagnostic Facility - Process Unit):

Growth cycle, EP4 cycle3 which is being repeated with an adapted temperature profile.  The science team saw nucleation start at a higher temperature than predicted during the previous run of EP4 Cycle 3.  The new profile starts measurements at a higher temperature after dissolution.  This script also incorporates more gradual steps in temperature between different set points.  This cycle was expected to end on 4/24.

And, finally, some CEO news:

CEO (Cre
w Ear
th Observations):   “Through 4/22, the ground has received a total of 3,179 of ISS CEO imagery for review and cataloguing.  Many of the targets that we have requested thus far are quite challenging to locate the first time and the weather has been less than cooperative for us all this past week.  We are continuing to work to improve the content of our target requests to help you recognize the features we are seeking.  Please feel free to let us know if there is anything else we can do to assist you in this effort.  We have already noted that the quality and composition of your photos is very high and you have acquired many interesting photos.  NASA/JSC/PAO is using your recent photo of Chicago’s Midway Airport.  Meanwhile, your striking view of the flooding Bois de Sioux River on the North Dakota-Minnesota border will be published this weekend on NASA/GSFC’s Earth Observatory website.  The GMT Day 109 image centers on the twin-cities area of Wahpeton, ND and Breckenridge, MN with the area still under snow.  It nicely illustrates the extent of yet another round of severe flooding this season in the Red River watershed.  Nice shot!”
[/i][/i][/i][/i][/i][/i][/i]
« Last Edit: 04/26/2009 08:59 PM by eeergo »
-DaviD-

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #148 on: 04/30/2009 06:44 PM »
Digging around a bit, I found these images showing the current crewmembers performing some of the experiments planned for this expedition. In the first one, you can see Barratt with the BISE experiment (spatial perception). The second shows Padalka with an educational experiment, the flying disk (or UFO  ;D ) part of the Fizika-LT program. Finally, the last one shows Barratt stowing urine samples for the NUTRITION program.
-DaviD-

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #149 on: 04/30/2009 06:47 PM »
Digging around a bit, I found some nice images portraying the current crewmembers performing some of the experiments planned for this Expedition. In the first one, you can see Barratt with the Canadian BISE experiment, concerning visual spatial perception in space. The second shows Padalka with the Russian Fizika-LT educational experiment, specifically the flying disk part (aka UFO  ;D ) Finally, the third one shows Barratt stowing urine samples in the MELFI for the NUTRITION program.
-DaviD-

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #150 on: 05/10/2009 12:50 PM »
Very interesting outreach article concerning the famous Salmonella experiment, with the increased virulence results obtained, and a possible explanation:

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2009/06may_salmonella.htm

Nickerson's team looked at Salmonella from two shuttle flights to the International Space Station: STS-115 in Sept. 2006 and STS-123 in March 2008. They found that 167 genes were either more or less active in these keyed-up bacteria than in the bacteria that hadn't flown. The team also identified a "master switch" that regulates about one-third of these genes, a protein called Hfq. Activity of this protein was also affected by the low fluid shear conditions of spaceflight.
« Last Edit: 05/10/2009 12:50 PM by eeergo »
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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #151 on: 05/11/2009 04:27 PM »
While Atlantis is getting ready for launch in a great astronomical mission, some ISS updates regarding its science experiments for this past week.

Let's start with a great, long update of BCAT-3/4, which appears to be yielding very interesting observations:

BCAT-3/4 (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test 3/4): Feedback from Peter Lu (PI): Dr. Mike, you did a fabulous job over the weekend setting up and photographing sample 4. The focus and illumination are fantastic, as is clear from the visible phase separation already ongoing (which is, incidentally, much faster than that observed for sample 2 over the past few weeks). And, you managed to trap a large bubble beneath the stir bar, as per the procedures, so it's not interfering with our measurement. Feedback from Chaikin and Hollingsworth at NYU regarding the BCAT-4 crystal growth samples: We are seeing evidence of crystals in samples 8 and 9. Sample 8 is showing some red speckle and curvature in the middle of the sample cell and again to the left. Sample 9 has a small red and green scintillating pattern in the bottom right hand corner. Very nice! Yet, the November pictures of sample 8 and sample 9 looked more dramatic, which indicates that we may want to try taking the photographs at the November angles, since the effects of crystals are likely to be even more pronounced now. Seeing crystals growing in samples 8 and 9 is very exciting and has profound implications regarding how it is that order arises out of disorder in nature. We would be interested to know if you see something similar in sample 10, which has not been captured by the camera. These three samples contain hard spheres, which are monodisperse, polydisperse, and monodisperse seeded with ‘nanodirt’ (large seed particles).”

BISE was also performed as voluntary science this week (there are images of the hardware for this experiment in the previous thread page)

Wakata continues to be very active, performing some slipped JAXA experiments from Expedition 18 (some commercial, some educational), as well as his regularly scheduled activities, like 3DSpace or FACET.

Update on EuTEF's status:

EuTEF (European Technology Exposure Facility):  Platform nominal. DOSTEL, EXPOSE, FIPEX, On-going science acquisition – nominal. MEDET: Acquired science nominally until 5/6 and then was switched off because the instrument was getting too cold. On-going science acquisition - nominal;DEBIE-2: the instrument continues to generate empty science packets at regular intervals (of 30 to 34hrs). Science acquisition is pursued with regular power cycling of the instrument (work-around).

A pair of anomalies in the Protein Crystallization facility in the EDR:

EDR (European Drawer Rack): The rack is continuously active in support of the PCDF (Protein Crystallization Diagnostic Facility) experiment. Two anomalies are currently under investigation.
PCDF-PU (Protein Crystallization Diagnostic Facility - Process Unit): Growth cycle, EP4 Cycle4 rerun ended on 5/5. In this reactor, science team sees about 10 large crystals that will be kept to be downloaded with PCDF-PU. Additionally in this reactor, the science team observed nucleation occurring at a higher temperature than in ground testing. The cause for this is still being studied.Nucleation cycle EP1 Cycle3 was started on 5/5. This cycle will conclude on 5/8. This cycle studies nucleation at a certain precipitant and protein concentration but at three different temperature rampings.

FSL checkouts continue, with some tests carried out when the last Progress undocked, to check its vibrational modes.
SOLAR is waiting for a Sun observation window to start, and SPICE has been restarted at the end of April.

Finally, a CEO report, and a note concerning difficulties for CEO targets during the next few days or weeks, due to the Station's orbit being almost parallel to the terminator. Lightning conditions are quite bad for Earth Observation purposes.

CEO (Crew Earth Observations): “Through 5/4, the ground has received a total of 5,499 of ISS CEO imagery for review and cataloguing. “Many of your imagery are under review and we are now pleased to confirm your acquisition of views of the following targets: Houston, TX; Delhi, India; Paris, France; Lake Poopo, Bolivia; Lake Chad, Chad; Galapagos Islands, Ecuador; and Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawai’i. Nice going! Also you are being very responsive to our specific requests with better than 20% of your imagery being acquired at target times provided. Your excellent, well-focused view of Ankara, Turkey will be posted on NASA/GSFC’s Earth Observatory website this weekend. Among the best recent images from the ISS of the Turkish capital city, your imagery beautifully documents this ancient and complex urban area located in an active earthquake region. Kudos to the crew for a fine image of a requested target!”CEO Note: In recent days, ISS daylight-awake orbit tracks have shifted rapidly into the Southern Hemisphere which is now some six weeks into the fall season, and both day length and sun elevation are significantly lowering. This situation along with deteriorating seasonal weather greatly limits good view opportunities for targets. The situation is further aggravated by the fact that the ISS orbit tracks nearly parallel with the terminator. The consequence is very low light right of track, low light near nadir, and adequate to good light left of track. Beginning today and for the next 5 to 7 days, there may be no targets with suitable illumination or weather.[/i][/i][/i][/i][/i][/i]
« Last Edit: 05/11/2009 04:29 PM by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline Marsbug

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #152 on: 05/12/2009 02:28 PM »
Hell, could some one please help, I was wondering if results from the previous BCAT experiments been published in any journals? I've been looking on the NASA site but I keep getting 404 errors.
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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #153 on: 05/12/2009 10:13 PM »
Hell, could some one please help, I was wondering if results from the previous BCAT experiments been published in any journals? I've been looking on the NASA site but I keep getting 404 errors.

Not a science journal, but this outreach explanation of the experiment is quite helpful to get a clear idea of supercriticality and its applications:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/BCAT_feature_093005.html

For more, in-depth information about this experiment, check the updated GRC site:

http://spaceflightsystems.grc.nasa.gov/Advanced/ISSResearch/MWA/BCAT/

More to the point of what you're looking for (from the NASA site, perhaps you disregarded them):

http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=AO-40-24-4146
http://www.ph.ed.ac.uk/~abs/PhysRevLett_96_028306_2006.pdf
http://scitation.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=APCPCS000458000001000108000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes

If you're interested in more but don't know how to find them, I'm just googling the references in NASA's site http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/science/experiments/BCAT-3-4-CP.html and looking for a relevant journal that contains the abstract. Of course, to get the full text you'll have to pay for it, or get the journal in a library.

If you still need more details but don't want to get into full-blown science papers, consider writing an email to the experimenters. See the GRC site, in the front page, at the bottom, to find their respective addresses.
-DaviD-

Offline Marsbug

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #154 on: 05/13/2009 09:46 AM »
Thank you eeergo, that's very helpfull! :)
« Last Edit: 05/13/2009 09:46 AM by Marsbug »
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Offline chen2x18

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #155 on: 05/18/2009 04:25 AM »
It is hard core engineering and science and a functional system because of what experiments they gathered..

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Micro molding



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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #156 on: 05/24/2009 12:02 AM »
Okay, my turn!

ISS On-Orbit Status 05/23/09

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below. Saturday – light-duty day for the ISS crew (soon to double in size!).

FE-1 Barratt continued his second run of sleep logging for the experiment SLEEP (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy & Light Exposure during Spaceflight) from his Actiwatch to the HRF-1 (Human Research Facility 1) laptop as part of a week-long session. This is similar to Barratt’s BCD (Baseline Data Collection) which was performed pre-flight for comparison. [To monitor the crewmember’s sleep/wake patterns and light exposure, Mike wears a special Actiwatch device which measures the light levels encountered by them as well as his patterns of sleep and activity throughout the Expedition and uses the payload software for data logging and filling in questionnaire entries in the experiment’s laptop session file on the HRF-1 laptop. The log entries are done within 15 minutes of final awakening for seven consecutive days.]

The crew performed the regular weekly three-hour task of thorough station cleaning, including COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory) and Kibo. ["Uborka", usually done on Saturdays, includes removal of food waste products, cleaning of compartments with vacuum cleaner, damp cleaning of the SM (Service Module) dining table, other frequently touched surfaces and surfaces where trash is collected, as well as the FE's sleep station with a standard cleaning solution; also, fan screens and grilles are cleaned to avoid temperature rises. Special cleaning is also done every 90 days on the HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) bacteria filters in the Lab.]

As part of the house cleaning, CDR Padalka conducted regular maintenance inspection & cleaning on fan screens in the FGB (TsV2), DC1 (V3), and SM (VPkhO, VPrK, FS5, FS6 & FS9), plus dust filter replacement in the FGB.

The CDR also performed the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers and replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers.]

For his chosen VolSci (Voluntary Weekend Science) program, FE-2 Wakata worked in the Kibo JPM (JEM Pressurized Module), installing dehumidifier units in the CBEF (Cell Biology Experiment Facility) incubator’s micro-G & 1-G sections.

FE-1 Barratt’s VolSci choice, troubleshooting the nonfunctional AgCam (Agricultural Camera), was to look into two failure possibilities identified on the ground team’s fault tree: (1) Bent or broken pins on the AgCam data acquisition cable (straighten pins if bent, wait for a new cable if broken), or (2) failed parallel port on the AgCam laptop (if so, swap with ELT-3 {EXPRESS-3 Rack laptop}). Further steps depend on the outcome of the troubleshooting.

In the US Airlock, Wakata wrapped up the BC4 (Battery Charger 4) troubleshooting by terminating the test discharge of EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) battery #2037 in BC4.

Koichi also completed the regular bi-monthly reboots of the OCA Router and File Server SSC (Station Support Computer) laptops.

At ~9:00am EDT, the crew conducted their regular WPC (Weekly Planning Conference) with the ground, discussing next week's "Look-Ahead Plan" (prepared jointly by MCC-Houston and TsUP-Moscow timeline planners) via S-band/audio, reviewing the monthly calendar, upcoming activities, and any concerns about future on-orbit events.

At ~11:55am, Gennady Padalka powered up the SM's amateur radio equipment (Kenwood VHF transceiver with manual frequency selection, headset, & power supply) and at ~12:00pm conducted a ham radio session with the participants of the Second Russian Innovation Forum at Kursk.

The crew completed their regular daily 2.5-hr. physical workout program (about half of which is used for setup & post-exercise personal hygiene) on the TVIS treadmill (CDR), ARED advanced resistive exercise device (CDR, FE-1, FE-2) and VELO cycle ergometer with bungee cord load trainer (FE-1, FE-2). [The CEVIS (Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation) continues to be unusable (see above).]

Afterwards, Mike downloaded the exercise data file to the MEC (Medical Equipment Computer) for downlinking, including the daily wristband HRM (Heart Rate Monitor) data of the workouts on ARED, followed by their erasure on the HRM storage medium (done six times a week).

CDR Padalka had four job items on his discretionary “time permitting” task list:

A session for Russia's Environmental Safety Agency (EKON), making observations and taking KPT-3 aerial photography of environmental conditions on earth using the Nikon D2X with the SIGMA 300-800mm telephoto lens.
Another run with the GFI-8 "Uragan" (hurricane) earth-imaging program, using the NIKON D2X digital camera to take 800mm-lens telephotos for subsequent downlinking on the BSR-TM payload data channel,
Urine transfer to the Progress Rodnik tankage, and
An audit/inventory of TP-TRG-L thermally conducting gaskets for various electronic components such as GIVUS A6, the TVM & TsVM Computers, and SNT Voltage & Current Stabilizers.

Conjunction Advisory: No maneuver required.

STS-125/Atlantis Return: Due to bad weather, today’s return of Atlantis to KSC was called off for all opportunities.
Return opportunities tomorrow (Sunday) are (EDT):
· 10:11am (Orbit 196) at KSC (Deorbit Burn: 8:58am)
· 11:40am (Orbit 197) at EDW (DO: 10:25am)
· 11:49am (Orbit 197) at KSC (DO: 10:31am)
· 1:19pm (Orbit 198) at EDW (DO: 12:08pm)

Weekly Science Update (Expedition Nineteen -- Week 7)

3-D SPACE: Ongoing.

AgCam (Agricultural Camera): Planned.

ALTCRISS (Alteino Long Term monitoring of Cosmic Rays on the ISS): Complete.

ALTEA DOSI (NASA/ASI): Standing by.

BCAT-3/4 (Binary Colloidal Alloy Test 3/4): “Nice focus. Very interesting images of sample 5, phase separation sample, which merit additional thought. Promised comment last week on crystal samples. Sample 8 (15830) showing crystals, but not as colorful as expected. May need to reduce reflections to see vibrant colors; still pondering and grateful as always for your nice work. Thank you!”

BIOLAB (ESA): No report.

Biological Rhythms (JAXA): Ongoing. Two runs are for Barratt, two are planned for De Winne.

BISE (CSA, Bodies in the Space Environment): Ongoing.

BISPHOSPHONATES: “Koichi, thank you for continuing to take your Alendronate pill. Your next dose will be Monday (5/25). Please continue to adhere to the fasting and NSAID constraints. Thanks for supporting this research.”

CARD (Long Term Microgravity: A Model for Investigating Mechanisms of Heart Disease, ESA): “Many, many thanks Koichi for your dedication and efforts to perform this experiment on 5/20 and 5/21. The CARD protocol includes a 24hrs urine collection, a 24hrs blood pressure monitoring, a blood draw (in the morning of day#2), and 5 cardiac output measurements performed with the HRF-2 Pulmonary Function System (PFS) via re-breathing technique. On 5/20, most of the CARD activities have been performed. An anomaly with the CARDIOLAB blood pressure Holter was encountered and the instrument could not be programmed for the blood pressure monitoring overnight. On 5/21, blood draw, urine collection and two PFS sessions have been completed nominally. Unfortunately, the Holter anomaly forced ESA to call off the continuation of the blood pressure monitoring in conjunction with the remaining two PFS sessions on 5/21. Moderate science impact is expected. Ground team will try to troubleshoot the Holter ASAP. ESA could envisage the possibility to plan for the blood pressure monitoring overnight later on if the Holter anomaly gets solved.”

CARDIOCOG-2: Complete.

CCISS (Cardiovascular & Cerebrovascular Control on Return from ISS): “Mike, your next CCISS session is planned for Wednesday (5/27) and Thursday (5/28).

CFE (Capillary Flow Experiment): Reserve.

CSI-3/CGBA-5 (CGBA Science Insert #2/Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 5): Complete.

CGBA-2 (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 2): Complete.

CIR (Combustion Integrated Rack): “CIR ran 3 FLEX test points on Friday, 5/22. These were the first of the 196 FLEX test points that are planned. We will not know about the success of those test points until after we are able to downlink the images, which isn’t on the timeline until next week, tentatively scheduled for 5/28.”

CSLM-2 (Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures 2): Complete.

Commercial 2 (JAXA): Cosmo Flower mission was completed by Wakata (slipped from I-18)

Commercial 3 (JAXA): Completed.

CW/CR (Cell Wall/Resist Wall) in EMCS (European Modular Cultivation System): Complete.

DomeGene (JAXA): Complete.

EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students): Planned.

EDR (European Drawer Rack, ESA): The rack is continuously active in support of the Protein Crystallization Diagnostic Facility (PCDF) experiment. Over the last couple of weeks, some power trips and reboots of EDR and/or PCDF have been encountered, and engineering teams are pin-pointing a flimsy EDR ESEM Board as the root cause of these problems. ESA plans to perform the swap of this ESEM Board during Week#8 with a spare available on orbit. To perform the swap, EDR and PCDF will have to be powered down for 1h30m minimum (impact to science to be minimized with respect to planned runs and previously formed crystals).

ELITE-S2 (Elaboratore Immagini Televisive - Space 2): Planned.

ENose (Electronic Nose): Operating.

EPM (European Physiology Module): Underway.

EPO (Educational Payload Operations): Reserve.

EPO J-Astro Report (JAXA): “According to EPO request, total report number has increased twofold. Public readers expecting your new reports. We appreciate interesting Space report; please continue with your outstanding job.”

EPO Space Clothes (JAXA): Complete.

EPO Hiten (Dance, JAXA): Complete.

EPO Moon Score (JAXA): Planned.

EPO Try Zero-G (JAXA): Planned.

EPO Kibo Kids Tour (JAXA): Complete.

EPO Spiral Top (JAXA): “Additional photo was very interesting. Thank you. Please keep photo in proprietary folder when you download them.”

ETD (Eye Tracking Device): Completed.

EuTEF (European Technology Exposure Facility): EuTEF platform and its instruments have been safe-configured for the NH3 venting on 5/15. - DEBIE-2: The last EOP script has been nominally started on 5/17 and will run for ~9 days. The instrument continues to regularly generate empty science packets, and as a work-around the instrument script includes a daily power cycle command, which is skipped from ground if the science packets remain nominal. - DOSTEL: On-going science acquisition - nominal;- EXPOSE: On-going science acquisition. On 5/13, the valves of the Experimental Trays have been closed for the NH3 venting event. It is planned to keep those closed for about 2 weeks to avoid any contamination to the samples;- EVC: Instrument is too cold to be operated for the time being;- FIPEX: The last EOP script has been nominally started on 5/17 and will run for ~9 days; - MEDET: the instrument has been manually restarted on 5/19;- PLEGPAY: Inactive, “Experiment 1” memory has been erased on 10/30/2008. Plasma generation capability has been disabled. On 5/21, PLEGPAY Langmuir Probe measurements have been resumed (after ~8.5mths of stand-down due to safety concerns).

FACET (JAXA): “Facet experiments continue smoothly. Microgravity environment in JEM seems very good for the experiment.”

FSL (Fluid Science Laboratory): No report.

GEOFLOW: No report.

HDTV System (JAXA): To be launched by HTV1.

Holter ECG (JAXA): “#2 for FE-2 was completed. There may be low signal intensity for Ch2, but data analysis will be no problem. We believe this is good first step for next Biorhythms experiment as well as future telemedicine demonstration.”

HQPC (JAXA): To be launched by 34P.

ICE CRYSTAL (JAXA): Complete.

IMMUNO (Neuroendocrine & Immune Responses in Humans During & After Long Term Stay at ISS): Complete.

InSPACE-2 (Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions 2): Complete.

Integrated Immune: Complete.

KUBIK-FM1/ KUBIK-FM2 Centrifuge/Incubators: Completed.

LOCAD-PTS (Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System): Completed.

Marangoni Experiment for ISS in JAXA FPEF (Fluid Physics Experiment Facility): In progress.

MAXI (JAXA): “This is not utilization but really close to (External) Payload activity, thus included in this week’s report: .Step 1 is complete and we confirm that modified MAC address data can correctly reach SSIPC. Good step for MAXI to recover from MAC address issue and start operations after 2JA. We need your contribution for Step 2 and 3 before 2JA.”

Micro-G Clay (JAXA EPO): Complete.

MISSE (Materials ISS Experiment): Ongoing.

Moon Photography from ISS (JAXA EPO): One run performed on the last day of Increment 18.

MSG-SAME (Microgravity Science Glovebox): Complete.

MTR-2 (Russian radiation measurements): Passive dosimeters measurements in DC1 “Pirs”.

MULTIGEN-1: Completed.

NOA-1/-2 (Nitric Oxide Analyzer, ESA): Complete.

NUTRITION w/REPOSITORY: Ongoing.

PADLES (JAXA, Area PADLES 3; Passive Dosimeter for Lifescience Experiment in Space): Continuing radiation dose accumulation.

PCDF-PU (Protein Crystallization Diagnostic Facility - Process Unit): Over the last weekend, the last nucleation runs have been successfully performed with EP1 reactor. EP1 Cycle6 has been successfully performed from 5/13 to 5/16. At the end of this run, a minor anomaly has occurred with the PCDF Light Scattering Unit (LSU) device, resulting in a loss of the last 2hrs of Dynamic Light Scattering measurements. Since 5/16, science team is now processing EP3 reactor, with similar nucleation runs, but for a different range of protein concentration. EP3 Cycle1 has been started on 5/16 but had to be aborted due to a PCDF spontaneous reboot on 5/17. EP3 Cycle1 rerun has been restarted and performed successfully from 5/17 to 5/19. EP3 is running nominally since 5/19. The EP4 reactor which contains some nice crystals to be returned by 2J/A. In preparation for the ESEM Board exchange, the science team has decided to progressively decrease its temperature from +23degC to +20degC by 1degC steps (over 24hrs) with some days in-between the temperature decreases. Finally, several important aspects of the remaining PCDF mission objectives have been discussed this week with the science team: 1) reshuffling of remaining science runs until 2J/A return; 2) coordination of periods of interest for SAMS measurements; 3) contingency plan in case of problem with EDR ESEM Board exchange.

PCRF (Protein Crystallization Research Facility) Reconfiguration (JAXA): Complete.

PMDIS (Perceptual Motor Deficits in Space): Complete.

POLCA/GRAVIGEN (ESA): Complete.

RadGene & LOH (JAXA): Complete.

SAMS/MAMS (Space & Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems): Ongoing.

SAMPLE: Complete.

SEDA-AP (JAXA): Exposed Payload,- to be launched by 2JA.

SHERE (Shear History Extensional Rheology Experiment): Complete.

SLEEP (Sleep-Wake Actigraphy & Light Exposure during Spaceflight): “Koichi, next week we are scheduling your 2nd week of Sleep logging for this increment. Mike, thanks for completing the monthly Actiwatch download/initialization session and getting the watches ready for Frank and Bob. The watches will take data until 6/14.”

SMILES (JAXA): Exposed Payload, to be launched by HTV1.

SOLAR (Solar Monitoring Observatory): The next Sun visibility window is expected to start on 5/23. The platform has been put a safe mode for the 33P docking on 5/12. For the NH3 venting event on 5/15, the platform has been put in idle mode (i.e. motor-controlled and fixed) and all the instrument covers closed. After the NH3 venting, SOLAR was put in survival power (feeder#2 only) configuration.

SOLO (Sodium Loading in Microgravity): No report.

SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellite): Reserve.

SPICE (Smoke Point In Co-flow Experiment): Planned.

Swab (Characterization of Microorganisms & Allergens in Spacecraft): Complete.

TRAC (Test of Reaction & Adaptation Capabilities): Planned.

ULTRASOUND: Planned.

VLE (Video Lessons ESA): VLE-1 completed.

WAICO #1/#2 (Waving and Coiling of Arabidopsis Roots at Different g-levels): Complete/Planned (2J/A Stage).

ISS Orbit (as of this morning, 8:32am EDT [= epoch])
Mean altitude -- 350.3 km
Apogee height – 356.9 km
Perigee height -- 343.7 km
Period -- 91.54 min.
Inclination (to Equator) -- 51.64 deg
Eccentricity -- 0.0009804
Solar Beta Angle -- 24.7 deg (magnitude peaking)
Orbits per 24-hr. day -- 15.73
Mean altitude loss in the last 24 hours -- 76 m
Revolutions since FGB/Zarya launch (Nov. 98) -- 60206
RIP Justin Wilson

Online eeergo

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #157 on: 05/29/2009 11:36 AM »
Thanks for the update Robert! :)

Science@NASA has just published a new article on Matroshka's results and its implications for long duration spaceflight, especially outside the magnetosphere. Surprisingly, even though the current models are ok within 10%, NASA doesn't appear to have a sufficiently effective radiation shielding system to support Mars missions, and would barely stay within safety limits in 6-month lunar missions. It appears not everything's about rockets in going 'beyond' ;)

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2009/27may_phantomtorso.htm
-DaviD-

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #158 on: 06/02/2009 09:40 PM »
This week's update... these are hopefully going to get much bigger with the brand new 6-person crew. Some of the experiments that are to begin soon thanks to the newly arrived deWinne, Thirsk or Romanenko are Biological Rythms from JAXA, BISE from the CSA, and WAICO from ESA.

First of all, some anomalies noted in AgCam, but nothing serious:

AgCam (Agricultural Camera): “Mike, the AgCam team was very happy with your successful laptop exchange during your Voluntary Science activity on Saturday, and were all geared up to get good imagery this week. However on Wednesday, 5/27, when attempting to take their first image, another anomaly, unrelated to the first one, became apparent. The AgCam team believes a short troubleshooting crew activity to change a cable would do the trick, and a task list activity to do that is under development.”

JAXA's cell biology experiment is having some difficulties getting set up, but is planned during the 17A stage, so there's still time.

CBEF (JAXA Cell Biology Experiment Facility): Troubleshooting continues. “The CBEF dehumidification was completed. Humidity reached to certain level to be able to start data acquisition of the CO2 sensor which has sensitive for humidity. Fan Rotations have also been finished by Koichi. Thank you for providing more effort than the scheduled task. The results show that the fan of the temp control unit in the micro gravity compartment is completely failed. The ground engineering team is now investigating how to repair this function. The first repair task will be prepared and need to be performed before running the Space Seed experiment, currently scheduled during the 17A stage.”

There have been also some problems on the heptane combustion runs in the CIR, and in a single propane run:

CIR (Combustion Integrated Rack): During last week’s six test point attempts (three methanol, three heptane), two methanol burns were successful but only one of the heptane burn attempts was partially successful. The first methane droplet drifted into the igniter, which immediately stopped the burn. The first two heptane attempts did not burn while the third heptane droplet hung on the dispenser needle and did not have a true microgravity characteristic during its burn. The heptane test point will be re-run at TBD date. The team is still assessing future operations with the given stowage configuration around the CIR rack.

FACET is doing well and will soon be completed:

FACET (JAXA): “75% of experiments have finished. Data show that Microgravity condition in JEM is really good for FACET experiment. We planned two more weeks to run the experiment and all will finish just before the 2J/A arrival if everything goes well.”

The Microgravity Measurement Apparatus in the JEM has completed its first run, and is awaiting Endeavour for data retrieval and the start of its second run:

MMA (Microgravity Measurement Apparatus): First attempt using ELT (Experiment Laptop Terminal) with MMA for micro-G data acquisition was successfully finished after a laptop exchange from MLT (MMA Laptop Terminal) to ELT. We successfully acquired background microgravity data in the JEM using the modified configuration. The MLT hard drive was removed by Koichi (thank you for quick task) and expected to be retrieved by 2J/A for micro-G data salvage on the ground. New hard drive installation will be scheduled after 2J/A which will carry a new drive unit.

Some good news from EuTEF, which is at last operating at its full potential. Specifically, while EXPOSE did temporarly close its lids to avoid ammonia contamination from the S3 radiator venting, PLEGPLAY has reactivated its Langmuir probe, the one that caused concerns about plasma discharge and the Soyuz pyrobolts. I am guessing the Pirs Langmuir probe gives enough confidence now for its activity to resume. I'm not really sure about the status of TRIBOLAB, which was experiencing some difficulties the last time I checked.

EXPOSE: On-going science acquisition. On 5/13, the valves of the Experimental Trays have been closed for the NH3 venting event. It is planned to keep those closed for about 2 weeks to avoid any contamination to the samples;-- PLEGPAY: On 5/21, PLEGPAY Langmuir Probe measurements have been resumed (after ~8.5mths of stand-down due to safety concerns). Preliminary analysis of the measurements shows that the Langmuir Probe is in good shape. Science measurements have been resumed between 5/26 and 5/28. PLEGPAY instrument will be de-activated one day prior to 19S docking.

Finally, very complete update about EDR and its resident experiment, PCDF. In spite of some temperature problems, it appears science impact will be restriced, and some samples are to be returned during STS-127:

EDR (European Drawer Rack, ESA): “Thank you Mike for having successfully performed the exchange of the ESEM Board. During this activity, the PCDF instrument was powered down for 2hrs in total, which is short enough from a science point of view. In order to minimize the temperature fluctuations for the PCDF reactors during the planned power down period, Columbus Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) set-point was increased from +17degC to +19degC. While the ESEM showed good H&S data from the re-activation of EDR, some anomalies have been encountered during PCDF restart (see dedicated PCDF paragraph). The EDR status is fully nominal since 5/27.

PCDF-PU (Protein Crystallization Diagnostic Facility - Process Unit): Over the last weekend, one additional science run has been performed with the EP3 reactor from 5/22 to 5/24. On 5/25, science acquisition started with the last of the 4 PCDF reactors, i.e. EP2. This last reactor is dedicated to study the phenomena of protein depletion zone apparition during crystal growth phase. Initial measurements had to be interrupted in order to perform the EDR ESEM board exchange on 5/27. Both PCDF Electronics Unit (EU) and PCDF Process Unit (PU) were powered off for a total duration of 2hrs during this EDR ESEM board exchange. After this crew activity, EDR got re-activated, followed by PCDF-EU and PCDF-PU power on sequence. Very rapidly an anomaly occurred during the PCDF-PU boot-up, as it started to rapidly cool down in an unexpected way (science impact TBC as soon as new images are available on ground). Ground team immediately performed a power cycle of the PCDF-PU, and normal temperature control of the PCDF-PU was then recovered, but leading to different operative mode of the PU (i.e. Stand-Alone Mode), which did not allow to resume the science acquisition. PCDF was kept in this configuration overnight, with a higher temperature set-point of the Columbus Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) at +19degC (instead of usual +17degC). On 5/28, ESA engineering experts gave their recommendation to proceed with a full and clean power cycling of both PCDF-EU and PCDF-PU. After ground commanding, PCDF-PU was put back in a nominal configuration and the science acquisition could be restarted. The EP4 reactor still contains some nice crystals to be returned by 2J/A. Next weeks will be devoted to grow additional crystals in EP2 reactor.

Oh boy, is this text formatter driving me crazy... sorry for the misplaced italics or strange symbols, I keep editing the post format and it keeps getting all screwed up.[/i][/i]
« Last Edit: 06/02/2009 09:46 PM by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline robertross

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Re: Science Experiments in the ISS
« Reply #159 on: 06/03/2009 01:49 AM »
Thanks David!

Wow, they finally have EuTEF going again!!!!!! Awesome news. Quite the troublesome unit...although for ISS that's nothing new.

And stowage issues around the CIR. They really need another module up there to move some stuff around (preferrably permanent MPLM).
RIP Justin Wilson

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