Author Topic: The suborbital thread!  (Read 636612 times)

Online Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13102
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 2890
  • Likes Given: 434
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1680 on: 07/18/2017 05:56 AM »
In 2014 this flight was scheduled to use VSB-30 rocket serial V12, but scheduled launch date was May 2015! www.unoosa.org/pdf/pres/stsc2014/tech-44E.pdf

VS-30/IO V12 flew on HIFiRE 5B on 18 May 2016. Article also confirms this launch on a VSB-30. Seems to be a coincidence that HIFiRE 5B and HIFiRE 4 have the same serials.

http://www.aeb.gov.br/foguete-com-propulsor-desenvolvido-pelo-dcta-e-lancado-na-australia/
« Last Edit: 07/18/2017 05:59 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8267
  • UK
  • Liked: 1339
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1681 on: 08/03/2017 04:24 PM »
Quote
ARLINGTON: A brand-new ICBM may cost the nation more than $85 billion, but keeping the geriatric Minuteman will cost even more. Thatís according to Boeing, the aerospace giant that began building the original Minuteman I in 1958 and has maintained the much-modified Minuteman III since 1970.

Quote
Sure, the company can reset the odometer on the Minuteman with yet another service life extension program (SLEP), Boeing strategic deterrence chief Frank McCall told reporters this morning. But itís still a 1950s design upgraded over six decades with a mix of technologies it was never intended to accommodate. While parts of the guidance and propulsion systems date to 1993, for example, some parts are so old the original manufacturers have long since gone out of business. That forces the Air Force to expensively reinvent the wheel Ė or, say, a 1961-vintage mechanical coding device.

So for about the same price as a rebuilt Minuteman, McCall told us, Boeing would rather build you an all-new missile. Thatís what the Air Force calls the Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent. (Lockheed and Northrop are also competing). GBSD would get you better performance, he said, including against modern, precision-guided missile defenses, which didnít exist when the Minuteman was designed. (Back then, cutting-edge missile defense destroyed incoming warheads by detonating a nuclear weapon over your own territory). It would be flexible for a wide range of scenarios, whereas the Minuteman was optimized for a massive exchange with Russia across the North Pole. And even sticking with low-risk, proven technology, it would be decades more advanced than Minuteman.

http://breakingdefense.com/2017/08/new-icbm-cheaper-than-upgraded-minuteman-boeing-on-gbsd/

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4474
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 3027
  • Likes Given: 1006
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1682 on: 08/13/2017 12:00 PM »
Quote
Aug. 13, 2017
RockSat-X Successfully Launches from NASA Wallops

The RockSat-X student payload was successfully launched on a NASA Terrier-Improved Malemute suborbital sounding rocket at 5:30 a.m., Sunday, Aug. 13, from NASAís Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

The payload flew to an altitude of 94 miles during its suborbital flight. It descended by parachute and landed in the Atlantic Ocean where it was recovered.

The payload will be returned to Wallops later today, Aug. 13; the experiments will be removed and returned to the student teams.

More than 100 students from 15 universities and community colleges from across the Unites States participating in RockSat-X were on hand to witness the launch.

The experiments were flown through the RockSat-X program in conjunction with the Colorado Space Grant Consortium. RockSat-X is the most advance of NASAís three-phase sounding rocket program for students. The RockOn launches are at the entry level then progress to the intermediate level RockSat-C missions, culminating with the advanced RockSat-X.

The three-tier program introduces secondary institution students to building experiments for space flight and requires them to expand their skills to develop and build more complex projects as they progress through the programs. RockSat-X experiments are flown approximately 20 miles higher in altitude than those in the RockOn and RockSat-C programs, providing more flight time in space.

The next launch from Wallops is a NASA Black Brant IX suborbital sounding rocket in mid-September carrying a technology development payload.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/wallops/2017/rocksat-x-successfully-launches-from-nasa-wallops

3rd picture caption:

Quote
RockSat-X team.
Students with the RockSat-X group pose in front of their rocket prior to launch operations. The RockSat-X mission successfully launched from NASA Wallops Aug. 13.
« Last Edit: 08/13/2017 12:01 PM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Online catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4705
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1496
  • Likes Given: 928
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1683 on: 08/13/2017 09:03 PM »
Terrier-Improved Malemute sounding rocket launches RockSat-X payload

SciNews
Published on Aug 13, 2017

A NASA Terrier-Improved Malemute sounding rocket launched the RockSat-X student project, experiments built by students through the RockSat-X program, on 13 August 2017, at 09:30 UTC (05:30 EDT), from the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. RockSat-X is the most advanced of NASAís three-phase sounding rocket program for students.  The RockOn launches are at the entry level, then progress to the intermedia level RockSat-C missions and then RockSat-X.

Credit: NASA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WsoWrxjgS-Y?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Lewis007

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1193
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 170
  • Likes Given: 83
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1684 on: 09/15/2017 06:49 AM »
On Sep 12, the Russian Strategic Rocket Forces performed a successful launch of a silo-based Yars ICBM from Plesetsk to the Kura test site in Kamchatka. According to the official release by the Ministry of Defense, the goal of the launch was to confirm reliability of a party of missiles of this class. The statement also said that experimental warheads successfully reached their targets.

source: http://russianforces.org/blog/2017/09/test_launch_of_yars_missile_wi.shtml

Online Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13102
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 2890
  • Likes Given: 434
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1685 on: 09/21/2017 04:41 AM »
The two WINDY payloads launched on 9 September. Note that Kwajalein is +12 UTC.

https://www.nasa.gov/Wallops/2017/feature/nasa-mission-to-study-atmospheric-disturbances-from-marshall-islands
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12856
    • Space Launch Report
  • Liked: 3610
  • Likes Given: 617
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1686 on: 09/21/2017 03:23 PM »
Second RS-24 Yars launch in just over a week took place on September 20 from Plesetsk.  This one was from a mobile launcher.
http://russianforces.org/blog/2017/09/training_launch_of_yars_icbm_f.shtml



 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 09/22/2017 01:49 PM by edkyle99 »

Online Olaf

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1030
  • Germany
  • Liked: 169
  • Likes Given: 172
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1687 on: 09/23/2017 07:48 AM »
Iran Test-Fires New Ballistic Missile With Range of 1,200 Miles
https://sputniknews.com/military/201709231057632271-iran-new-missile-launch-test/

Online Olaf

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1030
  • Germany
  • Liked: 169
  • Likes Given: 172
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1688 on: 09/26/2017 07:32 PM »

Offline Lewis007

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1193
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 170
  • Likes Given: 83
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1689 on: 09/27/2017 07:08 AM »
A video of the latest Topol launch can be seen on this webpage:
https://tvzvezda.ru/news/vstrane_i_mire/content/201709261927-8qvb.htm

Online jcm

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2814
  • Jonathan McDowell
  • Somerville, Massachusetts, USA
    • Jonathan's Space Report
  • Liked: 357
  • Likes Given: 299
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1690 on: 09/29/2017 01:04 AM »
Iran Test-Fires New Ballistic Missile With Range of 1,200 Miles
https://sputniknews.com/military/201709231057632271-iran-new-missile-launch-test/

The consensus of pundits seems to be that this story is incorrect, and the new Iranian TV footage was
of the launch back in January
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Offline Rik ISS-fan

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 749
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 153
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1691 on: 10/04/2017 03:06 PM »
Between September 18th and Oktober 18th westward of Scotland in the Atlantic Ocean, the NATO Naval BMD
formidable shield 2017 takes place.
At the end of the exercize a missile (most likely Terrier mk12. Orion) will be launched from the MOD Outer Hebrides range, that is operated by QinetiQ.
« Last Edit: 10/04/2017 03:06 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Online catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4705
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1496
  • Likes Given: 928
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1692 on: 10/04/2017 09:47 PM »
Terrier-Black Brant IX sounding rocket launches ASPIRE payload

NASA
Published on Oct 4, 2017


NASA tested a parachute platform during the flight of a Terrier-Black Brant IX suborbital sounding rocket on Oct. 4, from the agencyís Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The rocket carried the Advanced Supersonic Parachute Inflation Research Experiment (ASPIRE) from NASAís Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. The mission will evaluate the performance of the ASPIRE payload, which is designed to test parachute systems in a low-density, supersonic environment.

This video is available for download from NASA's Image and Video Library:
https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-NHQ_2017_1004_NASA%20Launches%20Parachute%20Test%20Platform%20from%20Wallops.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pB9Lhnvm7Gc?t=001

« Last Edit: 10/04/2017 09:51 PM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4474
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 3027
  • Likes Given: 1006
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1693 on: 10/05/2017 06:58 AM »
Quote
Gorgeous launch of @NASAJPL's #ASPIRE payload at 6:45 a.m. today from Wallops! The team had a smooth countdown and a good flight.

https://twitter.com/nasa_wallops/status/915553484338073601

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8267
  • UK
  • Liked: 1339
  • Likes Given: 168
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1694 on: 10/05/2017 11:40 AM »
On Sep 12, the Russian Strategic Rocket Forces performed a successful launch of a silo-based Yars ICBM from Plesetsk to the Kura test site in Kamchatka. According to the official release by the Ministry of Defense, the goal of the launch was to confirm reliability of a party of missiles of this class. The statement also said that experimental warheads successfully reached their targets.

source: http://russianforces.org/blog/2017/09/test_launch_of_yars_missile_wi.shtml

It seems there was even more to this launch than at first sight.

Quote
Russia tested a new and experimental type of intercontinental-range ballistic missile multiple warhead delivery method in September 2017, the Diplomat has learned.

According to a U.S. government source with knowledge of a recent U.S. intelligence assessment of Russian ballistic missile testing who spoke to the Diplomat, Russiaís strategic missile force recently tested an independent post-boost vehicle (IPBV) configuration for a three-warhead version of its solid-fuel, road-mobile RS-24 Yars ICBM.

The test was carried out on September 12 from a silo at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Archangelsk Oblast, striking at targets at the Kura Missile Test Range in Kamchatka Krai. It occurred just days before the start of the massive Russia-Belarus Zapad-2017 military drills. Itís unclear if this was the first test of an IPBV configuration on a Russian ICBM.

https://thediplomat.com/2017/10/revealed-russias-new-experimental-icbm-warheads/

Offline Rik ISS-fan

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 749
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 153
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1695 on: 10/16/2017 06:43 PM »
Formidable Shield went succesfully.
Two Large missile targets were launched.
The first was launched on September 25th, this test didn't go as planned. But the missile was tracked by a radar at a distance of 1500km. This was not part of Formidable Shield. {Thales Naval}.

The real test took place Oktober 15th, and was a succes.
From QinetiQ's Hebrides launch zone a Terrier Oriole was launch. This was detected by the Smart-L radar on Zr. Ms. De Ruiter (F804). The track information was send to USS Donald Cook (DDG75) [simplified explanation]. The Aegis system on USS Donald Cook also detected the missile target, and fired an SM-3 Block IB to successfully destroy it.

At the same time Spanish SPS Alvaro de Bazan (F101) fired a ESSM to destroy a anti-ship cruise missile. And Zr.MS. Tromp (F803) fired two ESSM's to destroy two anti-ship cruise missiles, one flying a zigzag profile and the other one made a pup-up maneuver.
 
c6f.navy.mil reported this, and also published that the available launch range was used for a SM-6 test (not part of Formidable Shield 2017).

And an older BBC Article
« Last Edit: 10/16/2017 07:16 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Online Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13102
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 2890
  • Likes Given: 434
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1696 on: 10/17/2017 04:58 AM »
Formidable Shield went succesfully.
Two Large missile targets were launched.
The first was launched on September 25th, this test didn't go as planned. But the missile was tracked by a radar at a distance of 1500km. This was not part of Formidable Shield. {Thales Naval}.

The article says the missile test was part of FS17. Perhaps you meant that the radar tracking was not part of FS17.

"On 25 September, a ballistic missile was launched from the Hebrides (Scotland) as part of Formidable Shield 2017"
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 749
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 153
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1697 on: 10/17/2017 07:33 AM »
Formidable Shield went succesfully.
Two Large missile targets were launched.
The first was launched on September 25th, this test didn't go as planned. But the missile was tracked by a radar at a distance of 1500km. This was not part of Formidable Shield. {Thales Naval}.

The article says the missile test was part of FS17. Perhaps you meant that the radar tracking was not part of FS17.

"On 25 September, a ballistic missile was launched from the Hebrides (Scotland) as part of Formidable Shield 2017"

This is a new radar on a test tower in the Netherlands (Smart-L MM). They used the launches to test the radar and to get information to improve it.

Online Olaf

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1030
  • Germany
  • Liked: 169
  • Likes Given: 172
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1698 on: 10/26/2017 06:25 PM »
http://tass.com/defense/972794
Russia launches ballistic missiles from submarines, spaceport during strategic drills

Offline Lewis007

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1193
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 170
  • Likes Given: 83
Re: The suborbital thread!
« Reply #1699 on: 10/27/2017 07:22 AM »
There's more news about the Sep 12 launch of the Yars missile.
According to The Diplomat's Ankit Panda, Russia tested "an independent post-boost vehicle (IPBV) configuration for a three-warhead version [of the Yars ICBM]."
For more info, see: http://russianforces.org/blog/2017/10/yars_launch_in_september_teste.shtml

Tags: