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1
With $9billion per year, particularly after 2024 when ISS comes down, NASA can get to Mars.

If they're buying a ride from SpaceX, then yea. If you expect it to be via SLS/Orion, I wouldn't bet anything of value on that horse.
3
I'm waiting to see if we need to "update" what a maximum damage to a successfuly returned stage looks like...

Did this one use a 3 engine landing burn?

Yes

Are you sure about that? The burn duration appeared to be about 30 seconds, which is consistent with previous single-engine landing burns.

Thought I had heard/read it here... Could be mistaken... It's happened before.
4
looks like all three ships have turned tword port

edit: go searcher looks to be just drifting with the flow
5
ASDS and Go Ships may be waiting for a rising tide to aid entry to port. Local low tide occurred at 10:36Pm EDT
7
At this point of the hosted webcast, the commentator on the left explicitly mentioned (and hand motioned) the 1-3-1 sequence:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBYC4f79iXc?t=29m54s

Thanks, I missed the sign language.   ;)
8
The center engine stays running for control, the outer two are timed to optimally minimize gravity loss (putting on the brakes hard means less time resisting acceleration due to gravity, hence more fuel saved for the final vectored approach).
9
At this point of the hosted webcast, the commentator on the left explicitly mentioned (and hand motioned) the 1-3-1 sequence:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBYC4f79iXc?t=29m54s

They start with one engine, turn on 2 more, turn off 2 and land with one? Why the sequenced startup? Might be related to the sudden jerk due to change in acceleration or to ease the tilt if the engines don't ramp up correctly?
10
At this point of the hosted webcast, the commentator on the left explicitly mentioned (and hand motioned) the 1-3-1 sequence:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBYC4f79iXc?t=29m54s
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