Author Topic: Soyuz reentry ground track  (Read 2141 times)

Offline spr_84

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Soyuz reentry ground track
« on: 01/19/2012 01:42 PM »
Hi,
I work with earth observation satellite data and was recently struck by the idea - purely for fun - of seeing if it's possible to capture satellite reentries with spacebourne sensors (primarily SEVIRI on Meteosat).
To my mind the easiest target to look for is a Soyuz reentry, as they're well documented and well timed (unlike the rather chaotic actions of Phobos-Grunt, for instance).
Looking for a reentry signature with no other information is rather like looking for a needle in a haystack, though, and that's where you guys come in: Do any of you have a handy map that shows the typical reentry path for a soyuz mission?
I realise they'll differ somewhat, but hopefully they follow more or less the same path (coming in from the South over Africa and up towards Russia, I presume).
If any of you have/can point me to a list of Soyuz reentry dates/times then that'd be very useful as well.

Thanks!

Offline ChileVerde

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Re: Soyuz reentry ground track
« Reply #1 on: 01/19/2012 02:16 PM »

If you load ISS orbital elements into a tracking program that shows ground tracks, the ones that pass through the landing area in Kazakhstan should be pretty close. The area is shown in http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/structure/elements/soyuz/landing.html and is near the town of Arkalyk, 50 N, 67 E.
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Offline ChileVerde

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Re: Soyuz reentry ground track
« Reply #2 on: 01/19/2012 03:28 PM »
To my mind the easiest target to look for is a Soyuz reentry, as they're well documented and well timed (unlike the rather chaotic actions of Phobos-Grunt, for instance).

Thinking about this, one strategy might be to track the computed position of ISS on the reentry pass, but look a bit ("a bit" needs to be defined) ahead of the station's location. Because of the slightly odd way orbital mechanics works, the Soyuz will pull ahead after the deorbit burn until it actually reenters uprange of the landing area.
"I canít tell you which asteroid, but there will be one in 2025," Bolden asserted.

Offline deaville

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Re: Soyuz reentry ground track
« Reply #3 on: 01/19/2012 09:41 PM »
Just a thought - you could try the 'Zayra' web site by Bob Christy.
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Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Soyuz reentry ground track
« Reply #4 on: 01/19/2012 10:14 PM »
I may be a little off topic, but I remember a long while back a NOAA weather satellite  captured a picture of the Challenger accident. I also vaguely recall back in the 80's some hubbub about a Landsat managing to capture by accident a then Soviet through the ice SLBM test.

My point being, if the timing is correct, it can and has been done.
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