Author Topic: ESA - Mars Express updates  (Read 82034 times)

Offline FransonUK

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Don't ya wish your spaceship was hot like me

Offline Ad Astra

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #1 on: 11/30/2005 05:54 PM »
It's starring us in the face. Let's get to Mars and see what it has to obviously offer.

Offline realtime

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #2 on: 12/01/2005 03:54 AM »
"Water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink..."

Unless you stick a well in it and have a sip.  It would be a hard life at first and it may never be easy, but an enterprising and intrepid group of people could make a living there.  This is confirmation.



Offline FransonUK

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #3 on: 12/01/2005 12:44 PM »
And there's more from Titan as well.
Don't ya wish your spaceship was hot like me

Offline Avron

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #4 on: 12/02/2005 02:35 AM »
Quote
FransonUK - 1/12/2005  8:44 AM

And there's more from Titan as well.

Thanks ESA and JPL, great work...

Offline Hotol

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #5 on: 04/10/2006 02:03 PM »
They call it the happy face image, but I think it looks more like Pacman!

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMMTFNFGLE_0.html

Offline MartianBase

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #6 on: 04/14/2006 06:59 AM »
great !

I wonder what those conspiracy nuts think of this, will the add it to the cydonia face and martian pyramids

Online Chris Bergin

Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #7 on: 04/21/2006 09:19 AM »
By mapping minerals on the surface of Mars using the European Space Agency's Mars Express spacecraft, scientists have discovered the three ages of Martian geological history - as reported in today's issue of Science - and found valuable clues as to where life might have developed.

Full story:
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM117OFGLE_index_0.html

Offline eeergo

Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #8 on: 04/21/2006 12:07 PM »
Funny ages names... I love the "siderikian";)
-DaviD-

Offline Fab

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #9 on: 04/27/2006 02:30 AM »
my question is -- if there was life in Mars, billions of years ago, and nobody lived, that means that there wasn't intelligent life there, or else they'd have manage to adapt - whcih makes me think that there wasn't life at all, because even roaches adapt to new living conditions...
dare to imagine.

Offline PlanetStorm

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #10 on: 06/24/2006 02:20 PM »
Quote
Fab - 26/4/2006  9:17 PM

my question is -- if there was life in Mars, billions of years ago, and nobody lived, that means that there wasn't intelligent life there, or else they'd have manage to adapt - whcih makes me think that there wasn't life at all, because even roaches adapt to new living conditions...

Ha! Intelligence has yet to be proven to be an advantage! If we are still here in 100 million years I might take your argument seriously! :)

Offline PlanetStorm

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #11 on: 06/24/2006 02:39 PM »
Quote
eeergo - 21/4/2006  6:54 AM

Funny ages names... I love the "siderikian";)


Yes, but quite appropriate for the red planet because I think siderikian = age of iron. Also, Phyllocian (or phyllosian) = age of sheets or leaves (presumably mica of some other sheet-like mineral); and theiikian = age of sulphate.

Online Chris Bergin

Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #12 on: 08/28/2006 12:51 PM »
Planetary scientists have discovered the highest clouds above any planetary surface. They found them above Mars using the SPICAM instrument on board ESA's Mars Express spacecraft. The results are a new piece in the puzzle of how the Martian atmosphere works.

More at:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMC4JZ7QQE_0.html

Offline meiza

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #13 on: 08/28/2006 04:15 PM »
CO2 crystal clouds at 80 to 100 km height? Mars Odyssey seems to have passed at 95 km at lowest when aerocapturing... What if it had met one of these?
( http://ccar.colorado.edu/asen5050/projects/projects_2004/dunn/ )

Offline simonbp

Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #14 on: 08/28/2006 04:49 PM »
Here's a 30 km limb cloud seen by MGS; I belive the shot on ESA's site is from Pathfinder...

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2005/09/07/

Simon ;)

Offline JulesVerneATV

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #15 on: 08/28/2006 08:52 PM »
Quote
simonbp - 28/8/2006  11:36 AM

Here's a 30 km limb cloud seen by MGS; I belive the shot on ESA's site is from Pathfinder...

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2005/09/07/

Simon ;)

You're correct

I quote : http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEMC4JZ7QQE_1.html
'This true-colour view taken by NASA's Pathfinder rover in August 1997 shows clouds in the Martian eastern sky (30 degrees above the horizon), as imaged before sunrise.'

Offline jacqmans

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #16 on: 07/13/2007 10:34 AM »
The origin of perennial water-ice at the South Pole of Mars

13 July 2007

Thanks to data from ESA's Mars Express mission, combined with models of the Martian climate, scientists can now suggest how the orbit of Mars around the Sun affects the deposition of water ice at the Martian South Pole.
 
Early during the mission, the OMEGA instrument (Visible and Infrared Mineralogical Mapping Spectrometer) on board Mars Express had already found previously undetected perennial deposits of water-ice. They are sitting on top of million-year old layered terrains and provide strong evidence for a recent glacial activity.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMKZRNSP3F_index_0.html

Offline jacqmans

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #17 on: 08/01/2007 01:26 PM »
The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA's Mars Express obtained images of the Tyrrhena Terra region on Mars.

Read more:
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM72PB474F_index_0.html

Offline Michael Z Freeman

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #18 on: 09/04/2007 11:09 PM »

Have you discovered the HSRC web interface  ? 3D projections as well.

DJ Barney

I love NSF!

Offline jacqmans

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Re: ESA - Mars Express updates
« Reply #19 on: 10/16/2007 02:48 PM »
The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on ESA’s Mars Express orbiter has obtained pictures of the Noachis Terra region on Mars, in particular, the striking Maunder crater.

Full story at:
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMOHJAMS7F_index_0.html

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