Author Topic: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)  (Read 16236 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #80 on: 05/11/2017 02:40 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/10/2017

Posted on May 10, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

OsteoOmics: The crew changed BioCell media in BioCell Habitat 3. The media in all four of the habitats will be changed in this second of four weeks of OsteoOmics operations.  Crewmembers experience bone loss in orbit, stemming from the lack of gravity acting on their bones. OsteoOmics investigates the molecular mechanisms that dictate this bone loss by examining osteoblasts, which form bone, and osteoclasts, which dissolve bone.  Improved understanding of these mechanisms could lead to more effective countermeasures to prevent bone loss during space missions and in a wide range of disorders on Earth. This may lead to better preventative care or therapeutic treatments for people suffering bone loss as a result of bone diseases like osteopenia and osteoporosis, or for patients on prolonged bed rest.

Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab)-3: Today’s second operational day for the Sarcolab-3 experiment began with converting the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) from the ankle measurement configuration to the knee measurement configuration. Subject donned the Percutaneous Electrical Muscle Stimulator (PEMS) and Electromyography (EMG) electrodes to stimulate and measure calf muscle and tendon response at the back of the knee (calf muscle origin).  During the knee joint evaluation, the subject sat on the MARES dynamometer with the chair and pantograph set to obtain knee flexion and extension from a 90 degree knee angle to full extension with the knee torque adapter securely fixed to the shin. The inflight data will be compared to preflight and post flight measurements to measure the impact of a hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss. Sarcolab investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus, or calf muscle, where it joins the Achilles tendon which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Phase Change Heat Exchanger (PCHx):  The crew removed the Wax Tray from the PCHx and stowed it for return on SpaceX 11. The objective of the PCHx Project is to create a unique test platform to advance the technology readiness level of phase change heat exchangers for infusion into future exploration vehicles. Phase change material heat exchangers are a useful technology that helps certain space missions in regulating the thermal conditions on their particular spacecraft. They serve as a supplemental heat rejection device during time-varying heat loads and/or transient environments. It does so by storing waste energy by melting a phase change material during peak loads. It can then reject this energy through a radiator when conditions allow, causing the phase change material to freeze.

European Space Agency (ESA) Active Dosimeter Swap:  The crew retrieved dosimeters worn by crewmembers and deployed them in the Columbus module, Node 3 and the Service Module. The European Crew Personal Active Dosimeter is worn by European ISS crewmembers on orbit to measure radiation exposure. This device, coupled with other dosimeters in the Columbus Laboratory, provides radiation dosage information that can be used to support risk assessment and dose management. The goal is to enable the verification of radiation monitoring systems for future medical monitoring of crewmembers in space.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The crew completed the following in preparation for Friday’s planned EXPRESS Pallet Controller Assembly (ExPCA) EVA.
•Detailed timeline and procedures review
•Briefing package review
•Tool configuration summary review
•Added EVA specific pages to the cuff checklist

On-Board Training (OBT) Emergency Response: All crew members participated in a rapid depress emergency scenario and completed the following objectives:
•Practiced ISS emergency response with crew and ground roles based on information provided by simulator displays.
•Physically translated through the ISS to appropriate response locations to visualize use of ISS equipment and interfaces.
•Practiced procedure execution and associated decision making based on cues provided by the simulator.
•Practiced communication and coordination with Mission Control Center (MCC)-Houston and MCC-Moscow as required for a given emergency scenario.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday afternoon, Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS, configured and stowed the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) on Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 2 (PDGF2) using the Space Station Robotic Manipulator System (SSRMS).  After stowing the SPDM, Controllers translated the Mobile Transporter from Worksite 3 (WS3) to WS4 and maneuvered the SSRMS into config for Friday’s ExPCA EVA. 

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #81 on: 05/11/2017 02:42 PM »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #82 on: 05/15/2017 06:10 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/11/2017

Posted on May 11, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
OsteoOmics: The crew changed BioCell media in BioCell Habitat 4. The media in all four of the habitats are changed in this second of four weeks of OsteoOmics operations.  Crewmembers experience bone loss in orbit, stemming from the lack of gravity acting on their bones. OsteoOmics investigates the molecular mechanisms that dictate this bone loss by examining osteoblasts, which form bone, and osteoclasts, which dissolve bone.  Improved understanding of these mechanisms could lead to more effective countermeasures to prevent bone loss during space missions and in a wide range of disorders on Earth. This may lead to better preventative care or therapeutic treatments for people suffering bone loss as a result of bone diseases like osteopenia and osteoporosis, or for patients on prolonged bed rest.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): The crew completed a series of interactive tasks during a FMS session today. The FMS investigation studies how the fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of the investigation is to determine how fine motor performance in microgravity trends/varies over the duration of a six-month and year-long space mission; how fine motor performance on orbit compare with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance trends/varies before and after gravitational transitions, including periods of early flight adaptation and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: In preparation for tomorrow’s planned EXPRESS Pallet Controller Assembly (ExPCA) EVA, the crew verified tools are configured properly and that batteries are installed in Pistol Grip Tools and cameras. They also performed a final procedures review and conference with ground teams followed by final Equipment Lock preparation. Egress is scheduled tomorrow at 7:10AM CDT.

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #83 on: 05/15/2017 05:23 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/12/2017

Posted on May 12, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

EXPRESS Pallet Controller Assembly (ExPCA) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) #42: EV1 Peggy Whitson and EV2 Jack Fischer performed the ExPCA EVA today. At the start of In-Suit Light Exercise (ISLE) Prebreathe, a water leak was discovered at the Service Cooling Umbilical (SCU) for Fischer’s suit.  The leaking SCU was subsequently disconnected and the functioning SCU was shared between the two EMU suits which impacted EMU battery capability, resulting in the EVA being shortened to 4 hours 12 minutes. During that time, the following tasks were completed:

Planned Tasks

    ExPCA R&R
    Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA) 3 forward shield install
    Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) 1553 terminator install
    Secure Multilayer Insulation (MLI) on Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS)

Get-ahead Task

    COL Articulating Portable Foot Restraint (APFR) relocation to PMA3

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) in support of today’s EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (ExPRESS) Carrier Avionics (ExPCA) EVA. IVA Crew Pesquet maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) into position, then EV2 Fisher installed the Articulating Portable Foot Restraint (APFR) on the SSRMS Latching End Effector (LEE) and ingressed it. Pesquet then maneuvered the SSRMS for EV2 to remove and replace the failed ExPCA on the Express Logistics Carrier #4 (ELC-4) with the spare ExPCA. When the failed ExPCA was stowed, Pesquet maneuvered the SSRMS to position EV2 for APFR egress, then Pesquet backed the SSRMS to a park position.
---
SMS ;-).

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #84 on: 05/16/2017 08:39 AM »
https://twitter.com/NanoRacks/status/864397090667016193
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This week's #CubeSat deployments have officially begun! @QB50Mission's #SOMP2 #HAVELSAT and #Columbia deployed from #NRCSD at 08:24:59 GMT

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #85 on: 05/16/2017 12:01 PM »
https://twitter.com/NanoRacks/status/864449895331180544
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Second #NRCSD deployment complete this morning at 11:54:59 GMT for @UniKent #SGSAT, @MoreheadState #CXBN2 and @NASAGoddard #IceCube

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #86 on: 05/16/2017 02:26 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/15/2017

Posted on May 15, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

SkinSuit:  Over the weekend a crewmember performed two days of Skinsuit activities. With assistance from an operator, measurements of the subject were taken after donning the suit in the morning and before doffing it in the afternoon. The Skinsuit is a tailor-made overall with a bi-directional weave specially designed to counteract the lack of gravity by squeezing the body from the shoulders to the feet, with a force similar to that felt on Earth. The subjects perform an evaluation of the efficacy of the Skinsuit in reducing or preventing lower back pain and preventing spine elongation.  They measure the gravitational load provided by Skinsuit and evaluate operational considerations, in particular hygiene, microbiology, comfort, thermoregulation, donning and doffing, impingement and range of motion.  Results from this investigation will be used to prepare for long duration missions.

Human Research Program (HRP): A 50S crewmember collected Flight Day (FD) 30 blood and urine samples over the weekend and today for Biochem Profile and Repository investigations.
•The Biochem Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during and after spaceflight.  Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time under controlled conditions. This archive of biosamples will be used as a resource for future spaceflight related research.

NanoRack Cubesat Deployer (NRCSD) #11: The crew installed two Quad deployers on the attachment mechanism of the JEM (Japanese Experiment Module) Airlock (JEMAL) Slide Table. The table was then retracted and JEMAL depressurized and vented in preparation for planned Cubesat deployment over the next two days.

NanoRacks Module-55:  The crew swapped a sample inside the NanoRacks Module 55 which is mounted on the front of NanoRacks Platform-1 in the JEM. This investigation is part of research into why bacteria are more virulent and grow more rapidly in space.  NanoRacks Module 55, also known as NanoRacks – National Design Challenge – Centaurus High School – The Effects of Simulated Gravity on Bacterial Lag Phase in a Microgravity Environment (NanoRacks-NDC-CHS-Bacterial Lag Phase), studies the bacterial lag phase, a delay period before the start of exponential growth, which is much shorter in microgravity than it is on Earth. The experiment uses a centrifuge to simulate gravity, comparing microgravity and simulated-gravity Escherichia coli (E. coli) cultures to determine whether microgravity itself causes changes in bacterial growth. 

Genes in Space 3: The crew completed a session of the Genes in Space 3 experiment today.They retrieved a sample from a General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER) and inserted it into the miniature Polymerase Chain Reaction (miniPCR) system for processing.  Later they removed the sample and put it into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  Genes in Space-3 seeks to establish a robust, user-friendly deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sample preparation process to enable biological monitoring aboard the ISS. The project joins two previously spaceflight tested molecular biology tools, miniPCR and the MinION, along with some additional enzymes to demonstrate DNA amplification, sample preparation for DNA sequencing, and sequencing of actual samples from the ISS. The Genes in Space-3 experiments demonstrate ways in which portable, real-time DNA sequencing can be used to assay microbial ecology, diagnose infectious diseases and monitor crew health aboard the ISS.

OsteoOmics: The crew fixated BioCells in Biocell Habitat 1 and inserted the sample into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  Crewmembers experience bone loss in orbit stemming from the lack of gravity acting on their bones. OsteoOmics investigates the molecular mechanisms that dictate this bone loss by examining osteoblasts, which form bone, and osteoclasts, which dissolve bone.  Improved understanding of these mechanisms could lead to more effective countermeasures to prevent bone loss during space missions and in a wide range of disorders on Earth. This may lead to better preventative care or therapeutic treatments for people suffering bone loss as a result of bone diseases like osteopenia and osteoporosis, or for patients on prolonged bed rest.

Fluid Shifts: A 49S crew member performed the first of two days of their Flight Day 180 Fluid Shifts operations in the Russian Segment. The subject donned the Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP/Chibis) device while the operator, with ground support in Moscow, assisted in the medical monitoring.  Additionally, while the subject was in the LBNP and experiencing the negative pressure (pulling the fluid feetward), the Crew Medical Officer performed Cerebral and Cochlear Fluid Pressure (CCFP) and Ultrasound measurements. Fluid Shifts is a joint NASA-Russian experiment that investigates the causes of severe and lasting physical changes to astronauts’ eyes. Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is investigated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and eye damage.

Post Extravehicular Activity: Following Friday’s EVA #42, on Saturday the crew completed post-EVA activities including EMU water maintenance dump and fill, camera disassembly, Airlock deconfiguration and a debrief with ground teams.

Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA) 3 Leak Checks: The crew will pressurize and verify integrity of PMA3 by performing gross and fine leak checks. PMA3 was relocated from Node 3 Port to Node 2 Zenith in March to configure Node 2 Zenith as a future visiting vehicle docking port.

Node 2 Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA) Vibration Noise: On Thursday, May 11th, 2017, the crew reported a vibration noise in the Crew Quarters (CQ) that appeared to be coming from the Node 2 CCAA. Initial data and telemetry review does not indicate any obvious anomalous signatures. The crew positioned foam between the CQ and the CCAA but it was still noticeable and the vibrations could be felt through the floor in the CQ. Teams are reviewing the data will discuss the forward plan.

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #87 on: 05/17/2017 08:15 AM »
https://twitter.com/NanoRacks/status/864658802007834624
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We've got three more @QB50Mission #CubeSats in orbit. Welcome to space #PHOENIX @XCubeSat and #QBEE! Deploy time of 01:45:00 GMT

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #88 on: 05/17/2017 08:18 AM »
https://twitter.com/NanoRacks/status/864756655703175168
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One big deploy early this morning - #MillenniumSpaceSystems #ALTAIR - a 6U #CubeSat - released into low-Earth orbit at 08:12:59 GMT

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #89 on: 05/17/2017 03:46 PM »
https://twitter.com/NanoRacks/status/864823636586377217
Quote
Another good #NRCSD deploy! #AFRL's 6U #SHARC #CubeSat cruised into orbit from @Space_Station at 12:40:01 GMT

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #90 on: 05/18/2017 09:48 AM »
May 17, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-055

Utah Students to Speak to NASA Astronauts on International Space Station
 
 
Utah students will speak with NASA astronauts living and working aboard the International Space Station at 12:40 p.m. EDT Friday, May 19. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 51 Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Jack Fischer, both of NASA, will speak with students gathered at Utah State University’s (USU) Space Dynamics Laboratory in North Logan, Utah. The event will be hosted by USU in partnership with U.S. Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah.

Whitson launched to the space station Nov. 17, 2016. Fischer launched to the station in April. Both astronauts are scheduled to return to Earth in September.

Hatch plans to attend the event. He will speak with the students and then open the call to the astronauts. All participating students are focusing their education in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

“Our students will have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to communicate with astronauts in space,” Hatch said. “This historic event is the culmination of months of hard work and coordination between my office and our friends at NASA. Utah has long been a key contributor to NASA missions, and Utah State is one of the leading space-grant universities. That’s why I have fought to improve our space exploration capabilities throughout my senate service. It’s an honor that our state was chosen to host this special event, which will only strengthen the natural partnership between Utah’s STEM workforce and the U.S. space program.”

Media interested in covering the event should contact Eric Warren, director of media relations for Utah State University, at 435-881-8439 or eric.warren@usu.edu. The event is scheduled to take place in the Robert F. Bennett Research Laboratory building at the Space Dynamics Laboratory.

A map to the facility can be found here:

https://www.usu.edu/map/index.cfm?id=238

The following Utah schools will attend the event:
•InTech Collegiate High School, North Logan (grades 8-12)
•Logan High School, Logan (grades 9-12)
•Mount Logan Middle School, Logan (grades 6-8)
•North Sanpete Middle School, Moroni (grades 7-8)
•Uintah High School, Vernal (grades 10-12)
•Wendover High School, Wendover (grades 10-12)

The following Utah schools are slated to watch the downlink on NASA TV:

•Dual Immersion Academy, Salt Lake City
•Edith Bowen Laboratory School, Logan
•Ephraim Middle School, Ephraim
•Wendover Junior High School, Wendover

In preparation for the in-flight education downlink, more than 400 students throughout Utah participated in various space-related activities based on NASA’s education resources. These activities range from learning about what life is like for an astronaut in space and exploring space careers to participating in hands-on aerospace engineering activities, such as designing and 3-D printing instruments and tools to be used in space.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in STEM, This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA Education’s STEM on station activity, which provides a variety of space station resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Get NASA TV streaming video, schedules and downlink information at:

https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Learn about videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #91 on: 05/18/2017 09:49 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/16/2017

Posted on May 16, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
NanoRack Cubesat Deployer (NRCSD) #11 Deploy:  Six cubesats were deployed today from the ISS: SGSat, CXBN-2 and IceCube, SOMP2, HAVELSAT, and COLUMBIA. SGSat demonstrates the attitude determination and control system reliant on utilization of pictures of star fields to orient the satellite and validate new software used to predict the satellite’s path as it experiences atmospheric drag.  CXBN-2 (Cosmic X-Ray Background Nanosatellite) uses an advanced materials detector system, a novel instrument configuration and a detector array twice the size of the used by the previous CXBN system. Data collected by the instrument minimizes critical uncertainties in subtle signals left over from the Big Bang and may clarify other sources of interstellar radiation as well.  IceCube will perform first-of-a-kind measurements of the ice particles embedded within clouds. These measurements advance monitoring technology and also fill in critical gaps in understanding how cloud ice affects the weather and how cloud formations process atmospheric radiation.  The remaining three cubesats are from the QB50 constellation of CubeSats from countries around the world. The constellation aims to study the upper reaches of the Earth’s atmosphere over a period of 1 to 2 years. The QB50 satellites conduct coordinated measurements on a poorly studied and previously inaccessible zone of the atmosphere referred to as the thermosphere. The project monitors different gaseous molecules and electrical properties of the thermosphere to better understand space weather and its long term trends.

Fluid Shifts: A 49S crewmember acted as onboard operator for subject Russian crewmember for Fluid Shifts operations. With remote guidance from the Fluid Shifts ground team, the USOS crewmember took measurements for Cerebral and Cochlear Fluid Pressure (CCFP), a Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) test, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), and a Tonometry examination.  Fluid Shifts is a joint NASA-Russian experiment that investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes. Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is investigated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and eye damage.

Genes in Space 3: The crew completed a session of the Genes in Space 3 experiment. They retrieved a sample from a General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER) and inserted it into the miniature Polymerase Chain Reaction (miniPCR) system for processing. Later they removed the sample and put it into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). Genes in Space-3 seeks to establish a robust, user-friendly deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sample preparation process to enable biological monitoring aboard the ISS. The project joins two previously spaceflight tested molecular biology tools, miniPCR and the MinION, along with some additional enzymes to demonstrate DNA amplification, sample preparation for DNA sequencing, and sequencing of actual samples from the ISS. The Genes in Space-3 experiments demonstrate ways in which portable, real-time DNA sequencing can be used to assay microbial ecology, diagnose infectious diseases and monitor crew health aboard the ISS.

OsteoOmics: The crew fixated BioCells in Biocell Habitat 2 and inserted the sample into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). Crewmembers experience bone loss in orbit, stemming from the lack of gravity acting on their bones. OsteoOmics investigates the molecular mechanisms that dictate this bone loss by examining osteoblasts, which form bone, and osteoclasts, which dissolve bone.  Improved understanding of these mechanisms could lead to more effective countermeasures to prevent bone loss during space missions and in a wide range of disorders on Earth. This may lead to better preventative care or therapeutic treatments for people suffering bone loss as a result of bone diseases like osteopenia and osteoporosis, or for patients on prolonged bed rest.

Combustion Integration Rack (CIR) Fuel Oxidizer Management Assembly (FOMA) Remove and Replace:  The crew completed a routine changeout of the CIR FOMA. This activity supports the ongoing Cool Flames investigation.  Cool Flames provides new insight into the phenomenon where some types of fuels initially burn very hot, then appear to go out but continue burning at a much lower temperature with no visible flames (cool flames). Understanding cool flame combustion helps scientists develop new engines and fuels that are more efficient and less harmful to the environment.

Node 2 Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA) Remove and Replace:  Last week the crew reported noise and vibration near the Node 2 Crew Quarters. Ground teams susequently determined that the most probable source was the Node 2 CCAA inlet fan. Today the crew succesfully R&Rd the CCAA fan and resolved the issue.   

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #92 on: 05/18/2017 02:26 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/17/2017

Posted on May 17, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

NanoRack Cubesat Deployer (NRCSD) #11 Deploy:  Five Cubesats were deployed today from the ISS:  Phoenix, Xcubesat, Qbee, Altair and SHARC.  ALTAIR is a technology demonstration / risk reduction mission for critical subsystems for the ALTAIR product line of spacecraft.  SHARC (Spacecraft for High Accuracy Radar Calibration) hosts a series of experimental payloads including a C-band transponder and GPS. The primary goal of SHARC is to contribute to the calibration of Department of Defense (DoD) tri-service C-band radar installations. The remaining three cubesats that are being launched today are from the QB50 constellation of CubeSats from countries around the world. The constellation aims to study the upper reaches of the Earth’s atmosphere over a period of 1 to 2 years. The QB50 satellites conduct coordinated measurements on a poorly studied and previously inaccessible zone of the atmosphere referred to as the thermosphere. The project monitors different gaseous molecules and electrical properties of the thermosphere to better understand space weather and its long term trends.

Fluid Shifts:  A 50S crew member performed their second of their two days of Flight Day 180 Fluid Shifts Chibis operations in the Russian Segment. They donned the Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP/Chibis) device while the operator, with ground support in Moscow, assisted in the medical monitoring.  Additionally, while the subject was in the LBNP and experiencing the negative pressure (pulling the fluid feetward), the Crew Medical Officer performed Ultrasound measurements. Fluid Shifts is a joint NASA-Russian experiment that investigates the causes of severe and lasting physical changes to astronauts’ eyes. Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is investigated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and eye damage.

Veg-03: The crew harvested leaves from Chinese Cabbage growing in the Veggie facility for crew consumption. The plants will be left in place to continue growing. The goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate the proof of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and planting pillows. Future long-duration missions into the solar system will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which entails growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and ISS made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the Veggie hardware to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables. Tests determine which types of microorganisms are present in space-grown cabbage, providing baseline data for future crop-growing efforts. Behavioral health surveys assess the impact of growing plants on crew morale and mood.

OsteoOmics:  Crew fixated BioCells in Biocell Habitat 3 and insert the sample into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). Crewmembers experience bone loss in orbit, stemming from the lack of gravity acting on their bones. OsteoOmics investigates the molecular mechanisms that dictate this bone loss by examining osteoblasts, which form bone, and osteoclasts, which dissolve bone. Improved understanding of these mechanisms could lead to more effective countermeasures to prevent bone loss during space missions and in a wide range of disorders on Earth. This may lead to better preventative care or therapeutic treatments for people suffering bone loss as a result of bone diseases like osteopenia and osteoporosis, or for patients on prolonged bed rest.

Genes in Space 2: The crew completeed a session of the Genes in Space 2 experiment. They retrieved a sample from a General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER) and inserted it in the miniature Polymerase Chain Reaction (miniPCR) system for processing.  Later they removed the sample and put it into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Genes in Space 2 investigation is based on the winning student proposal from the second Genes in Space competition.  It tests whether the polymerase chain reaction can be used to study deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) alterations on board the ISS.  Spaceflight causes many changes to the human body, including alterations in DNA and a weakened immune system. Understanding whether these two processes are linked is important for safeguarding crew health, but DNA technology that can track these changes is relatively untested in space.

Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA) 3 Ingress:  Following the successful completion of gross and fine leak checks, the crew opened the Node 2 overhead to PMA 3 hatch in preparation for ingress. They then removed the Common Berthing Mechanism Center (CBM) Disc Cover, Controller Panel Assemblies (CPA) and the Centerline Berthing Camera System (CBCS) which were used during the PMA 3 relocation from Node 3 Port to Node 2 Zenith in March. They also installed an Active CBM to Passive CBM ground strap.

ISS Reboost: Later this afternoon the ISS is scheduled to perform a reboost using the Service Module main engines. The purpose of the reboost is to set up planned conditions for 49S landing on June 2 and 67P launch on June 14.

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #93 on: 05/19/2017 01:39 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 5/18/2017

Posted on May 18, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

NanoRack Cubesat Deployer (NRCSD) #11 Deploy: The final six CubeSats for NRCSD #11 were deployed today from the ISS:  Aerosat, Link, CSUNSat, UpSat, SpaceCube and Hoopoe.  CSUNSAT was developed at California State University Northridge (CSUN) in partnership with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).  It is being used to validate in space a new low temperature energy storage system developed at JPL. The remaining cubesats being launched today are from the QB50 constellation of CubeSats from countries around the world. The constellation aims to study the upper reaches of the Earth’s atmosphere over a period of 1 to 2 years. The QB50 satellites conduct coordinated measurements on a poorly studied and previously inaccessible zone of the atmosphere referred to as the thermosphere. The project monitors different gaseous molecules and electrical properties of the thermosphere to better understand space weather and its long term trends.

Sprint Ultrasound 2 Operations: The crew configured Ultrasound 2, placed reference marks on the calf and thigh of right leg, donned Sprint (Integrated Resistance and Aerobic Training Study) thigh and calf guides, and performed thigh and calf scans with guidance from the Sprint ground team. Ultrasound scans are used to evaluate spaceflight-induced changes in the muscle volume. The Sprint investigation evaluates the use of high intensity, low volume exercise training to minimize loss of muscle, bone, and cardiovascular function in ISS crewmembers during long-duration missions.

Fluid Shifts:  A 49S crewmember performed their Flight Day 30 Fluid Shifts Chibis operations in the Russian Segment. They donned the Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP/Chibis) device while the operator, with ground support in Moscow, assisted in the medical monitoring.  While the subject was in the LBNP and experiencing the negative pressure (pulling the fluid feetward), the USOS crewmember will take measurements for Cerebral and Cochlear Fluid Pressure (CCFP), a Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) test, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), and a Tonometry examination.  Fluid Shifts is a joint NASA-Russian experiment that investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes. Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is investigated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and eye damage.

Biolab:  Today the crew replaced the Biolab Centrifuge rotor belt.  On August 4, 2016 the crew noticed that the centrifuge would not rotate due to the rotor belt not being properly aligned. The BioLab is a multiuser research facility located in the Columbus laboratory. It is used to perform space biology experiments on microorganisms, cells, tissue cultures, small plants, and small invertebrates.

OsteoOmics:  The crew fixated BioCells in Biocell Habitat 4 today and inserted the sample into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  Crewmembers experience bone loss in orbit, stemming from the lack of gravity acting on their bones. OsteoOmics investigates the molecular mechanisms that dictate this bone loss by examining osteoblasts, which form bone, and osteoclasts, which dissolve bone.  Improved understanding of these mechanisms could lead to more effective countermeasures to prevent bone loss during space missions and in a wide range of disorders on Earth. This may lead to better preventative care or therapeutic treatments for people suffering bone loss as a result of bone diseases like osteopenia and osteoporosis, or for patients on prolonged bed rest.

Service and Cooling Umbilical (SCU) Remove & Replace (R&R): In preparation for last week’s EVA, at the beginning of In-Suit Light Exercise (ISLE) Prebreathe a water leak was discovered at the SCU for Fischer’s Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) suit. The leaking SCU was subsequently disconnected and a single functioning SCU was shared between the two EMU suits. Today the crew R&Rd the faulty SCU, removed air from the feed water line and filled transport water lines. The faulty SCU will return to the ground for investigation.

Online Chris Bergin

Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #94 on: 05/20/2017 11:14 PM »
https://twitter.com/cbs_spacenews/status/866059113213677568
ISS: No immediate impact & crew in no danger; but contingency spacewalk likely needed soon to replace MDM-1 if troubleshooting can’t fix

Online DaveS

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #95 on: 05/20/2017 11:59 PM »
https://twitter.com/cbs_spacenews/status/866059113213677568
ISS: No immediate impact & crew in no danger; but contingency spacewalk likely needed soon to replace MDM-1 if troubleshooting can’t fix
According to this tweet by Bill Harwood, the MDM-1 failure occurred today at 1815UTC (2:15 pm EDT):

https://twitter.com/cbs_spacenews/status/866058461502681088
ISS: 1 of 2 fully redundant computer relay boxes (MDM-1) on the space station’s power truss apparently failed today around 2:15pm EDT
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
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Offline rsnellenberger

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #96 on: 05/21/2017 01:33 AM »
Link to a fine article discussing the prior failure of EXT-2 MDM in April 2014:

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2014/04/imminent-spacewalks-external-mdm-failure-iss/

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #97 on: 05/21/2017 10:02 AM »
So this is identical to the April 2014 EXT-2 MDM failure in terms of impacts, as both EXT-1 and EXT-2 serve in a primary and back-up role to each other.

At this time, EXT-2 should have kicked in as the back-up to EXT-1, however the concern now will be loss of redundancy, since if EXT-2 fails, command & control will be lost to the Mobile Transporter (MT), Thermal Radiator Rotary Joint (TRRJ), Secondary Electrical Power System (SEPS), Passive Thermal Control System (PTCS), and Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ).

I don't know if any spare EXT MDMs are available onboard (they are stored internally), but it would be a fairly quick & simple EVA to change it out. Could probably be done robotically, but they likely wouldn't risk a robotic operation with EXT-1 down (besides, there are no spares stored externally anyway).
« Last Edit: 05/21/2017 10:08 AM by Space Pete »
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Offline psloss

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #98 on: 05/21/2017 03:07 PM »
https://twitter.com/cbs_spacenews/status/866307347722981376
Quote
ISS: Space station managers met today and approved a contingency spacewalk to replace a failed external avionics box (MDM-1)

https://twitter.com/cbs_spacenews/status/866307467319422976
Quote
ISS: MDM-1, loaded with upgraded software, was installed during a spacewalk March 30; it suffered an apparent hardware failure Saturday

https://twitter.com/cbs_spacenews/status/866307615890034688
Quote
ISS: ISS crew assembled a replacement MDM today; it will be installed during a spacewalk next week, possibly as early as Tuesday
« Last Edit: 05/21/2017 03:08 PM by psloss »

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Re: Expedition-51 thread (April - June 2017)
« Reply #99 on: 05/21/2017 07:44 PM »
Does the spare MDM that they will install also have the upgraded software? Any chance that the upgrade could be related?

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