Author Topic: General ISS Q&A thread  (Read 522033 times)

Offline anik

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #40 on: 10/14/2006 12:09 PM »
Quote
dutch courage - 14/10/2006  2:56 PM

Does anybody know what tasks will be preformed during the november 22/23 EVA by Tyurin and Lopez-Alegria?

From ISS Expedition 14 Press Kit:

Russian EVA-17

1. Golf project: Tyurin will conduct a Russian commercial activity for a Canadian golf equipment manufacturer, hitting a golf ball from a “tee” mounted outside the Pirs airlock

2. Install Vsplesk on the large diameter part of the Zvezda Service Module (SM). VSPLESK is a science experiment in earthquake forecasting, observing the Earth both before and after an event

3. Install BTN-Neutron on the small diameter part of Zvezda. BTN-Neutron is a science experiment to develop a
model of the radiation background of the ISS space environment during different flight conditions

4. Changeout experiment CKK #5 with CKK #9 on the Zvezda large diameter aft end. CKKs are detachable
cassette-containers that measure the level and composition of contamination, and monitor the change in operating characteristics for samples of materials from the outside surfaces of the ISS Russian segment. The CKK is a two-flap structure, and consists of a casing and spool holders with samples. Samples of materials for the outside surfaces of the ISS Russian segment modules are exposed within the cassettes

5. Install bracket on Zvezda aft end and relocate WAL antenna #2 to it. The WAL #2 is a low gain antenna used for
space-to-space communication with the European Automated Transfer Vehicle

6. Inspect mechanisms on the Strela-2 crane system. During Russian EVA 16, the EVA crew reported that the stopper arms designed to prevent the Strela translation ring from coming off the end of the Strela boom were not fully deployed

Also see http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=61&start=259 (about "Vsplesk") and http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=61&start=211

Offline dutch courage

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #41 on: 10/14/2006 12:29 PM »
Thanks for your elaborate answer, anik :)

Offline rdale

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #42 on: 10/14/2006 04:22 PM »
FYI that's available at http://www.shuttlepresskit.com

Offline Spiff

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #43 on: 10/15/2006 12:04 PM »
Now that Elektron is offline again they are using some of the oxygen 'candles' again on ISS.

1. How do these work?
2. How many do they have and how much oxygen does 1 provide?
I always consider space to be the FIRST frontier.

Offline Jim

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #44 on: 10/15/2006 01:01 PM »
lithium perchlorate.  I believe one supplies 3 mandays of O2

Offline tesheiner

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #45 on: 10/16/2006 03:18 PM »
I made a question some time ago related to that broken CMG (CMG-1) which was replaced during STS-114 last year and returned back for analysis/refurbishment, but got no answer.
Now that the CMGs are on the news again I think it's time to ask for a second time if there are any info/results on the analysis of that CMG, which kind of damage was found inside, failure reasons, etc?

Offline dutch courage

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #46 on: 10/16/2006 06:33 PM »
Quote
tesheiner - 16/10/2006  5:01 PM

Now that the CMGs are on the news again I think it's time to ask for a second time if there are any info/results on the analysis of that CMG, which kind of damage was found inside, failure reasons, etc?

During today's ISS Mission Coverage Kyle Herring said the ground controlers had been testing with the current failed CMG. Spinning it up to 500 rpm and testing for vibrations and deceleration times. A vibrating bearing cover is presumed to be the culprit.


Offline Suzy

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #47 on: 10/16/2006 09:05 PM »
Quote
Spiff - 15/10/2006  9:47 PM
   
   Now that Elektron is offline again they are using some of the oxygen 'candles' again on ISS.
   
   1. How do these work?
   2. How many do they have and how much oxygen does 1 provide?
 

From the "ISS Russian Segment Life Support System (Star City, 1997)" guide (linked diagrams are stored on my Photobucket site):

   
 

The TGK (Fig. A-4) consists of a replaceable cartridge with an igniter, a striker mechanism, a filter, a dust collection filter, and a fan that are located inside one case. The TGK is designed for the thermal decomposition of an oxygen compound packaged in a cylindrical cartridge. When oxygen exits the generator, it is cooled by airflow. The oxygen generator is activated by the crew if ppO2 drops to 160 mmHg and per ground instructions. The TGK is activated by rotating the driving handle (knob) until a specific “click” sound is heard. This sound indicates that the pin has struck the ignition device and the chemical reaction has begun.

   

One cartridge yields 600 L (21.2 ft³) of oxygen. The contents of the cartridge take 5-20 minutes to decompose at a reaction temperature of 450-500°C (842-932°F). Temperature of the outer surface of the TGK may reach 50°C (122°F). If the fan is running, it takes approximately 3 hours for the cartridge to cool down.

   

The cartridge is replaced in the following way:

     
     
  • the fan is stopped;
  •    
  • the latch is opened;
  •    
  • the clamping handle is turned 180°;
  •    
  • the crossbar is unlatched;
  •    
  • the cartridge is pulled out of the TGK.
  •  
   

The cartridge replacement takes approximately 2 minutes.

   

A cloth dust collector is placed over the fan intake. The collector is changed when full. The TGK fan is turned on by means of toggle switches TGK-1, TGK-2 on the systems power supply panel (PPS-23) (Fig. A-5, B-2).

 

TGK = Tverdotoplivnyi Generator Kisloroda, the system for oxygen generation using solid state fuel (I don't know how many are on board, sorry  :(


Offline hop

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #48 on: 10/16/2006 09:41 PM »
It was mentioned recently that the old mechanical ignition system is being replaced with an electric ignition system.

see http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=22269

Last I heard they are using oxygen from Quest, having used up all the oxygen candles that were near their expiration date.

Offline tesheiner

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #49 on: 10/17/2006 10:28 AM »
Quote
dutch courage - 16/10/2006  8:16 PM

Quote
tesheiner - 16/10/2006  5:01 PM

Now that the CMGs are on the news again I think it's time to ask for a second time if there are any info/results on the analysis of that CMG, which kind of damage was found inside, failure reasons, etc?

During today's ISS Mission Coverage Kyle Herring said the ground controlers had been testing with the current failed CMG. Spinning it up to 500 rpm and testing for vibrations and deceleration times. A vibrating bearing cover is presumed to be the culprit.


Thanks for the info about the current failed CMG.
But I'm still looking for data on the failed CMG which was replaced last year.  ;)

Offline Spiff

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #50 on: 10/17/2006 08:04 PM »
Hey thanks everyone again for explanations and pictures!
Interesting is that Jim talks about Lithiumperchlorate (LiClO4) and hop's article about Potassiumperchlorate (KClO4.) Not that it matters much, the reaction is almost the same.
;)
I always consider space to be the FIRST frontier.

Offline reubenb

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #51 on: 10/18/2006 05:07 AM »
Quote
tesheiner - 17/10/2006  5:11 AM

Quote
dutch courage - 16/10/2006  8:16 PM

Quote
tesheiner - 16/10/2006  5:01 PM

Now that the CMGs are on the news again I think it's time to ask for a second time if there are any info/results on the analysis of that CMG, which kind of damage was found inside, failure reasons, etc?

During today's ISS Mission Coverage Kyle Herring said the ground controlers had been testing with the current failed CMG. Spinning it up to 500 rpm and testing for vibrations and deceleration times. A vibrating bearing cover is presumed to be the culprit.


Thanks for the info about the current failed CMG.
But I'm still looking for data on the failed CMG which was replaced last year.  ;)

Don't remember where I read it, but I read it was being refurbished to have as a spare.

Offline tesheiner

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #52 on: 10/18/2006 09:34 AM »
Yep.
This last report about the currently falied CMG also includes a note talking about refurbishment of the old CMG-1, but no details wrt its condition right after returning it back from the station.

Offline Spirit

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #53 on: 10/19/2006 04:41 PM »
Why will Roskosmos increase the production of Progress ships after 2009 when ATV and HTV will be flying. Now for a crew of three the Russians launch four Progress ships per year. The Progress transports 1 700 kg of cargo. 4 x 1 700 = 6 800 kg. That's for three crew members. ATV alone delievers 7 500 kg and HTV 7 900 kg. So one ATV and one HTV launches per year should be enough to support a six member crew. And still the Russians plan to increase Progress production instead of decreasing it. What's wrong with my calculations?

A second question: 4 x Souyz per year for supporting six crew member rotation. This means that no space tourists and no short duration (8-10 days) cosmonauts will fly after 2009. Is that going to happen?
Regards,
Atanas

Offline Jim

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #54 on: 10/19/2006 05:28 PM »
It is not just crew support.  The Progress and ATV provide fuel and attitude control.   Larger mass and drag profile of the ISS means more fuel is required.   With the addition of the Columbus and KIBO, there will be more experiments to fly to the ISS.

Offline Danderman

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #55 on: 10/19/2006 06:38 PM »
Quote
Spirit - 19/10/2006  9:24 AM

Why will Roskosmos increase the production of Progress ships after 2009 when ATV and HTV will be flying. Now for a crew of three the Russians launch four Progress ships per year. The Progress transports 1 700 kg of cargo. 4 x 1 700 = 6 800 kg. That's for three crew members. ATV alone delievers 7 500 kg and HTV 7 900 kg. So one ATV and one HTV launches per year should be enough to support a six member crew. And still the Russians plan to increase Progress production instead of decreasing it. What's wrong with my calculations?

A second question: 4 x Souyz per year for supporting six crew member rotation. This means that no space tourists and no short duration (8-10 days) cosmonauts will fly after 2009. Is that going to happen?

It is not uncommon for Russian plans to have large numbers of Soyuzes and Progresses flying in the "out" years. However, the real plans are decided upon about 18 months before launch of any particular article.

As for the 4 Soyuzes a year, there would be double the number of flight opportunities for space tourists if that came to pass.


Offline Spirit

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #56 on: 10/19/2006 08:53 PM »
I don't understand that. There will be 4 Souyzes. The first two will transport x3 astrounats that are members of a 6 moth expedition. Then the second two will transport the 6 crew members of the next expedition 6 moths later. So where are the tourists?
Regards,
Atanas

Offline Jorge

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #57 on: 10/20/2006 01:56 AM »
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Spirit - 19/10/2006  3:36 PM

I don't understand that. There will be 4 Souyzes. The first two will transport x3 astrounats that are members of a 6 moth expedition. Then the second two will transport the 6 crew members of the next expedition 6 moths later. So where are the tourists?

Same place they are now, in the third seat of the Soyuz, at least until September 2010. Currently ISS has a crew of three, with one rotating on shuttle and the other two rotating on Soyuz. That opens up the third seat on Soyuz for a tourist. The same scheme can continue when the crew goes to six, with four on Soyuz and two on shuttle, leaving two seats open for tourists. After the shuttle fleet is retired, all six will rotate on Soyuz and there will be no tourists seats until either COTS or Orion becomes available, or Russia ramps up Soyuz production further to add dedicated tourist flights.
--
JRF
JRF

Offline dbhyslop

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #58 on: 10/20/2006 02:05 AM »
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Jorge - 19/10/2006  9:39 PM
After the shuttle fleet is retired, all six will rotate on Soyuz and there will be no tourists seats until either COTS or Orion becomes available, or Russia ramps up Soyuz production further to add dedicated tourist flights.

Since they're going to have to double the flight rate just for ISS staffing, is it realistic from an operational perspective that there would be additional flights just for tourists?

Dan

Offline lmike

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Re: General ISS Q&A thread
« Reply #59 on: 10/20/2006 02:06 AM »
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Spirit - 19/10/2006  9:24 AM
...
So one ATV and one HTV launches per year should be enough to support a six member crew.
...

I think it's not only the amount that's important but also the frequency (relating to the cost of a launch as well).  Or at least an ability to deliver small amount of crucial supplies on shorter notice.  Fresh fruit, parcels from family, drinking water, tool replacements, spare parts to repair broken machinery, perishables, etc...  (some of these may not sound important, but they do help folks up there endure half a year stretch in space)  A super large delivery capability is certainly desirable for some things, but frequent (well, relatively, once in 3 months at least) small and (relatively) inexpensive deliveries will still be needed.  With a larger crew the frequency also increases in importance as a parameter.

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