Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION  (Read 1661 times)

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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CRS-13 Discussion thread

NSF Threads for CRS-13 : Discussion

NSF Articles for CRS-13:

NSF Articles for CRS missions :  https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/?s=CRS


Launch NET 1 November 2017 on Falcon 9 from LC-40



External cargo: Space Debris Sensor



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX Section
« Last Edit: 04/20/2017 02:18 PM by Galactic Penguin SST »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #1 on: 04/20/2017 01:24 PM »
Created the thread to have sonewhere to post this!

Quote
NASA's JC Liou of Orbital Debris Office: We expect our Space Debris Sensor to fly to ISS on Nov 1 @SpaceX's Falcon 9/Dragon.

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/855045463711641601

Edit: so I can't count! CRS-12 is NET August, CRS-13 Nov.
« Last Edit: 04/20/2017 01:28 PM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : NET 1 Nov 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #2 on: 05/03/2017 04:27 PM »
Space Debris Sensor Waiting For Launch
The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) has completed functional testing and been delivered to the Kennedy Space Center for final integration checkout with the International Space Station (ISS). From there it will go into storage until a SpaceX launch vehicle is ready to deliver it to the ISS.  Launch is currently scheduled for late 2017.

The SDS is a flight demonstration of an impact sensor designed to detect and characterize impacts by small debris objects. The sensor will be attached to the ESA Columbus module facing the ISS velocity vector with one square meter of detection area. The sensor combines multiple technologies to measure the time, speed, direction, size, and density of objects greater than 50 Ám in size. With this information, as well as the orbital position of each detection, the sensor should collect enough data over its intended minimum 2-year mission to update the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model for objects smaller than 1 mm near ISS altitudes. With lessons learned from the SDS experience, a follow-on mission to place a second-generation sensor at higher altitudes will someday provide the ability to update the risk from small debris to many operational spacecraft in low Earth orbit.
« Last Edit: 05/10/2017 02:54 PM by gongora »

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