Author Topic: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket  (Read 2871 times)

Offline Robotbeat

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VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« on: 04/18/2017 11:36 PM »
VASMIR originally was a fusion rocket concept but never had a real hope of getting ignition. But what about as a plasma core fission rocket? Line the thing with neutron reflectors... It could be done, if done at a big enough scale. I wonder how high of Isp it could achieve if no external radiators were used and the magnets were cooked with liquid hydrogen propellant.
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Offline Elmar Moelzer

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #1 on: 04/19/2017 12:02 AM »
VASMIR originally was a fusion rocket concept but never had a real hope of getting ignition. But what about as a plasma core fission rocket? Line the thing with neutron reflectors... It could be done, if done at a big enough scale. I wonder how high of Isp it could achieve if no external radiators were used and the magnets were cooked with liquid hydrogen propellant.
Hmm, do you mean something like a gas core NTR?

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #2 on: 04/19/2017 12:12 AM »
Sorta, except hotter. Has to be a plasma for the magnetic nozzle to work.
« Last Edit: 04/19/2017 12:25 AM by Robotbeat »
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Offline Stan-1967

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #3 on: 04/19/2017 12:46 AM »
Sorta, except hotter. Has to be a plasma for the magnetic nozzle to work.

just to be clear...

1.  Are you proposing to (a.) expel the fuel in plasma state that sustains the fission out the magnetic nozzle, or (b.) proposing to expel another working fluid/propellant, heated by the fission plasma, out the nozzle?

I'm assuming you are proposing (b).   So you can skip the bulk of the power demands to heat the plasma via RF heating, but are still stuck with the power demands of powering & cooling the superconductors & pumps.  Can you extract power (via MHD) from the exiting plasma to feed power back into the system?   I am also assuming your propellant ( Argon?) will be used for cooling?

Sounds like maybe you want to combine  Zubrin's NSWR with VASIMIR's nozzle,  or hopefully "fix" the safety problem inherent to Zubrins idea.


Offline Robotbeat

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #4 on: 04/19/2017 12:56 AM »
Both. Fission products and any extra propellant needed to keep the chamber from melting and keep the coils cool.
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Offline Stan-1967

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #5 on: 04/19/2017 01:31 AM »
Both. Fission products and any extra propellant needed to keep the chamber from melting and keep the coils cool.

Well if it is going to be powered by fission, you need to maintain a very controlled neutron economy, so I don't think this favors allowing the mixing your hydrogen/propellant into the fission core. The core also need a effective reflector to keep the neutrons contained.  How then do the thermodynamics & heat transfer work out to heat the propellant to a plasma?  The transient time in the chamber will be too short for any convective or radiative solution to work. ( the downfall of the GCR scheme)  That seems to leave isolating the fission core, & using it to power the RF couplers if you can extract the power.

Now we are back the VASIMIR needing a magical power source.


Offline Robotbeat

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #6 on: 04/19/2017 01:39 AM »
The plasma would be isolated by magnetic pressure. It'd be heated by the process of fission. Fission doesn't need heat to work, in fact it works better if cold as it'd be denser. Residence time would be controlled by controlling the shape of the magnetic bottle/nozzle.

It's possible it'd have to be absurdly huge to work in order to reach criticality with a low density plasma. But I'm cool with that.
« Last Edit: 04/19/2017 01:41 AM by Robotbeat »
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Offline Robotbeat

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #7 on: 04/19/2017 01:43 AM »
Also, it's possible you could mix in the hydrogen with the fission products near the nozzle throat so as not to mess up the neutron economy. Ideally, you wouldn't need to add hydrogen, but I'm betting there's going to be a hell of a lot of heat leaking into the VASIMR structure, so you'll need to carry that away with hydrogen.
« Last Edit: 04/19/2017 01:44 AM by Robotbeat »
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Offline Hanelyp

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #8 on: 04/19/2017 02:30 AM »
I'm wondering if there's a magnetic field configuration that would contain the fissile plasma as it radiatively heated a propellant plasma that then escapes through a magnetic nozzle.  Maybe a field-reversed configuration with the fuel in the closed inner field lines as propellant travels the open field lines around it.

Offline Elmar Moelzer

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #9 on: 04/19/2017 02:49 AM »
So you would create something that is similar to a gas core reactor, but with even hotter fuel so that the gas becomes a plasma. I don't think that this has ever been done before. I would probably start with research on gas core reactors and then go on from there.

Online Asteroza

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #10 on: 04/19/2017 09:30 AM »
You would probably need to benchmark this against a "conventional" NTER + VASIMR accelerator/nozzle where the turbo-inductor heats to/near-to plasma conditions in the last stages of the heater assembly (turbo-inductor functions as an inductive heater which may be able to replace the VASIMR helicon functionally).

See ESA NTER study, NTER = NTR + turbo-inductor

http://www.esa.int/gsp/ACT/doc/PRO/ACT-RPR-PRO-1107-LS-NTER.pdf

https://info.aiaa.org/tac/SMG/STTC/White%20Papers/THE%20NUCLEAR%20THERMAL%20ELECTRIC%20ROCKET%20ENGINE%20AIAASTTC.pdf

turbo-inductor is before the throat so can still squeeze the VASIMR accelerator/nozzle stack in the bottom...


Offline Rei

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #11 on: 04/19/2017 12:15 PM »
Well if it is going to be powered by fission, you need to maintain a very controlled neutron economy, so I don't think this favors allowing the mixing your hydrogen/propellant into the fission core. The core also need a effective reflector to keep the neutrons contained.  How then do the thermodynamics & heat transfer work out to heat the propellant to a plasma?

I don't know about this idea in general, but hydrogen (1H) is the most effective neutron moderator (elastic scattering cross section times energy drop per scattering) of all isotopes.  Now, its rate of (n,gamma) reactions is higher than would be preferred, which if you need an improved neutron economy is remedied by using deuterium as a moderator, which is excellent in both moderating abillity (although the cross section is lower than 1H and the mass doubled) an and low rate of neutron absorption.  So if you're going for a slow reactor, hydrogen in the fuel is not only possible, but desired. Now if you want a fast reactor, no, you don't want hydrogen anywhere near it.

Another possibility is 4He.  The cross section is quite low, and the mass 4x that of 1H - but the (n, gamma) rate is zero.  Not "near zero" - literally zero; it will never capture a neutron.

I'm not sure what you're referring to when you talk about neutron reflectors in the same context as heat transfer. Neutron reflectors aren't mirrors, it's not about reflecting electromagnetic radiation (visible, IR, etc, aka how radiative cooling works).  They don't really "reflect" neutrons; they just have low rates of neutron capture, and so a "random walk" leads to neutrons frequently reentering the core (it is technically possible to make an actual neutron mirror, but it requires *extremely* cold neutrons). A moderator can double as a reflector for a fast reactor; otherwise you want your moderator made with heavy elements to minimize the amount of neutron energy transferred per interaction.  It's also popular to make reflectors out of multipliers - that is, isotopes with significant (n, 2n), (n, 3n), etc reactions. The only light element that has this to a significant degree is beryllium, which also lucks into having a rather low (n, 2n) cross section.  Most heavy elements have meaningful (n, 2n) cross sections to varying degrees, and often (n, 3n), (n, 4n), etc of relevance. But they tend to require faster neutrons for it than beryllium.

The big issue with cooling a fissioning plasma is not the plasma itself, but any moderators / reflector involved. All of those elastic and inelastic interactions transfer the energy from the neutrons into the moderator / reflector, and you need to get rid of it.  Aka, huge, heavy radiators.This is where your neutron economy comes into play; the higher the percentage of your neutrons that contribute to fission, the fewer neutrons you need to maintain a given level of output, and thus the amount of their energy that goes into your reflector / moderator.  Now, EM reflection does factor into it to, to the degree that the more of the plasma's radiant energy that you reflect back into it, the less fission output you need to maintain the core temperature. The main challenge is that your mirror becomes less reflective over time in exposure to the core. And yes, everyone wants to research ideas for things like "liquid mirrors" or whatnot that  would maintain reflectivitity, but at present, it's an issue of concern.

Back to the idea in general: what's the advantage of this vs. say a dusty or misty core fission fragment rocket?
« Last Edit: 04/19/2017 12:24 PM by Rei »

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #12 on: 04/19/2017 01:10 PM »
Advantage is higher power and thrust than those concepts, I hope.
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Offline Rei

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #13 on: 04/19/2017 03:06 PM »
Advantage is higher power and thrust than those concepts, I hope.

Power is limited by your ability to radiate the heat from your moderator / reflector more than anything else in both designs. Both eject plasma from a magnetic nozzle - the big difference is that a standard plasma core is Maxwellian (thermalized), while in a fission fragment rocket they're non-Maxwellian (and relativistic). Much higher exhaust velocity in the latter, while the core temperature is lower (dusty = solid, misty = liquid), and thus the radiative heat load is far lower.
« Last Edit: 04/19/2017 03:20 PM by Rei »

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #14 on: 04/20/2017 01:06 AM »
Nah, you can also dump heat into liquid hydrogen. Not just radiating. Of course, that limits your effective Isp, but if you can minimize the heat leakage, it might not be so bad.
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Offline Rei

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #15 on: 04/20/2017 11:29 AM »
Nah, you can also dump heat into liquid hydrogen. Not just radiating.

Not when you're talking about the amount of energy released by nuclear reactions.  The difference between energy stored per kg hydrogen vs. energy released per kg fuel is going to be something like 7-8 orders of magnitude difference, depending on how much you're talking about heating up the hydrogen.  And if you're actually talking about having that high of a ratio between fuel and hydrogen, then you're not going to have any fission of note, almost all of your neutrons will go into creating deuterium.

Offline Elmar Moelzer

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #16 on: 04/20/2017 08:27 PM »
I think it also depends on how hot you can run your fission engine. Theoretically, the hotter it can run at its standard operating temperature, the less cooling panels you would need. And the hydrogen should be able to carry away the heat too, if you exhaust it like with a NERVA engine. Otherwise, NERVA engines would not work.

Offline Rei

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #17 on: 04/21/2017 12:36 AM »
I think it also depends on how hot you can run your fission engine. Theoretically, the hotter it can run at its standard operating temperature, the less cooling panels you would need. And the hydrogen should be able to carry away the heat too, if you exhaust it like with a NERVA engine. Otherwise, NERVA engines would not work.

What part are you referring to when you mention "your fission engine"? The plasma? The moderator / reflector? The radiators?

I'm rather certain they're not talking about something like NERVA, because they're talking about containing a plasma and exhausting it through a magnetic nozzle. NERVA (nuclear thermal) doesn't work with plasma, as it would destroy the core.
My assumption (although I could be wrong about this) is that they're talking about a plasma containing both hydrogen and the fissile fuel, with the mixture exhausted through the nozzle.

Another architecture could be to have the fuel on the sides and heat the plasma through, say, neutron bombardment, although that would be A) very difficult (*massive* neutron flux needed, the vast majority of which most of which won't go where you want), and B) give you an orders-of-magnitude worse heating problems (since all of the thermalized fission fragment energy, and a good chunk of the neutron energy, and the radiated heat from the plasma need to be radiated).  You can't heat the plasma radiatively from a fissioning fuel unless that fissioning fuel is also a plasma, since radiative exchange will as a whole transfer heat from the hotter substance (the plasma) to the cooler substance (the fuel), not the other way around.  So the latter architecture would have to be cooling the exterior fuel enough to keep it solid, while it's giving off enough neutrons that the fraction of them that go in the right direction raise the core to plasma-temperatures.  Which is an insane cooling task.

If they do just mean NERVA-style nuclear thermal, however, then a VASIMR architecture, plasma, and magnetic nozzles don't come into the picture at all.  Unless the concept is having the hydrogen capture heat from the moderator / reflector before entering the core and joining a plasma with the fissoning fuel.  Wherein, see my previous post about the order-of-magnitudes differences between energy out and heat capacity in that scenario.  The hydrogen going into the core, in order to capture a meaningful fraction of the energy, would have to outmass the fuel by many orders of magnitude, and as a consequence capture all of the neutron flux and stop fission.

Again, if I'm envisioning the architecture wrong, please elaborate  :)
« Last Edit: 04/21/2017 12:57 AM by Rei »

Offline Elmar Moelzer

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #18 on: 04/21/2017 05:50 AM »
I think it also depends on how hot you can run your fission engine. Theoretically, the hotter it can run at its standard operating temperature, the less cooling panels you would need. And the hydrogen should be able to carry away the heat too, if you exhaust it like with a NERVA engine. Otherwise, NERVA engines would not work.

I'm rather certain they're not talking about something like NERVA, because they're talking about containing a plasma and exhausting it through a magnetic nozzle. NERVA (nuclear thermal) doesn't work with plasma, as it would destroy the core.
My assumption (although I could be wrong about this) is that they're talking about a plasma containing both hydrogen and the fissile fuel, with the mixture exhausted through the nozzle.

I hope that Robot will correct me if I am wrong, but I understood his "use hydrogen for cooling" as in " you pass liquid hydrogen through past heat sensitive parts of the engine and use said hydrogen carry away the heat. The hydrogen could then be exhausted through a nozzle to generate additional thrust (similar to a NERVA engine).

Offline as58

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #19 on: 04/21/2017 06:49 AM »
I think it also depends on how hot you can run your fission engine. Theoretically, the hotter it can run at its standard operating temperature, the less cooling panels you would need. And the hydrogen should be able to carry away the heat too, if you exhaust it like with a NERVA engine. Otherwise, NERVA engines would not work.

I'm rather certain they're not talking about something like NERVA, because they're talking about containing a plasma and exhausting it through a magnetic nozzle. NERVA (nuclear thermal) doesn't work with plasma, as it would destroy the core.
My assumption (although I could be wrong about this) is that they're talking about a plasma containing both hydrogen and the fissile fuel, with the mixture exhausted through the nozzle.

I hope that Robot will correct me if I am wrong, but I understood his "use hydrogen for cooling" as in " you pass liquid hydrogen through past heat sensitive parts of the engine and use said hydrogen carry away the heat. The hydrogen could then be exhausted through a nozzle to generate additional thrust (similar to a NERVA engine).

But won't that just effectively make it a nuclear thermal rocket (if a rather contrived one)? Wouldn't the 'additional thrust' from exhausting coolant hydrogen make up most of the thrust.


Offline Elmar Moelzer

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #20 on: 04/21/2017 08:26 AM »
But won't that just effectively make it a nuclear thermal rocket (if a rather contrived one)? Wouldn't the 'additional thrust' from exhausting coolant hydrogen make up most of the thrust.
I guess it depends on how much hydrogen you have to bleed through to cool the rocket. If it is very little, it will probably not matter much.

Offline Rei

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #21 on: 04/21/2017 03:10 PM »
But won't that just effectively make it a nuclear thermal rocket (if a rather contrived one)? Wouldn't the 'additional thrust' from exhausting coolant hydrogen make up most of the thrust.
I guess it depends on how much hydrogen you have to bleed through to cool the rocket. If it is very little, it will probably not matter much.

What's the point of the plasma then, if you're just exhausting hydrogen at ~800-900 sec ISP? Why not a solid core and save yourself all of the containment issues, simplify moderation, get a far better mass fraction, and so on? 

Regardless of how you try to arrange things, if you want the hydrogen to carry away the fission energy, it has to vastly outmass the fissile fuel.  All the moreso if it has to do so at temperatures that won't destroy cooling channels.
« Last Edit: 04/21/2017 03:16 PM by Rei »

Offline as58

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #22 on: 04/21/2017 06:37 PM »
Obviously what is needed is aneutronic fission. ;) Preferably also without gamma radiation.

Offline Elmar Moelzer

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #23 on: 04/21/2017 11:16 PM »
Regardless of how you try to arrange things, if you want the hydrogen to carry away the fission energy, it has to vastly outmass the fissile fuel.  All the moreso if it has to do so at temperatures that won't destroy cooling channels.
I am not so sure about that. IIRC most of the VASIMIR rockets are bleeding small amounts of hydrogen through the cooling channels after the rocket engine has been turned off to keep the engine cool enough.
Those were quite obviously only very small amounts (or you could have just kept firing the engine).
Obviously it depends on how hot the walls of Robot's rocket engine will get. It is not my design but his, so he would have to be the one to answer that question.

Offline Rei

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #24 on: 04/22/2017 08:07 AM »
Regardless of how you try to arrange things, if you want the hydrogen to carry away the fission energy, it has to vastly outmass the fissile fuel.  All the moreso if it has to do so at temperatures that won't destroy cooling channels.
I am not so sure about that. IIRC most of the VASIMIR rockets are bleeding small amounts of hydrogen through the cooling channels after the rocket engine has been turned off to keep the engine cool enough.

Which has nothing to do with the ratio of nuclear fuel to hydrogen required to absorb the fission energy in a nuclear-equivalent of VASIMR.

The concept, unless I misunderstood Robot, is that a fission reaction is what's making the plasma. Which means that you have a tremendous neutron flux in your moderator-reflector, corresponding to the level of fission needed to self-heat to a plasma (it's even worse if you want the nuclear fuel to be solid and only the hydrogen plasma). Now, pick from from the following scenarios:

1) Hydrogen fully cools the moderator before entering the plasma: then the rate of exhausting the fuel-hydrogen mixture must match; the nuclear fuel is only using the most utterly miniscule fraction of its potential energy on average before being exhausted, to the point where you might as well just be burning the hydrogen instead.

2) The fuel is being burned up: then pick one of the two:

2a) The hydrogen is grossly insufficient by many orders of magnitude to handle the heat load

2b) The hydrogen is outmassing the fuel in the core by many orders of magnitude, and thus shutting off fission.

There's no working around it. No matter your geometry, a large chunk of the fission energy is going into the walls. If you're cooling the walls and exhausting hydrogen, then you're facing the same limits as NERVA in terms of performance. Wherein, why the heavy, convoluted design?  "Cooling" is something that happens on the order of a fraction of an eV-per-atom**.  Fission is something that happens on the hundreds-of-MeV-per-atom scale. And a good chunk of that hundreds-of-MeV-per-atom ends up in the walls. Unavoidably. You simply cannot cool it down non-radiatively without either grossly outmassing the fuel by many orders of magnitude, or by only using the tiniest fraction of the fuel before exhausting it. And both render the exercise pointless.

** Hydrogen's specific heat is ~14,3 kJ/kg, and for it to be a "cooling" fluid it must be colder than the object it's cooling. 1 eV per hydrogen atom = 96,5 MJ/kg hydrogen.  Uranium fission ~= 200MeV per atom . Yes, the fissile fuel is 2 orders of magnitude heavier per atom than hydrogen, but that does little to close the gap.

If you want high thrust from a fission rocket, you want nuclear thermal.
If you want high impulse from a fission rocket, you want a fission fragment rocket.
« Last Edit: 04/22/2017 08:22 AM by Rei »

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #25 on: 04/22/2017 06:21 PM »
Good points. Might need the hydrogen itself to act as the neutron reflector, or simply have a big enough core that no reflector is needed. You still have to cool the coils, but the neutrons could mostly just fly out into space. Additional hydrogen could be added to increase thrust, but not so much that the plasma state is unable to be maintained.

These requirements may mean the engine would have to be HUGE.
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Offline Rei

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #26 on: 04/22/2017 07:32 PM »
Good points. Might need the hydrogen itself to act as the neutron reflector, or simply have a big enough core that no reflector is needed. You still have to cool the coils, but the neutrons could mostly just fly out into space. Additional hydrogen could be added to increase thrust, but not so much that the plasma state is unable to be maintained.

These requirements may mean the engine would have to be HUGE.

The neutrons don't just fly out into space.  By definition of a moderator, it ends up capturing the majority of the energy of the neutrons. A moderator thermalizes neutrons - brings them down to the roughly the same energy  as the moderator itself by repeated interactions, primarily elastic. Which is virtually all of the energy of the neutrons. Some will ultimately be absorbed and some will ultimately escape, but to maintain slow fission, the vast majority of the neutron energy must go into the moderator, regardless of what ultimately happens to them.

The whole point of moderating down is about cross sections. If you're not familiar with the concept, picture that you're throwing tennis balls randomly down a hall in which someone has hung up plates at random positions. The odds that you'll end up hitting a plate is relative to the cross section of the interaction between your tennis ball and the plates. If you increase the size of the ball or increase the size of the plates, the odds of a collision rises - and vice versa.

With nuclear interactions, it's not exactly the physical size that matters, but it makes for a nice analogy, and hence cross sections, with the units (barns) based to be in the ballpark of typical physical cross sections.

Anyway, elastic scattering, (n, gamma) and fission cross sections typically look like these:

http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/sigma/getPlot.jsp?evalid=15321&mf=3&mt=2&nsub=10
http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/sigma/getPlot.jsp?evalid=15321&mf=3&mt=102&nsub=10
http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/sigma/getMF5.jsp?evalid=15321&mf=5&mt=18&nsub=10

You'll notice how cross sections tend to increase by many orders of magnitude once you get down into the thermal spectrum, which means that it becomes far easier to use neutrons for whatever purpose (including fission). 

This is getting a bit off topic, but the short of it is, you give up the overwhelming majority of the neutron energy into the moderator (excepting in fast reactors, but for a wide variety of reasons they're generally not proposed for space usage), even when you're losing neutrons. And if you're doing any simple exhaustion of hydrogen at all to get rid of heat then you might as well go fully nuclear thermal, because your ISP is going to be poor due to that loss (aka, simultaneously combining a 800 ISP thruster with a 10000 ISP thruster gives you something far more like an 800 ISP thruster). 

Now, it seems you're trying to work around this by scaling up to the point that you don't need an externally located moderator, that it's located in the plasma? Scaling up actually dumps more neutron radiation into your magnets, but the ratio of thrust to magnet heating will rise with scale. But how hot are you having the plasma? ISP is relative to your plasma temperature. But the thermal radiation from the plasma is proportional to its temperature to the *fourth* power. As as mentioned previously, you can't have some sort of near-perfect reflectivity, because even if it starts out almost perfectly reflective, the intense thermal and neutron fluxes damage your mirroring over time.  So the fission isn't actually upping the maximum ISP of your VASIMIR thruster, nor its max thrust; it's just replacing the means of heating it, at the cost of having a more hazardous fuel with a higher atomic mass, irradiating your spacecraft, and in particular your superconducting magnets.  And remember that it's *very* thermodynamically expensive to remove heat from extremely cold objects. In VASIMR they only have to deal with reflecting radiated heat from the plasma, but in your case they're being heated internally.

There are of course some theorized designs between simple nuclear thermal and a purely plasma driven design. There's one gas/plasma core concept (open gas cycle NTR) where they transfer the energy to hydrogen while trying to minimize the mixing of hydrogen and fuel by fluid dynamics processes to decrease the rate at which fissile fuel is exhausted, and to allow the hydrogen to be ejected rapidly for maximum thrust and minimum engine heating. But an effective means to keep the two fluids separate is still a topic of research. There's also a closed gas cycle NTR version which I find kind of interesting, sometimes called a "nuclear lightbulb" - the fission plasma is inside a fused quartz / fused silica tube (or other high temperature transparent material), preventing exchange / leakage between fluids. The thermal energy of the radiating fissile fuel passes through the transparent tube; some is absorbed in the process, but the concept is to keep the tube cool enough that it doesn't melt.  Again, very immature, but still, an interesting idea.  The biggest problem is neutron radiation blackening, which is particularly a problem at short wavelengths.

I once played around with the concept of a multimode fission rocket which was to function as a nuclear lightbulb while in the atmosphere but a fission fragment rocket in space. Kind of fun project. But it's a big materials challenge. Radiating from a dusty or misty core means longer wavelength light, which means that the blackening isn't as much of a problem, but it also means you need a lot more radiating surface area.
« Last Edit: 04/22/2017 07:42 PM by Rei »

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #27 on: 04/22/2017 08:31 PM »
I wasn't thinking of moderating the neutrons. I was thinking a fast neutron reactor.
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Offline Stormbringer

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #28 on: 04/22/2017 09:17 PM »
There is an article today about Chinese researchers having developed a neutron source that is 100 fold better than current state of the art and they believe they can make it a one thousand fold increase:

https://phys.org/news/2017-04-laser-technique-neutron-yield.html
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Offline Rei

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #29 on: 04/23/2017 02:23 PM »
There is an article today about Chinese researchers having developed a neutron source that is 100 fold better than current state of the art and they believe they can make it a one thousand fold increase:

https://phys.org/news/2017-04-laser-technique-neutron-yield.html

For some reason the actual paper isn't loading for me, so I can't see exactly what's being mentioned.  100 fold "better" in what context, and state of the art "what"?  I can see a graph which shows 1e8-1e10 neutrons per pulse, and no info on the pulse rate (but since it involves ICF on hohlraums, it's going to be low). Nuclear reactors and spallation neutron sources produce many orders of magnitude higher neutron fluxes than that per second.  It might be a good yield for "fusion neutrons", which are single-energy and hotter than fission "evaporation" neutrons (although colder than spallation neutrons before multiplication).

Offline Rei

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Re: VASIMR as Plasma core fission rocket
« Reply #30 on: 04/23/2017 02:59 PM »
I wasn't thinking of moderating the neutrons. I was thinking a fast neutron reactor.

Fast reactors are interesting, although they have disadvantages that have generally led to avoiding them for space missions.  They're sort of balanced on a knife's edge, more wanting to either runaway or shutdown entirely (less Doppler broadening) in comparison to a thermal reactor. The neutron spectrum hitting your structural materials is hard, rather than moderated, and thus more difficult to shield / more penetrating (although fast reactor cores are more compact, so the surface area is less). It's usually  harder to ensure longevity with a fast reactor. Proliferation is more of a concern, since you have to enrich them more because cross sections are so much lower at higher energies. And experience with them is lower than with thermal reactors. But don't get me wrong, they are still interesting. Small volume, high burnup, fast responsiveness, etc.

But they don't get you around the fact that if you have a plasma in the center of a core - regardless of the neutron flux - its temperature is going to be limited by your ability to deal with the thermal radiation it gives off.  Nuclear or not. Which limits both thrust and ISP. Fission fragment reactors work around this by having the fuel itself not actually be that hot; it's giving off fission fragments, which are *extremely* high energy, but as ions they're constrained by magnetic fields and immediately leave the core, while the heavy grains / droplets have a far higher ratio of mass to charge and are constrained by a Penning trap.  This doesn't work around thrust limitations, mind you - hence my playing around with dual-mode reactors ("nuclear lightbulb" NTR for in atmosphere, fission fragment in space)

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