Author Topic: House Space Subcommittee Hearing - The ISS after 2024: Options and Impacts  (Read 2117 times)

Offline Dante80

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Date: Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 10:00am

Location:
2318 Rayburn House Office Building

Witnesses:

Mr. William Gerstenmaier

Associate Administrator for Human Exploration and Operations, NASA

Dr. Mary Lynne Dittmar
Executive Director, Coalition for Deep Space Exploration

https://science.house.gov/legislation/hearings/space-subcommittee-hearing-iss-after-2024-options-and-impacts

Offline Dante80

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« Last Edit: 03/16/2017 11:34 PM by Dante80 »

Offline Proponent

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From the list of witnesses, it looks like show trial.  Ms. Dittmar's job is to promote Orion/SLS.  Gerst's responsibilities are technically as much about ISS as Orion/SLS, but given that he spends most of his time on the latter these days, I don't see him speaking up for ISS.  Thus, there will be nobody to speak up for retaining ISS past 2024.

So, I make three predictions:

  • 1. NASA will be put on the track of withdrawing from ISS in 2024.  The decision will not formally be made during the hearing, but that will be the drift.
  • 2. Noises will be made about privatizing ISS or offering NASA's share to the international partners, quite possibly in tandem with the notion that NASA would rent space aboard ISS.
  • 3. There will be no serious discussion of the difficulties or costs involved in either disposing of ISS or giving NASA's share to a commercial entity or foreign space agency.

  • Regardless of whether my hunches are correct, ISS's actual future will remain unclear for years.  Recall that under Bush II's Vision for Space Exploration, NASA was to withdraw from ISS in 2015.  No funds were ever allocated for de-orbiting ISS, however, nor, to my knowledge, was any serious case made that any entity, commercial or governmental, would be likely to pick up NASA's share of the operation.  It was simply assumed that ISS expenses would magically vanish from NASA's budgets.  The stage was being set for a funding crises in 2015.  I would guess that's a very possible outcome now, with the crisis occurring in 2024.

    Offline Proponent

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    Two other witnesses have been added to the hearing, namely the president of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation and a professor specializing in biotech.  So, it no longer looks like show trial.

    Offline redliox

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    So, I make three predictions:

  • 1. NASA will be put on the track of withdrawing from ISS in 2024.  The decision will not formally be made during the hearing, but that will be the drift.
  • 2. Noises will be made about privatizing ISS or offering NASA's share to the international partners, quite possibly in tandem with the notion that NASA would rent space aboard ISS.
  • 3. There will be no serious discussion of the difficulties or costs involved in either disposing of ISS or giving NASA's share to a commercial entity or foreign space agency.

  • If anyone cries about the death of ISS, perhaps the compensation may be the DSH to be placed around Luna.  Either way the station is going to be 26 years old by 2024, can't last forever.  Hard to say what the President's opinion is going to be in the matter.

    Two other witnesses have been added to the hearing, namely the president of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation and a professor specializing in biotech.  So, it no longer looks like show trial.

    I'm not much of a space station fan but I would certainly hope they take the matter seriously since, outside of the ISS, the best bet for the immediate 10 years for a destination is lunar orbit, but not Luna itself.
    "Let the trails lead where they may, I will follow."
    -Tigatron

    Offline Rocket Science

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    "The laws of physics are unforgiving"
    ~Rob, Physics instructor, aviator, vintage auto racer

    Online AncientU

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    ...

    I'm not much of a space station fan but I would certainly hope they take the matter seriously since, outside of the ISS, the best bet for the immediate 10 years for a destination is lunar orbit, but not Luna itself.

    Don't hear this often... or often enough.
    Quote
    This is a thoughtful hearing, with good witnesses. No easy answers to question of extending ISS beyond 2024.

    https://twitter.com/SciGuySpace
    "If we shared everything [we are working on] people would think we are insane!"
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    Offline Rocket Science

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    Good hearing, Gerst gave a shout-out to Dream Chaser and her ability to land on a runway for cargo/experiments return...
    « Last Edit: 03/22/2017 05:46 PM by Rocket Science »
    "The laws of physics are unforgiving"
    ~Rob, Physics instructor, aviator, vintage auto racer

    Offline Rocket Science

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    Great job by our friend Mary-Lynne! :)
    "The laws of physics are unforgiving"
    ~Rob, Physics instructor, aviator, vintage auto racer

    Tags: ISS