Author Topic: NASA's Trappist-1 Announcement - Feb 22, 2017  (Read 20620 times)

Offline Mongo62

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Re: NASA's Trappist-1 Announcement - Feb 22, 2017
« Reply #140 on: 04/03/2017 01:37 AM »
A revolution is brewing: observations of TRAPPIST-1 exoplanetary system fosters a new biomarker

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The recent discovery of seven potentially habitable Earth-size planets around the ultra-cool star TRAPPIST-1 has further fueled the hunt for extraterrestrial life. Current methods focus on closely monitoring the host star to look for biomarkers in the transmission signature of exoplanet's atmosphere. However, the outcome of these methods remain uncertain and difficult to disentangle with abiotic alternatives. Recent exoplanet direct imaging observations by THIRSTY, an ultra-high contrast coronagraph located in La Trappe (France), lead us to propose a universal and unambiguous habitability criterion which we directly demonstrate for the TRAPPIST-1 system. Within this new framework, we find that TRAPPIST-1g possesses the first unambiguously habitable environment in our galaxy, with a liquid water percentage that could be as large as ∼ 90 %. Our calculations hinge on a new set of biomarkers, CO2 and CxH2(x+1)O (liquid and gaseous), that could cover up to ∼ 10 % of the planetary surface and atmosphere. THIRSTY and TRAPPIST recent observations accompanied by our new, unbiased habitability criterion may quench our thirst for the search for extraterrestrial life. However, the search for intelligence must continue within and beyond our Solar System.

I was going to edit my original post to point out that it was an April Fool's joke by the author, but accidentally hit "delete" instead, so I am reposting.
« Last Edit: 04/03/2017 01:38 AM by Mongo62 »

Offline CuddlyRocket

Re: NASA's Trappist-1 Announcement - Feb 22, 2017
« Reply #141 on: 04/17/2017 07:58 AM »
Updated Masses for the TRAPPIST-1 Planets (arXiv)

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The newly detected TRAPPIST-1 system, with seven low-mass, roughly Earth-sized planets transiting a nearby ultra-cool dwarf, is one of the most important exoplanet discoveries to date. The short baseline of the available discovery observations, however, means that the planetary masses (obtained through measurement of transit timing variations of the planets of the system) are not yet well constrained. The masses reported in the discovery paper were derived using a combination of photometric timing measurements obtained from the ground and from the Spitzer spacecraft, and have uncertainties ranging from 30\% to nearly 100\%, with the mass of the outermost, P=18.8d, planet h remaining unmeasured. Here, we present an analysis that supplements the timing measurements of the discovery paper with 73.6 days of photometry obtained by the K2 Mission. Our analysis refines the orbital parameters for all of the planets in the system. We substantially improve the upper bounds on eccentricity for inner six planets (finding e<0.02 for inner six known members of the system), and we derive masses of 0.79±0.27M⊕, 1.63±0.63M⊕, 0.33±0.15M⊕, 0.24+0.56−0.24M⊕, 0.36±0.12M⊕, 0.566±0.038M⊕, and 0.086±0.084M⊕ for planets b, c, d, e, f, g, and h, respectively.

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Figure 4 indicates that – to within the errors of our determinations – the four most distant planets are consistent with pure water compositions, and in any event, are substantially less dense either Mars or Venus.

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA's Trappist-1 Announcement - Feb 22, 2017
« Reply #142 on: 04/25/2017 05:55 PM »
Further Work on TRAPPIST-1

http://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=37557

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA's Trappist-1 Announcement - Feb 22, 2017
« Reply #143 on: 05/11/2017 09:24 AM »
Exoplanet Puzzle Cracked by Jazz Musicians

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There’s more than one way to appreciate the results. While Tamayo was working on his simulations, he was approached by Matt Russo, a fellow postdoc and jazz guitarist who thought the TRAPPIST-1 resonances looked familiar from music theory. Now, coordinated with the release of Tamayo’s paper, Russo, Tamayo and the musician Andrew Santaguida have teamed up to translate the system’s intricate arrangement of passing worlds into a musical composition.

The seventh planet, h, orbits about once every three weeks. Sped up some 200 million times and expressed in sound waves, that frequency is a C note. From there, the known ratios between planets determine every other planet’s signature note. Together the notes form a major ninth chord. “It’s really remarkable that it worked out like that,” Russo said. “Even with a different pattern of resonances, you wouldn’t get a chord that sounds as good.”

On top of that, the team added drumbeats for whenever an inner planet overtakes an outer neighbor — moments that correspond to close gravitational interactions among the planets. Compared to human percussion, Russo said, “It’s a super-creative drummer. It’s doing something that nobody else would think of.”

https://www.quantamagazine.org/exoplanet-puzzle-cracked-by-jazz-musicians/

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA's Trappist-1 Announcement - Feb 22, 2017
« Reply #144 on: 05/17/2017 09:31 AM »
Worlds without Moons: Exomoon Constraints for Compact Planetary Systems

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One of the primary surprises of exoplanet detections has been the discovery of compact planetary systems, whereby numerous planets reside within ~0.5 au of the host star. Many of these kinds of systems have been discovered in recent years, indicating that they are a fairly common orbital architecture. Of particular interest are those systems for which the host star is low mass, thus potentially enabling one or more of the planets to lie within the habitable zone of the host star. One of the contributors to the habitability of the Earth is the presence of a substantial moon whose tidal effects can stabilize axial tilt variations and increase the rate of tidal pool formation. Here, we explore the constraints on the presence of moons for planets in compact systems based on Hill radii and Roche limit considerations. We apply these constraints to the TRAPPIST-1 system and demonstrate that most of the planets are very likely to be worlds without moons.

http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/aa6bf2/meta;jsessionid=A3DBDC5F5F51BE049C8E8088EB9EAE2D.c1.iopscience.cld.iop.org

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA's Trappist-1 Announcement - Feb 22, 2017
« Reply #145 on: 05/18/2017 07:32 PM »
Atmosphere discovery makes Trappist-1 exoplanet priority in hunt for alien life

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With Nasa’s James Webb Space Telescope not due to launch until late 2018, the scientists turned to computer models to find out whether the Trappist-1 planets could have long-lived atmospheres. From details of the Trappist-1 system, which lies 39 light years distant, they worked out the intensity of the stellar wind – the rush of high energy particles streaming out of the star – and the effect it would have on the seven orbiting planets.

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The intensity of the solar wind destroyed the atmospheres of the inner Trappist-1 planets within millions of years. But planets further out fared better, their atmospheres surviving for billions of years, the models found. According to the scientists, while the seventh planet around the star is considered too cold for liquid water to exist on the surface, the sixth planet, Trappist-1g, appears to be the most likely home for life in the Trappist-1 system.

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/may/18/atmosphere-discovery-makes-trappist-1-exoplanet-priority-in-hunt-for-alien-life

Here's the paper the article is based on.

https://arxiv.org/abs/1705.05535v1

Offline clongton

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Re: NASA's Trappist-1 Announcement - Feb 22, 2017
« Reply #146 on: 05/19/2017 12:47 AM »
Exoplanet Puzzle Cracked by Jazz Musicians

Quote
There’s more than one way to appreciate the results. While Tamayo was working on his simulations, he was approached by Matt Russo, a fellow postdoc and jazz guitarist who thought the TRAPPIST-1 resonances looked familiar from music theory. Now, coordinated with the release of Tamayo’s paper, Russo, Tamayo and the musician Andrew Santaguida have teamed up to translate the system’s intricate arrangement of passing worlds into a musical composition.

The seventh planet, h, orbits about once every three weeks. Sped up some 200 million times and expressed in sound waves, that frequency is a C note. From there, the known ratios between planets determine every other planet’s signature note. Together the notes form a major ninth chord. “It’s really remarkable that it worked out like that,” Russo said. “Even with a different pattern of resonances, you wouldn’t get a chord that sounds as good.”

On top of that, the team added drumbeats for whenever an inner planet overtakes an outer neighbor — moments that correspond to close gravitational interactions among the planets. Compared to human percussion, Russo said, “It’s a super-creative drummer. It’s doing something that nobody else would think of.”

https://www.quantamagazine.org/exoplanet-puzzle-cracked-by-jazz-musicians/

Brings new meaning to the phrase "Music of the Spheres". Perhaps the ancients were right after all?
Chuck - DIRECT co-founder
I started my career on the Saturn-V F-1A engine

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA's Trappist-1 Announcement - Feb 22, 2017
« Reply #147 on: 05/22/2017 08:58 PM »
Kepler telescope spies details of TRAPPIST-1 system's outermost planet

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-05/uow-kt052217.php

Offline Alpha_Centauri

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Re: NASA's Trappist-1 Announcement - Feb 22, 2017
« Reply #148 on: 05/24/2017 06:35 PM »
Why are you posting stuff by a nutjob with a penchant for caps as if it means anything?
« Last Edit: 05/24/2017 06:38 PM by Alpha_Centauri »

Offline Star One

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Re: NASA's Trappist-1 Announcement - Feb 22, 2017
« Reply #149 on: 05/24/2017 07:02 PM »
Why are you posting stuff by a nutjob with a penchant for caps as if it means anything?

Well his idea was getting consideration over there & I regard that as a decent site for your information.

By the way would you kindly show some consideration to those with mental health issues in general rather than throwing around comments like 'nutjob' as it makes you sound like a ten year old.

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