Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION  (Read 113501 times)

Online gongora

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CRS-11 Discussion thread

NSF Threads for CRS-11 : Discussion / Updates / Rendezvous-Berthing-ISS Ops / L2 SpaceX Missions May/June 2017 / Party Thread

NSF Articles for CRS-11:
   SpaceX to static fire CRS-11 Falcon 9 Sunday ahead of ISS mission
   Falcon 9 launches with CRS-11 Dragon on 100th 39A launch

NSF Articles for CRS missions :  https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/?s=CRS


Launched successfully on June 3, 2017 at 17:07:38 EDT (2107 UTC) on Falcon 9 (core 1035) from LC-39A.  Successful landing at LZ-1.



External cargo: ROSA (Roll-Out Solar Array), NICER (Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR), MUSES (Multi-User System for Earth Sensing)



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX Section
« Last Edit: 06/04/2017 02:08 PM by gongora »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #1 on: 02/04/2017 01:06 AM »
ROSA (Roll-Out Solar Array) is an external payload on CRS-11

Quote
The Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) is a new type of solar panel that rolls open in space like a party favor and is more compact than current rigid panel designs. The ROSA investigation tests deployment and retraction, shape changes when the Earth blocks the sun, and other physical challenges to determine the array’s strength and durability.

Research Overview
The Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) is an innovative new solar array design that uses high strain one-piece composite slit-tube booms. The stored strain energy of the booms enforces the deployment actuation, and the booms provide the array's deployed structural stiffness and strength.

Operational Requirements and Protocols
ROSA is stowed in the trunk of the SpaceX’s Dragon capsule during launch. Once on orbit, the ISS robotic arm removes ROSA from the Dragon trunk and temporarily stows it on an ELC. When ROSA operations are ready to begin, the ROSA is picked up by the ISS robotics arm and located in its operations location. The ROSA operations are conducted while attached to the SSRMS/SPDM for a duration of 7 days. During initial deployment of the array, video is required. Data are recorded using embedded sensors on the experiment. Testing is activated and commanded via the ground controllers (ROBO).

ROSA is built by Deployable Space Systems
« Last Edit: 02/04/2017 01:37 AM by gongora »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #2 on: 02/04/2017 01:07 AM »
NICER (Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR) is an external payload on CRS-11

NICER home page on NASA.gov
Quote
About NICER
NASA’s Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer, or NICER, mission is an International Space Station payload that will provide high-precision measurements of neutron stars – objects containing ultra-dense matter at the threshold of collapse into black holes.

NICER will also test — for the first time in space — technology that relies on pulsars as navigation beacons. The technique may eventually guide human exploration to the distant reaches of the solar system and beyond.

Although NICER’s standalone research offers definitive improvements to existing scientific understanding, NICER’s data will have significant synergy with existing and future missions that can further expand our understanding of the universe.

NICER will launch in early 2017 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida aboard the SpaceX-11 ISS Commercial Resupply Services flight.

NICER home page at Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA’s NICER Mission Arrives at Kennedy Space Center [June 8, 2016]
Quote
NICER's X-ray Timing Instrument (XTI) offers an unprecedented combination of capabilities to view the emissions of neutron stars in “soft” X-ray light (less energetic than the X-rays typically used for medical imaging). A bundle of 56 co-aligned optics and X-ray sensors, the instrument represents an innovative configuration of flight-proven components, minimizing risk and meeting the science investigation’s demands of fast timing and the ability to measure the energies of detected X-ray photons.
...
NICER will operate from the ExPRESS Logistics Carrier 2 on the ISS after launch, extraction from the transfer vehicle and installation. NICER is planned for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida aboard the SpaceX-11 ISS Commercial Resupply Services flight, currently scheduled for February 2017. The baseline mission lifetime is 18 months. The NICER team anticipates initial science results by late summer 2017.
« Last Edit: 02/17/2017 02:47 PM by gongora »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #3 on: 02/04/2017 01:07 AM »
MUSES (Multi-User System for Earth Sensing) is an external payload on CRS-11

MUSES - ISS experiment page
Quote
Teledyne Brown is developing the Multiple User System for Earth Sensing (MUSES), an Earth imaging platform, as part of the company’s new commercial space-based digital imaging business. MUSES hosts earth-viewing instruments (Hosted Payloads), such as high-resolution digital cameras, hyperspectral imagers, and provides precision pointing and other accommodations. It hosts up to four instruments at the same time, and offers the ability to change, upgrade, and robotically service those instruments.
[editorial comment:  That page is a freakin' mess and badly needs updating]

Precision Pointing Platform For Earth Observations From The ISS [Oct 22, 2015]
Quote
The first instrument placed aboard will be the DLR’s DESIS hyperspectral instrument, which has the capacity to distinguish slight variations in the reflectance of sunlight from the Earth surface (in the visible through near-infrared spectrum) when pointed over a geo- graphic area. An image spectrometer is able to distinguish very subtle changes in the reflectance spectrum for distinguishing plant species or whether the forest is undergoing some sort of stress due to drought or pests. Fine variations in surface reflectance can give immense amounts of information just not possible with picture, such as you would take with an off-the-shelf digital camera.

The attached PDF file, "Teledyne’s DESIS Spectrometer on the ISS-based MUSES Platform" from June 2016 is a nice source of information.
« Last Edit: 02/04/2017 02:10 AM by gongora »

Offline RemoveBeforeFlight

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #4 on: 02/04/2017 08:02 PM »
ROSA (Roll-Out Solar Array) is an external payload on CRS-11

Quote
The Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) is a new type of solar panel that rolls open in space like a party favor and is more compact than current rigid panel designs. The ROSA investigation tests deployment and retraction, shape changes when the Earth blocks the sun, and other physical challenges to determine the array’s strength and durability.

Research Overview
The Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA) is an innovative new solar array design that uses high strain one-piece composite slit-tube booms. The stored strain energy of the booms enforces the deployment actuation, and the booms provide the array's deployed structural stiffness and strength.

Operational Requirements and Protocols
ROSA is stowed in the trunk of the SpaceX’s Dragon capsule during launch. Once on orbit, the ISS robotic arm removes ROSA from the Dragon trunk and temporarily stows it on an ELC. When ROSA operations are ready to begin, the ROSA is picked up by the ISS robotics arm and located in its operations location. The ROSA operations are conducted while attached to the SSRMS/SPDM for a duration of 7 days. During initial deployment of the array, video is required. Data are recorded using embedded sensors on the experiment. Testing is activated and commanded via the ground controllers (ROBO).

ROSA is built by Deployable Space Systems

This is some amazing technology. I can't wait to see the used on the ISS. There has been a lot of new innovation in the world of solar panels lately. (Orbital ATK Cygnus panels, Tesla's residential shingle panel etc) It will be interesting if the deployment of this solar array is as complicated as the BEAM module.

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #5 on: 02/16/2017 02:25 AM »
SpaceX is keeping up a steady pace of applications for FCC permits, let's hope they follow up with a steady pace of launches...

FCC Applications for: CRS-11 Dragon TT&C / CRS-11 Launch / CRS-11 Recovery

Quote
The current launch planning date is NET 4/14/2016

Offline CameronD

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #6 on: 02/16/2017 02:36 AM »
ROSA (Roll-Out Solar Array) is an external payload on CRS-11

NICER (Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR) is an external payload on CRS-11

MUSES (Multi-User System for Earth Sensing) is an external payload on CRS-11

That looks like quite an array of expensive, complex and one-off hardware there!!  The various owners (and NASA) must be VERY, very confident these payloads will arrive safely to all decide to go up on the same flight.

« Last Edit: 02/16/2017 02:36 AM by CameronD »
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #7 on: 02/16/2017 03:34 AM »
That looks like quite an array of expensive, complex and one-off hardware there!!  The various owners (and NASA) must be VERY, very confident these payloads will arrive safely to all decide to go up on the same flight.

When the GAO did a report on the CRS program they helpfully pointed out that NASA was paying for the trunk space whether they used it or not, so they should really try to use it.  Dragon trunks will mostly carry a full load from now on.

Offline deruch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #8 on: 02/17/2017 02:06 PM »


Quote
The NICER Mission: A Partnership in Science and Technology on the ISS
Host- Jan Vrtilek
Speaker- Keith Gendreau (Goddard)
Feb 4, 2016

The Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) is an X-ray astrophysics mission of opportunity that will reveal the inner workings of neutron stars, cosmic lighthouses that embody unique gravitational, electromagnetic, and nuclear-physics environments. NICER achieves this objective by deploying a high-heritage instrument as an attached payload on a zenith-side ExPRESS Logistics Carrier (ELC) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). NICER offers order-of-magnitude improvements in time-coherent sensitivity and timing resolution beyond the capabilities of any X-ray observatory flown to date. Through a cost-sharing opportunity between the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) NICER will also demonstrate how neutron stars can serve as deep-space navigation beacons to guide humankind out of Earth orbit, to destinations throughout the Solar System and beyond. I will overview the NICER mission, discuss our experience working with the ISS, and describe the process of forging a partnership between SMD and STMD.
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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #9 on: 02/20/2017 06:08 AM »
ROSA (Roll-Out Solar Array) is an external payload on CRS-11
This is fascinating - I can't find basic information on this however.
The DSS homepage says of a picture that is also used by NASA to talk of this '10-15kW'.
Aha!
https://www.nasa.gov/content/administrator-bolden-visits-company-rolling-out-new-solar-array-technology/ has some more info.
Quote
The ROSA engineering development unit is sized to provide nominally 20 kW of electrical power per array – enough for exciting new missions such as redirecting an asteroid to lunar orbit to enable in-depth studies by astronauts and commercial venturers. 

The solar array is configured for launch stows into a cylindrical volume less than two feet in diameter. Once the spacecraft is positioned, the arrays roll out to their full size, 20 feet by 45 feet. The very large solar array is able to be stowed so compactly because its solar cells are mounted on an innovative flexible blanket which is much thinner than the traditional rigid panels in current use.

A report on near term space capabilities gives ROSA up to 150W/kg performance - which seems implausible unless this is the one with the lens structures, which it seems it is not.

The CRS11 manifest would of course give the weight, but I don't think it's been listed.
As some context - DS1 got 42W/kg, Dawn 80W/kg, and ISS panels are now around 27W.

Even if it is one of their more 'pedestrian' array designs - it would enable development of the more exotic arrays the company has designed.

As well as the more obvious launch cost issues, lighter solar panels make for sportier ion drive vehicles.

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #10 on: 02/20/2017 11:23 AM »
ROSA (Roll-Out Solar Array) is an external payload on CRS-11
This is fascinating - I can't find basic information on this however.
The DSS homepage says of a picture that is also used by NASA to talk of this '10-15kW'.
Aha!
https://www.nasa.gov/content/administrator-bolden-visits-company-rolling-out-new-solar-array-technology/ has some more info.
Quote
The ROSA engineering development unit is sized to provide nominally 20 kW of electrical power per array – enough for exciting new missions such as redirecting an asteroid to lunar orbit to enable in-depth studies by astronauts and commercial venturers. 

The solar array is configured for launch stows into a cylindrical volume less than two feet in diameter. Once the spacecraft is positioned, the arrays roll out to their full size, 20 feet by 45 feet. The very large solar array is able to be stowed so compactly because its solar cells are mounted on an innovative flexible blanket which is much thinner than the traditional rigid panels in current use.

A report on near term space capabilities gives ROSA up to 150W/kg performance - which seems implausible unless this is the one with the lens structures, which it seems it is not.

The CRS11 manifest would of course give the weight, but I don't think it's been listed.
As some context - DS1 got 42W/kg, Dawn 80W/kg, and ISS panels are now around 27W.

Even if it is one of their more 'pedestrian' array designs - it would enable development of the more exotic arrays the company has designed.

As well as the more obvious launch cost issues, lighter solar panels make for sportier ion drive vehicles.
Here's a couple of slides from an STMD presentation dated 26 Jul 2016 which has some tech info on ROSA.

[Note: SOA = State of the Art]
« Last Edit: 02/20/2017 11:24 AM by AnalogMan »

Offline Spirit47

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #11 on: 02/21/2017 07:41 AM »
I read that it's not a new Dragon for this flight, but the reuse of CRS-4. That's true ?

http://spacenews.com/spacex-to-reuse-dragon-capsules-on-cargo-missions/

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #12 on: 02/21/2017 09:51 AM »

A report on near term space capabilities gives ROSA up to 150W/kg performance - which seems implausible unless this is the one with the lens structures, which it seems it is not.

The CRS11 manifest would of course give the weight, but I don't think it's been listed.
As some context - DS1 got 42W/kg, Dawn 80W/kg, and ISS panels are now around 27W.

Even if it is one of their more 'pedestrian' array designs - it would enable development of the more exotic arrays the company has designed.

As well as the more obvious launch cost issues, lighter solar panels make for sportier ion drive vehicles.

That's not at all out of line versus what ATK's been making, a number of such systems which have already been utilized on actual probes, and what their next generation system is like:

https://www.orbitalatk.com/space-systems/space-components/solar-arrays/docs/FS007_15_OA_3862%20UltraFlex.pdf
https://www.orbitalatk.com/space-systems/space-components/solar-arrays/docs/FS008_15_OA_3862%20MegaFlex%20Solar%20Array.pdf

Solar power mass density for space applications has dramatically increased over the past couple decades.  It'll be neat to see how far these trends can go.  My first thoughts were that wiring mass would eventually be the blocking tech, but you can always go higher voltage.  The active solar material still makes up just a tiny fraction of the total mass.  We might a couple decades from now see array power/mass ratios that make even these numbers look poor by comparison.

One tech that I feel provides really exciting opportunities for space - particularly things like very large solar arrays, but much more - is rollable trusses.  Have you ever seen these?



They also have expandable / retractable booms that seem to appear from / disappear to nowhere:



« Last Edit: 02/21/2017 09:59 AM by Rei »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #13 on: 02/21/2017 10:31 AM »
I read that it's not a new Dragon for this flight, but the reuse of CRS-4. That's true ?

http://spacenews.com/spacex-to-reuse-dragon-capsules-on-cargo-missions/

Yes. Confirmed in CRS-10 press conference. (I can't remember if it was the pre-launch or post-launch briefing, or both?!) CRS-4 Dragon shell is bring re-used. Some components will be new, but I don't think there are any public details on the extent of that.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #14 on: 02/21/2017 02:12 PM »
On Salo's ISS manifest, I see the date for this flight is currently April 9. How reliable is that date?

Offline ChrisGebhardt

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #15 on: 02/21/2017 03:35 PM »
On Salo's ISS manifest, I see the date for this flight is currently April 9. How reliable is that date?

9 April is the NET date.  There are at least two, possibly three, F9 missions from 39A before that.  The basic answer, as frustrating as it might be, is that NET 9 April is as reliable as a launch date can be 6 weeks out with missions manifested on a single pad ahead of it.  I wouldn't go booking flights yet.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #16 on: 02/21/2017 05:04 PM »
NASA pulled rank and the CRS-10 date stuck forcing Echostar to move after. Is this a common occurrence? In other words, is the CRS-11 date more sticky such that if there are delays, then other satellites planned to be launched before would move after?

Offline whitelancer64

NASA pulled rank and the CRS-10 date stuck forcing Echostar to move after. Is this a common occurrence? In other words, is the CRS-11 date more sticky such that if there are delays, then other satellites planned to be launched before would move after?

CRS missions are subject to the VV schedule for the ISS, that's the primary driver for the launch date. If the VV schedule gets shuffled, so does the launch date for CRS-11.
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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #18 on: 02/21/2017 06:12 PM »
NASA pulled rank and the CRS-10 date stuck forcing Echostar to move after. Is this a common occurrence? In other words, is the CRS-11 date more sticky such that if there are delays, then other satellites planned to be launched before would move after?

Texas and SLC40 could launch commsats if LC39 is tied up with a NASA or FH launch.

This is why having the diversity of multiple eastern pads available will help SpaceX. 

With any luck it won't be a problem much longer.
I know they don't need it, but Crossfeed would be super cool.

Offline Norm38

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-11 : June 3, 2017 : DISCUSSION
« Reply #19 on: 03/16/2017 04:09 PM »
I can't believe that ROSA array fits in the trunk.  Going by the people in the picture as 2m, the array is more than 4m wide, which is greater than the trunk dimensions.  Does it tri-fold or something?

I looked for a deployment video and only found this: 

Is this array used to provide extra power to the station?  If not, what is the load?  Also, the press release says the experiment only runs 7 days.  What happens to the array after that?  It can't be rolled up and put back in the trunk.  Does it remain at ISS permanently? 
« Last Edit: 03/29/2017 03:57 PM by jacqmans »

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