Author Topic: Exoplanet Thread  (Read 6158 times)

Offline missinglink

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Re: Exoplanet Thread
« Reply #40 on: 05/11/2017 08:34 PM »
Not a "trick question", just wanted to get an idea how NSF Forum members expect that the relevant organizations -- and the public, which funds them -- will react to detection of life on exoplanets.

Thanks for answers received thus far.
« Last Edit: 05/11/2017 08:36 PM by missinglink »

Offline dror

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Re: Exoplanet Thread
« Reply #41 on: 05/11/2017 09:14 PM »
My whole interest in space derives from the hope to see that picture.
Sadly, I don't think the reaction will be as immediate or effective as you have suggested. I do hope, though, that it will encourage more reasonable discussions, put some sense in some people who needs it, and allow for a general increase in funding for research.
We must remember, though, that while an exoplanet may save the human race, it will not save the humans on this planet, and won't save this planet from them.

Offline Star One

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Re: Exoplanet Thread
« Reply #42 on: 05/11/2017 09:19 PM »
NASA Study Finds Unexpectedly Primitive Atmosphere Around ‘Warm Neptune’

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A study combining observations from NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes reveals that the distant planet HAT-P-26b has a primitive atmosphere composed almost entirely of hydrogen and helium. Located about 437 light years away, HAT-P-26b orbits a star roughly twice as old as the sun.

The analysis is one of the most detailed studies to date of a “warm Neptune,” or a planet that is Neptune-sized and close to its star. The researchers determined that HAT-P-26b’s atmosphere is relatively clear of clouds and has a strong water signature, although the planet is not a water world. This is the best measurement of water to date on an exoplanet of this size.

The discovery of an atmosphere with this composition on this exoplanet has implications for how scientists think about the birth and development of planetary systems. Compared to Neptune and Uranus, the planets in our solar system with about the same mass, HAT-P-26b likely formed either closer to its host star or later in the development of its planetary system, or both.


https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/nasa-study-finds-unexpectedly-primitive-atmosphere-around-warm-neptune

Offline missinglink

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Re: Exoplanet Thread
« Reply #43 on: 05/12/2017 02:54 PM »
We must remember, though, that while an exoplanet may save the human race, it will not save the humans on this planet, and won't save this planet from them.
True, true...

Life on exoplanets may be detected sooner than we think, if this proposal comes to fruition: https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/niac/2017_Phase_I_Phase_II/Solar_Gravity_Lens_Mission/

Just imagine, an habitable planet that doesn't need to be terraformed ... because it's already teeming with lush plant life. Send seed ships with human eggs and sperm, make of it a Second Earth. Ethical to do this to another biosphere? I guess not. Anyway, cost is prohibitive and First Earth gets no return on investment after bankrupting itself to stage the mission. So, probably never happen.

Online gospacex

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Re: Exoplanet Thread
« Reply #44 on: 05/12/2017 05:50 PM »
We must remember, though, that while an exoplanet may save the human race, it will not save the humans on this planet, and won't save this planet from them.
True, true...

Life on exoplanets may be detected sooner than we think, if this proposal comes to fruition: https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/niac/2017_Phase_I_Phase_II/Solar_Gravity_Lens_Mission/

Travel to 550 AU to be able to observe a single target? Because steering this telescope would be... difficult, to say the least.

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Just imagine, an habitable planet that doesn't need to be terraformed ... because it's already teeming with lush plant life. Send seed ships with human eggs and sperm, make of it a Second Earth. Ethical to do this to another biosphere? I guess not.

How about founding "bacteria have rights!" movement? It's sickening to think what massacres some people perpetrate daily, using only toothbrushes!
« Last Edit: 05/12/2017 05:50 PM by gospacex »

Offline Oli

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Re: Exoplanet Thread
« Reply #45 on: 05/14/2017 03:42 PM »
We must remember, though, that while an exoplanet may save the human race, it will not save the humans on this planet, and won't save this planet from them.
True, true...

Life on exoplanets may be detected sooner than we think, if this proposal comes to fruition: https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/niac/2017_Phase_I_Phase_II/Solar_Gravity_Lens_Mission/

Travel to 550 AU to be able to observe a single target? Because steering this telescope would be... difficult, to say the least.

If we find a planet with the right atmosphere (i.e. Earth-like), such a mission could certainly be worth it. I'm not aware of any other method that could deliver a 1000x1000px image of an exoplanet other than truly gigantic space telescopes.

Offline TakeOff

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Re: Exoplanet Thread
« Reply #46 on: 05/14/2017 06:45 PM »
Just imagine, an habitable planet that doesn't need to be terraformed ... because it's already teeming with lush plant life. Send seed ships with human eggs and sperm, make of it a Second Earth. Ethical to do this to another biosphere? I guess not. Anyway, cost is prohibitive and First Earth gets no return on investment after bankrupting itself to stage the mission. So, probably never happen.

That would be unlikely. Even here on Earth we've had about today's oxygen level only 1/10 of the planet's history. And we might've problems with the microbiomes available before we evolved here. I think we are extremely tightly integrated with Earth as it is now and will have to construct our own environment in other places.

Offline TakeOff

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Re: Exoplanet Thread
« Reply #47 on: 05/14/2017 06:56 PM »
Life on exoplanets may be detected sooner than we think, if this proposal comes to fruition: https://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/niac/2017_Phase_I_Phase_II/Solar_Gravity_Lens_Mission/

Travel to 550 AU to be able to observe a single target? Because steering this telescope would be... difficult, to say the least.
The LISA space laser interferometer is expected to perform an even greater miracle of precision flying. Solar gravity lensing is one of the "resources" that could be taken advantage of from early almost-interstellar flight. Other opportunities might be huge baseline parallax distance measurements and maybe radio interferometry, besides flying by distant objects and studying the interstellar medium. I think that a single object like an interesting exoplanet or the SMBH could be well worth a dedicated observatory.

Offline hop

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Re: Exoplanet Thread
« Reply #48 on: 05/14/2017 07:22 PM »
The LISA space laser interferometer is expected to perform an even greater miracle of precision flying.
Precision distance measurement between active spacecraft is not equivalent to precision pointing, so it's a *different* miracle rather than a greater one. But of all the miracles required to make gravitational focus telescope work, pointing probably isn't the biggest.

If we find a planet with the right atmosphere (i.e. Earth-like), such a mission could certainly be worth it. I'm not aware of any other method that could deliver a 1000x1000px image of an exoplanet other than truly gigantic space telescopes.
It's not clear a gravitational focus telescope can actually do this in practice either. See https://arxiv.org/abs/1604.06351

There is already a thread about for the gravitational focus telescope concept:  http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=27490.0

Offline CuddlyRocket

Re: Exoplanet Thread
« Reply #49 on: 05/16/2017 08:30 PM »
K2-106, a system containing a metal rich planet and a planet of lower density (arXiv)

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The two planets have similar masses, though very different densities. For K2-106b we derive Mp = 7.69 ± 0.82 M⊕, Rp = 1.52 ± 0.16 R⊕, and a high density of 12.0 +4.8 −3.2 g cm−3. For K2-106c, we find 6.79 ± 2.29 M⊕, Rp = 2.59 ± 0.27 R⊕ and a relatively low density of 2.4 +1.6 −1.1 g cm−3.

The 'Fulton Gap' has been proposed to be used to distinguish between 'super-Earths' and 'sub-Neptunes' - with the former having a radius of 1-1.75 R⊕ and the latter one of 1.75–3.5 R⊕. On that definition, this is an interesting system where the super-Earth is more massive than the sub-Neptune!

Offline Star One

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Re: Exoplanet Thread
« Reply #50 on: 05/16/2017 10:10 PM »
New 'styrofoam' planet provides tools in search for habitable planets

https://m.phys.org/news/2017-05-styrofoam-planet-tools-habitable-planets.html

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