Author Topic: LIVE: Soyuz ST-B Flight VS16 - HISPASAT 36W-1 January 28, 2017  (Read 26675 times)

Offline Jester

  • NSF Night Flyer
  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6775
  • Some Space Agency
  • Liked: 2768
  • Likes Given: 82
Live thread for this mission.
« Last Edit: 01/28/2017 07:08 AM by input~2 »

Offline Space Lizard

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 254
  • Liked: 6
  • Likes Given: 4
Is there a launcher available in CSG?

Because Roskosmos is not very keen to deliver one these days due to the Yukos case.
I watch rockets

Offline Stan Black

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2776
  • Liked: 106
  • Likes Given: 91

Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1140
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Commonwealth of Virginia
  • Liked: 241
  • Likes Given: 701
Some cross-posting from the Arianespace launch schedule thread, regarding this launch's hardware and capabilities.  This Hispasat satellite appears to max out, or slightly exceed the maximum payload capacity of Soyuz+Fregat from Kourou.

VA234 A5 ECA 20th of December 2016 at 17:30 local
VS16 ST-B (Hispasat AG1) 27th of January 2017 at 22:03:34 local

That's amazing. Hispasat AG1 gets transferred from an Ariane 5ECA to a Soyuz-STB Fregat-MT. Maybe the satellite was edited a bit to fit on the Soyuz (i.e. less mass).

Hispasat AG1 (aka 36W-1) is 3.2 tonnes http://www.hispasat.com/es/flota-de-satelites/futuros-satelites/hispasat-36w-1 which is precisely the GTO limit for Soyuz-ST from CSG (3250 kg)

EDIT: Upon more careful examination, I realized 3.25 tonnes is for SC+adapter, so it might be true they sacrificed a bit of propellant or found some other measure to lighten the satellite -or found a way to squeeze extra performance by the Soyuz?

This bird has been delayed by launcher unavailability and problems during the test program of the new REDSAT platform, since at least 2013, and has prompted Hispasat to lease capacity from Canada's Nimiq 2.

EDIT: Upon more careful examination, I realized 3.25 tonnes is for SC+adapter, so it might be true they sacrificed a bit of propellant or found some other measure to lighten the satellite -or found a way to squeeze extra performance by the Soyuz?
Or found a way to squeeze extra performance from the Fregat-MT upper stage?
Depends on the Fregat-MT number AFAIK their is version with enhanced features being developed. I doubt an enhanced Fregat-MT will have flown on a Russian Federal mission before this commercial flight starts to space.

AFAIK is a standard Fregat-MT, same one we used for our Galileo launches.

Here's another thought: Some Falcon 9 GTO launches have been GEO-1800 m/s, instead of the customary GEO-1500 m/s.  The 300 m/s difference must be made up by the spacecraft.

Will the same strategy be used in this case?
« Last Edit: 11/04/2016 12:45 PM by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium!

Offline Nicolas PILLET

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2207
  • Gien, France
    • Kosmonavtika
  • Liked: 354
  • Likes Given: 35
Is there a launcher available in CSG?

Because Roskosmos is not very keen to deliver one these days due to the Yukos case.

If Roscosmos doesn't want to give launchers, the fact that they are already in Guyana or not does not matter.
Nicolas PILLET
Kosmonavtika : The French site on Russian Space

Offline Rik ISS-fan

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 681
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 129
  • Likes Given: 33
If RosCosMos terminates all launcher colaborations with ESA/Europe. Might it be a nice idea to partner with Ukraine and convert ELS into a launchsite for MAYAK?
Then we have the missing launch capability between Vega C/E and Ariane 62. And our own backup in case of a launch failure.

Offline pechisbeque

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 101
  • Liked: 23
  • Likes Given: 0
OHB Communications Satellite for HISPASAT arrived at Launch Site
Bremen, 12/01/2016

Bremen/Kourou, December 1st, 2016. Telecommunications satellite H36W-1 of Bremen satellite manufacturer OHB has arrived at Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. The overall design of the satellite belonging to the SmallGEO series*) was verified during an extensive test campaign.

“The completion of our first geostationary communications satellite is an important milestone in the history of our company”, says Marco R. Fuchs, CEO of OHB System AG, and adds: “This will spur on our other SmallGEO projects, EDRS-C, Electra and Heinrich Hertz”.

OHB developed the versatile geostationary satellite platform called SmallGEO within ESA’s Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems (ARTES) programme. The first satellite, H36W-1, was built under a public-private partnership between ESA, OHB and Spanish satellite operator HISPASAT. With H36W-1, HISPASAT plan on supplying the Iberian Peninsula, the Canary Islands as well as South America with media services. The satellite will be integrated into their existing fleet of geostationary communications satellites. The satellite is designed for a mission duration of 15 years.

“Our satellite underwent extensive environmental tests in an 11-month test campaign after which it was declared ready for shipment to the launch site. The cooperation with ESA, our customer HISPASAT, the experts from the test house IABG and our partner TESAT has been close and target oriented”, says Dieter Birreck, OHB’s project manager for this SmallGEO project. He is looking forward to the remaining tasks to be conducted in Kourou: “The launch date is rapidly approaching and the whole team is excited and can hardly wait for it to come!”

OHB’s Chief Technical Officer and Head Telecommunications Satellites, Guy Perez, reflects: “H36W-1 is the first telecom satellite fully designed, developed, integrated and tested by OHB under close supervision of ESA and HISPASAT. Like any first, this meant a number of technical challenges that the OHB teams had to address in order to achieve customer satisfaction. OHB teams have hence learned a lot in the course of this project and have been able to enhance OHB know-how considerably. We will make sure that those lessons learned will benefit our future satellite projects including future telecom satellites belonging to the SmallGEO family.”


Transport by Truck, Airplane and Launcher
An Antonov airplane carried the communications satellite from Germany to French Guiana. At the Kourou launch site, the experts from OHB will again test their satellite and check all functions before the satellite is integrated in a Soyuz launcher and subsequently undergoes final tests. Satellite launch is scheduled for January 27, 2017. H36W-1 will be deployed in a geostationary orbit of approximately 36,000 km to carry out its mission operations.

*) The SmallGEO family of satellites is defined by a broad spectrum of possible configurations to fulfill a variety of mission objectives. These include telecommunications, Earth observation and laser-communication applications from a geostationary orbit. As propellant options clients can choose between classic, hybrid or electrical. Depending on the model, the satellite mass at launch can vary between 2,500 kg and 3,500 kg, whereby the individually permitted payload may vary between 300 kg and 650 kg. OHB is currently also working on the SmallGEO projects EDRS-C, Electra and Heinrich Hertz.

http://www.ohb.de/press-releases-details/ohb-communications-satellite-for-hispasat-arrived-at-launch-site.html
« Last Edit: 12/10/2016 12:42 PM by jacqmans »

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8189
  • UK
  • Liked: 1322
  • Likes Given: 168
Will today's loss of the Progress mission impact this flight being as this is also on a Soyuz launcher even if a different variant?

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7436
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 1434
  • Likes Given: 4475
Will today's loss of the Progress mission impact this flight being as this is also on a Soyuz launcher even if a different variant?
Completely different Block-I. The old Soyuz-U used the old structure with the RD-0110 gas generator engines and the old analog avionics made in Ukraine. The ST-B uses the staged combustion RD-0124 with the new structure Block-I with tank sizes optimized for the new O/F ratio and the new digital avionics made in Russia.

Offline russianhalo117

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3806
  • AR USA / Berlin, DE / Moscow, RF
  • Liked: 737
  • Likes Given: 449
Will today's loss of the Progress mission impact this flight being as this is also on a Soyuz launcher even if a different variant?
Completely different Block-I. The old Soyuz-U used the old structure with the RD-0110 gas generator engines and the old analog avionics made in Ukraine. The ST-B uses the staged combustion RD-0124 with the new structure Block-I with tank sizes optimized for the new O/F ratio and the new digital avionics made in Russia.
unless its a common component between all versions. IF TLM downlink lasted long enough then Fault tree will be better.

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7436
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 1434
  • Likes Given: 4475
Will today's loss of the Progress mission impact this flight being as this is also on a Soyuz launcher even if a different variant?
Completely different Block-I. The old Soyuz-U used the old structure with the RD-0110 gas generator engines and the old analog avionics made in Ukraine. The ST-B uses the staged combustion RD-0124 with the new structure Block-I with tank sizes optimized for the new O/F ratio and the new digital avionics made in Russia.
unless its a common component between all versions. IF TLM downlink lasted long enough then Fault tree will be better.
Different structure, different O/F, different tanks, different engine, different avionics. What could be the common components? I'm pretty sure that the Russians will clear this flight pretty fast.

Offline bolun

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2581
  • Europe
  • Liked: 188
  • Likes Given: 67
Dec 7, 2016

Hispasat 36W-1 arrives at the Spaceport as an all-new telecom satellite type for Arianespace’s first launch in 2017

Launch preparation activity is underway for Arianespace’s initial mission in 2017, with an all-new type of telecommunications satellite now delivered to the Spaceport for liftoff on a Soyuz launcher from French Guiana in January.

Arriving aboard a chartered Antonov An-124 cargo jetliner was Hispasat 36W-1, the first satellite based on the SmallGEO platform developed under the European Space Agency’s Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems (ARTES) program.

The aircraft touched down earlier this month at Félix Eboué International Airport near French Guiana’s capital city of Cayenne. The spacecraft was unloaded and transferred by road to the Spaceport launch base, where it is undergoing initial checkout in the S1B payload preparation facility.

Once orbited by Arianespace, Hispasat 36W-1 will be operated by Hispasat – a world leader in Spanish and Portuguese broadcasting.

Conventional & new technologies on Hispasat 36W-1

Germany’s OHB System AG designed and built the three-metric-ton Hispasat 36W-1, and its delivery to French Guiana marked the completion of a nearly eight-year development effort for the SmallGEO platform.

Hispasat 36W-1 is equipped with a conventional commercial relay payload of 20 Ku-band transponders, along with three Ka-band transponders developed by TESAT Spacecom under funding from the DLR German Aerospace Center.

Also integrated on the satellite is a new-generation active antenna that receives and reconfigures radio frequency beams over the Earth’s visible disc. This Redsat payload and its onboard processor will enable Hispasat to provide more flexible multimedia and broadcasting services over the Americas, Europe and the Canary Islands.

http://www.arianespace.com/mission-update/hispasat-36w-1-arrival-at-spaceport/

Offline bolun

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2581
  • Europe
  • Liked: 188
  • Likes Given: 67
Small Geostationary Satellite SGEO: link

First SmallGEO makes its final terrestrial trip: link
« Last Edit: 12/24/2016 01:56 PM by bolun »

Offline SMS

  • Regular
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 604
  • PL/Europe
    • Astronauts & their spaceflights
  • Liked: 87
  • Likes Given: 120
According to http://www.roscosmos.ru/23055/:

launch is planned on January 28th, 2017 at 01:03:34 UTC.
---
SMS ;-).

Offline Lewis007

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1186
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 82
VS-16 launch sticker of CSG
(credit: CSG facebook)

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Flight VS16 – First-ever mission to geostationary orbit with Soyuz from the Guiana Space Center to launch Hispasat satellite

January 19, 2017 – For its year-opening launch of 2017, Arianespace will orbit the Hispasat 36W-1 geostationary satellite for the Spanish operator Hispasat using a Soyuz launch vehicle.

Designated Flight VS16 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system, this mission will be the first-ever mission to geostationary transfer orbit performed by Soyuz from the Guiana Space Center in French Guiana.

Hispasat 36W-1 is the first satellite to be built using Europe’s new “SmallGEO” platform developed by OHB System AG (Germany) under ESA’s ARTES (Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems) program.

The launch will be from the Soyuz Launch Complex (ELS) in Sinnamary, French Guiana.

The launcher will be carrying a total payload of 3,343 kg.


The Launch Readiness Review (LRR) will take place on Thursday, January 26, 2017 in Kourou, to authorize the start of operations for the final countdown.

Hispasat 36W-1 is a telecommunications satellite for Hispasat, and the first to be built using Europe’s new “SmallGEO” platform.

Hispasat is the Spanish satellite communications operator, a leader in the distribution of content in Spanish and Portuguese. With more than 25 years’ experience, the Hispasat Group maintains an important presence on the Iberian Peninsula and in Latin America, where it is now the fourth-largest satellite operator.

From its orbital position at 36 deg. West, Hispasat 36W-1 will allow Hispasat to provide a wide range of telecommunications services in Spain, Portugal, the Canary Islands and South America.

Hispasat 36W-1 was built by OHB System AG in Bremen, Germany, using a SmallGEO platform.

Developed by OHB System AG under ESA’s ARTES (Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems) program, the SmallGEO platform line offers satellite operators an entirely European solution in the smaller telecom satellite market.

To watch a live, high-speed online transmission of the launch (including commentary from the launch site in French and English), go to arianespace.com on January 27, 2017, starting 20 minutes before liftoff.

You can also follow the launch live on your iPhone or iPad (the Arianespace HD app is free).

Offline Tobi

  • Member
  • Posts: 26
  • Regensburg, Germany
  • Liked: 1
  • Likes Given: 1
Is it vehicle number R-15000-012 that is being prepared for this launch?

Offline russianhalo117

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3806
  • AR USA / Berlin, DE / Moscow, RF
  • Liked: 737
  • Likes Given: 449
Is it vehicle number R-15000-012 that is being prepared for this launch?
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13239.msg1589115#msg1589115
The first one listed in the post.

Offline russianhalo117

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3806
  • AR USA / Berlin, DE / Moscow, RF
  • Liked: 737
  • Likes Given: 449

Offline pechisbeque

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 101
  • Liked: 23
  • Likes Given: 0

Offline jcm

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2802
  • Jonathan McDowell
  • Somerville, Massachusetts, USA
    • Jonathan's Space Report
  • Liked: 338
  • Likes Given: 293
Is it vehicle number R-15000-012 that is being prepared for this launch?
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13239.msg1589115#msg1589115
The first one listed in the post.

And do we know the Fregat-MT serial number?
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
January 24, 2017 

Soyuz rolls out for Arianespace’s medium-lift launch with Hispasat 36W-1

The Soyuz launcher for Arianespace’s year-opening mission rolled out to the launch pad in French Guiana today, readying the vehicle to receive its Hispasat 36W-1 payload for a nighttime liftoff from the Spaceport on January 27.

Soyuz was moved from the Spaceport’s MIK launcher assembly facility to the ELS launch zone, using a transport/erector rail car in a horizontal transfer process. When positioned over the launch pad, the vehicle was erected into a vertical orientation, where it is suspended in place by four large support arms.

With this step’s completion, the mobile gantry was moved into position around the basic three-stage launcher – providing protection for the upcoming installation of Soyuz’ “upper composite,” which consists of the Hispasat 36W-1 spacecraft, plus the Fregat upper stage and payload fairing.

Flight VS16: a mission with several “firsts”

Friday’s mission, designated Flight VS16 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system, will be the first for Soyuz to geostationary transfer orbit in the medium-lift vehicle’s operations from the Spaceport. Soyuz was introduced at French Guiana in 2011, and has performed 15 missions to date from the South America facility.

Another first for Flight VS16 is the Hispasat 36W-1 passenger – the initial telecommunications satellite to use the SmallGEO series platform, developed under the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems (ARTES) program. Its design and manufacture was performed by Germany’s OHB System AG.

Once in orbit at a position of 36 deg. West, the three-metric-ton-category telecommunications platform will provide relay coverage and multimedia services across Europe, the Canary Islands and South America at the service of Hispasat – a world leader in Spanish and Portuguese broadcasting.

This photo series highlights today’s erection sequence for Soyuz at the Spaceport. After being positioned on the launch pad by its transporter/erector rail car (left), Soyuz is raised by the erector’s support arm (center photo). At right, the 53-meter-tall mobile gantry moves into position around Soyuz, providing a protected environment for installation of the mission’s Hispasat 36W-1 payload, as well as for final checkout of the fully-integrated launch vehicle.

http://www.arianespace.com/mission-update/soyuz-rollout-vs16/

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4263
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 2856
  • Likes Given: 952

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Press Release
N°02-2017

Paris, 25 January 2017

Call for Media: First flight for SmallGEO

Europe's new versatile small geostationary platform will be launched on its maiden flight in the early hours of 28 January on a Soyuz rocket.

SmallGEO is carrying Hispasat's Hispasat 36W-1 telecommunications payload, which marks the first partnership between ESA and a Spanish operator and will provide flight heritage to OHB System AG's platform. 

It is the first telecommunications satellite to be developed, integrated and tested in Germany for more than a quarter of a century. The launch will also be the first time a Soyuz has lifted a telecom satellite of more than 3 tonnes to geostationary
transfer orbit from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.

Liftoff is scheduled for 01:03 GMT on 28 January (02:03 CET, 22:03 on 27 January local time). 

The satellite's destination is a geostationary position at 36°W, where it will provide broadband coverage across Europe, the Canary Islands and the Americas.

It will do so through its Redsat payload, which offers better signal quality and flexible land coverage by independently allocating up to four reconfigurable Ku-band beams at once, adapting the beams' strength and location according to demand. 

Together with a traditional commercial payload using advanced Ka- and Ku-band transponders, Redsat allows for higher transmission speeds. It can also convert data received in the existing standard to the newer Digital Video Broadcasting Second generation
standard. 

The SmallGEO platform and Hispasat 36W-1 mission were developed under ESA's Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems (ARTES) programme, which transforms research and development investments into commercial products. This helps to secure the
future success of Europe and Canada in the highly competitive global satcom market. 

The launch will be streamed live and linked from the ESA website. 

Offline Jester

  • NSF Night Flyer
  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6775
  • Some Space Agency
  • Liked: 2768
  • Likes Given: 82

Offline Lewis007

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1186
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 82
Video of the roll-out

Offline 0Firefly

  • Member
  • Posts: 9
  • Europe
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 0
Proton grounded for at least six months?

Following on from the continuing investigation into the Progress MS-04 Soyuz-U failure, even more bad news from the Voronezh Mechanical Plant (VMZ), via Anatoly Zak:

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/proton_2017.html

On 24th January, "the Kommersant newspaper reported that a recent firing test had revealed technical problems with RD-0210 and RD-0212 engines, which propel the second and third stage of the Proton rocket respectively. The failure of the engine was reportedly traced to illegal replacement of precious heat-resistant alloys within the engine's components with less expensive but failure-prone materials."

The Proton engines have now been recalled as well as the Soyuz RD-0110 ones; and it looks as if Proton will be grounded for at least six months.

"To be continued ...",  as Zak writes with some understatement at the end of his article.

(Cross-posted from the MS-04 Failure thread)

From the Mission Planner’s Guide, with the introduction of the Proton-M there was:-
Quote
The structural materials of the turbine parts have been replaced with combustion-resistant nickel alloy;

Given the fact that the RD-0124 used on tomorrows launch was built in the same plant, is there any concern that similar substitutions happened on those engines?

Quote from a different tread (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=17568.160).

Anyone here has given any thought about it?

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
January 26, 2017 

Soyuz is “GO” for Arianespace’s first launch of 2017

Arianespace’s year-opening mission has been approved for liftoff tomorrow night from the Spaceport in French Guiana, using a Soyuz to place the Hispasat 36W-1 telecommunications relay platform into geostationary transfer orbit (GTO).

The authorization for this mission, designated Flight VS16 in Arianespace’s numbering system, was given today following the Launch Readiness Review, which validated the “go” status of Soyuz and its three-metric-ton-category satellite passenger, along with the Spaceport’s infrastructure and network of ground-based tracking stations.

This will be the first of up to 12 missions planned in 2017 by Arianespace, utilizing its medium-lift Soyuz, heavy-lift Ariane 5 and lightweight Vega launchers.

Underscoring Arianespace’s reactivity, the launch services provider is planning six of its 2017 missions during a three-month timeframe from tomorrow’s liftoff of Flight VS16 through the second half of April.

A new Soyuz launch profile from Sinnamary

Flight VS16’s 32-minute mission profile with Hispasat 36W-1 will mark the first use of Soyuz from French Guiana in a GTO payload deployment from French Guiana.

The fully-assembled Soyuz for tomorrow’s mission is on the ELS launch pad, located in the Spaceport’s northwestern sector within the commune of Sinnamary. It is protected by a 53-meter-tall mobile gantry, which will be rolled back at 1 hour, 10 minutes prior to liftoff.

Hispasat 36W-1 is the initial telecommunications satellite built with a SmallGEO series spacecraft platform, developed under the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems (ARTES) program. The satellite was designed and manufactured by Germany’s OHB System AG.

http://www.arianespace.com/mission-update/vs16-launch-readiness-review/

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156

Offline Stan Black

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2776
  • Liked: 106
  • Likes Given: 91

Offline Alter Sachse

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 475
  • Germany (near Heidelberg)
  • Liked: 66
  • Likes Given: 106

Offline Stan Black

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2776
  • Liked: 106
  • Likes Given: 91
Is it vehicle number R-15000-012 that is being prepared for this launch?
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13239.msg1589115#msg1589115
The first one listed in the post.

That is for the next launch?
This one is rocket 24/136?
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13239.msg1534267#msg1534267
This is my offer:
R-15000-012 (30/136)
source:
http://www.russianspaceweb.com/hispasat-36w-1.html


But Mr. Zak is quoting from the above post; the fairing he shows has a different serial number of 6/137. That is for the next launch.
« Last Edit: 01/27/2017 04:50 PM by Stan Black »

Offline Alter Sachse

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 475
  • Germany (near Heidelberg)
  • Liked: 66
  • Likes Given: 106
Is it vehicle number R-15000-012 that is being prepared for this launch?
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13239.msg1589115#msg1589115
The first one listed in the post.

That is for the next launch?
This one is rocket 24/136?
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13239.msg1534267#msg1534267
This is my offer:
R-15000-012 (30/136)
source:
http://www.russianspaceweb.com/hispasat-36w-1.html


But Mr. Zak is quoting from the above post; the fairing he shows has a different serial number of 6/137. That is for the next launch.
One thing s clear:
 R15000-012
(roll-out Video 0:26 sec)

Offline russianhalo117

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3806
  • AR USA / Berlin, DE / Moscow, RF
  • Liked: 737
  • Likes Given: 449
Is it vehicle number R-15000-012 that is being prepared for this launch?
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13239.msg1589115#msg1589115
The first one listed in the post.

That is for the next launch?
This one is rocket 24/136?
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13239.msg1534267#msg1534267
This is my offer:
R-15000-012 (30/136)
source:
http://www.russianspaceweb.com/hispasat-36w-1.html


But Mr. Zak is quoting from the above post; the fairing he shows has a different serial number of 6/137. That is for the next launch.
One thing s clear:
 R15000-012
(roll-out Video 0:26 sec)
mr Zak said that it is an error and will be corrected after the launch.

Correct information confirmed by Jester: Soyuz-ST-B  SZ20  24М136С  Р15000-012  81КС  Р15000-025  VS16 HISPASAT-AG1
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13239.msg1635893#msg1635893
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=13239.msg1635964#msg1635964
« Last Edit: 01/27/2017 08:17 PM by russianhalo117 »

Offline input~2

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5227
  • Liked: 356
  • Likes Given: 167
WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC.
FRENCH GUIANA.
ROCKETS.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS 0053Z TO 0207Z DAILY
28 JAN THRU 27 FEB IN AREA BOUND BY
05-22.03N 052-52.20W, 05-25.89N 052-37.34W,
05-21.65N 052-31.55W, 05-10.45N 052-38.45W.
2. CANCEL THIS MSG 270307Z FEB 17.//

Authority: MARINE GUYANE 111410Z JAN 17.

Date: 230444Z JAN 17
Cancel: 27030700 Feb 17


NORTH ATLANTIC.
ROCKETS.
DNC 01.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS 28 JAN THRU 27 FEB DAILY
IN AREAS BOUND BY:
A. 0103Z TO 0207Z
05-03N 047-27W, 05-05N 047-28W,
05-19N 048-27W, 05-17N 048-25W.
B. 0003Z TO 02007Z
04-44N 045-08W, 04-49N 046-23W,
05-16N 046-22W, 05-12N 045-07W.
C. 0003Z TO 0207Z
04-12N 039-05W, 04-01N 039-02W,
04-35N 040-34W, 05-14N 040-32W.
D. 0104Z TO 0254Z
01-53N 002-08W, 01-34N 000-59E,
00-59N 000-56E, 01-18N 002-11W.
2. CANCEL THIS MSG 270354Z FEB 17.//

Authority: MARINE GUYANE 111410Z JAN 17.

Date: 230533Z JAN 17
Cancel: 27035400 Feb 17
« Last Edit: 01/27/2017 07:10 PM by input~2 »

Online ZachS09

L-3 hours, 50 minutes. The Soyuz is continuing to be fueled for tonight's launch of Hispasat 36W-1.

Only RP-1 kerosene and liquid oxygen are being used in the Soyuz's main rocket stages; the Fregat fourth stage's unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine and dinitrogen tetroxide propellants were loaded between one and two months before launch day.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

L-2 hours, 30 minutes. Less than one hour remains until the Soyuz is completely fueled.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

L-1 hour, 35 minutes. Fueling operations are complete. Standing by for the Mobile Service Tower to retract away from the Soyuz in 25 minutes.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

L-1 hour, 9 minutes. We should be getting photography of this event soon; Mobile Service Tower retraction underway.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Under one hour to launch.

The Hispasat 36W-1 satellite, weighing in at 3,221 kilograms, will be the heaviest payload for the Arianespace Soyuz program, which dates back to October 2011.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

L-45 minutes. The Arianespace webcast should start in 25 minutes.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin

The wah wah wah music is on.

Online ZachS09

15 minutes until we're live.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline pechisbeque

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 101
  • Liked: 23
  • Likes Given: 0
H - 40 mn. All is green for Hispasat 36W-1 @Hispasat
https://twitter.com/arianespaceceo/status/825137650956922886
« Last Edit: 01/27/2017 11:42 PM by pechisbeque »

Online ZachS09

Kourou's English soundtrack test now playing as the second part of the pre-webcast section.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

A new countdown clock for the webcast start.

Under 2 minutes.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Live from Kourou's Guiana Space Centre, Arianespace presents live coverage of the launch of VS-16 carrying the Hispasat 36W-1 satellite into geosynchronous orbit: the first time an Arianespace Soyuz will ever do so.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

L-14 minutes. Looking at a pad shot of VS-16.
« Last Edit: 01/27/2017 11:50 PM by ZachS09 »
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin

Good evening Soyuz!


Online ZachS09

Playing the Flight Mission Presentation.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

DDO gave the flight readiness signal.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Stephane Israel talking about the upcoming mission.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin

T-10 mins and here's the boss.

Online ZachS09

L-9 minutes.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline pechisbeque

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 101
  • Liked: 23
  • Likes Given: 0
Fregat upper stage and SmallGEO/H36W-1 satellite


Online ZachS09

The Jupiter Control Room is 27 kilometers from the ELS pad.

We are green board.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Playing the Launch Campaign video.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Passing the 6-minute mark in the countdown.

No prelaunch issues being discussed.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T-5 minutes. Fregat is transferring to internal power.

The launch key is in.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."


Online ZachS09

T-4 minutes. This will mark the 6th night launch of the Arianespace Soyuz program; T0 will be 202 minutes and 34 seconds after sunset (10:03:34 PM local).

We've begun the Synchronized Sequence a while ago.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T-3 minutes. The Soyuz-STB Fregat-MT config will be used for the 12th time; it was mainly used for O3b and Galileo launches.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T-2 minutes, 25 seconds. The upper composite umbilical, which is located on the bigger umbilical tower, has dropped off.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin


Online ZachS09

The Jupiter Control Room spectators will soon go outside to watch the launch around 30 seconds before T0.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T-1 minute. Soyuz now on internal power.

DDO announcing the final minute of the countdown.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin

Audience leaving to go watch outside!

Online ZachS09

T-35 seconds. The first umbilical tower has retracted from the Soyuz.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T-16 seconds. Ignition sequence start.

The second umbilical tower is also retracting.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, all engines at full thrust, and liftoff of the Soyuz-STB Fregat-MT rocket carrying the Hispasat 36W-1 satellite into geosynchronous orbit. Hispasat 36W-1 will provide the latest in communications services to customers throughout Europe, the Canary Islands, and South America.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+16 seconds. Everything continues to look good as the Soyuz initiates its roll and pitch programs to put itself on the proper trajectory.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+30 seconds. Coming up on Mach 1, or the speed of sound.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+50 seconds. We've passed Mach 1 and we're now passing Max-Q.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin

LAUNCH!!

Online ZachS09

T+1 minute, 10 seconds. The first stage boosters and second stage are burning well. All 17 engines providing 1,008,426 pounds of thrust; five main engines and twelve verniers.

We'll expect the boosters to cut off at 1 minute, 58 seconds. Simultaneously, they'll separate from the second stage, which will continue to burn.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."



Online ZachS09

T+1 minute, 40 seconds. Coming up on BECO in less than 20 seconds.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."


Online ZachS09

T+2 minutes. We have BECO and booster separation. Too bad the Korolev Cross can't be seen in the night sky.

Second stage continues to burn well.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."


Online ZachS09

T+3 minutes. Coming up on fairing separation in about 30 seconds.

Altitude 80 kilometers, speed 2.05 kilometers a second, downrange 145 kilometers.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+3 minute, 33 seconds. Fairing separation confirmed.

We'll expect second stage Main Engine Cut Off (MECO) to occur at 4 minutes, 47 seconds. Using a hot-fire method, the third stage will ignite at the same time MECO occurs, severing the interstage lattice structures and separating the second stage. A few seconds after staging, the three interstage pieces will fall away from the third stage engine.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+4 minutes.

Altitude 120 kilometers, speed 2.74 kilometers a second, downrange 295 kilometers.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+4 minutes, 30 seconds. Second stage propulsion is healthy; standing by for MECO and staging.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+4 minutes, 50 seconds. Second stage MECO, third stage ignition, second stage separation, interstage jettison. All four events looked good.

The single RD-0124 engine will fire until 9 minutes, 22 seconds. After SECO occurs at that time, there will be a 1-second coast phase before Fregat separates.
« Last Edit: 02/19/2017 05:22 PM by ZachS09 »
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin

Staging. On to the third stage.

Online ZachS09

T+5 minutes, 30 seconds.

Getting good data from the Galliot tracking station. Nothing's ratty thus far.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+6 minutes. Third stage thrust looks good. Flight path is nominal.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."


Online ZachS09

Playing a few launch replays. What an awesome night launch.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+7 minutes. About two minutes to SECO.

Altitude 189 kilometers, speed 4.6 kilometers a second, downrange 940 kilometers.
« Last Edit: 02/19/2017 05:23 PM by ZachS09 »
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Galliot LOS, Natal AOS.

"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+8 minutes.

Third stage propulsion nominal. Playing the Hispasat 36W-1 Presentation.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+8 minutes, 50 seconds.

Altitude 199 kilometers, speed 5.95 kilometers a second, downrange 1490 kilometers.
« Last Edit: 01/28/2017 12:13 AM by ZachS09 »
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

We have SECO. Third stage has shut down and separated.

And the tumble valve has opened on the third stage's fuel tank.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Exactly 60 seconds will pass between Fregat separation and Fregat MES-1. After the latter occurs, the single firing of the Fregat's S5.92 engine will last 17 minutes and 37 seconds.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin

Staging. On to the upper stage.

Online ZachS09

T+10 minutes, 23 seconds. Fregat MES-1.

The 17-and-a-half minute burn will inject Hispasat 36W-1 into a geosynchronous transfer orbit, leaving the satellite to use its onboard propulsion to raise the perigee in order to circularize the orbit.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

11 minutes Mission Elapsed Time.

Altitude 200 kilometers, speed 6.9 kilometers a second, downrange 2420 kilometers.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Just got confirmation that Fregat MES-1 occurred as planned.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Fregat's performance looking good.

All fuel lines are at the right temperatures.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Playing another Hispasat 36W-1 presentation.

Passed the 13-minute mark.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+14 minutes.

Altitude 181 kilometers, speed 7.29 kilometers a second, downrange 3630 kilometers.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

The SmallGEO platform is 5 meters long and 2 meters wide.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Explaining the RedSat instrument on the satellite.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+17 minutes. Not sure if we acquired Ascension yet.

Altitude 155 kilometers, speed 7.67 kilometers a second, downrange 4900 kilometers.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."


Online ZachS09

It's official that we did have Natal LOS and Ascension AOS during the Hispasat video.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

The Fregat main engine continues to burn very well.

Brief unexpected LOS.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Ascension LOS, Libreville AOS.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin

My bad, engine is still firing.

Online ZachS09

Playing the ESA SmallGEO presentation.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+20 minutes.

Altitude 156 kilometers, speed 8.13 kilometers a second, downrange 6360 kilometers.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Still getting good data from Libreville.

Flight path still nominal.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+23 minutes.

Altitude 217 kilometers, speed 8.56 kilometers a second, downrange 7800 kilometers.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."


Online ZachS09

Four minutes left for the only Fregat burn.

Again, Fregat MECO-1 will occur at exactly 28 minutes MET.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+25 minutes.

Playing the Relationship presentation.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Altitude 360 kilometers, speed 8.92 kilometers a second, downrange 9100 kilometers.

Good thrust on Fregat.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Fregat was originally designed by Russia as an interplanetary probe.

It was then modified to fly on Soyuz.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Just mentioned the Cluster 2 satellite quartet.

Not the original quartet which was lost on the maiden flight of Ariane 5.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+28 minutes. Fregat MECO-1. Now we enter the ballistic phase, or "space ballet", in which Fregat orients itself for spacecraft separation.

Hispasat 36W-1 will separate from Fregat 4 minutes and 10 seconds after MECO-1.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Nice simulated sunrise as seen from the CGI telemetry.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Now getting data from the Malindi tracking station.

Altitude 760 kilometers, speed 9.26 kilometers a second, downrange 11,000 kilometers.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin

Ballistic phase. Coming up on S/C Sep.

Online ZachS09

Playing the Hispasat LEOP presentation.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Just passed the half-hour mark of the flight.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Fregat and Hispasat 36W-1 are currently in a geosynchronous transfer orbit whose apogee is at 35,786 kilometers and perigee is at a Low Earth parking orbit altitude; maybe at 185 kilometers.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

T+31 minutes, 30 seconds.

Altitude 1170 kilometers, speed 8.92 kilometers a second, downrange 12,100 kilometers.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Spacecraft sep confirmation will be a bit later than scheduled.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin

Waiting for the Russians to confirm S/C Sep.

Online ZachS09

And we have spacecraft separation! Arianespace kicks off the year of 2017 with a great start!

Congrats to Hispasat, Arianespace, the European Space Agency, and the makers of Soyuz on a spectacular GTO ascent!
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Before we begin the post-launch speeches, we'll have to wait for AOS from Hispasat 36W-1.

It's a new milestone Arianespace possibly included in the launch profile.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin

Confirmation, but no applause....

Online ZachS09

Playing more launch replays. Doesn't get any better than this.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline Chris Bergin

Waiting for more confirmation (AOS).

Article:

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/01/arianespace-soyuz-st-b-launches-hispasat-36w-1/

Thanks very much for everyone's coverage, not least Zach.

Online ZachS09

Explaining the three Arianespace launchers.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Playing a video about the 2016 Arianespace launches.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Waiting for more confirmation (AOS).

Article:

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/01/arianespace-soyuz-st-b-launches-hispasat-36w-1/

Thanks very much for everyone's coverage, not least Zach.

I think they always wait for independent tracking data for all Soyuz launches since the 2014 "Galileo anomaly".
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline Mapperuo

  • Assistant Webmaster
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1602
  • Yorkshire
  • Liked: 382
  • Likes Given: 63
Re: LIVE: Soyuz ST-B Flight VS16 - HISPASAT-AG1 January 27, 2017
« Reply #146 on: 01/28/2017 12:43 AM »
- Aaron

Online ZachS09

Explaining the Fregat passivation.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

49 minutes, 30 seconds MET.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

It's so quiet.

About 20 minutes post-separation and still no signal from Hispasat 36W-1.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Hispasat 36W-1 AOS confirmed.

Time to officially start celebrating the successful mission outcome.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Awaiting post-launch speeches momentarily.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Stephane Israel giving the first speech as he's the chairman.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Carlos Espinos is next at the podium.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Next speaker is Jan Woerner.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Norbert Barthle now giving his speech.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Marco Fuchs taking his turn at the "speech podium".
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

Stephane Israel back at the podium to let us know about upcoming missions.

Up next is on February 14, Valentine's Day, when an Ariane 5ECA (2) rocket launches Intelsat 32e/SKY-Brasil 1 & Telkom 3S. The launch time is at 21:39:07 UTC (6:39:07 PM local).
« Last Edit: 01/28/2017 01:24 AM by ZachS09 »
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online ZachS09

The webcast finishing its broadcast with one last replay of the initial launch events at 01:03:34 UTC.

Thank you so much for joining me tonight. I'll see you next time.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4648
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1473
  • Likes Given: 902
Re: LIVE: Soyuz ST-B Flight VS16 - HISPASAT-AG1 January 27, 2017
« Reply #159 on: 01/28/2017 03:24 AM »
Full coverage replay...

Arianespace Flight VS16 / Hispasat 36W-1

 
Arianespace

Published on Jan 27, 2017
Arianespace began its busy 2017 launch schedule with a Soyuz mission tonight that marked multiple “firsts” in orbiting the Hispasat 36W-1 telecommunications satellite on a flight from the Spaceport.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qEyy3n65VLQ?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline input~2

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5227
  • Liked: 356
  • Likes Given: 167
Re: LIVE: Soyuz ST-B Flight VS16 - HISPASAT-AG1 January 27, 2017
« Reply #160 on: 01/28/2017 06:59 AM »
2 objects have been cataloged by USSTRATCOM:

2017-006A/41942 in 239 x 35639 km x 5.54°
2017-006B/41943 in 239 x 35593 km x 5.42°

Offline Lewis007

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1186
  • the Netherlands
  • Liked: 168
  • Likes Given: 82
Some high-res launch pics
(source: Arianespace website)

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Press Release
 N°04-2017

 Paris, 28 January 2017

 SmallGEO's first flight reaches orbit

 ESA's new small telecom platform was launched on its first mission in the early hours of this morning.

 The Hispasat 36W-1 satellite, based on the SmallGEO platform, lifted off on a Soyuz rocket at 01:03 GMT this morning from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.

 SmallGEO is Europe's response to the market demand for more flexible, modular telecommunications platforms. It marks the first time the German satellite manufacturing company OHB System AG have been the prime contractor for a telecommunications satellite mission. Its Hispasat payload marks the first ESA partnership with a Spanish operator.

 The three-tonne satellite was released by Soyuz into its transfer orbit 29 minutes after liftoff this morning. It will now use its own thrusters to make its way to its final destination over the course of the next few weeks.

 It is heading towards 'geostationary' orbit at an altitude of 36 000 km over the equator, where it will take a day to circle Earth and therefore appear to hang over the same point, in this case at 36°W over the Atlantic Ocean.
 OHB will test the satellite's health and performance, making sure the sensitive technology made it unscathed through the violence of the launch.

 After all is deemed well, they will hand the control over to Hispasat and the satellite will begin providing broadband services to Europe, South America and the Canary Islands.

 "The launch of this first SmallGEO platform marks another major success for ESA's programme of Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems, known as ARTES, which aims to boost the competitiveness of its Member State industry through innovation," noted Magali Vaissiere, ESA's Director of Telecommunications and Integrated Applications.

 "SmallGEO is part of our continuous efforts to strengthen the position of European and Canadian industry in the commercial telecommunications market, expanding the current range of available products.
 "The next satellite based on SmallGEO will be EDRS-C, as the second node to the European Data Relay System."

 Carlos Espinós Gómez, CEO of Hispasat, said: "For Hispasat, this new satellite represents an important step forward in its innovation strategy.

 "Hispasat 36W-1 is not only the first mission of the new SmallGEO platform, but also incorporates an advanced regenerative payload that will provide the satellite with greater flexibility and signal quality thanks to its reconfigurable antenna and onboard processor, thus improving the telecommunications services it will provide to our clients.

 "We are very satisfied with our collaboration with ESA, which has allowed us to participate in a leading technological project to which they have added significant value with their knowledge and experience in the space sector."
 Marco Fuchs, CEO of OHB System AG, commented: "The launch is a major milestone in the history of OHB. Hispasat 36W-1 proves that OHB's concept of a modular and flexible SmallGEO platform fits into the market.
 "SmallGEO is destined to build a cornerstone for Europe's future activities in the segment of geostationary satellites in the three-tonne class.

 "For OHB, Hispasat 36W-1 is the first project of a wide scope of future missions based on the SmallGEO platform, including a revolution in satellite technology: the full electric propulsion mission Electra."

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Flight VS16: For Soyuz’ first GTO launch from the Guiana Space Center, Arianespace successfully orbits Hispasat 36W-1


Arianespace has orbited the Hispasat 36W-1 telecommunications satellite for operator Hispasat. The launch took place on Friday, January 27, 2017 at 10:03 p.m. (local time) from the Guiana Space Center (CSG), Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana.

 This was the first launch of the year for Arianespace, and also the first Soyuz launch into geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) from CSG.

 Hispasat 36W-1 is the first satellite built using Europe’s new SmallGEO geostationary platform, developed by OHB System AG of Germany within the scope of the European Space Agency’s ARTES (Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems) program.

 With this latest mission, Arianespace continues to deploy its complete family of launchers to support Europe’s innovative space solutions.
   

First Soyuz geostationary satellite launch from CSG is a success


 Capable of launching small geostationary satellites, Soyuz complements the payload capacity of Ariane 5 from the Guiana Space Center. The ability to launch lighter satellites into geostationary transfer orbit (GTO), identified right from the start of the program, is now a reality with the launch of Hispasat 36W-1.

 Arianespace has another Soyuz GTO launch scheduled in 2017, for the operator SES.

 Through these missions, Arianespace clearly confirms the availability and versatility of its launcher family for the benefit of all customers.
   

A launch for the Spanish satellite communications operator Hispasat


 Hispasat 36W-1 is the seventh satellite orbited by Arianespace since 1992 for Hispasat, the Spanish satellite communications operator and leading distributor of Spanish and Portuguese content.

 Building on more than 25 years of experience, Hispasat has a strong presence in Iberia and Latin America, where it is the fourth leading satellite operator. Hispasat deploys a fleet of satellites to distribute more than 1,250 television and radio channels, and also plays a key role in the Spanish space industry.

 Once in its orbital position, Hispasat 36W-1 will provide a wide range of communications services for continental Europe, the Canary Islands and South America.

Hispasat satellites previously orbited by Arianespace:
•1992: Hispasat 1A
•1993: Hispasat 1B
•2009: Amazonas 2
•2010: Hispasat 1E
•2013: Amazonas 3
•2014: Amazonas 4A
 
Supporting ESA-driven European innovation in space

Hispasat 36W-1 is the first telecommunications satellite built using Europe’s new SmallGEO geostationary platform. Developed by OHB System AG (Germany) under ESA’s ARTES (Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems) program, the SmallGEO platform offers satellite operators an all-European solution in the small telecom satellite market.

 By design, it speeds up the production and testing processes, reducing costs and broadening the range of design options.

 The satellite features the innovative RedSAT regenerative payload, plus an antenna equipped with a processor, to offer a superior quality signal, as well as fast beam reconfiguration in orbit for optimized utilization.

Arianespace and OHB System AG

 Including Hispasat 36W-1, Arianespace has now launched 15 satellites built by OHB System AG, and has 11 more from this company in its order book:
•3 SmallGEO-based satellites: EDRS-C – MTG-I1 et MTG-S1,
•8 Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites
Shortly after the announcement of the satellite’s orbital injection, Stéphane Israël, Chairman and CEO of Arianespace, said: “With this successful first launch of the year, Arianespace is proud of being able to give Hispasat the benefits of our family of launchers, characterized by excellence and versatility. We are very honored by this mark of confidence from Hispasat, for whom we have already orbited seven satellites since 1992. Congratulations to OHB System AG, which built the Hispasat 36W-1 satellite, as well as the European Space Agency, a key partner in the development of the innovative SmallGEO platform. I would also like to thank the Russian space agency Roscosmos for their commitment to our partnership on the Soyuz launcher, which today carried out a first launch into geostationary transfer orbit from CSG. In addition, I would like to thank CNES/CSG, our ground segment companies and all staff at the space center, who continue to work alongside us for new successes. Lastly, congratulations to everybody at Arianespace for this first launch of the year, a success.”

Hispasat 36W-1 •The Hispasat 36W-1 satellite was built by OHB System AG in Bremen, Germany, using Europe’s new Small GEO platform.
•Its payload is composed of 20 Ku-band transponders and additional capacity provided by three Ka-band beams.
•Once positioned at 36° West, Hispasat 36W-1 will cover Europe, the Canary Islands, and South America.
•The satellite weighed 3,210 kg. at launch and offers a design life of 15 years.
 
 

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
January 27, 2017 

Soyuz delivers! Arianespace’s first 2017 mission opens a fast-paced year of launch activity

Arianespace began its busy 2017 launch schedule with a Soyuz mission tonight that marked multiple “firsts” in orbiting the Hispasat 36W-1 telecommunications satellite on a flight from the Spaceport.

Departing at the exact planned liftoff moment of 10:03:34 p.m. (local time in French Guiana), Soyuz flew a 32-minute profile to release its satellite passenger into geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) – the first mission that Arianespace’s medium-lift Soyuz has performed for a GTO deployment while operating from the Spaceport.

Today’s success was Soyuz’ 16th launch from French Guiana since it began service at the Spaceport in 2011, and was designated Flight VS16 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system. The workhorse Soyuz vehicle previously delivered payloads on Spaceport missions to circular Earth orbits, low-Earth orbits, Sun-synchronous orbits, and an elliptical orbit for an Earth escape trajectory.

“This flight once again demonstrates the availability and flexibility of Arianespace’s launch vehicle family at the service of our customers,” said Stéphane Israël, the company’s Chairman and CEO in comments from the Spaceport.

Europe’s “SmallGEO” makes its debut

Another first on tonight’s mission involved the Hispasat 36W-1 satellite itself, which is the initial spacecraft built using Europe’s new “SmallGEO” platform.

Developed by Germany’s OHB System AG under ESA’s ARTES (Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems) program, the SmallGEO product line offers an entirely European solution in the smaller telecommunications satellite market. It benefits from faster production and testing processes, reduced costs and a broader range of design options.

Once at its orbital position at 36 deg. West, Hispasat 36W-1 will enable Spanish satellite communications operator Hispasat – a leader in the distribution of content in Spanish and Portuguese – to provide a wide range of telecommunications services in Europe, the Canary Islands and South America.

Equipped with 20 Ku-band transponders and the additional capacity of three transponders in Ka band, Hispasat 36W-1 features the innovative RedSAT regenerative payload, along with an antenna equipped with a processor that allows onboard beam reconfiguration.

Hispasat 36W-1 had a liftoff mass of 3,210 kg., with Soyuz delivering an overall payload lift performance of 3,319 kg. on tonight’s Flight VS16 mission.

A milestone mission for Hispasat and OHB System

With Flight VS16, Hispasat 36W-1 was the seventh satellite launched by Arianespace for Hispasat since 1992. “In doing so, more than 60 percent of Hispasat satellites currently in operation have been orbited by Arianespace,” said Stéphane Israël. “I am sure that we will have future opportunities to deliver for Hispasat!”

Carlos Espinós, Hispasat’s Chief Executive Officer, described the Flight VS16 launch as a “wonderful and exciting moment,” adding: “I want to thank Arianespace’s work, which – as always – has been done with excellence.’’

Hispasat 36W-1 was the 15th OHB System-built satellite lofted by Arianespace, with 11 more in Arianespace’s order book for future launches.

Soyuz confirmed its accuracy on Flight VS16, with the following estimated orbital parameters for Hispasat 36W-1’s deployment:
– Apogee altitude: 35,886.5 km. for a target of 35,862.6 km.
– Perigee altitude: 249.4 km. for a target of 250.1 km..
– Inclination: 5.44 deg. for a target of 5.44 deg.

Keeping up the launch cadence in 2017

As the first Arianespace mission for 2017, Flight VS16 opens a busy launch manifest that targets up to 12 flights during the year, utilizing the medium-lift Soyuz, heavy-lift Ariane 5 and lightweight Vega. Of this total, six are planned between today and late April, underscoring Arianespace’s reactivity in meeting its customers’ launch requirements.

The next mission is scheduled for February 14, using an Ariane 5 to orbit two telecommunications satellite passengers. Designated Flight VA235 in Arianespace’s numbering system, this launch will carry SKY-Brasil-1 for AT&T (DIRECTV) through its affiliate DIRECTV Latin America, along with Telkom 3S for Indonesia’s Telkom.

http://www.arianespace.com/mission-update/vs16-launch-success/

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Successful launch of the Hispasat 36W-1 satellite

January 28, 2017


Hispasat’s new communications satellite, successfully launched by a Soyuz rocket from French Guiana, is now orbiting in space.

 The H36W-1 includes a pioneering RedSAT regenerative payload, enabling HISPASAT to use satellite power more smoothly and efficiently.

 This is the first mission of the new SmallGEO platform, which was developed by OHB System AG (Germany) together with the European Space Agency and HISPASAT.

Madrid, 28 January 2017. At 2:03 AM Spanish time, Hispasat successfully launched its tenth satellite, the Hispasat 36W-1 (H36W-1), from the European Spaceport of Kourou in French Guiana, aboard Arianespace’s Soyuz launch vehicle.

Approximately 32 minutes after the rocket took off, the H36W-1 satellite separated from the launch vehicle, at which point the solar panels were started up and deployed. From that moment on, manoeuvres began to position the new satellite at the geostationary orbit point where the test phase will be carried out to make sure it is working properly, and which is scheduled to last several weeks.

Carlos Espinós, the satellite operator’s CEO, stated that “this new satellite is an important step in Hispasat’s innovation strategy. Hispasat 36W-1 is not only the first mission of the new SmallGEO platform, but also incorporates an advanced regenerative payload that will provide the satellite with greater flexibility and signal quality thanks to its reconfigurable antenna and on-board processor, thus improving the telecommunications services it will provide to its clients. We are very satisfied with our collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA), which has allowed us to participate in a leading technological project to which they have added significant value with their knowledge and experience in the space sector.”

The new satellite will provide coverage for South America and Europe, including the Canary Islands. It has a 15-year lifespan and will offer video contribution and cellular backhaul services, as well as company and broadband solutions. It is fitted with 20 transponders on the Ku band and additional capacity of up to 3 transponders on the Ka band, and has a launch mass of 3,200 kg.

Innovation

The H36W-1satellite was built by the German company OHB System AG and is the first mission of the SmallGEO platform, developed by the German manufacturer together with the European Space Agency and HISPASAT. This platform allows for a substantial reduction in satellite mass thanks to the use of electric propulsion throughout the lifespan of the satellite.

In addition, the H36W-1 incorporates RedSAT, an advanced regenerative payload consisting of a novel active antenna with reconfigurable beams that, together with the on-board processor, will improve the efficiency and services offered by the satellite. The antenna can be controlled electronically from the Earth and reoriented at any point during the lifespan of the satellite, granting it the flexibility to adapt its coverage to mission changes that may occur after launch, while still in orbit.

The on-board processor is a further step in the evolution of satellites, which can greatly simplify network architecture by performing in space a part of the processing usually carried out on Earth. It can simultaneously process up to four 36 MHz transponders, correcting possible signal degradations and transmitting them without errors, leading to a more robust and higher quality communications system that enables signal reception with small-diameter antennas.

Investment in the project has amounted to more than 240 million euros, and it has received funding from the CDTI as well as significant involvement from the Spanish industrial sector:

• Airbus Defense and Space Spain: Reconfigurable DRA-ELSA active receiving antenna (RedSAT payload), two reflective, deployable antennas on the Ku band and one fixed antenna on the Ka band. Two deployment systems for the two deployable DAPM (Deployable Antenna Positioning Mechanism) antennas on the Ku band.

• Arquimea: Analogue and digital ASICs (Application-Specific Integrated Circuits) on the DRA-ELSA antenna.

• Celis: Development of the satellite IOT test bench.

• Crisa (subsidiary of Airbus): PCU (Power Control Unit) or satellite power regulator.

• Expace: NOC (Network Operation Centre) development of the RedSAT regenerative payload Earth system.

• GMV: Satellite control centre and flight dynamics systems.

• Iberespacio: Control units of the electric propulsion subsystem. LHP (Loop Heat Pipe) active cooling system for the DRA-ELSA antenna.

• Indra: Terrestrial segment of satellite control. Gateway of the RedSAT terrestrial segment.

• Tecnobit (Oesía Group): DRA-ELSA antenna control unit: ICU (Integrated Control Unit) and its PSU (Power Supply Unit).

• Thales Alenia Space Spain: Regenerative RedSAT on-board processor and associated terrestrial segment.

• Tryo Aerospace: LNA (Low-Noise Amplifier) and Down Converters (Frequency Converters) on the Ku and Ka frequency bands. Telemetry and telecommand (omni-directional and horn) antennas.

http://www.hispasat.com/en/press-room/press-releases-2016/archivo-2017/253/el-satelite-hispasat-36w-1-ha-sido-lanzado-con-exito

Offline Rocket Science

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7955
  • NASA Educator Astronaut Candidate Applicant 2002
  • Liked: 2157
  • Likes Given: 5103
Congrats to all the teams, well done! Thanks for all the great coverage NSF! :)
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob, Physics instructor, aviator, vintage auto racer

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
28.01.2017

OHB with a successful launch into a geostationary orbit

Bremen/Kourou, January 28, 2017. In the early hours of the morning, the telecommunications satellite H36W-1 produced by space technology company OHB System AG reached its target orbit at an altitude of 36,000 kilometers. A Russian Soyuz carrier had lifted off on schedule at 2.03 hours CET from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French-Guyana. Roughly half an hour later, the carrier released the satellite with a mass of 3,200 kg into its geostationary transfer orbit.

The successful launch of the first satellite from the SmallGEO range marks a milestone in OHB’s history. SmallGEO is the first telecommunications satellite to be developed, integrated and tested in Germany for more than 20 years.

“We are thrilled and relieved that H36W-1 is now on its way. The first satellite is always a major step particularly in the case of a new specially developed platform in such an important segment as the telecommunications market. We have developed, managed and implemented an integrated design, which we have tested intensively during an eleven-month test campaign. We are very confident of achieving good performance from the end of March,” says Dr. Dieter Birreck, the responsible project manager at OHB System AG.

The German Aerospace Center (DLR) satellite control center received the first “sign of life” from the satellite just under one hour later via the ground centers in Kumsan, South Korea, and Uralla, Australia. 22 employees from OHB System AG, four from OHB Sweden and two from OHB Italia are working around the clock at the satellite control center to ensure the smooth start-up of the telecommunications satellite and to support mission control. H36W-1 will be reaching its geostationary test position in twelve days’ time, where it will be calibrated and placed in operation over a period of a good five weeks. After a voyage of a further nine days, the satellite will reach its final position over 36 degrees longitude west, where it will provide communications services for Europe, the Canary Islands and South America for Spanish operator HISPASAT over a period of more than 15 years.

The first of its kind

Germany’s return to system capability in the commercial market for telecommunications satellites has its roots in the close partnership between OHB System AG, the German Aerospace Center (DLR), the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) and the European Space Agency (ESA). The development of SmallGEO is expressly included in the German space strategy and underscores the country’s wish to act independently and flexibly in the small satellite segment.

Developed by OHB System AG as part of the ESA ARTES program (Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems), SmallGEO is a flexible geostationary satellite platform which can be tailored for different mission goals such as telecommunications, Earth observation and technology testing. With its modular structure, the SmallGEO satellite platform can be modified flexibly to meet specific customer requirements. Customers can select a classic, hybrid or electric propulsion system for the satellite. Depending on the type, it has a launch mass of between 2,500 and 3,500 kg, with a permitted payload mass of between 450 and 900 kg. Measuring 3.7 x 1.9 x 2 meters, H36W-1 had a launch mass of 3,200 kg.

Involvement of further OHB SE companies

In addition to OHB System AG acting as the prime contractor, three of OHB’s European sister companies were also involved in the successful development and realization of this first SmallGEO satellite and will also contribute to future SmallGEO platforms. OHB Sweden delivered innovative subsystems for electric propulsion and attitude and orbit control. Luxspace delivered the telemetry, telecontrol and ranging subsystem and actively participated in its validation at the satellite level. In addition, LuxSpace contributed to the development of the satellite simulator. OHB Italia developed the payload management unit and supported system engineering of the thermal control subsystem.

Further OHB SmallGEO projects

The first SmallGEO satellite, the H36W-1, was completed in the form of a private-public partnership between ESA, OHB and the Spanish satellite operator HISPASAT. Further projects in the conventional telecommunications segment include EDRS-C (laser relay) and Heinrich Hertz (in-orbit verification of numerous national scientific and technical innovations as well as satellite communications for the German federal armed forces). OHB is developing Electra, a satellite with a fully electric propulsion system based on the SmallGEO platform, which will be able to carry a substantially larger payload due to the lighter weight of the propulsion system. Europe’s future fleet of weather satellites, the “Meteosat Third Generation” EUMETSAT satellites, is also based on the SmallGEO satellite platform.

https://www.ohb-system.de/press-releases-details/ohb-with-a-successful-launch-into-a-geostationary-orbit.html

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
ESA photos

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16676
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2348
  • Likes Given: 156
Press release, 28 January 2017


Europe's new geostationary satellite platform for the telecommunications market - First 'made in Germany' SmallGEO satellite is in space

The Hispasat 36W-1 telecommunications satellite, the first in a new satellite platform called SmallGEO, developed and built in Germany, was launched to space on 28 January 2017 at 02:03 CET (27 January, 22:03 local time). SmallGEO is a platform for
relatively light geostationary satellites weighing approximately three tons – instead of the standard six or eight – that orbit Earth at an altitude of 36,000 kilometres.

The platform has a modular design and can be configured and used in various ways – especially for the commercially interesting market of telecommunications services. The first SmallGEO satellite was launched from the European Space Agency (ESA) spaceport
in French Guiana on board a Soyuz launcher. The German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft-und Raumfahrt; DLR) supported the development of this 'small' satellite platform with funding from the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs
and Energy: Germany is the largest contributor to ESA's SmallGEO programme and has invested some 150 million euros (42.5 percent of the total budget) in the development of the platform and payload. The main contractor for the satellite is an industrial
team headed by OHB System AG  in Bremen.

System capability in telecommunications

"After the DFS-Copernicus programme, whose last satellite was launched in the early 1990s, SmallGEO shows that Germany is once again able to develop and build communication satellites," emphasises Gerd Gruppe, Director of DLR Space Administration.
He adds: "The mission now under way marks the entry into the market and is an important milestone. "With SmallGEO, Germany is gaining a new system capability. This makes our industry stronger - even in the competitive international market. Furthermore,
this is a key objective of Germany's space strategy."

German expertise for the payload

Hispasat 36W-1 will provide Spain, the Canary Islands and South America with multimedia services. The German company Tesat Spacecom from Backnang designed and built its first complete communications payload for this mission. Part of this payload is
the Ka-Band Demonstrator, a communications unit with a particularly wide range of frequencies. This payload unit includes a new control unit and three power amplifiers. Both technologies are being tested in space and are intended to make satellite
communications more flexible. Until now, telecommunications satellites have been relatively inflexible: once launched into space, they transmit in the same frequency range and at a fixed power for their entire service life of about 15 years. "This
is no longer viable these days and does not meet market demands. A flexible power amplifier can, if necessary, increase or decrease the intensity. This saves power, which is then available for other applications," explains DLR Programme Manager Frank
Bensch.

The first weeks

During the first 10 days after the launch – the so-called 'Launch and Early Orbit Phase' – the engineers and scientists at the German Space Operations Center (GSOC)  at the DLR site in Oberpfaffenhofen and at the ground station in Weilheim are responsible
for the navigation and control of the satellite. "In the first phase, we intensively test the operation of the satellite platform and bring the satellites into their geostationary orbit. This is followed by in-orbit tests, which mainly include payload
tests with the transponders and antennas. A few weeks later, the satellite is handed over to the control centre of the Spanish satellite operator Hispasat near Madrid," explains Thomas Kuch, Head of Mission Operations at GSOC.

Looking into the future

Frank Bensch, SmallGEO programme manager at the DLR Space Administration, adds: "Hispasat 36W-1 is the start of our own product line." For example, the European Meteosat Third Generation weather satellites currently being built are based on SmallGEO.
In the EDRS-C follow-up mission – scheduled for launch in the autumn of 2017 – the SmallGEO platform will be expanded with a purely chemically powered variant. EDRS-C will be part of the European Data Relay System (EDRS), a data highway in space, which
started operating in 2016 with its first EDRS-A satellite. The SmallGEO platform is also preparing the German Heinrich Hertz  satellite mission, with the launch scheduled for 2020. A platform variant with a fully electric drive is being developed for
the Electra mission, which is planned for 2022. As a result, the payload can be nearly doubled for the same satellite mass.

SmallGEO – Programme and participants

SmallGEO is part of a European Space Agency (ESA) development programme for telecommunications systems. The main contractor for the satellites is OHB System AG in Bremen. In addition, the Spanish satellite operator Hispasat is ESA's partner in the
SmallGEO programme and the first satellite customer. The main contractor for the payload is Tesat-Spacecom GmbH and Co. KG from Backnang. The star trackers are supplied by Jena-Optronik GmbH. A total of 12 ESA Member States are involved in the programme.
In addition to Germany, the main contributors are Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Italy. Germany is the programme leader with 42.5 percent. In addition to the system and payload expertise, Germany can build on a strong supplier base. With the solar
cells provided by Azur and the solar array by Airbus Defense and Space, large parts of the power supply come from Heilbronn and Ottobrunn. The xenon tanks were supplied by MT Aeropace in Augsburg and the fuel tanks by Airbus Safran Launchers in Bremen.
Other suppliers are Airbus DS in Friedrichshafen, Airbus Safran Launchers in Lampoldshausen, Jena Optronik and Rockwell Collins in Heidelberg. The satellite tests were carried out at IABG and Airbus DS, both based in Ottobrunn.


Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1140
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Commonwealth of Virginia
  • Liked: 241
  • Likes Given: 701
Re: LIVE: Soyuz ST-B Flight VS16 - HISPASAT-AG1 January 27, 2017
« Reply #170 on: 01/28/2017 09:07 PM »
Some cross-posting from the Arianespace launch schedule thread, regarding this launch's hardware and capabilities.  This Hispasat satellite appears to max out, or slightly exceed the maximum payload capacity of Soyuz+Fregat from Kourou.

VA234 A5 ECA 20th of December 2016 at 17:30 local
VS16 ST-B (Hispasat AG1) 27th of January 2017 at 22:03:34 local

That's amazing. Hispasat AG1 gets transferred from an Ariane 5ECA to a Soyuz-STB Fregat-MT. Maybe the satellite was edited a bit to fit on the Soyuz (i.e. less mass).

Hispasat AG1 (aka 36W-1) is 3.2 tonnes http://www.hispasat.com/es/flota-de-satelites/futuros-satelites/hispasat-36w-1 which is precisely the GTO limit for Soyuz-ST from CSG (3250 kg)

EDIT: Upon more careful examination, I realized 3.25 tonnes is for SC+adapter, so it might be true they sacrificed a bit of propellant or found some other measure to lighten the satellite -or found a way to squeeze extra performance by the Soyuz?

This bird has been delayed by launcher unavailability and problems during the test program of the new REDSAT platform, since at least 2013, and has prompted Hispasat to lease capacity from Canada's Nimiq 2.

EDIT: Upon more careful examination, I realized 3.25 tonnes is for SC+adapter, so it might be true they sacrificed a bit of propellant or found some other measure to lighten the satellite -or found a way to squeeze extra performance by the Soyuz?
Or found a way to squeeze extra performance from the Fregat-MT upper stage?
Depends on the Fregat-MT number AFAIK their is version with enhanced features being developed. I doubt an enhanced Fregat-MT will have flown on a Russian Federal mission before this commercial flight starts to space.

AFAIK is a standard Fregat-MT, same one we used for our Galileo launches.

Here's another thought: Some Falcon 9 GTO launches have been GEO-1800 m/s, instead of the customary GEO-1500 m/s.  The 300 m/s difference must be made up by the spacecraft.

Will the same strategy be used in this case?

Would the orbits below be the initial GTO orbit of Hispasat-AG1 and the disposal orbit of the Fregat stage?
2 objects have been cataloged by USSTRATCOM:

2017-006A/41942 in 239 x 35639 km x 5.54°
2017-006B/41943 in 239 x 35593 km x 5.42°

Also, I see the spacecraft massed out at 3221 kg.

What was the solution to the apparent issue of "this satellite + adapter is too heavy to launch to GTO on a Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT"?

Example: Was this launch similar to the Falcon 9 GEO-1800 m/s launches?

Or, was this launch within the envelope of the launch vehicle's capabilities, including reaching a "standard" GEO-1500 m/s orbit?
***

I thank the NSF members who contributed to the live coverage of the launch.  I couldn't watch live, so having this thread to view later is appreciated!

EDITED
« Last Edit: 01/29/2017 01:08 AM by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium!

Offline LouScheffer

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1551
  • Liked: 1734
  • Likes Given: 197
Some cross-posting from the Arianespace launch schedule thread, regarding this launch's hardware and capabilities.  This Hispasat satellite appears to max out, or slightly exceed the maximum payload capacity of Soyuz+Fregat from Kourou.


Hispasat AG1 (aka 36W-1) is 3.2 tonnes http://www.hispasat.com/es/flota-de-satelites/futuros-satelites/hispasat-36w-1 which is precisely the GTO limit for Soyuz-ST from CSG (3250 kg)

EDIT: Upon more careful examination, I realized 3.25 tonnes is for SC+adapter, so it might be true they sacrificed a bit of propellant or found some other measure to lighten the satellite -or found a way to squeeze extra performance by the Soyuz?

This bird has been delayed by launcher unavailability and problems during the test program of the new REDSAT platform, since at least 2013, and has prompted Hispasat to lease capacity from Canada's Nimiq 2.

Here's another thought: Some Falcon 9 GTO launches have been GEO-1800 m/s, instead of the customary GEO-1500 m/s.  The 300 m/s difference must be made up by the spacecraft.

Will the same strategy be used in this case?

Would the orbits below be the initial GTO orbit of Hispasat-AG1 and the disposal orbit of the Fregat stage?
2 objects have been cataloged by USSTRATCOM:

2017-006A/41942 in 239 x 35639 km x 5.54°
2017-006B/41943 in 239 x 35593 km x 5.42°

Also, I see the spacecraft massed out at 3221 kg.

What was the solution to the apparent issue of "this satellite + adapter is too heavy to launch to GTO on a Soyuz-STB/Fregat-MT"?

Example: Was this launch similar to the Falcon 9 GEO-1800 m/s launches?

Or, was this launch within the envelope of the launch vehicle's capabilities, including reaching a "standard" GEO-1500 m/s orbit?

This is a standard GEO-1500 (I get GEO-1495) orbit.

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7436
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 1434
  • Likes Given: 4475
Congratulations to RSC Progress, Lavochin, Roscosmos, Arianespace, OHB, Thales Aliena, Hispasat and the CSG.
I have a question, was the anomaly on the atomic clocks of the Galileo fleet what "freed" this Soyuz? Was the decision to move the Galileo all to Araine-5ES? Or was simply available?

Offline Jester

  • NSF Night Flyer
  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6775
  • Some Space Agency
  • Liked: 2768
  • Likes Given: 82
Fregat = MT 133-06

Are you sure?

I'll find a picture if I can, but thats what I have yes
VS14 = Fregat M 133-08
VS15 = Fregat MT 133-05
VS16 = Fregat MT 133-06
« Last Edit: 01/31/2017 11:35 AM by Jester »

Offline Jester

  • NSF Night Flyer
  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6775
  • Some Space Agency
  • Liked: 2768
  • Likes Given: 82
hi-res without you know what.
« Last Edit: 01/31/2017 11:27 AM by Jester »

Offline jcm

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2802
  • Jonathan McDowell
  • Somerville, Massachusetts, USA
    • Jonathan's Space Report
  • Liked: 338
  • Likes Given: 293
 
 
Would the orbits below be the initial GTO orbit of Hispasat-AG1 and the disposal orbit of the Fregat stage?
2 objects have been cataloged by USSTRATCOM:

2017-006A/41942 in 239 x 35639 km x 5.54°
2017-006B/41943 in 239 x 35593 km x 5.42°


 
 

The early TLEs for B were a mistake (they were really for A?). B TLEs now show 180 x 35632 km which is more in line with the expected Fregat depletion perigee. (Some of the early A TLEs were also actually for B).

Also, A seems to have raised its perigee yesterday to 474 km, indicating a propulsion test burn at apogee
at around 0100 Jan 30
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Roscosmos photos


Offline calapine

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 148
  • Linz, Austria
  • Liked: 96
  • Likes Given: 76
ESA released a timelapse showing the preperation of Hispasat up to and including the launch.

The video features a (somewhat too relaxing) ambient soundtrack:

« Last Edit: 02/10/2017 07:52 PM by calapine »

Offline pechisbeque

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 101
  • Liked: 23
  • Likes Given: 0

Now in geosynchronous orbit according to the latest TLE in CelesTrak.


Epoch (UTC): 11 February 2017 04:36:41
Eccentricity: 0.0001620
Inclination: 0.0947°
Perigee height: 35780 km
Apogee height: 35793 km
Right ascension of ascending node: 269.4422°
Argument of perigee: 42.2739°
Revolutions per day: 1.00270512
Mean anomaly at epoch: 232.9142°
Orbit number at epoch: 30

Offline bolun

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2581
  • Europe
  • Liked: 188
  • Likes Given: 67
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Telecommunications_Integrated_Applications/SmallGEO/First_SmallGEO_mission_to_start_service

Quote
After four months of exhaustive testing in space, the flagship SmallGEO mission Hispasat 36W-1 has passed all trials with flying colours, which means control has been handed to the operator.

Tags: vs 16