Author Topic: Atlas V 401 - Cygnus CRS OA-7 - April 18, 2017 - Launch  (Read 65211 times)

Offline WHAP

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Re: Atlas V 401 - OA-7 - March 2017
« Reply #20 on: 11/29/2016 10:47 PM »
There's no firm date for OA-7 yet.  I've seen the 6th, 8th, 9th, 16th and now the 14th.  Not providing a link to my source, since it would do you no good  ;).
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Offline vapour_nudge

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Re: Atlas V 401 - OA-7 - March 2017
« Reply #21 on: 11/30/2016 09:40 PM »
WHAP, could the OA-7 Atlas really launch on the 9th with the Delta WGS-9 launching the day before?

Offline WHAP

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Re: Atlas V 401 - OA-7 - March 2017
« Reply #22 on: 12/01/2016 02:53 AM »
I didn't say it was on the 9th.  I had seen it listed as the 9th, but is currently showing as the 14th.  My point was that it had fluctuated a lot, and it could move again.  Looking at predicted launch dates this far ahead and worrying about potential conflicts is a waste of time.
ULA employee.  My opinions do not necessarily reflect those of my employer.

Offline vapour_nudge

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Re: Atlas V 401 - OA-7 - March 16, 2017
« Reply #23 on: 12/06/2016 11:41 PM »
I didn't say it was on the 9th.  I had seen it listed as the 9th, but is currently showing as the 14th.  My point was that it had fluctuated a lot, and it could move again.  Looking at predicted launch dates this far ahead and worrying about potential conflicts is a waste of time.
WHAP didn't say OA-7 was launching in the 9th. The launch date is now NET 16th
I wonder how many 2017 launch slots are left for Atlas V now that we have 9 confirmed launches for 2017?
« Last Edit: 12/10/2016 10:41 PM by vapour_nudge »

Offline virnin

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Re: Atlas V 401 - OA-7 - March 2017
« Reply #24 on: 01/10/2017 08:39 PM »
https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2017/01/10/next-cygnus-mission-to-station-set-for-march/
Quote
Orbital ATK has completed a significant mission milestone for NASA’s next International Space Station cargo mission.

The Pressurized Cargo Module (PCM) of the Cygnus spacecraft has arrived at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center for processing and assembly before launch. The OA-7 mission is targeted to launch on Thursday, March 16 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

Orbital ATK will launch Cygnus atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket  for delivery of essential crew supplies, equipment and scientific experiments to astronauts aboard the International Space Station. The 30 minute launch window opens at 12:29am EDT.

OA-7 will mark Orbital ATK’s seventh cargo delivery mission for NASA under its Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) -1 contract.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Atlas V 401 - OA-7 - March 16, 2017
« Reply #25 on: 01/11/2017 08:57 AM »
The Orbital ATK OA-7 Cygnus spacecraft's pressurized cargo module (PCM) arrives at the Space Station Processing Facility of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The PCM is sealed in an environmentally controlled shipping container, pulled in by truck on a low-boy flatbed trailer. Scheduled to launch in March 2017, the Orbital ATK OA-7 mission will lift off atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station will deliver thousands of pounds of supplies, equipment and scientific research materials that improve life on Earth and drive progress toward future space exploration.

Photo credit: NASA/ Ben Smegelsky

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Atlas V 401 - OA-7 - March 16, 2017
« Reply #26 on: 01/11/2017 07:52 PM »
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The OA-7 Pressurized Cargo Module has been uncrated at @NASAKennedy and is being prepped for a targeted March 16 launch. (NASA photos) #OA7

https://twitter.com/orbitalatk/status/819270242740346881

Offline vapour_nudge

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Re: Atlas V 401 - OA-7 - March 16, 2017
« Reply #27 on: 01/26/2017 09:06 AM »
Also looking for a better image of this:

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Atlas V 401 - OA-7 - March 16, 2017
« Reply #28 on: 01/30/2017 07:16 PM »
Quote
The #OA7 #Cygnus service module is on its way to @NASAKennedy! Launch to @Space_Station is scheduled for NET March 16

https://twitter.com/orbitalatk/status/826143059423481857

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Atlas V 401 - OA-7 - March 16, 2017
« Reply #29 on: 02/03/2017 03:49 PM »
February 03, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-013

NASA Opens Media Accreditation for Next Orbital ATK Cargo Resupply Mission

NASA has opened media accreditation for the next Orbital ATK launch of a commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station. The Cygnus spacecraft is targeted to launch March 19, during a 30-minute window that opens at approximately 10:56 p.m. EDT.

Cygnus will launch on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida. The spacecraft will carry crew supplies and vehicle hardware to the orbital laboratory to support the Expedition 50 and 51 crews.

Media prelaunch and launch activities will take place at CCAFS and NASA’s nearby Kennedy Space Center.

•International media without U.S. citizenship must apply by 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 15, for access to Cape Canaveral and Kennedy.
•International media without U.S. citizenship must apply by 4:30 p.m. on Monday, March 6, for access to Kennedy.
•U.S. media must apply by 4:30 p.m. Thursday, March 9.

All media accreditation requests should be submitted online.

International media are required to upload a scanned copy of their media visa and passport or green card with their accreditation requests. Media must present two forms of unexpired, government identification to enter Kennedy. One form must include a photo, such as a passport or driver’s license.

Questions about accreditation may be addressed to Jennifer Horner at jennifer.p.horner@nasa.gov or 321-867-6598. For other questions, or additional information, contact Kennedy’s newsroom at 321-867-2468.

Investigations scheduled on this launch include an Advanced Plant Habitat, which will integrate new technology to increase overall efficiency, reliability, and robustness of plants grown on station. This experiment will build on the success of NASA’s Veggie, the first fresh food growth system on station, and will provide ongoing research for the development of food production systems for long-duration exploration missions.

Manipulating cell cultures in space is challenging as the cells can spontaneously grow in 3-D. Another new investigation bound for the U.S. National Laboratory will look at using magnetized cells and tools to make it easier to handle cells and cultures, and improve the reproducibility of experiments.

The Slosh Coating experiment will investigate a special type of coating that can repel liquids when applied to container walls. If effective, the liquid repellent could be used to design more efficient storage tanks for propellant and other fluids used in space exploration.

There also will be a number of CubeSats onboard Cygnus that will be deployed from the NanoRacks CubeSat Deployment on the space station, including a NASA science payload known as IceCube, which will provide data to scientists’ understanding of ice clouds and their role in climate change.

The International Space Station is a convergence of science, technology and human innovation that demonstrates new technologies and makes research breakthroughs not possible on Earth. The space station has been occupied continuously since November 2000. In that time, more than 200 people and a variety of international and commercial spacecraft have visited the orbiting laboratory. The space station remains the springboard to NASA's next great leap in exploration, including future missions to an asteroid and Mars.

The NASA TV schedule and video streaming information is available online. Visit the agency’s website for more information about the mission including launch countdown coverage and NASA's launch blog.

Offline ChrisGebhardt

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Re: Atlas V 401 - Cygnus CRS OA-7 - March 19, 2017
« Reply #30 on: 02/03/2017 06:02 PM »
The above press release confirms the three day slip from the 16th to the 19th of March.

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Re: Atlas V 401 - Cygnus CRS OA-7 - March 19, 2017
« Reply #31 on: 02/05/2017 01:37 PM »
Quote
United Launch Alliance's navy has delivered Atlas 5 to Port Canaveral for resupply run to the space station in March http://spaceflightnow.com/2017/02/05/ulas-navy-delivers-rocket-that-will-launch-supplies-to-the-space-station/

https://twitter.com/spaceflightnow/status/828249335695556609

There's a brief video attached to the tweet

Offline vapour_nudge

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Re: Atlas V 401 - OA-7 - March 2017
« Reply #32 on: 02/06/2017 07:56 AM »
Great to see ULA getting some missions in a market that they were originally barred from competing in.  Space launch is a small community.  Always good to see companies work together to get the job done during tough times, especially with recent failures.  With OA7, I wonder how much payload mass ULA will have taken to the ISS compared to Falcon 9 and Antares.
Just saw this post. Going by the previous Atlas & Antares Cygnus launches, there's about a 50% improvement in up-mass using Atlas over Antares
« Last Edit: 02/06/2017 11:01 AM by vapour_nudge »

Offline ethan829

Re: Atlas V 401 - OA-7 - March 2017
« Reply #33 on: 02/06/2017 12:13 PM »
Great to see ULA getting some missions in a market that they were originally barred from competing in.  Space launch is a small community.  Always good to see companies work together to get the job done during tough times, especially with recent failures.  With OA7, I wonder how much payload mass ULA will have taken to the ISS compared to Falcon 9 and Antares.
Just saw this post. Going by the previous Atlas & Antares Cygnus launches, there's about a 50% improvement in up-mass using Atlas over Antares




That was before Enhanced Cygnus and Antares 230, though. The switch to Atlas V now allows for about 300 kg of extra cargo mass, per Chris G's recent article: https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2016/11/oa-7-atlas-v-high-praise-antares-rtf/

Offline vapour_nudge

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Re: Atlas V 401 - Cygnus CRS OA-7 - March 19, 2017
« Reply #34 on: 02/06/2017 11:00 PM »
OK. I see your point. I was going by how much the last mission on Antares (OA-5) lifted which I read was 5163lbs. Atlas' last mission (OA-6) lifted 7758lbs
« Last Edit: 02/06/2017 11:46 PM by vapour_nudge »

Offline rayleighscatter

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Re: Atlas V 401 - Cygnus CRS OA-7 - March 19, 2017
« Reply #35 on: 02/06/2017 11:48 PM »
OK. I see your point. I was going by home much the last mission on Antares (OA-5) lifted which I read was 5163lbs. Atlas' last mission (OA-6) lifted 7758lbs
And OA-5 wasn't quite representative because it was a modified core originally built for the AJ-26 so it couldn't fly to the full capacity of the RD-181. Cores purpose built for the RD-181 will be able to handle a little more (although still a little short of Atlas).

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Atlas V 401 - Cygnus CRS OA-7 - March 19, 2017
« Reply #36 on: 02/07/2017 05:27 PM »
Quote
It was an uplifting experience as the @OrbitalATK OA-7 #Cygnus was lifted out of its shipping container, scheduled to launch March 19th. 🚀🛰️

https://twitter.com/nasakennedy/status/829019411591880704

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Atlas V 401 - Cygnus CRS OA-7 - March 19, 2017
« Reply #37 on: 02/08/2017 02:37 PM »
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.@NASAglenn Saffire-III experiment, which will examine how fire spreads in space, is installed in the #OA7 #Cygnus Pressurized Cargo Module

https://twitter.com/orbitalatk/status/829352543985758208

Offline Space Ghost 1962

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Re: Atlas V 401 - Cygnus CRS OA-7 - March 19, 2017
« Reply #38 on: 02/08/2017 11:16 PM »
Cores purpose built for the RD-181 will be able to handle a little more (although still a little short of Atlas).
Of course. And not just a "little".

It is after all Atlas Centaur. One would really be surprised if they were near parity.

Offline vapour_nudge

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Re: Atlas V 401 - Cygnus CRS OA-7 - March 19, 2017
« Reply #39 on: 02/09/2017 12:29 AM »
Once again, they provide the uplift mass in lbs. Upthread it was quoted the difference will be 300kg. So that's about 660lbs. Please no comment about metric versus imperial

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