Author Topic: Lockheed Martin Orbiting Mars Laboratory discussion thread.  (Read 29777 times)

Offline redliox

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1597
  • Arizona USA
  • Liked: 291
  • Likes Given: 53
Re: Lockheed Martin Orbiting Mars Laboratory discussion thread.
« Reply #180 on: 04/28/2017 05:29 PM »
Our effort must be oriented to get artificial gravity. The following presentation is

 a new approach to get  1 G gravity.

Ah, elevator modules!  :)

Specific downside: what if something jams?  :(
"Let the trails lead where they may, I will follow."
-Tigatron

Offline Dalhousie

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2031
  • Liked: 245
  • Likes Given: 288
Re: Lockheed Martin Orbiting Mars Laboratory discussion thread.
« Reply #181 on: 04/30/2017 11:47 PM »
Are there any papers out there on the proposal yet?
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10586
  • Liked: 2169
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Lockheed Martin Orbiting Mars Laboratory discussion thread.
« Reply #182 on: 05/20/2017 05:53 PM »
http://www.businessinsider.com/spidersuit-mars-astronauts-lockheed-nasa-2017-5

Astronauts may wear eight-legged 'spider' spacesuits to crawl on the moons of Mars


    Dave Mosher
    May 19, 2017, 3:21 PM 4,693

When the first astronauts reach Mars in the 2030s, they'll never set foot on the planet's surface. Instead, NASA wants its plucky human crew to orbit the desert world for about a year, then return home.

But that doesn't mean astronauts couldn't explore Phobos or Deimos two tiny and intriguing moons of Mars.

Lockheed Martin, a company that's building NASA's Orion spaceship, recently put forth a tantalizing pitch for a sortie mission: Put astronauts inside an eight-legged, rocket-powered spacesuit that can crawl, walk, or hop across a moon's surface.
« Last Edit: 05/20/2017 10:51 PM by Blackstar »

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10586
  • Liked: 2169
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Lockheed Martin Orbiting Mars Laboratory discussion thread.
« Reply #183 on: 05/21/2017 12:06 PM »
Are there any papers out there on the proposal yet?


Here:

Offline Dalhousie

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2031
  • Liked: 245
  • Likes Given: 288
Re: Lockheed Martin Orbiting Mars Laboratory discussion thread.
« Reply #184 on: 05/21/2017 11:56 PM »
Are there any papers out there on the proposal yet?


Here:

Thank you!
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline redliox

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1597
  • Arizona USA
  • Liked: 291
  • Likes Given: 53
Re: Lockheed Martin Orbiting Mars Laboratory discussion thread.
« Reply #185 on: 05/22/2017 05:26 AM »
http://www.businessinsider.com/spidersuit-mars-astronauts-lockheed-nasa-2017-5

Astronauts may wear eight-legged 'spider' spacesuits to crawl on the moons of Mars


I like this aspect of the orbiting lab, but I'm split between whether something like the SEV could do a better and safer job than an astronaut in a MMU 2.0.

Also, the MMU was sadly short-lived.  After Challenger, like so much of the STS' programs, it was deemed risky as opposed to just using the robotic arm or tethered spacewalkers.  Despite being pretty iconic, it wasn't used again after 1984.  I point this out because, just like with wishing to repeat/reuse/refly old probe designs (lookn' at you Blackstar  ;) ), the parts if not the blueprints for the MMU don't exist anymore and I doubt the Smithsonian will be thrilled for NASA to recall a museum piece for dissection.

Using an SEV as opposed to the walker will be heavier, but then again the walker option requires an airlock module alongside it; coupled with the heavy fuel needs of the orbiter mission nothing is going to be lightweight in the end.

Anyone have any thoughts about using a SEV as opposed to a walker option?
"Let the trails lead where they may, I will follow."
-Tigatron

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10586
  • Liked: 2169
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Lockheed Martin Orbiting Mars Laboratory discussion thread.
« Reply #186 on: 05/22/2017 03:48 PM »
Also, the MMU was sadly short-lived.  After Challenger, like so much of the STS' programs, it was deemed risky as opposed to just using the robotic arm or tethered spacewalkers.

I don't think it was simply the risk that led to the MMU's retirement, it was experience with the arm that demonstrated that the MMU was not really necessary.

Plus, the MMU was expensive to operate. I vaguely remember reading that it used one-time batteries that were very expensive. So they had better options and they chose them instead.