Author Topic: SSTL led consortium awarded grant for novel propulsion system (HTP/peroxide)  (Read 2086 times)

Offline AlexA

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SSTL led consortium awarded Innovate UK grant for novel propulsion system


A British consortium led by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has been awarded a grant from Innovate UK, the UK’s innovation agency, to co-fund the development of a novel High Test Peroxide (HTP) propulsion system.
 
The new HTP propulsion system is being designed as an environmentally friendly and cost effective “green” replacement for hydrazine propellant systems, which are currently commonly used in small satellites.  Hydrazine is on the REACH* sunset list of chemicals and there is a drive from the space industry to develop alternative high performance, low cost, propulsion systems.  SSTL has identified HTP as an environmentally friendly monopropellant with the potential for providing the high performance required for future small satellite missions, and has teamed with partners on a project to bring the new HTP propulsion system design to flight-ready status.
 
SSTL’s propulsion engineers have designed a prototype HTP propulsion system, and will work together with the consortium partners to resolve the remaining design and materials challenges to achieve a flight-ready concept by the end of 2016.  The project will require a comprehensive validation of material compatibility that will be undertaken by European Astrotech (EAL) to demonstrate for future customers the long term suitability of HTP with all system components.  A new valve will be developed by SSTL, based on a novel patent from The Open University, and a high-strength Aluminium propellant tank will be developed by TISICS Ltd using fibre reinforced aluminium composite (Al-MMC). Finally the whole system will be built as a ground demonstration unit by SSTL and tested with EAL.


http://www.sstl.co.uk/News-and-Events/2016-News-Archive/SSTL-led-consortium-awarded-Innovate-UK-grant-for
 

Offline rocx

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Seems like British rocket engineers have a preference for hydrogen peroxide. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Arrow
Any day with a rocket landing is a fantastic day.

Online QuantumG

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To be fair, you aint making monopropellant systems with LOX.
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Offline a_langwich

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How does this compare to the GPIM (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/tdm/green/index.html)?

in terms of ISP, thrust range being tested, size/weight of the thruster, etc?  Or to the previous European green propellant options?

Are there specifics available?

Offline AlexA

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Are there specifics available?

Nothing beyond the press release linked above.

FYI here's basics on H2O2:
http://www.astronautix.com/props/h2o2.htm
Isp 117 s

Offline baldusi

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Doesn't HTP suffers from Oxygen separation? Isn't this the limiting factor of Soyuz-TM(A) 210 day in space?

Online RanulfC

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Well the Brit's have a history of successfully working with H2O2 in quantity and with far fewer "issues" than anyone else :) As for H2O2 long term storage, while it has a issue with spontaneous decomposition over time, proper venting keeps it from normally being an issue. 210 days sound about right for it.

However it should be noted that if the system is insulated and kept at a fairly even temperature (off the top of my head IIRC it's around 40 degrees F) it doesn't decompose at all.

Randy
From The Amazing Catstronaut on the Black Arrow LV:
British physics, old chap. It's undignified to belch flames and effluvia all over the pad, what. A true gentlemen's orbital conveyance lifts itself into the air unostentatiously, with the minimum of spectacle and a modicum of grace. Not like our American cousins' launch vehicles, eh?

Offline baldusi

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I'm thinking about GSO birds that last 15 to 20 years. And SSO usually do 5 to 10 years. That's quite a stretch from 0.57 years.

Online RanulfC

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I'm thinking about GSO birds that last 15 to 20 years. And SSO usually do 5 to 10 years. That's quite a stretch from 0.57 years.

That was my point actually, I'm looking for the relevant paper but H2O2 stored at the cited temperature underwent NO decomposition for over 20 years in storage. Nothing in the study pointed to this remaining for much longer if required.

Randy
From The Amazing Catstronaut on the Black Arrow LV:
British physics, old chap. It's undignified to belch flames and effluvia all over the pad, what. A true gentlemen's orbital conveyance lifts itself into the air unostentatiously, with the minimum of spectacle and a modicum of grace. Not like our American cousins' launch vehicles, eh?

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