Author Topic: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3  (Read 85000 times)

Online Chris Bergin

New Update and Discussion Thread for Boeing's CST-100.

Thraed 1:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=22125.0

Thread 2:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=32438.0

News articles:
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/tag/cst-100/

L2 Master Thread:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=29664.0

--

Please note we now have the Starliner CST-100 Specific Forum Section, so this remains an update and discussion thread as we will be looking to create specific threads for specific updates to fill out the section on what is a relatively media shy vehicle.

Online jacqmans

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #1 on: 01/12/2016 01:23 PM »
NASA Astronauts Get Advance Look at CST-100 Starliner Trainers

Systems will prepare crews for Boeing’s first-ever commercial spaceflights to International Space Station
 

ST. LOUIS, Jan. 7, 2016 – Two of the four NASA astronauts training to fly Boeing’s [NYSE: BA] CST-100 Starliner spacecraft recently tried some of the systems that will prepare them for flights to the International Space Station.

During a visit to Boeing, astronauts Eric Boe and Bob Behnken focused on systems used for learning to manipulate switches and display panels. Flight controllers were also able to experience devices they will use to train for flight tests and missions.

“We have been learning about the spacecraft displays through slideshows. It’s great to finally see what we are actually going to train on,” Boe said. ”The trainers look great, and this visit gives us an opportunity to meet with the Boeing engineers. We appreciate them allowing us to give input on these trainers so the devices are ready when they arrive at Johnson Space Center.”

Behnken added that the training equipment is comprehensive.

“Historically, some trainers were just a simple component that might have a very specific task,” he said. “This one has a lot of capability with multiple tasks coming together so it can execute more complicated training scenarios.”

Two of the trainers are to be delivered to NASA in the autumn of 2016. Boeing is also building an immersive, high-fidelity training system that’s to be delivered in early 2017 to Houston’s Johnson Space Center.

The CST-100 Starliner’s first crew flight test to the space station is expected in 2017 and will be Boeing’s first commercial flight transporting humans to that destination. More information about the CST-100 can be found at www.Boeing.com/cst100.

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NASA astronauts Eric Boe (left) and Bob Behnken inspect the controls of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner Crew Part Task Trainer as part of an early look at one of the systems that will prepare them for flight tests and missions.
« Last Edit: 01/12/2016 01:24 PM by jacqmans »

Offline arachnitect

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #2 on: 01/19/2016 01:41 AM »
http://spaceflightnow.com/2016/01/19/bridging-the-past-and-future-on-the-shoulders-of-the-atlas-rocket/

Nice piece with a few details about launch ops and flight test plans.

Online AnalogMan

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #3 on: 02/09/2016 09:53 PM »
Administrator Bolden Sees Starliner Before Testing
February 9, 2016 - Steven Siceloff

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden took a close look today at the airbag system for Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, before a contingency water landing test with a full-size spacecraft mock-up.

Although it’s designed to land on land, Boeing is testing the Starliner at Langley’s Hydro Impact Basin to evaluate its tendencies in case it has to land in the water in the event of, for example, an unlikely launch or ascent emergency that calls for the spacecraft to separate from its rocket and parachute itself and the astronauts inside to safety. Starliner is being developed in partnership with NASA to carry up to four astronauts at a time to the International Space Station. An additional crew member will allow science time on the orbiting laboratory to double for NASA’s Journey to Mars and research that will benefit everyone on Earth.

Bolden visited Langley to deliver his annual “State of NASA” address during which he detailed aspects of the agency’s budget request.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcrew/2016/02/09/administrator-bolden-sees-starliner-before-testing/

Offline The man in the can

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #4 on: 02/10/2016 10:26 PM »
It remember me of this test:

(This video was publish in April 2015)

I don't know if the airbag's design changed in between.

Online jacqmans

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #5 on: 02/12/2016 11:55 AM »
This artist’s concept shows Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner. In partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, the Starliner is being developed to carry astronauts to and from the International Space Station. Credit: Boeing

Offline yg1968

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #6 on: 02/16/2016 02:22 AM »
Quote from: Chris Ferguson
#Boeing #CST100 #Starliner pad abort test site in White Sands, NM; the views are breathtaking and chilies are great!
https://twitter.com/Astro_Ferg/status/699373860035006464

Offline psloss

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #7 on: 02/17/2016 04:52 PM »
http://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/commercial-crew-partner-boeing-tests-starliner-spacecraft
Quote
Engineers from NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, and Boeing dropped a full-scale test article of the company’s CST-100 Starliner into Langley’s 20-foot-deep Hydro Impact Basin.

Offline Thorny

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #8 on: 02/17/2016 05:12 PM »
This artist’s concept shows Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner. In partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, the Starliner is being developed to carry astronauts to and from the International Space Station. Credit: Boeing

What's the purpose of the perforated ring around the SM?

Offline ethan829

This artist’s concept shows Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner. In partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, the Starliner is being developed to carry astronauts to and from the International Space Station. Credit: Boeing

What's the purpose of the perforated ring around the SM?


Could it be for aerodynamic stability during an abort, like Crew Dragon's fins?

Offline The man in the can

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #10 on: 02/19/2016 09:17 PM »


Quote
Published on Feb 19, 2016

Engineers from NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va., and Boeing dropped a full-scale test article of the company’s CST-100 Starliner into Langley’s 20-foot-deep Hydro Impact Basin at the Landing and Impact Research Facility. Although the spacecraft is designed to land on land, Boeing is testing the Starliner’s systems in water to ensure astronaut safety in the unlikely event of an emergency. This test happened Feb. 9, 2016.
« Last Edit: 02/19/2016 09:25 PM by The man in the can »

Offline whitelancer64

This artist’s concept shows Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner. In partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, the Starliner is being developed to carry astronauts to and from the International Space Station. Credit: Boeing

What's the purpose of the perforated ring around the SM?

Apparently that ring is for stability on ascent, though there's not much detail about that.

http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/1081471-boeing-cst-100-spacecraft-updates/?page=2
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Offline clongton

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #12 on: 02/20/2016 01:23 AM »
It seems to float a little deep.
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Offline jtrame

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #13 on: 02/22/2016 05:47 PM »
Saw the ILC Dover on the side of the airbags so I looked at their website.  Turns out they also made the landing bags for Pathfinder, Opportunity, and Spirit. 

Offline Lampyridae

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #14 on: 03/02/2016 01:38 PM »
This artist’s concept shows Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner. In partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, the Starliner is being developed to carry astronauts to and from the International Space Station. Credit: Boeing

What's the purpose of the perforated ring around the SM?

Apparently that ring is for stability on ascent, though there's not much detail about that.

http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/1081471-boeing-cst-100-spacecraft-updates/?page=2

That would be my guess. To my uneducated eye, the attitude jet pods / service module connector thingy look like they will create vortices on the way up - maybe that's the issue.
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Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #15 on: 03/03/2016 04:12 AM »
According to schedule posted at

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/705107057251233792

OFT (orbital flight test) and CFT (crewed flight test) have been delayed by one month to June 2017 and October 2017, respectively.
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Offline Patchouli

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #16 on: 03/03/2016 05:46 PM »


Apparently that ring is for stability on ascent, though there's not much detail about that.

http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/1081471-boeing-cst-100-spacecraft-updates/?page=2

It probably also helps assure a clean separation and prevents recontact by increasing drag on the SM.


« Last Edit: 03/03/2016 05:51 PM by Patchouli »

Offline woods170

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #17 on: 03/03/2016 08:49 PM »


Apparently that ring is for stability on ascent, though there's not much detail about that.

http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/1081471-boeing-cst-100-spacecraft-updates/?page=2

It probably also helps assure a clean separation and prevents recontact by increasing drag on the SM.



Given that nominal separation of the CM and SM will take place before entry interface, and thus pretty much outside the discernible atmosphere (read: will happen in a near perfect vacuum), I very much doubt the ring will have any effect on the separation event.
« Last Edit: 03/04/2016 06:29 AM by woods170 »

Offline HarryM

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #18 on: 03/03/2016 09:06 PM »
In case of an abort though, you'd want clean separation of the SM.

Offline woods170

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #19 on: 03/04/2016 06:31 AM »
In case of an abort though, you'd want clean separation of the SM.
Yessir, but you don't need the ring for that. The ring is mainly there for keeping the 'stack' aerodynamically stable during the abort itself. It's function is similar to that of the 'fins' on the Dragon 2 trunk.

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