Author Topic: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)  (Read 31405 times)

Offline SMS

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Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« on: 01/01/2016 08:36 PM »
The Expedition 52 insignia was created by NASA graphics artist Sean Collins.
« Last Edit: 05/04/2017 05:00 PM by SMS »
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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #1 on: 06/08/2016 02:00 PM »
.
« Last Edit: 06/08/2016 02:01 PM by jacqmans »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #2 on: 06/15/2016 07:05 AM »

Online SaxtonHale

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #3 on: 11/21/2016 03:24 AM »
New patch

Offline bolun

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #4 on: 11/26/2016 02:18 PM »
Vita logo

Mission logo for ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli's third spaceflight. The logo was developed by ESA together with Italian space agency ASI and Paolo.

The overall circle and blue shading evoke our planet, with the Third Paradise symbol by Italian artist Michelangelo Pistoletto linking the mission’s main messages.

Three elements stand out: a strand of DNA as a symbol of life and science, a book as a symbol of culture and education, and Earth as a symbol of humanity.

The Third Paradise is a reformulation of the symbol for infinity. The two opposing ovals contain elements of the scientific and cultural activities Paolo will perform in space. Their meeting in the centre represents the evolution of Earth and benefits for humankind.

The central shape of the symbol, together with the presence of the globe, can also be seen as an eye, giving an astronaut’s perspective over our planet.

Reflecting Paolo’s origins, the logo features the colours of the Italian flag.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/11/Vita_logo

Image credit: ESA/ASI

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #5 on: 12/09/2016 05:27 PM »
Quote
Jack Fischer ‏@Astro2fish

So proud of this amazing training team, who somehow got even us ready for flight--we'll do our best to make you proud on orbit! #NextUp
---
SMS ;-).

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #6 on: 12/14/2016 06:12 PM »
Quote
Командир 52-й длительной экспедиции на МКС Фёдор Юрчихин и его коллега по экипажу, бортинженер МКС-51/52 Джек Фишер в течение нескольких недель проходили курс подготовки в Космическом центре имени Джонсона (НАСА). Участники космической экспедиции отрабатывали типовые операции, которые ежедневно проводятся на американском сегменте МКС. По окончании сессии состоялась традиционная церемония, во время которой космонавт и астронавт разрезали специально изготовленные торты с изображением экипажных эмблем.
---
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Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #7 on: 12/16/2016 05:29 PM »
https://twitter.com/AstroKomrade/status/809516906176794624

Swimming with @Astro2fish ……my underwater and in-orbit spacewalk crewmate Col. Jack "2Fish" Fischer, USAF
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Czv5irsUAAAHf1G.jpg

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #8 on: 12/27/2016 10:32 PM »
For approximately 2 weeks, according to the current schedule, a 2-person crew will operate ISS in May 2017, Yurchikin and Fischer.

Obviously (?), the several space agencies' operational staffs have made plans for this.  But, the minimal crew size in the operational ISS era was always envisioned as 3?

It's a big station!  What changes will occur?  Particularly, will operational tasks will take up more or all of their time, as opposed to science experiments?
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Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #9 on: 01/11/2017 01:28 PM »
crew poster

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #10 on: 01/17/2017 07:03 PM »
Quote
Jack Fischer
Our Exp.52 crew pic is out--5 folks due to new Cosmonaut rotation plan...We're getting closer!
---
SMS ;-).

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #11 on: 01/17/2017 10:04 PM »
Quote
Jack Fischer
Our Exp.52 crew pic is out--5 folks due to new Cosmonaut rotation plan...We're getting closer!
Likely going to change again: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=39244.msg1631724#new
USOS to have 4 crew members and RS to have 2 on orbit.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #12 on: 01/18/2017 06:29 AM »
Quote
Jack Fischer
Our Exp.52 crew pic is out--5 folks due to new Cosmonaut rotation plan...We're getting closer!
Likely going to change again: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=39244.msg1631724#new
USOS to have 4 crew members and RS to have 2 on orbit.
This new crew assignment (2 RS, 4 USOS) will start NET September with EC 53.

Offline B. Hendrickx

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #13 on: 01/24/2017 07:31 AM »
http://tass.ru/sibir-news/3953464
http://tass.ru/kosmos/3960698

During an EVA now scheduled for August 2 cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergei Ryazanskiy will deploy a nanosatellite called Tomsk TPU-120 built with 3D printer technology. The satellite was delivered to the station last year. Yurchikhin, Ryazanskiy and back-up cosmonaut Aleksandr Misurkin have been practicing the deployment at a Star City simulator called "Vykhod" ("Exit"). The hydrolab at Star City has been down for maintenance since late 2014 and is not expected to become available again until next month. The August spacewalk is the only Russian EVA planned for this year.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #14 on: 01/24/2017 05:59 PM »
For approximately 2 weeks, according to the current schedule, a 2-person crew will operate ISS in May 2017, Yurchikin and Fischer.

Obviously (?), the several space agencies' operational staffs have made plans for this.  But, the minimal crew size in the operational ISS era was always envisioned as 3?

It's a big station!  What changes will occur?  Particularly, will operational tasks will take up more or all of their time, as opposed to science experiments?
Never mind...
I'm reading that Peggy Whitson will remain aboard with Yurchikin and Fischer until they leave in September.  So, no 2-person crew.

EDIT--where I read it:
Seeing that NASA is looking to have more time in orbit, is it possible that Whitson comes back with soyuz MS04?

Yes it is....

They are talking about it and word is that it will be announced soon.
So that would be September 3rd at the earliest and November at the latest for landing timeline.

<snip>
Current schedule of ISS flight events
UTC time is used in table

2017
<snip>
May 15 - Soyuz MS-03 undocking (from Rassvet) and landing [Novitskiy, Pesquet, Whitson]
<snip>
late September (TBD) - Soyuz MS-04 undocking (from Poisk) and landing [Yurchikhin, Fisher, tourist Whitson]
<snip>

Changes on January 3rd
Changes on January 4th
Changes on January 6th
Changes on January 8th
Changes on January 10th
Changes on January 13th
Changes on January 15th
Changes on January 16th
Changes on January 17th
Changes on January 18th
Changes on January 24h
« Last Edit: 01/24/2017 09:19 PM by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline Sesquipedalian

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #15 on: 01/24/2017 08:23 PM »
Cool if true.  Peggy Whitson missed out on the Year In Space opportunity; this would be a nice consolation.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #16 on: 01/24/2017 09:24 PM »
Cool if true.  Peggy Whitson missed out on the Year In Space opportunity; this would be a nice consolation.
I edited my post to show the NSF posts.

Yes, it would be like a stealth YIS mission, unless NASA chooses to trumpet the news when it's officially announced.  (perhaps 10 months for Whitson, compared to Kelly's 11 months)

I'll be interested to learn NASA's decision process to allow Whitson a longer duration mission.
« Last Edit: 01/24/2017 09:26 PM by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #17 on: 01/25/2017 05:04 AM »
If Peggy Whitson will stay until the landing of Soyuz MS-04 who will be Expedition 52 commander? Yurchikhin as planned or Whitson (station commander Expedition 51)?

Online ZachS09

Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #18 on: 01/25/2017 02:14 PM »
Most likely Peggy Whitson because if she's staying for a longer period of time, she'll have to retain her Commander position. Just like Scott Kelly during his One Year Mission.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #19 on: 01/28/2017 08:56 PM »
Most likely Peggy Whitson because if she's staying for a longer period of time, she'll have to retain her Commander position. Just like Scott Kelly during his One Year Mission.
Maybe not.

I believe the commander assignments are worked out at the inter-agency level.

The Expedition Commanders have already been assigned--Yurchikin for Expedition 52.

Roscosmos State Corporation would have to be convinced to concede a commander's slot.

I suspect Whitson will conclude her mission as a Flight Engineer.

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Offline DreamlinerFinder

Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #20 on: 01/29/2017 12:21 PM »
Just remember, none of this peggy stuff is confirmed till either NASA announces it, or Soyuz MS-03 lands with two people inside.

Online catdlr

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #21 on: 04/02/2017 12:00 AM »
PPaolo Nespoli training at EAC

European Space Agency, ESA

Published on Mar 31, 2017
ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli from Italy will soon embark upon a long-duration mission to the International Space Station. Scheduled as part of a barter agreement between NASA and the Italian Space Agency ASI, it will be his third flight to the Space Station; his first flight was in 2007, during the Station’s construction phase, followed by a six-month mission launched in December 2010.

Paolo is currently training at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany, in preparation for the many scientific experiments he’ll be carrying out in orbit.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGuHr03xH2M?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #22 on: 04/06/2017 06:15 PM »
Who will be Expedition 52 commander? Whitson or Yurchikhin?

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #23 on: 04/08/2017 11:07 AM »
Yurchikhin
---
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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #24 on: 04/08/2017 02:06 PM »
Do you have a source?

Offline SMS

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« Last Edit: 04/08/2017 08:59 PM by SMS »
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Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #26 on: 04/08/2017 06:47 PM »
Sorry, but I don't see a word that Yurchikkin will be Expedition 52 commander.

Offline TJL

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #27 on: 04/08/2017 10:32 PM »
Any word on revised  6 person ISS-52 crew patch?

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #28 on: 04/10/2017 05:27 PM »
Whitson to stay on the ISS for an additional three months
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/04/whitson-iss-additional-three-months/
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Offline Jaskentner

Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #29 on: 04/10/2017 09:57 PM »
During today's Soyuz undocking/deorbit/landing coverage, the NASA PAO noted that Yurchikhin will be the Commander of Expedition 52. Peggy Whitson will be a Flight Engineer on Expedition 52, after she serves as Commander for Expedition 51.

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #30 on: 04/14/2017 07:12 PM »
ISS 51 & 52 crew posters:

first personal patch of Fyodor Yurchikhin:
---
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Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #31 on: 04/19/2017 02:31 PM »
Any word on revised  6 person ISS-52 crew patch?

Fischer, Yurchikhin, Whitson
Bresnik, Ryazanskiy, Nespoli

Just first look at this photo:
« Last Edit: 04/19/2017 04:04 PM by SMS »
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Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #32 on: 04/19/2017 08:29 PM »
 >:(
---
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Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (May - September 2017)
« Reply #34 on: 04/27/2017 12:35 PM »
Here is the hi res version.

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #35 on: 05/15/2017 05:28 PM »
According to: https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/schedule.html

Quote
TBD, Thursday, June 1 - ISS Expedition 51/52 Change of Command Ceremony (Whitson hands over ISS command to Yurchikhin)
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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #36 on: 05/16/2017 07:50 AM »
Here is the hi res version.

That is not the official version, but the NASA version. The one Olaf posted  (the spacepatches.nl facebook image) is the official one

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #37 on: 06/01/2017 06:51 PM »


Expedition 51 Crew Hands Over the Space Station to Expedition 52

The reins of command of the International Space Station were passed from NASA’s Peggy Whitson to Fyodor Yurchikhin of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) during a ceremony on the orbital outpost June 1. Although Whitson is remaining on the station as an Expedition 52 crew member, Yurchikhin will serve as Expedition 52 commander until he, Whitson and NASA’s Jack Fischer return home in early September. Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos and Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency will return to Earth as a two-man crew on June 2 in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, completing a six and a half month mission.
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Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #38 on: 06/02/2017 11:38 AM »
SSRMS waiting Dragon...

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #39 on: 06/02/2017 09:45 PM »
Expedition 52 Crew Portrait (Uploaded on June 2, 2017)

The Expedition 52 crew members (front row, from left) are Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik. In the back row (from left) are, NASA astronauts Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli and Roscosmos cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy.
---
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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #40 on: 06/02/2017 10:01 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/01/2017

Posted on June 1, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

SpaceX (SpX)-11 Launch: SpX-11 is scheduled to launch today at 4:55 pm CDT. Pending a successful launch, capture and berthing are planned for Sunday, June 4th at 9:00am CDT.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5):  The crew unpacked, installed and configured four Animal Habitats and configured the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) for RR-5 operations to be performed after arrival of rodents and additional hardware and materials on SpaceX-11. The Ground team successfully completed a software checkout of all the Habitats.

DOSIS 3D:  The crew de-installed DOSIS 3D passive detectors and handed them over to a Russian crewmember for packing for return on Soyuz 49S.  Data from the various active and passive radiation detectors are used in the determination of the radiation field parameters absorbed doses and dose equivalents inside the ISS. A concise three dimensional (3D) dose distribution map of all the segments of the ISS will be developed based on this data and data from JAXA and NASA monitoring devices.

Matiss:  The crew de-installed the four Matiss Sample Holders from the Columbus module for return on 49S.  The MATISS experiment investigates the antibacterial properties of materials in space to see if future spacecraft could be made easier to clean. The experiment aims to understand the mechanisms of attachment of biofilms in microgravity conditions. MATISS objectives include simplification of decontamination operations to save crew time and validation of innovative surfaces for use in future spacecraft.

ISS Change of Command: In preparation for 49S departure on Friday, Peggy Whitson handed over command of the ISS to Fyodor Yurchikhin. During this event, the entire crew discussed with Mission Control Center (MCC)-Houston and MCC-Moscow Flight Control their roles and responsibilities for the timeframe between the Change of Command event and tomorrow’s 49S departure.  Following the Change of Command, the new Commander’s Soyuz crew became prime for emergencies.
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Offline John44

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #42 on: 06/04/2017 05:45 PM »
---
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Offline k1998w

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #43 on: 06/05/2017 02:17 PM »
Today Peggy Whitson beat Samantha Cristoforetti's record for the longest spaceflight by a women of 199 days 16 hours and counting ! Impressive stuff !

Anyone know how many days the MS-04 crew will spend on orbit ? It'd be nice for Fischer to have a 170-180 day mission as a rookie !

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #44 on: 06/05/2017 02:19 PM »
MS-04 is scheduled to land on September 03, 2017. This would be 135 days for Fischer.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #45 on: 06/05/2017 03:02 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/02/2017

Posted on June 2, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

SpaceX (SpX)-11 Launch Delay: Yesterday’s planned SpX-11 launch was scrubbed due to weather. Launch is now planned for tomorrow, Saturday, June 3 at 4:07pm CDT with capture and berthing on Monday, June 5th at 6:00am CDT. The vehicle will deliver 3,900 pounds of research experiments, food, crew provisions and exercise equipment. Unberth is currently planned for July 2.

49 Soyuz (49S) Undock: 49S, with Thomas Pesquet and Oleg Novitskiy onboard, undocked today at 5:45am CDT and landed in Kazakhstan at 9:10am CDT. The ISS will be in 3-crew operations until the arrival of 51S on July 28.

Orbital 7 (OA-7) Unberth: Due to the delay of SpX-11 launch on Thursday, SpX-11 is planned to berth to the ISS on Monday instead of Sunday. This delay allows OA-7 to unberth on Sunday, June 4 at 8:10am. In preparation, the crew completed a Robotics On-Board Trainer (RoBOT) session to practice 3 release runs.

Human Research Program:  With assistance from an operator, blood samples were taken from a 50S crewmember and stowed at ambient temperature for return on 49S.  This sample will support the functional Immune investigation which analyzes blood and saliva samples to determine the changes taking place in crewmembers’ immune systems during flight. Results are expected to provide new insight into the possible health risks of long-duration space travel.

JAXA Protein Crystal Growth (PCG): The crew removed PCG canister bags from the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) and canisters from the Protein Crystallization Research Facility (PCRF) in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) and handed them over to a Russian crewmember for return on 49S. High quality protein crystals were produced in the microgravity environment on the ISS for about 6 weeks from samples provided by Russian and Japanese researchers from universities, national research institutes, and the private sector. The results of this experiment may contribute to the development of drugs for multidrug-resistant bacteria, Alzheimer’s disease, muscular dystrophy and periodontitis. They will also aid in the development of a blood substitute and biosensor.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) which was maneuvered to capture the Cygnus Power Video Grapple Fixture (PVGF). SSRMS will stay grappled to Cygnus until Sunday when Cygnus will be unberthed and released.
---
SMS ;-).

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #46 on: 06/06/2017 03:06 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/05/2017

Posted on June 5, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

SpaceX (SpX)-11 Launch and Berth: SpX-11 launched on Saturday, June 3 at 4:07pm CDT. Capture occurred today at 9:00am CDT followed by berthing at ~11:30m CDT. The crew completed successful pressurization and leak checks, removed Control Panel Assemblies and configured the Dragon vestibule for ingress which is scheduled tomorrow. Robotics ground controllers will translate the Mobile Transporter from Work Site (WS) 4 to WS6 and unstow Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) in preparation for Dragon trunk unloading tomorrow.

Rodent Research (RR) Transfer Review: Following capture and berthing of SpX-11, the crew prepared for transfer of the mice from Dragon planned for this Wednesday. They reviewed Big Picture words, presentations, videos and reference material and procedures for transferring the animals from the transporter to their habitat. Following the review they completed a conference with ground teams.

Orbital 7 (OA-7) Unberth: OA-7 unberthed from the ISS on Sunday, June 4 at 6:05am CDT with release at 8:10am CDT. The delay of SpX-11 launch on Thursday allowed OA-7 to unberth Sunday. Following departure, Cygnus is supporting two NASA payloads – SAFFIRE III and NRCSD-E prior to re-entry on June 11.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics 3:  Yesterday the crew removed Biophysics-3 Plate 1 and placed it into a MERLIN.  Investigators will use the results from LMM Biophysics 3 to examine the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity. This investigation is expected to add to scientists’ understanding of the physical processes that enable high-quality crystals to grow in space where Earth’s gravity does not interfere with their formation.

Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (CEVIS) Troubleshooting: Over the weekend the crew performed additional CEVIS troubleshooting utilizing spare cables to check out both control panels.  Neither control panel functioned with either cable. The crew returned CEVIS to the temporary configuration using the Contingency Control Panel (CCP) and the spare cable. When using the CCP, the crew must manually dial the resistance and record their exercise information. A spare ergometer, control panel and 2 power cables are scheduled for launch on SpX-12. An additional ground cable and CCP are also being refurbished for flight.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Robotics Ground Controllers used the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to maneuver the Dragon to and install it on the Node-2 Nadir Active Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM). They then supported the inspection of the Dragon Passive CBM sealing surface.  Ground Controllers then captured and bolted Dragon to the ISS. The MSS was subsequently configured to a nominal operations configuration. 
---
SMS ;-).

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #47 on: 06/07/2017 03:50 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/06/2017

Posted on June 6, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

SpaceX (SpX)-11 Ingress and Unpack: Following yesterday’s successful capture, berthing, and ingress of SpX-11, today the crew began transferring payloads and cargo to the ISS. This multi-day process will result in the transfer of 3,900 pounds of science and cargo and the beginning of Fruit Fly Lab and Rodent Research later this week.

Fruit Fly Lab-02 (FFL-02): The crew installed four Vented Fly Boxes with live flies into the Space Automated Bioproduct Lab (SABL) incubator. The two remaining Vented Fly Boxes will remain in the cargo transfer bag they were flown up in and stowed in the Columbus Endcone for the duration of the experiment. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster serves as a useful model organism for investigation of cellular and genetic mechanisms that can cause heart problems during spaceflight. Significant effects on numerous body systems have been identified as a result of spaceflight, including the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, neuroendocrine, and immune systems.  The FFL-02 investigation compares flies that have hatched in space with flies grown on the ground to understand how prolonged spaceflight affects their heart function.

JAXA Area PADLES (Area Passive Dosimeter for Life-Science Experiments in Space):  The crew installed nine area dosimeters on Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) walls today. The JAXA Area PADLES investigation uses area dosimeters to continuously monitor the radiation dose onboard the ISS.  Radiation exposure can have significant biological effects on living organisms, including the biological investigations being done on ISS in the JEM.

NanoRacks Module 9 Operations: The crew activated mixture tubes in support of NanoRacks Module 9 experiments for the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP) of the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education. The SSEP supports various schools and student-designed experiments that address challenges of living and working in space. The program is also a key initiative for U.S. science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), that strives to educate and inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers to work on the space program.

Cardiac Stem Cells:  In support of the Cardiac Stem Cell investigation, the crew changed out media for three BioCell Habitats in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG).  Cardiac Stem Cells investigates how microgravity affects stem cells and the factors that govern stem cell activity, in order to clarify the role of stem cells in cardiac biology and tissue regeneration.  This investigation also supports research into the possible acceleration of the aging process in microgravity.

Robotic Operations in Support of SpX-11: Yesterday evening, Robotic Ground Controllers translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite 4 (WS4) to WS6.  Next they ungrappled the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) from SpX-11 Dragon Flight Releasable Grapple Fixture (FRGF) and maneuvered it to unstow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) from Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 2 (PDGF2).  Finally, controllers configured the SSRMS and the SPDM for extraction of the Multiple User System for Earth Sensing (MUSES) payload from the Dragon trunk. 
---
SMS ;-).

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #48 on: 06/08/2017 09:14 AM »
Some cleaning today ...
« Last Edit: 06/08/2017 12:00 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #49 on: 06/08/2017 02:49 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/07/2017

Posted on June 7, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

NanoRacks Module-70:  The crew removed NanoRacks Module-70 from a General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER) this morning and installed it into the Nanoracks Platform-2 in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM).  Module-70 is an educational research project designed to study the effects of radiation damage to synthetic DNA for gene regions that code for a human antibody. The experiment will make copies of the synthetic DNA samples at certain time-points during the mission using a technique called polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The DNA will be returned for study of strand break analysis. The experiment is from the Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) School of Life Science in Beijing, China.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  Two crewmembers checked water flow in each side of the four Animal Habitats and installed the Rodent Hut and Habitat Foodbars. The crew then transferred mice from the Transporters to the Habitats after performing animal health checks. Habitats were installed in Lab racks to complete the activity.  Spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system, therefore, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

NanoRacks Module-54 and Module-56:  The crew retrieved NanoRacks Module-54 and Module-56 from a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) and installed them in Nanoracks Platform-1 in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM).

Algae can produce both fats and hydrogen which can each be used as fuel sources on Earth and potentially in space.  NanoRacks Module-54, also known as NanoRacks-National Design Challenge-Chatfield High School-The Effect of Microgravity on Two Strains of Biofuel Producing Algae with Implications for the Production of Renewable Fuels in Space Based Applications (NanoRacks-NDC-CHS-The Green Machine), studies two algae species to determine whether they still produce hydrogen and store fats while growing in microgravity.  Results from this student-designed investigation improve efforts to produce a sustainable biofuel in space, as well as remove carbon dioxide from crew quarters.

Vermicomposting, or using worms to break down food scraps, is an effective way to reduce waste and obtain a nutrient-rich fertilizer for plants. NanoRacks Module-56, also known as NanoRacks-NDC-Bell Middle School-Efficiency of Vermicomposting in a Closed System (NanoRacks-NDC-BMS-Vermicomposting), is a student-designed project that studies whether red wiggler worms, a species of earthworm, are able to produce compost in space.  Results are used to study the potential for composting as a form of recycling on future long-duration space missions.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Overnight, Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Arm 1 to extract the Multiple User System for Earth Sensing (MUSES) payload from the SpX-11 Dragon Trunk.  SPDM Arm1 and the SPDM Body were then maneuvered to stow the MUSES payload on the SPDM Enhanced Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Temporary Platform (EOTP). Finally, the SPDM was stowed on Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 2 (PDGF2) and the SSRMS was maneuvered to a park position.

Dragon Cargo Operations: The crew has completed ~8.5 hours of cargo transfer from Dragon to the ISS. Approximately13.5 hours of transfer remain to completely unload the vehicle.
---
SMS ;-).

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #50 on: 06/09/2017 05:53 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/08/2017

Posted on June 8, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

NanoRacks Module-70:  The crew removed NanoRacks Module-70 from the Nanoracks Platform-2 in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) and inserted it into a General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER).  Module-70 is an educational research project designed to study the effects of radiation damage to synthetic DNA for gene regions that code for a human antibody. The experiment will make copies of the synthetic DNA samples at certain time-points during the mission using a technique called polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The DNA will be returned for study of strand break analysis. The experiment is from the Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) School of Life Science in Beijing, China.

NanoRacks Module-52:  The crew retrieved NanoRacks Module-52 from Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) and initiated sub-experiments that are housed within NanoRacks Module-52.  Photographs will be taken of the petri dishes and video will be downlinked.  Microscope-3 imagery will also be taken of some of the petri dish slides.  NanoRacks Module-52 is a collection of 6 student-led biological experiments photo-documenting the life-cycle of various molds and bacteria on petri plates in microgravity.

NanoRacks Module 9 Operations: The crew activatd mixture tubes today in support of the NanoRacks-National Center for Earth and Space Science-Casper (NanoRacks-NCESSE-Casper) investigation.  NCESSE supports various schools and student-designed experiments that address challenges of living and working in space. The program is also a key initiative for U.S. science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), that strives to educate and inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers to work on the space program.  The specific investigations supported today include Growth and Development of Fathead Minnows in Microgravity, Possible Effects of Microgravity on Development of Dictyostelium discoideum (a type of cellular slime mold), and Tiny Wings of Glory (which involves the growth and life cycle of Vanessa Cardui (“Painted Lady”) butterflies in microgravity).

JAXA Medium Temperature Protein Crystal Growth (MT PCG): The crew retrieved PCG Samples from the JAXA Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle 2 (J-FROST2) so that protein crystal growth can begin and will later return the samples back to the FROST2. The main scientific objective of the JAXA MT PCG experiment is to make high quality protein crystals in the microgravity environment at moderate temperature.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): The crew completed a series of interactive tasks during a FMS session which studies how the fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of the investigation is to determine how fine motor performance in microgravity varies over the duration of six-month and year-long space missions; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance varies before and after gravitational transitions, including periods of early flight adaptation and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Dose Tracker:  The crew completed a weekly medication tracking entry in the Dose Tracker application.  Dose Tracker documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The investigation is expected to provide anecdotal evidence of medication effectiveness during flight and any unusual side effects experienced. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics is occurring during missions.

Lighting Effects: The crew set up and configured the Light Meter hardware and take readings in the US Lab and the JEM Pressurized Module (JPM). Both modules use the legacy General Luminaire Assembly (GLA). The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  Yesterday and overnight, Robotic Ground Controllers powered up the MSS cameras and lights and walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) off the Node2 Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) onto Mobile Base System (MBS) PDGF1. They then translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite 6 (WS6) to WS2.  Finally the Robotics Ground Controllers unstowed the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) from MBS PDGF2.  The SPDM is holding the Multiple User System for Earth Sensing (MUSES) payload on the Enhanced Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Temporary Platform (EOTP) which will be installed later today on Express Logistic Carrier 4 (ELC4).
---
SMS ;-).

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #51 on: 06/12/2017 02:13 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/09/2017

Posted on June 9, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  Two crewmembers performed the first injection of the RR-5 mice in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG).  Spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system, therefore, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot:  The crew set up the JEM Camera Robot and installed a target marker on the JEM Airlock Inner Hatch.  This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations in support of MUSES: Yesterday and overnight, Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) to unstow the Multiple User System for Earth Sensing (MUSES) payload from the SPDM Enhanced Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Temporary Platform (EOTP) and install it on Express Logistic Carrier 4 (ELC4) Site 2.  Teams at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) subsequently activated the MUSES payload successfully.

Offline eeergo

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #52 on: 06/12/2017 05:56 PM »

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot:  The crew set up the JEM Camera Robot and installed a target marker on the JEM Airlock Inner Hatch.  This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras.


Any more info about this one? :O
-DaviD-

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #53 on: 06/12/2017 08:08 PM »

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot:  The crew set up the JEM Camera Robot and installed a target marker on the JEM Airlock Inner Hatch.  This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs. It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras.


Any more info about this one? :O
I've seen word of a press release about this late July.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #54 on: 06/14/2017 01:32 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/12/2017

Posted on June 12, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  On Saturday two crewmembers performed the second injection of the RR-5 mice in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG).  Spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system; therefore, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Cardiac Stem Cells:  In support of the ongoing Cardiac Stem Cell investigation, on Sunday the crew performed the second changeout of media for three BioCell Habitats in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG).  Cardiac Stem Cells investigates how microgravity affects stem cells and the factors that govern stem cell activity, in order to clarify the role of stem cells in cardiac biology and tissue regeneration.  This investigation also supports research into the possible acceleration of the aging process in microgravity.

Integrated Resistance and Aerobic Training Study (SPRINT) Configuration: The crew configured the Portable Pulmonary Function System (PPFS) in advance of their Flight Day 45 Sprint Volume of Oxygen Utilized (VO2) Max session this Wednesday. The Sprint investigation evaluates the use of high intensity, low volume exercise training to minimize loss of muscle, bone, and cardiovascular function in ISS crewmembers during long-duration missions.

Seedling Growth 3:  The crew replaced the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) Experiment Containers (ECs) with new ECs prepared for the Seedling Growth 3 experiment. Seedling Growth-3 is the third part of the Seedling Growth Experiment series using the plant Arabidopsis thaliana to investigate the effects of gravity on the cellular signaling mechanisms of light sensing in plants (phototropism) and to investigate cell growth and proliferation responses to light stimulation under microgravity conditions. There will be two runs for this investigation, each 6 days long.

Body Measures: This morning, a 49S subject performed the Body Measures Flight Day 214 session. The crewmember, with assistance from a trained operator, collected Body Measures data after configuring still and video cameras. NASA is collecting in-flight anthropometric data to assess the impact of physical body shape and size changes on suit sizing.  Still and video imagery is captured and a tape measure is used to measure segmental length, height, depth, and circumference data for all body segments (chest, waist, hip, arms, legs, etc.) from astronauts before, during and after their flight missions.

Node 2 Nadir Common Berthing Mechanism Bolt Assembly Remove & Replace (R&R): During SpaceX (SpX)-10 demate from Node 2 Nadir Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM), Bolt 1-3 jammed. The Ground was subsequently able to demate the bolt within nominal torque limits. Today the crew R&Rd the bolt in preparation for SpX-11 unberth.  Required bolt checkout will be planned during nominal CBM operations when Dragon unberths on July 2.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations in support of NICER:  Yesterday and overnight, Robotics Ground Controllers operated the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) to grasp the Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) Flight Releasable Attach Mechanism (FRAM) and unberth it from the Dragon Trunk. The NICER FRAM was then temp-stowed on side 1 of the Enhanced Orbit Replaceable Unit (ORU) Temporary Platform (EOTP). SPDM was then stowed on the Mobile Base System’s (MBS) Power & Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) #2.  NICER will remain stowed on the EOTP until installation onto Express Logistics Carrier (ELC)-2 on Wednesday June 14th.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #55 on: 06/14/2017 01:32 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/13/2017

Posted on June 13, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF): The crew replaced the Sample Cartridge and the stuck Sample Holder in the ELF with a new type of Sample Holder and a Sample Cartridge.  The ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the Electrostatic Levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured, and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

NeuroMapping: The crew set up the Neuromapping hardware and executed testing in both a “strapped in” and “free floating” body configuration. During the test, the crewmember performed three Behavioral Assessments: mental rotation, sensorimotor adaptation, and motor-cognitive dual tasking. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, or multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Habitability Walk-through: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through videoim documenting observations of life onboard ISS and providing insights related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. These observations can help spacecraft designers understand habitable volume requirements and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crewmembers need or not.

ISS Medical Accessory Kit (IMAK) Unpack: The crew unpacked resupply kits delivered on SpX-11 and replaced expired items with new ones. They also packed items designated for return to ground.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations in Support of NICER:  Overnight, Robotics Ground Controllers walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) off the Node2 Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) onto Mobile Base System (MBS) PDGF1. They then translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) with the Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) Payload from Worksite 6 (WS6) to WS2.  Finally, Controllers unstowed the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) from MBS PDGF2.  These activities were to set up for tonight’s NICER installation onto ELC2.   

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #56 on: 06/15/2017 02:18 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/14/2017

Posted on June 14, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

67 Progress Launch: 67P launched successfully from Baikonur, Kazakhstan today at 4:20am CDT followed by a nominal ascent and orbit insertion.  All systems are performing nominally.  Docking is scheduled for Friday, June 16 at 6:42am CDT.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis: The crew restocked two of the four Animal Habitats and will restock the other two tomorrow. The habitats are emptied, cleaned, and new food bars installed. The rodents are then transferred back to the habitats and returned to their individual stowage locations.  Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Cool Flames Investigation: The crew replaced Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) Igniters, Fiber Arm, and fuel reservoirs in support of continued operations for the Cool Flames investigation. Cool Flames provides new insight into the phenomenon where some types of fuels initially burn very hot, then appear to go out but they continue burning at a much lower temperature, with no visible flames (cool flames). Understanding cool flame combustion helps scientists develop new engines and fuels that are more efficient and less harmful to the environment.

Sprint Volume of Oxygen Utilized (VO2) Max: The crew set up and performed the Sprint VO2 Max exercise protocol.  The Sprint investigation evaluates the use of high intensity, low volume exercise training to minimize loss of muscle, bone, and cardiovascular function in ISS crewmembers during long-duration missions.

Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) Sample Collection: The crew collected water samples from the PWD for in-flight and post-flight analysis. This is nominally scheduled maintenance that occurs multiple times throughout the expedition to ensure good water quality.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Fuel Dispenser Troubleshooting: The crew completed troubleshooting of the CIR Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) Chamber Insert Assembly (CIA) Fuel Dispenser 1. Prior to troubleshooting, the dispenser shaft could only rotate ˝ turn each direction. Following oiling the drive shaft threads, the shaft could easily turn in the dispensing direction, however, it had difficulty turning in the retraction direction. Crew observed the difficulty may be due to a misalignment in the shaft and was able to alleviate some of the binding by depressing the dispenser actuator finger. Two fuel reservoirs were installed and nominal maintenance completed following troubleshooting.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations in Support of NICER:  Overnight, Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) to unstow the Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) from side 1 of the SPDM Enhanced Orbit Replaceable Unit (ORU) Temporary Platform (EOTP) and install it on EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Logistic Carrier 2 (ELC2) Site 7. SSRMS and SPDM were then positioned for NICER deployment viewing. Deployment was attempted this afternoon but was unsuccessful. Latches were locked while teams discuss the next steps with NICER engineers.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #57 on: 06/16/2017 09:55 AM »
Right now, Peggy is on JEM "Small Satellite Orbital Deployer" (SSOD) install

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #58 on: 06/16/2017 01:11 PM »
Tsukuba MC: "go for JEMRMS activation and test, Peggy !"
« Last Edit: 06/16/2017 01:25 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #59 on: 06/19/2017 02:18 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/15/2017

Posted on June 15, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) Status: Yesterday’s planned NICER deployment was not completed due to  a problem with releasing all four of the NICER launch locks. Following several attempts, the NICER team successfully released three of the four launch locks. The team continues attempts to release the fourth lock.

NanoRacks Module-52:  The crew performed a status check of subexperiments inside NanoRacks Module-52.  Photographs were taken of the petri dishes and video was downlinked. NanoRacks Module-52 is a collection of 6 student-led biological experiments photo-documenting the life-cycle of various molds and bacteria on petri plates in microgravity.

Cardiac Stem Cells:  In support of the ongoing Cardiac Stem Cell investigation, the crew changed out media in one of the BioCell Habitats and fixated cells from the other two Habitats. They placed the fixated cells into a MELFI for return on SpX-11.  Cardiac Stem Cells investigates how microgravity affects stem cells and the factors that govern their activity to clarify the role of stem cells in cardiac biology and tissue regeneration. This investigation also supports research into the possible acceleration of the aging process in microgravity. 

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis: Two of the four Animal Habitats wiere restocked by the crew today. The other two were restocked yesterday.  The habitats were emptied, cleaned, and new food bars were installed. The rodents were transferred back to the habitats and returned to their individual stowage locations.

Node 3 (N3) Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA) Water Separator: Water carryover had been previously noted in the N3 CCAA on May 3 and 4. The Low Temperature Loop (LTL) set point was raised, reducing the condensation rate in N3 and the carryover stopped. In the last few days, the N3 Water Separator Liquid Sensor Wet indication has been received multiple times, therefore, ground teams have declared the N3 CCAA Water Separator failed and are requesting to Remove & Replace the unit. Ground teams moved condensation collection to the Lab to account for the failed N3 unit. Condensation collection can remain in the Lab for approximately 28 days prior to requiring a dryout of the Lab unit.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Devise (ARED) Crank Handle Remove & Replace (R&R): The crew completed installing a new design of ARED crank handle. The new design will eliminate torqueing the crank handle center cap screw and inspecting witness marks which results in crew time savings.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #60 on: 06/19/2017 02:18 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/16/2017

Posted on June 16, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

67 Progress (67P) Docking: 67P rendezvous and docking to ISS Service Module (SM) aft port was completed successfully today at 6:37 am CDT.  Following hatch opening the crew began transferring early unstow items.

Japanese Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD): The crew brought the JEM Airlock Slide Table (ST) into the ISS and mounted the J-SSOD #7 to it. A checkout was performed of the J-SSOD before removing the launch lock cover and attaching the Multi-Layered Insulation. The ST was then retracted back into the JEMAL and the airlock inner hatch was closed. These activities are in preparation for planned CubeSat deploys from the J-SSOD planned for July 7, 2017.

Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER): Utilizing views from cameras mounted to the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM), Robotics Ground deployed the NICER today. Teams are conducting routine checks before proceeding to range-of-motion tests. Neutron stars consist of ultra-dense matter at the threshold of collapse to a black hole. These stars emit X-ray radiation that enables investigations into their structure, dynamics and energetics, but their X-rays do not penetrate Earth’s atmosphere. NICER is an articulated payload that provides full-hemisphere sky coverage for astronomical observations in soft X-ray band. Observations with NICER will help resolve competing models of neutron star composition, answer decades-old questions about extreme matter and gravity and reveal workings of high-energy, dynamic phenomena that neutron stars exhibit.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics 1:  The crew retrieved the Biophysics-1 Plate 2 from a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) and allowed it to thaw for 90 minutes before placing it onto the Petri Base and installing the base into the LMM.  The LMM was then placed into the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) for a Biophysics science run.  Investigators will use the results from LMM Biophysics 3 to examine the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity. This investigation is expected to add to scientists’ understanding of the physical processes that enable high-quality crystals to grow in space, where Earth’s gravity does not interfere with their formation.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #61 on: 06/23/2017 04:46 PM »
Right now, Peggy working on SPHERES experiment
« Last Edit: 06/23/2017 04:47 PM by centaurinasa »

Offline jcm

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #62 on: 06/23/2017 11:54 PM »
No ISS status reports on the website this week - is someone on holiday?
-----------------------------

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #63 on: 06/24/2017 12:30 AM »
No ISS status reports on the website this week - is someone on holiday?
up to date on the L2 side equivalent.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #64 on: 06/24/2017 05:04 AM »
No ISS status reports on the website this week - is someone on holiday?
up to date on the L2 side equivalent.

Yes, but there are a lot of fine details not in that.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #65 on: 06/24/2017 12:05 PM »
No ISS status reports on the website this week - is someone on holiday?
up to date on the L2 side equivalent.

Yes, but there are a lot of fine details not in that.
True

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #66 on: 06/26/2017 01:22 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/19/2017

Posted on June 19, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Roll Out Solar Array (ROSA) External Payload: Over the weekend, Robotic ground controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) to remove the ROSA payload from the Dragon Trunk and position it at the ROSA Nominal Dynamics Operations position. When at this position, the controllers mated the Orbital Replaceable Unit Tool Changeout Mechanism 2 umbilicals to the ROSA payload, applied power to it and performed the initial ROSA checkouts. They then commanded the ROSA wing to fully deploy and began the planned dynamics experiments. ROSA is a new type of solar panel that is more compact than current rigid panel designs. The ROSA investigation tests deployment and retraction, array shape changes when the Earth blocks the sun, and other physical challenges to determine the array’s strength and durability.

NanoRacks Module 9: The crew activated mixture tubes in support of the NanoRacks-National Center for Earth and Space Science-Casper (NanoRacks-NCESSE-Casper) investigation.  NCESSE supports various schools and student-designed experiments that address challenges of living and working in space. The program is also a key initiative for U.S. science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) that strives to educate and inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers to work on the space program.  The specific investigations supported today include Growth and Development of Fathead Minnows in Microgravity, Does the structure of a fairy shrimp change in microgravity? and Soybean Germination in Microgravity.

Microbial Tracking-2:  The crew collected body samples in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation.  Microbial Tracking-2 monitors the different types of microbes that are present on ISS over a 1 year period through surface and air sampling.  After the samplings are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS to understand the microbial flora diversity and how it changes over time.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  In support of upcoming Bone Densitometer measurements for the RR-5 investigation, the crew changed out the Imaging unit on the Bone Densitometer and calibrated the hardware.  The Bone Densitometer device measures the density of minerals in bone. Quantitative measures of bone loss in mice during orbital space flight provide data for the development of countermeasures for human crewmembers, as well as for bone-loss syndromes on Earth. 

Cardiac Stem Cells:  The crew changed out the media in one of the BioCell Habitats.  Cardiac Stem Cells investigates how microgravity affects stem cells and the factors that govern their activity to clarify the role of stem cells in cardiac biology and tissue regeneration.  This investigation also supports research into the possible acceleration of the aging process in microgravity. 

NanoRacks Module-70:  The crew removed NanoRacks Module-70 sample from a General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER) and installed it in the Nanoracks Platform-2 in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM).  Module-70 is an educational research project designed to study the effects of radiation damage to synthetic DNA for gene regions that code for a human antibody. The experiment will make copies of the synthetic DNA samples at certain time-points during the mission using a technique called polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The DNA will be returned for study of strand break analysis. The experiment is from the Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) School of Life Science in Beijing, China.

Seedling Growth 3: The first of two six-day growth sessions were completed today. The crew removed Experiment Containers from the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), processed the samples, and stowed them in the Minus Eighty degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for return to the ground.  One of the samples could not be processed nominally but was also placed in the MELFI for return.  Seedling Growth-3 is the third part of the Seedling Growth Experiment series, using the plant Arabidopsis thaliana to investigate the effects of gravity on the cellular signaling mechanisms of light sensing in plants (phototropism), and to investigate cell growth and proliferation responses to light stimulation under microgravity conditions.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #67 on: 06/26/2017 01:22 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/20/2017

Posted on June 20, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM):  The crew ingressed BEAM and replaced a 3.3 mm thick Radiation Environment Monitor (REM) shield that was installed onto a REM sensor on May 31, 2017 with a 10.0 mm thick shield that was also printed on the 3D printer onboard the ISS.  BEAM is an experimental expandable module attached to the ISS.  Expandable modules weigh less and take up less room on a rocket than a traditional module, while allowing additional space for living and working. They provide protection from solar and cosmic radiation, space debris, and other contaminants. Crews traveling to the moon, Mars, asteroids, or other destinations may be able to use them as habitable structures.

NanoRacks Module-48:  The crew took photos for the NanoRacks Module-48 investigation for downlink to the ground.  NanoRacks Module-48 connects students on Earth to the space program by sending their photographs and messages to the ISS along with plant seeds that are germinated after being returned to Earth. The investigation increases awareness of humans’ ability to access space, spurring interest in the space program and encouraging students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

Sprint Ultrasound 2:  For their Flight Day 60 Sprint Ultrasound 2 session, a crewmember, with support from an operator, configured Ultrasound 2, place reference marks on the calf and thigh of their right leg, don the thigh and calf guides, and perform thigh and calf scans with remote guidance from the Sprint ground team. Ultrasound scans are used to evaluate spaceflight-induced changes in the muscle volume. The Sprint investigation evaluates the use of high intensity, low volume exercise training to minimize loss of muscle, bone, and cardiovascular function in ISS crewmembers during long-duration missions.

NanoRacks Module-70:  The crew removed the NanoRacks Module-70 sample inserted yesterday into the Nanoracks Platform-2 in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) and placed it into a General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER).  Module-70 is an educational research project designed to study the effects of radiation damage to synthetic DNA for gene regions that code for a human antibody. The experiment will make copies of the synthetic DNA samples at certain time-points during the mission using a technique called polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The DNA will be returned for study of strand break analysis. The experiment is from the Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) School of Life Science in Beijing, China.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): The crew completed a series of interactive tasks during a FMS session today. The FMS investigation studies how the fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of the investigation is to determine how fine motor performance in microgravity varies over the duration of six-month and year-long space missions; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance varies before and after gravitational transitions, including periods of early flight adaptation and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Surface Sample Kit (SSK) Collection/Incubation: The crew completed this regularly scheduled maintenance to complete bacterial and fungal sampling. This activity is performed in all USOS modules, including BEAM.

SpaceX (SpX)-11 Cargo Operations: The crew has completed approximately 36 hours of cargo operations with approximately 17.5 hours of packing remaining. SpX-11 is scheduled to unberth on July 2nd, 2017.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #68 on: 06/26/2017 01:25 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/21/2017

Posted on June 21, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  The crew set up and checked out the spare Rodent Habitat which replaces Rodent Habitat 2 that has excessive condensation in its water box.  Later the crew will perform injections of the mice in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG).  Spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system; therefore, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Multi Omics-Mouse:  The crew completed initial steps to prepare and check out hardware and facilities to be used for the Multi Omics-Mouse investigation to be performed with rodents arriving on SpaceX-12.  They cleaned the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF), reconfigured video cables between the CBEF and Video Compression and Recording Unit 2 for multiple video channels, installed and set up the Mouse Habitat Unit (MHU) Experiment Laptop Terminal 2, replaced ammonia sensors in the Mouse Habitat Microgravity Interface and 1G units, and installed the Mouse Habitat Unit Back Up Interface Unit.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  The crew collected a saliva sample and placed it in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes that are present on ISS over a 1 year period through surface and air sampling.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS to understand the microbial flora diversity and how it may change over time.

NanoRacks Module-52:  The crew performed a status check of subexperiments inside NanoRacks Module-52.  Photographs were taken of the petri dishes and video will be downlinked.  NanoRacks Module-52 is a collection of 6 student-led biological experiments photo-documenting the life-cycle of various molds and bacteria on petri plates in microgravity.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #69 on: 06/26/2017 01:26 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/22/2017

Posted on June 22, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  The crew completed injections of the mice in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) for the RR-5 investigation. Spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system; therefore, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Multi Omics-Mouse:  The crew completed preparation and checkout of hardware and facilities to be used for JAXA’s Multi Omics-Mouse investigation.  Rodents for this investigation will arrive on the SpaceX-12 vehicle.  The Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Back Up Interface was removed and the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit was installed in the CBEF Incubator Unit.  Later today the crew till take images of the Cage Unit with the Ghost camera.

Compound Specific Analyzer-Combustion Products (CSA-CP) Maintenance:  The crew completed this routine maintenance to replace the battery packs in all CSA-CPs and zero calibrate all the units.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #70 on: 06/26/2017 01:55 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/23/2017

Posted on June 23, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Halo: The crew completed a test session for the SPHERES Halo investigation. For this investigation the ISS fleet of SPHERES satellites are upgraded to enable each satellite to communicate with six external objects concurrently, supporting testing of new control and remote assembly methods. Results may be used to support remote or autonomous servicing of retired, obsolete, or failed satellites that otherwise eventually become space debris.  SPHERES Halo also supports research into future assembly of space habitats including large telescopes and exploration vehicles that may be too difficult and costly to launch from Earth but could be assembled in orbit.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  The crew collected surface and air samples at different locations and a saliva sample and placed them inside a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) in support of the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation. MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes that are present on ISS over a 1 year period.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS in order to understand the microbial flora diversity on the ISS and how it changes over time.

Vascular Echo Ultrasound: Ultrasound scans of a crewmember’s neck, torso, heart, and back of the knee were taken today. The crewmember donned Electrocardiogram (ECG) electrodes and with remote guidance assistance from the ground, collected ultrasound measurements.  They donned leg cuffs for several hours and repeat the ECG and ultrasound measurements. This Canadian Space Agency (CSA) investigation examines changes in blood vessels and the heart while the crew members are in space, and again upon their return to Earth. The results could provide insight into potential countermeasures to help maintain crew member health.

Cardiac Stem Cells: In support of the ongoing Cardiac Stem Cells investigation, the crew changed out the media in one of the BioCell Habitats in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). Cardiac Stem Cells investigates how microgravity affects stem cells and the factors that govern their activity, in order to clarify the role of stem cells in cardiac biology and tissue regeneration. This investigation also supports research into the possible acceleration of the aging process in microgravity. 

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #71 on: 06/26/2017 04:49 PM »
Deployment of the Space Station's Roll Out Solar Array Experiment
 

Over the weekend of June 17-18, 2017, engineers on the ground remotely operated the International Space Station's robotic Canadarm2 to extract the Roll Out Solar Array (ROSA) experiment from the SpaceX Dragon resupply ship. The experiment will remain attached to the Canadarm2 over seven days to test the effectiveness of ROSA, an advanced, flexible solar array that rolls out like a tape measure.
 
Image credit: NASA

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #72 on: 06/26/2017 04:50 PM »
Changing How Solar Power Rolls
 

Traditional solar panels used to power satellites can be bulky with heavy panels folded together using mechanical hinges. An experiment that recently arrived at the International Space Station will test a new solar array design that rolls up to form a compact cylinder for launch with significantly less mass and volume, potentially offering substantial cost savings as well as an increase in power for satellites.
 
Smaller and lighter than traditional solar panels, the Roll-Out Solar Array, or ROSA, consists of a center wing made of a flexible material containing photovoltaic cells to convert light into electricity. On either side of the wing is a narrow arm that extends the length of the wing to provide support, called a high strain composite boom. The booms are like split tubes made of a stiff composite material, flattened and rolled up lengthwise for launch. The array rolls or snaps open without a motor, using stored energy from the structure of the booms that is released as each boom transitions from a coil shape to a straight support arm.
 
Image credit: NASA

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #73 on: 06/27/2017 03:55 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/26/2017

Posted on June 26, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Roll Out Solar Array (ROSA): On Sunday, three attempts to retract ROSA solar array were unsuccessful.  Imagery showed the array was not lining up correctly (“telescoping”), preventing the locking of ROSA’s latches which is required for return in Dragon. Teams met and agreed to stand down on further retraction attempts due to the risk of getting stuck in an off nominal configuration with a partially retracted array. ROSA was left fully deployed following the last attempt and jettison was approved which was completed today at 4:15PM CDT to the nadir and aft of ISS.

Seedling Growth 3: The crew completed the second of two six-day growth sessions for Seedling Growth 3 today. They removed Experiment Containers from the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), processed the samples, and stowed them in the Biolab Thermal Control Unit. The samples from this and the previous run will be returned on SpaceX-11. This is the third part of the Seedling Growth Experiment series using the small flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana to investigate the effects of gravity on the cellular signaling mechanisms of light sensing in plants (phototropism), and to investigate cell growth and proliferation responses to light stimulation under microgravity conditions.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  Yesterday the crew collected saliva samples for the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation and placed them in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes that are present on ISS over a 1 year period.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS in order to understand the microbial flora diversity on the ISS and how it changes over time.

Human Research Program (HRP): A crewmember collected Flight Day 60 urine and blood samples yesterday and today for Biochem Profile and blood and air samples for Marrow.
•The Biochem Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during and after spaceflight.  Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results which scientists can use in their study of the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•The Marrow investigation identifies the effect of microgravity on bone marrow.  It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on blood cell production in bone marrow.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #74 on: 06/28/2017 01:42 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/27/2017

Posted on June 27, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Cardiac Stem Cells:  In support of the ongoing Cardiac Stem Cells investigation, the crew changed out the media in one of the BioCell Habitats in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG).  Cardiac Stem Cells investigates how microgravity affects stem cells and the factors that govern their activity, in order to clarify the role of stem cells in cardiac biology and tissue regeneration.  This investigation also supports research into the possible acceleration of the aging process in microgravity.

Lighting Effects: The crew set up and configured the Light Meter hardware and took readings in the Cupola, which uses the legacy General Luminaire Assembly (GLA). The Lighting Effects experiment hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have major implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

NanoRacks Module 9: The crew activated mixture tubes in support of the NanoRacks-National Center for Earth and Space Science-Casper (NanoRacks-NCESSE-Casper) investigation.  NCESSE supports various schools and student-designed experiments that address challenges of living and working in space. The program is also a key initiative for U.S. science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), that strives to educate and inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers to work on the space program.  The specific investigations supported today include Growth and Development of Fathead Minnows in Microgravity, Does the Structure of a Fairy Shrimp Change in Microgravity?, Soybean Germination in Microgravity, and Benefits of Mint.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday afternoon and overnight, Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Arm1 to grasp the Roll Out Solar Array (ROSA) Payload Jettison Micro-Square Fixture (MSF).  At 4:15pm CDT Controllers applied power to the ROSA Jettison Motors and the ROSA Payload was jettisoned from ISS.  Next they maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and SPDM to release Arm1 from the ROSA Jettison MSF to grasp the ROSA Flight Releasable Attachment Mechanism (FRAM) MSF with Arm1 and to release Arm2 from the ROSA Operations MSF.  Finally the SSRMS and SPDM were maneuvered to position the ROSA FRAM at the Dragon Trunk threshold in preparation for stowing it later today.

Potable Water Dispenser Relocation: The crew installed a potable water tee on the Node 1 to Node 3 portion of the potable water hose to provide a connection for the PWD. The crew then transferred the PWD from ExPRESS-6 to the galley rack.

Commercial Orbital Transport Services (COTS) UHF Communication Unit (CUCU) Checkout:  In preparation for the upcoming SpaceX-11 departure planned for July 2nd, the crew coordinated with ground teams to activate the CUCU System and perform a Crew Command Panel (CCP) checkout. CUCU provides a command and telemetry communications link between ISS and Dragon during free flight operations in the vicinity of ISS.   

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #75 on: 06/28/2017 02:38 PM »
CTB time....
At the same Time,  Fyodor working on Orlan MK and new MKS spacesuits maintenance...
« Last Edit: 06/28/2017 07:14 PM by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #76 on: 06/29/2017 02:58 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/28/2017

Posted on June 28, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis: The two animal habitats that will remain on ISS following SpX-11 departure were cleaned and restocked with new food bars.  Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF):  The crew exchanged sample holders in the ELF. They also removed samples that had been lost in the Holder Cartridge to prevent interference with the subsequent experiment.  The ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the Electrostatic Levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Food Acceptability:  The crew reviewed reference material and completed a Food Acceptability questionnaire. This investigation hopes to determine the impact of repeat consumption on food acceptability on ISS within the current closed-variety spaceflight food system. Results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions.

Portable Emergency Provisions (PEPs) Inspection: The crew completed this regularly scheduled maintenance to verify that Portable Fire Extinguishers (PFE), Extension Hose Tee Kits (EHTK), Portable Breathing Apparatuses (PBA) and pre-breathe masks are free of damage to ensure functionality.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday evening, Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Arm1 to stow the Roll Out Solar Array (ROSA) Flight Releasable Attachment Mechanism (FRAM) in Dragon Trunk Site 2.  SPDM Arm1 then released the ROSA FRAM Micro-Square Fixture (MSF) and the SSRMS lifted the SPDM out of the Dragon Trunk and maneuvered it to a park position. 

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #77 on: 06/30/2017 12:41 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/29/2017

Posted on June 29, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Extremophiles:  In preparation for Session C of the Extremophiles investigation the crew wiped designated surfaces in Node 1, Node 3 and the Cupola with sterile wet wipes and placed them into a Biolab Thermal Control Unit.  Archaea and extremophilic bacteria have not been considered as significant contributors to the microbiome on the ISS. The Extremophiles experiment will add critical knowledge about the microbial diversity on the ISS.  The experiment will Isolate and characterize archaea and extremophilic bacteria by sampling selected locations inside the Station.  Changes in archaea and extremophilic bacteria over a period of at least 3 months will be assessed.  The population of archaea and extremophilic bacteria on the ISS will be compared with that of spacecraft clean rooms and visiting vehicles.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis: The crew reviewed material on live animal return operations and discussed those operations with the Payload Developer. They then set up the Animal Transporter for return of 10 RR-5 mice on SpX-11, powered up the Transporter, installed food bars and activated water lixits.  Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

NanoRacks Module-52:  The crew performed a status check of subexperiments inside NanoRacks Module-52.  Photographs and video were taken of the petri dishes.  NanoRacks Module-52 is a collection of 6 student-led biological experiments photo-documenting the life-cycle of various molds and bacteria on petri plates in microgravity.

NanoRacks Module-48:  The crew took photos for the NanoRacks Module-48 investigation for downlink to the ground.  NanoRacks Module-48 connects students on Earth to the space program by sending their photographs and messages to the ISS along with plant seeds that are germinated after being returned to Earth. The investigation increases awareness of humans’ ability to access space, spurring interest in the space program and encouraging students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and math.

On Board Training (OBT) Dragon Robotics On Board Trainer (RoBOT): In preparation for SpX-11 unberth and release currently planned for Sunday, July 2, the crew completed this 70-minute training session during which they practiced 2 Dragon release runs. They also reviewed departure monitoring and procedures to prevent loss of/recovery of attitude control in the event of a loss of comm with ground teams during free-flyer release.

SpaceX (SpX)-11 Cargo Operations: The crew completed approximately 57 hours of cargo operations with approximately 5 hours of packing remaining. SpX-11 is scheduled to unberth on July 2nd, 2017.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #78 on: 07/01/2017 11:33 AM »
June 30, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-079

Connecticut Students to Speak with NASA Astronauts on Space Station

Students at the Wallingford Public Library in Wallingford, Connecticut, will speak with NASA astronauts living and working aboard the International Space Station at noon EDT on Thursday, July 6. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television’s Media Channel and the agency’s website.

Expedition 52 Flight Engineers Peggy Whitson and Jack Fischer will answer questions from students ages 5 and up gathered at the library. 

Whitson launched to the space station Nov. 17, 2016. Fischer launched to the station in April. Both astronauts are scheduled to return to Earth in September.

For more information on the downlink, contact Allison Murphy at 203-284-6435 or amurphy@wallingfordlibrary.org. The library is at 200 N. Main Street.

The Children’s Department of the library has structured its summer reading theme, Race to Space, around the downlink and will be exploring the space theme throughout the summer break. Various science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) activities will be offered in the Children’s Department through Aug. 12. Additionally, library visitors will be able to view official artifacts from an archived NASA collection, and students will participate in monitoring the growth of seeds that have been harvested from tomato plants grown on the space station.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in STEM. This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA Education’s STEM on Station activity, which provides a variety of space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow NASA astronauts on Twitter: @NASA_astronauts.

For more information, videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #79 on: 07/03/2017 08:09 AM »
Jack Fischer‏@Astro2fish

Sorry for the long break folks, but I’m back now. Hope you like the new stuff that's coming your way!


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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #80 on: 07/03/2017 09:27 AM »
ISS config. after Dragon CRS-11 departure, from Node-2 "Harmony" nadir

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #81 on: 07/03/2017 01:50 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 6/30/2017

Posted on June 30, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
SpaceX (SpX)-11 Unberth Status: Teams met this afternoon to discuss the plan to unberth Dragon on Sunday, July 2. Weather at the splashdown area has been a concern for the past few days but reports are that the weather is improving. Teams decided to go forward with the plan to release on Sunday at 10:38AM CDT.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis: The crew transferred half of the RR-5 mice to an Animal Transporter for return on SpX-11.  Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Cardiac Stem Cells: The crew removed a Cardiac Stem Cells sample from a General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER) and placed it in a Space Automated Bioproduct Lab (SABL) incubator.  They also changed out the media in one of the BioCell Habitats in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG).  Cardiac Stem Cells investigates how microgravity affects stem cells and the factors that govern their activity, in order to clarify the role of stem cells in cardiac biology and tissue regeneration. This investigation also supports research into the possible acceleration of the aging process in microgravity.

NanoRacks Module-54 and Module-56:  A crewmember removed NanoRacks Module-54 and Module-56 from NanoRacks Platform-1 in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) and placed them into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for return on SpX-11.

Algae can produce both fats and hydrogen which can each be used as fuel sources on Earth and potentially in space.  NanoRacks Module-54, also known as NanoRacks-National Design Challenge-Chatfield High School-The Effect of Microgravity on Two Strains of Biofuel Producing Algae with Implications for the Production of Renewable Fuels in Space Based Applications (NanoRacks-NDC-CHS-The Green Machine), studies two algae species to determine whether they still produce hydrogen and store fats while growing in microgravity.  Results from this student-designed investigation improve efforts to produce a sustainable biofuel in space, as well as remove carbon dioxide from crew quarters. 

Vermicomposting, or using worms to break down food scraps, is an effective way to reduce waste and obtain a nutrient-rich fertilizer for plants.  NanoRacks Module-56, also known as NanoRacks-NDC-Bell Middle School-Efficiency of Vermicomposting in a Closed System (NanoRacks-NDC-BMS-Vermicomposting), is a student-designed project that studies whether red wiggler worms, a species of earthworm, are able to produce compost in space.  Results are used to study the potential for composting as a form of recycling on future long-duration space missions.

NanoRacks Module 9: The crew deactivated mixture tubes for NanoRacks Module 9 Ops Session 5 today in support of the NanoRacks-National Center for Earth and Space Science-Casper (NanoRacks-NCESSE-Casper) investigation. NCESSE supports various schools and student-designed experiments that address challenges of living and working in space. The program is also a key initiative for U.S. science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), that strives to educate and inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers to work on the space program. The specific investigations supported today include Growth and Development of Fathead Minnows in Microgravity, Does the Structure of a Fairy Shrimp Change in Microgravity?, Soybean Germination in Microgravity, and Benefits of Mint.

JAXA Tissue Equivalent Proportional Chamber (TEPC) and Area Passive Dosimeter for Life-Science Experiments in Space (PADLES):  The crew removed area dosimeters from the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) walls and Bio Dosimeters from the JEM TEPC Detector Units for return on SpX-11. The JAXA Area PADLES investigation uses area dosimeters to continuously monitor the radiation dose onboard the ISS.  Radiation exposure can have significant biological effects on living organisms, including the biological investigations being done on ISS in the JEM.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics 1: The crew removed the Biophysics-3 Plate 2 from the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and placed it into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  Investigators will use the results from LMM Biophysics 1 to examine the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity. This investigation is expected to add to scientists’ understanding of the physical processes that enable high-quality crystals to grow in space where Earth’s gravity does not interfere with their formation.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #82 on: 07/04/2017 08:10 PM »
https://www.facebook.com/NASAastronautPeggyWhitson
/photos/a.863588617069434.1073741828.845423648885931/1387067524721538/?type=3&theater

Fashion police, you have to grade us on a curve – we just love our country… a LOT!! Happy Birthday U.S.A.!
« Last Edit: 07/12/2017 10:36 PM by Chris Bergin »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #83 on: 07/05/2017 12:16 PM »
Right now, a beautiful flyby of Manicouagan Crater !

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #84 on: 07/05/2017 01:39 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/04/2017

Posted on July 4, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

SpaceX (SpX)-11 Departure/Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: On Monday, Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to position Dragon for release.  At 1:41am CDT the ISS Crew released Dragon and backed the SSRMS away. Following Dragon departure, Controllers maneuvered the SSRMS to a park position and provided video support of the Node 2 Nadir Active Common Berthing Mechanism (ACBM) petals closure. Dragon splashed down in the Pacific Ocean at ~7:15am CDT.  Recovery forces then retrieved more than 4100 lbs of cargo, including human and animal science samples, biotechnology studies, and physical science and education investigations.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  On Sunday the crew cleaned the Animal Access Unit in preparation for injections today. Today they set up the Bone Densitometer and the ground performed a quality control check. They then completed injections of half of the RR-5 mice remaining on the ISS in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and performed bone densitometer scans of each of those mice. Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight. The Bone Densitometer device measures the density of minerals in bone. Quantitative measures of bone loss in mice during orbital space flight provide data for the development of countermeasures for human crewmembers, as well as for bone-loss syndromes on Earth.

Cardiac Stem Cells:  On Sunday, the crew removed Life Science hardware from the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), concluding Cardiac Stem Cells operations. Cardiac Stem Cells investigates how microgravity affects stem cells and the factors that govern their activity, in order to clarify the role of stem cells in cardiac biology and tissue regeneration. This investigation also supports research into the possible acceleration of the aging process in microgravity. 

Food Acceptability:  The crew completed a Food Acceptability questionnaire today. The investigation seeks to determine the impact on food acceptability on ISS of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system. Results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #85 on: 07/07/2017 08:34 AM »
http://wakky.asablo.jp/blog/2017/06/11/8590822
Quote
Release from the Japan/Kibo Space Station is scheduled on July 7
with a time window from 9:00 am UTC to 10:15 am UTC.
Is there a live broadcast anywhere?

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #86 on: 07/07/2017 08:49 AM »
http://wakky.asablo.jp/blog/2017/06/11/8590822
Quote
Release from the Japan/Kibo Space Station is scheduled on July 7
with a time window from 9:00 am UTC to 10:15 am UTC.
Is there a live broadcast anywhere?

Small satellites deployment from "Kibo"


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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #87 on: 07/07/2017 08:52 AM »
Thank you very much.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #88 on: 07/07/2017 09:11 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/05/2017

Posted on July 5, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  The crew completed injections of half of the RR-5 mice remaining on the ISS in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and performed bone densitometer scans of each of those mice. Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.The Bone Densitometer device measures the density of minerals in bone. Quantitative measures of bone loss in mice during orbital space flight provide data for the development of countermeasures for human crewmembers, as well as for bone-loss syndromes on Earth.

S-Band String 2 Space to Ground (S/G)-2 Audio Troubleshooting: Ground teams performed troubleshooting steps for distorted S/G-2 downlink voice experienced while on S-Band String 2. The distortion was first observed last Wednesday, June 28th.  Since then, ground teams performed various troubleshooting steps to isolate the problem to String 2 of the S-Band System. Today’s troubleshooting focused on the S-Band Baseband Signal Processor (BSP)-2.  BSP-2 built in tests were executed without errors followed by a power cycle of the unit and a repeat of S/G-2 communication checks. The distortion was no longer present after the power cycle.  S-Band String 2 remains the active string.     

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #89 on: 07/07/2017 09:16 AM »
According to the live broadcast all five cubesats were succesfully deployed from J-SSOD.
« Last Edit: 07/07/2017 11:19 AM by Olaf »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #90 on: 07/07/2017 03:05 PM »
A view (never seen before to my knowledge) of european module Columbus ...

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #91 on: 07/07/2017 05:07 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/06/2017

Posted on July 6, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

Group Combustion Module (GCM):  The crew completed closeout operations in the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack 1 (MSPR1) for the GCM investigation that was completed this week. The Group Combustion investigation tests combustion changes of fuel sprays as flames spread across a cloud of droplets. In the MSPR fuels are arranged randomly on thin-fiber lattice points and the flame and droplet positions and temperature distribution are measured as the flame spreads.  Microgravity blocks convection, which on Earth would quickly disperse the droplets and combustion products before such measurements could be made.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): A crewmember completed a session of the FMS investigation which studies how the fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of the investigation is to determine how fine motor performance in microgravity varies over the duration of six-month and year-long space missions; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance varies before and after gravitational transitions, including periods of early flight adaptation and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Food Acceptability:  The crew completed a Food Acceptability questionnaire.  The investigation seeks to determine the impact on food acceptability on ISS of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system. Results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions.

Biolab:  As part of the routine maintenance for the Biolab, the crew exchanged Biological Isolation Filters and the Cold Spot Sponge. The BioLab is a multiuser research facility located in the Columbus laboratory. It is used to perform space biology experiments on microorganisms, cells, tissue cultures, small plants, and small invertebrates.  BioLab allows scientists to study the effects of microgravity and space radiation on biological organisms.

Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) Sample Collection: The crew collected water samples from the PWD for in-flight and post-flight microbial and coliform analysis. This is a regularly scheduled activity that is performed multiple times throughout the expedition to verify water safety.

Water Processing Assembly (WPA) Increasing Water Conductivity: As expected, there is an increasing trend in the conductivity of water measured in the WPA between the two Multi Filtration Beds (MF Beds).  The increase in conductivity likely indicates the predicted acetate breakthrough of the first MF bed. When water conductivity between the two MF beds stabilizes, a sample will be collected and returned to the ground for analysis to confirm that the conductivity increase is due to acetate breakthrough.  If the ground determines that the conductivity increase is due to a different contaminant that is harmful to the Catalytic Reactor, one or both of the MF Beds would need to be replaced.
---
SMS ;-).

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #92 on: 07/07/2017 10:19 PM »
According to the live broadcast all five cubesats were succesfully deployed from J-SSOD.


Working from the recorded broadcast I think the deploy times were probably 0850 GMT and 0910 GMT, but
does anyone have official times?
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #93 on: 07/08/2017 12:18 AM »
http://iss.jaxa.jp/en/kiboexp/news/170707_cubesat_birds.html

Successful deployment of five "BIRDS project" CubeSats from the "Kibo"
Last Updated: July 7, 2017

On July 7, 2017, from 5:45 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. , a total of five "BIRDS project" CubeSats were successfully deployed from the Japanese Experiment Module "Kibo".


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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #94 on: 07/08/2017 08:19 PM »
Expedition 52 final exam

Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, and Randy Bresnik of NASA answer questions from the press outside the Soyuz simulator ahead of their final Soyuz qualification exam, on 7 July 2017 at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. The crew are preparing for launch with a Soyuz rocket from Baikonur on 28 July.

Paolo Nespoli will be heading to space for a third time. His mission, named the Vita mission, is part of a barter agreement between NASA and Italy’s ASI space agency involving ESA astronauts. Vita stands for Vitality, Innovation, Technology and Ability. In Italian, “vita” means “life”, reflecting the experiments that Paolo will run and the philosophical notion of living in outer space – one of the most inhospitable places for humans.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/07/Expedition_52_final_exam

Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #95 on: 07/10/2017 01:29 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/07/2017

Posted on July 7, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Fluid Shifts Dilution Measurements: The 49S subject performed the final Fluid Shifts operations with Dilution Measurements activities.  Saliva, blood and urine samples were collected at multiple points during the day and inserted into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  Fluid Shifts is a joint NASA-Russian experiment divided into Dilution Measurements, Baseline Imaging, and Baseline Imaging with Chibis (Lower Body Negative Pressure). The Fluid Shifts experiment investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes.  Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is being evaluated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and to prevention of eye damage.

JEM-Small Satellite Orbital Deployer 7 (J-SSOD 7):  This morning CubeSats from Japan, Ghana, Mongolia, Bangladesh and Nigeria were deployed from J-SSOD 7. These satellites are part of the Joint Global Multi-Nation Birds Satellite project, a cross-border interdisciplinary satellite project for non-space faring countries supported by Japan.  During this 2-year project, students from the Graduate School of Engineering of the Kyushu Institute of Technology design, develop and operate CubeSats belonging to the five participating countries. 

Magnetic 3D Cell Culturing:  The crew set up the Magnetic 3D Life Science Hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) in preparation for the first media change operations.  Cell cultures in space spontaneously grow in three dimensions (3D), which results in characteristics more representative of how cells grow and function in living organisms. But in microgravity, routine manipulation of cell cultures is challenging. Magnetic 3D Cell Culture for Biological Research in Microgravity (Magnetic 3D Cell Culturing) uses magnetized cells and tools to make it easier to handle cells and cultures, and to improve the reproducibility of experiments. This approach also makes it possible to generate two-dimensional (2D) cultures as controls, and to determine whether biological events in these monolayer cultures result from gravity or substrate attachment.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  The crew refilled water containers in the Animal Habitats for RR-5.  Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight. The Bone Densitometer device measures the density of minerals in bone. Quantitative measures of bone loss in mice during orbital space flight provide data for the development of countermeasures for human crewmembers, as well as for bone-loss syndromes on Earth.

Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Direct Test Drive:  Last night ground teams performed a SSRMS test to gather data on SSRMS joint performance as a baseline for trending joint performance over time.  The test was requested due to a Gearbox Limping (GBL) issue experienced earlier this year which indicated substantial differences between the actual and expected final joint angles. Testing was requested at SSRMS Joint 3 to support the investigation into the root cause of the irregular gearbox twist data by rotating the joint at a consistent rate through the full range of joint travel in both directions on both power strings.  The testing on the first string was completed nominally with no reported issues.  The same test will be performed tonight on the redundant power string.

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #96 on: 07/10/2017 08:07 PM »
from https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2017/06/27/

Quote
ORLAN-МК #6 sleeves R&R
СК ОРЛАН-МК №6 sleeves replacement – help
ORLAN-МК #6 leak check

from https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2017/06/28/

Quote
ORLAN-MK #6 Leg Shell Replacement
ORLAN-MK #6 Leak Check

Quote
Jack Fischer @Astro2fish

Up here we have each other- #1team- working together w/ the ground every day. Here’s my friend & cmdr Fyodor & I working on a spacesuit.

« Last Edit: 07/10/2017 08:26 PM by SMS »
---
SMS ;-).

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #97 on: 07/10/2017 10:44 PM »
What's about Orlan MK №4?

Here it is:

1)

2)
« Last Edit: 09/16/2017 09:47 PM by SMS »
---
SMS ;-).

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #98 on: 07/11/2017 02:09 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/10/2017

Posted on July 10, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Magnetic 3 Dimensional (Mag 3D) Cell Culturing:  The crew prepared hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) for Mag 3D operations. BioCell Habitat, Mag 3D samples and Cultures Inoculation Kits were removed from the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) and used to inoculate Multiwell BioCells using Inoculum syringes. Cell cultures in space spontaneously grow in three dimensions, which results in characteristics more representative of how cells grow and function in living organisms. But in microgravity, routine manipulation of cell cultures is challenging. This investigation uses magnetized cells and tools to make it easier to handle cells and cultures and to improve the reproducibility of experiments. This approach also makes it possible to generate two-dimensional cultures as controls, and to determine whether biological events in these monolayer cultures result from gravity or substrate attachment.

Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) Operations:  The crew pressurized the JEMAL this morning and performed a leak check. This is in preparation for installation of the Handhold Experiment Platform (HXP) adapter on the JEMAL Slide Table later this week that will support the Exposed Experiment Handhold Attachment Mechanism (ExHAM) investigation operations planned for next week.

Capillary Structures for Exploration Life Support (Capillary Structures):  The crew set up hardware for the Capillary Structures investigation and completed two sorbent demonstrations.  They first demonstrated flow through two microgravity air-liquid contactors in series, then demonstrated flow through two parallel microgravity air-liquid contactor wedges with a viscous fluid.  Current life-support systems on the ISS require special equipment to separate liquids and gases including rotating or moving devices that could cause contamination if they break or fail. Capillary Structures studies a new method using structures of specific shapes to manage fluid and gas mixtures.  It also studies water recycling and carbon dioxide removal, benefitting future efforts to design lightweight, more reliable life support systems for future space missions.

On-Board Training (OBT) 50 Soyuz (50S) Emergency Egress Drill:  All three crew members participated in this OBT to practice procedures for departing the Station in the event of an emergency. This drill is scheduled 12 to 14 weeks aboard the ISS and every 2.5 months thereafter.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #99 on: 07/12/2017 01:29 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/11/2017

Posted on July 11, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Node 3 Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA) Water Separator (WS) Change Out:  Today, the crew replaced the Node 3 CCAA WS. The unit had experienced several water carryover events since May 3, 2017. To assist in preventing these events, ground teams adjusted the Node 3 Low Temperature Loop to reduce condensation rates.  The failing unit esd operational for over 7 years with expected life of 5 years. Ground teams activated the newly repaired CCAA and are receiving good telemetry.   

Magnetic 3 Dimensional (Mag 3D) Cell Culturing:  With assistance from the Payload Developer, the crew used a microscope to view Magnetic 3D Biocells. They fixated the biocells and inserted them in to a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). This was followed by injections of Magnetic 3D cultures media into the multiwell Biocells. Cell cultures in space spontaneously grow in three dimensions, resulting in characteristics more representative of how cells grow and function in living organisms. But in microgravity, routine manipulation of cell cultures is challenging. This investigation uses magnetized cells and tools to make it easier to handle cells and cultures and to improve the reproducibility of experiments. This approach also makes it possible to generate two-dimensional cultures as controls, and to determine whether biological events in these monolayer cultures result from gravity or substrate attachment.

Microbial Monitoring System (MMS): The crew configured the hardware and collected low and high DNA concentration deionized water samples using the Razor Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Microbial Monitoring System.  They then transferred data from the sample tests for downlink.  The MMS supports crew testing and monitoring of the safety of water supplies on the ISS and is also applicable to future space missions where Earth-based testing would be difficult or impossible.

Habitability Walk-through: The crew will record and submit a walk-through video today documenting observations of life onboard ISS and providing insights related to human factors and habitability. The investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. These observations can help spacecraft designers understand habitable volume requirements and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crewmembers need or not.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #100 on: 07/14/2017 07:33 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/12/2017

Posted on July 12, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Sprint Volume of Oxygen Utilized (VO2) Maximum:  The crew set up and performed a Sprint VO2 Max exercise protocol. The subject completed their Flight Day 75 session with assistance from the other USOS crewmember.  The Sprint investigation evaluates the use of high intensity, low volume exercise training to minimize loss of muscle, bone, and cardiovascular function in ISS crewmembers during long-duration missions.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics 3:  The crew retrieved the Biophysics 3 Plate 1 from a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) and allowed it to thaw before placing it onto the Petri Base and installing the base into the LMM.  The LMM was then placed into the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) for a Biophysics science run.  Using the three-dimensional structure of proteins, scientists can determine how they function and how they are involved in disease. Some proteins benefit from being crystallized in microgravity, where they can grow larger and with fewer imperfections. Access to crystals grown on the ISS supports research for a wide range of diseases, as well as microgravity-related problems such as radiation damage, bone loss and muscle atrophy. This investigation identifies which proteins would benefit from crystallization in space.

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF):  The crew exchanged sample holders in the ELF and removed a sample that was lost in the ELF chamber. The ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the Electrostatic Levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Two Phase Flow:  The crew configured hardware and materials in the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) and activated the Two Phase Flow experiment.  Boiling normally removes heat by turning liquid into vapor at the heated surface, and that vapor returns to a liquid by way of a condenser which continues to cycle and make a cooling system. In the microgravity of space, the heat transfer rate must be changed because liquid and bubble behavior is drastically different than on Earth. This investigation seeks to build a database on the heat transfer efficiency of liquids in space that can be used in the design of high-performance thermal management systems for future space platforms.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  The two Animal Habitats in use for RR-5 were cleaned and restocked with new food bars.  Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #101 on: 07/14/2017 09:00 AM »
http://iss.jaxa.jp/en/kiboexp/news/170714_int_ball_en.html

First disclosure of images taken by the JEM Kibo's internal drone "Int-Ball"

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has for the first time disclosed images and movies taken by the JEM Internal Ball Camera called "Int-Ball"-its first camera drone that can record video while moving in space under remote control from the ground.






« Last Edit: 07/14/2017 01:17 PM by yoichi »

Offline Fuji

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #102 on: 07/14/2017 10:14 AM »
Int-Ball document (Japanese).

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #103 on: 07/16/2017 01:19 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/13/2017

Posted on July 13, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Window Observational Research Facility (WORF): The crew installed the WORF Improved Payload Ethernet Hub Gateway (iPEHG) and WORF Shutter Actuator System (SAS) in the WORF Rack. This hardware will allow ground commanded control of the US Lab Window Shutter in support of payload operations and the new iPEHG design corrects performance limitations experienced by the older PEHG. The WORF provides a facility for Earth science remote sensing instruments. It uses the US Laboratory science window that has the highest quality optics ever flown on a human-occupied spacecraft.

Space Automated Bioproduct Lab (SABL):  The crew installed a controller for the SABL CO2 Incubator. The SABL supports a wide variety of experiments in the life, physical and material sciences with a focus on supporting research of biological systems and processes. It has a temperature controlled volume with LED lighting for scientific hardware and experiments. It can be fitted to provide 5% CO2 for cell cultures.

NeuroMapping: A USOS crewmember set up the Neuromapping hardware and performed tests in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. During the test, the crewmember executed three Behavioral Assessments: mental rotation, sensorimotor adaptation, and motor-cognitive dual tasking. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, or multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Inspections: The crew audited the HEPA filters on June 16 and found that 8 of the 10 filters did not have required packaging. Engineering requested that the crew inspect the filters for seal debonding, seal deformation, and/or cuts/gouges that extend through the depth of the sealing surface and to verify that the cap is properly affixed to the housing. These filters were inspected by the crew today and Foreign Object Debris (FOD) was identified on the seals of some of the filters. Cleaning of the affected filters will be scheduled followed by wrapping of the filters in approved packaging for storage.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #104 on: 07/17/2017 03:23 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/14/2017

Posted on July 14, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) Operations:  Today the crew brought the JEMAL Slide Table into the JEM from the Airlock and replaced the Japanese Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD) on the Slide Table with the Handhold Experiment Platform (HXP) Adapter.  The HXP Adapter will support the Exposed Experiment Handhold Attachment Mechanism 1 (ExHAM 1) operations planned for next week.

Fluid Shifts:  The crew will perform baseline imaging activities this week for the Fluid Shifts investigation.  With one of them performing as an operator, ultrasound imaging will be taken of blood vessels at various body locations. Additional data will be obtained from tests for Cerebral and Cochlear Fluid Pressure (CCFP), Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE), and a Tonometry examination will be performed. Fluid Shifts is a joint NASA-Russian experiment that investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes. Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is part of the investigation to support a possible intervention. Results from this study may help in development of preventative measures against eye damage and lasting changes in vision.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #105 on: 07/18/2017 01:44 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/17/2017

Posted on July 17, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Body Measures: On Saturday, a crewmember completed the Body Measures Flight Day 244 session with assistance from a trained operator. NASA is collecting in-flight anthropometric data to assess the impact of physical body shape and size changes on suit sizing.  Still and video imagery is captured and a tape measure is used to measure segmental length, height, depth, and circumference data for all body segments (chest, waist, hip, arms, legs, etc.) from astronauts before, during and after their flight missions.

Magnetic 3 Dimensional (Mag 3D) Cell Culturing:  With assistance from the Payload Developer, on Saturday the crew used a microscope and will use it again today to view Magnetic 3D Biocells.  Today they fixated the BioCells and inserted them into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  Cell cultures in space spontaneously grow in three dimensions, which results in characteristics more representative of how cells grow and function in living organisms. But in microgravity, routine manipulation of cell cultures is challenging. This investigation uses magnetized cells and tools to make it easier to handle cells and cultures, and to improve the reproducibility of experiments. This approach also makes it possible to generate two-dimensional cultures as controls, and to determine whether biological events in these monolayer cultures result from gravity or substrate attachment.

Human Research Program (HRP): A crewmember collected Flight Day 240 blood and urine samples over the weekend and today for Biochem Profile, Repository and Cardio Ox investigations.  An ultrasound was also performed today for Cardio Ox.
•The Biochem Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during and after spaceflight.  Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time under controlled conditions. This archive of bio samples will be used as a resource for future spaceflight related research.
•By collecting Cardio Ox ultrasound and ECG data, along with blood and urine samples, scientists are trying to determine whether biological markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after space flight and whether this results in an increased, long-term risk of atherosclerosis in astronauts.

ISS Safety Video Survey:  The crew recorded video of the interior volume of the ISS to allow ground teams to assess the current vehicle configuration and identify any safety concern. This survey is performed approximately every 6 months to identify ventilation blockage, flammability hazards, verify emergency egress paths, and confirm access to fire ports and safety equipment.

Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (CEVIS) Clicking Noise: Over the weekend the crew reported a clicking noise coming from the CEVIS.  In 2011, crew reported a similar clicking noise from CEVIS that was determined to be a spring on a rod within the Inertial Vibration Isolation System (IVIS) boxes that makes a clicking noise as it engages with the throw mass (used to stabilize CEVIS during exercise).  Further on-orbit troubleshooting indicated that CEVIS is providing expected workload and the clicking noise is intermittent and very likely the same issue that was seen in 2011. CEVIS is GO for exercise and the crew will monitor for any changes in operations.  There are no spare IVIS boxes on orbit, however there is a spare ready to be launched if needed.

Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) Electronics Unit (EU) Failure: Today the Brayton Motor of MELFI-1 in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) was powered down as part of a planned activity to power MELFI-1 from its auxiliary power feed for better power balance during the upcoming high beta angle period. When attempts were made to bring the Brayton Motor back up, the commands failed. A retry was attempted along with a power cycle of the rack with no success. The EU was determined to be failed so the crew performed an R&R with no impacts to the science samples in MELFI.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #106 on: 07/19/2017 02:51 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/18/2017

Posted on July 18, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Capillary Structures:  The crew set up hardware for the Capillary Structures investigation, then performed a stability assessment and transferred the hardware to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM).  Life-support systems on the ISS require special equipment to separate liquids and gases including rotating or moving devices that could cause contamination if they break or fail.  This investigation studies a new method using structures of specific shapes to manage fluid and gas mixtures.  It also studies water recycling and carbon dioxide removal, benefitting future efforts to design lightweight, more reliable life support systems for future space missions.

Crew Autonomous Scheduling Test (CAST): The crew completed the final of five CAST sessions today.  They scheduled their work day for this coming Thursday using an iPad, Playbook and a list of scheduling priorities. On Thursday they will execute their scheduled plan utilizing Playbook. They also completed a survey of this session.  Space missions beyond low-Earth orbit require new approaches to daily operations between ground and crew to account for significant communication delays. One approach is increased autonomy for crews, or Autonomous Mission Operations. The CAST investigation analyzes whether crews can develop plans in a reasonable period of time with appropriate input, whether proximity of planners to the planned operations increases efficiency, and if crew members are more satisfied when given a role in plan development.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  The crew performed injections of the RR-5 mice in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.The Bone Densitometer device measures the density of minerals in bone. Quantitative measures of bone loss in mice during orbital space flight provide data for the development of countermeasures for human crewmembers, as well as for bone-loss syndromes on Earth. 

JEM Smoke Detector Cleaning:  The crew cleaned JEM Cabin Smoke Detector B using a Connector Cleaner Tool Kit and N2 Cartridge to supply bursts of N2 to remove particles. This routine maintenance is performed in order to keep the Smoke Detectors working properly and preventing inadvertent alarm trips.   

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #107 on: 07/20/2017 02:13 PM »
https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2017/07/18/
Quote
Ground Activities

•JEMRMS Maneuver to transfer Handhold Exp Platform at SPB to JEMAL

Is it correct to accept, that the ExHAM#1-2 was uninstalled yesterday?

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #108 on: 07/20/2017 02:58 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/19/2017

Posted on July 19, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Efficacy and Metabolism of Azonafide Antibody-Drug Conjugates in Microgravity (ADCs in Microgravity):  The crew retrieved a BioCell Habitat, inoculation kits and ADC samples from a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI), set up hardware inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Work Volume and inoculated the Multiwall BioCells using Inoculum syringes.  Later today the crew will repeat these steps with a second BioCell Habitat which begins an 11-day run. The ADCs in Microgravity investigation evaluates new antibody-drug conjugates that combine an immune-activating drug with antibodies to target only cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapy and reducing its side effects.  In microgravity, cancer cells grow in three-dimensional, spheroid structures that closely resemble their form in the human body, allowing for better drug testing. This investigation may accelerate development of targeted therapies for cancer patients.

NeuroMapping: The crew set up the Neuromapping hardware and performed tests in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. During the test, the crew executed three Behavioral Assessments: mental rotation, sensorimotor adaptation, and motor-cognitive dual tasking. The investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, or multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Food Acceptability:  The crew completed a Food Acceptability questionnaire. The Food Acceptability investigation seeks to determine the impact on food acceptability on ISS of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system. Results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): The crew completed a series of interactive tasks during a FMS session. The investigation studies how the fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of the investigation is to determine how fine motor performance in microgravity varies over the duration of six-month and year-long space missions; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance varies before and after gravitational transitions, including periods of early flight adaptation and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

JEM Wireless Access Point (J-WAP)-2 Install:  The crew removed the JEM Wireless Access Port located at the JPM1A7 location and replaced it with an improved JEM Wireless Access Port (J-WAP)-2. JWAP-2 will provide JEM internal Wi-Fi capability which incorporates new radio communications standards. 

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #109 on: 07/21/2017 03:11 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/20/2017

Posted on July 20, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
66 Progress (66P) Undock: 66P undocked from Docking Compartment (DC)-1 today at 12:45 pm CDT. Deorbit burn will occur at 3:58 pm CDT with destructive re-entry at 4:35 pm CDT.

Efficacy and Metabolism of Azonafide Antibody-Drug Conjugates in Microgravity (ADCs in Microgravity):  With assistance from the Payload Developer this morning, the crew viewed ADC cells with a microscope and injected media into the Multiwall BioCells. Later today the crew will repeat these steps with a second set of samples. The ADCs in Microgravity investigation evaluates new antibody-drug conjugates that combine an immune-activating drug with antibodies in order to target only cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapy and reducing its side effects.  In microgravity, cancer cells grow in three-dimensional, spheroid structures that closely resemble their form in the human body, allowing for better drug testing. This investigation may accelerate development of targeted therapies for cancer patients.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot:  The crew set up the JEM Camera Robot and the ground performed a set of checkout steps. This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs.  It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras.

Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) Operations:  The crew pressurized the JEMAL and performed a leak check. They also gathered Handhold Experiment Platform (HXP) items to support changeout of samples on the Exposed Experiment Handhold Attachment Mechanism 1 (ExHAM 1) this Friday after the ExHAM 1 is retrieved from the JEM Exposed Facility.

Sprint Ultrasound 2:  For their Flight Day 90 Sprint Ultrasound 2 session, a crewmember, with support from an operator, configured the Ultrasound 2, placed reference marks on the calf and thigh of their right leg, donned the thigh and calf guides, and performed thigh and calf scans with remote guidance from the Sprint ground team. Ultrasound scans are used to evaluate spaceflight-induced changes in the muscle volume. The Sprint investigation evaluates the use of high intensity, low volume exercise training to minimize loss of muscle, bone, and cardiovascular function in ISS crewmembers during long-duration missions.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Cable Arm Rope (CAR) Flip: Use of the exercise rope during cable exercises causes a portion of the CARs to experience cyclic flexural loads during operations. To mitigate this issue, the crew removed, flipped and reinstalled the CARs. This results in the ropes being “pre-stretched” which will double the life of the CARs, reducing the number of ropes that need to be built, tested and flown in the future.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #110 on: 07/21/2017 03:34 PM »

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #111 on: 07/22/2017 10:17 AM »
https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2017/07/18/
Quote
Ground Activities

•JEMRMS Maneuver to transfer Handhold Exp Platform at SPB to JEMAL

Is it correct to accept, that the ExHAM#1-2 was uninstalled yesterday?
It seems to be correct.
http://iss.jaxa.jp/kiboexp/plan/status/images/schedule_170720.pdf

And the installation of ExHAM#1-3 will be on July,27.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #112 on: 07/25/2017 06:13 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/21/2017

Posted on July 21, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Exposed Experiment Handrail Attachment Mechanism (ExHAM) #1-2:  The crew opened the Japanese Experiment Module Airlock (JEMAL) inner hatch and extended the Airlock slide table into the JEM. They detached and stowed samples for return to the Ground from the Handhold Experiment Platform #1 (HXP1) and attached new samples on the HXP1 for return to the JEM External Facility.  Two of the original samples were left on the HXP1 for continued exposure.  The ExHAM is a cuboid mechanism equipped with a fixture on the upper surface for grappling by the JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) Small Fine Arm (SFA) and components on the under surface for attaching the ExHAM to the handrail on the JEM Exposed Facility.

Fluid Shifts: The crew gathered and transferred Fluid Shifts hardware to the ISS Russian segment in preparation for Fluid Shifts Chibis (Lower Body Negative Pressure) operations that begin on Monday.  The Fluid Shifts experiment investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes.  Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is being evaluated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and to prevention of eye damage.

Node 2 (N2) Bacteria Filter Remove & Replace (R&R): The crew R&Rd four expended bacteria filters in N2 that have reached end of life. They also clean the smoke detectors.

Compound Specific Analyzer-Combustion Products (CSA-CP) Maintenance: The crew installed new battery packs into the newly re-supplied CSA-CPs, reset the internal clock and data logger for each monitor and allowed all units to off-gas in an open environment.

Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #113 on: 07/25/2017 01:16 PM »
First disclosure of images taken by Kibo’s internal drone “Int-Ball” (Full version: 2m21s)


Int-Ball Letter Vol. 1: Release on updated images of Kibo’s internal drone “Int-Ball”


Offline ChrisGebhardt

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #114 on: 07/25/2017 04:54 PM »
Is the upcoming Russian EVA still scheduled for Aug. 17th?

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #115 on: 07/25/2017 05:01 PM »
Is the upcoming Russian EVA still scheduled for Aug. 17th?
Per this as of the 23rd of July 2017, Yes:
Current schedule of ISS flight events
UTC time is used in table

2017
...
August 17 - 14:45/~21:00 - spacewalk (ISS Russian EVA-43) from Pirs airlock [Yurchikhin, Ryazansky]
August 17 - release of satellites TOMSK-TPU-120, TNS-0 №2, Radioscaf RS-6 (Tanyusha SWSU №1), Radioscaf RS-7 (Tanyusha SWSU №2), Sfera-53
...

Changes on July 23rd

Offline ChrisGebhardt

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #116 on: 07/25/2017 05:06 PM »
Is the upcoming Russian EVA still scheduled for Aug. 17th?
Per this as of the 23rd of July 2017, Yes:
Current schedule of ISS flight events
UTC time is used in table

2017
...
August 17 - 14:45/~21:00 - spacewalk (ISS Russian EVA-43) from Pirs airlock [Yurchikhin, Ryazansky]
August 17 - release of satellites TOMSK-TPU-120, TNS-0 №2, Radioscaf RS-6 (Tanyusha SWSU №1), Radioscaf RS-7 (Tanyusha SWSU №2), Sfera-53
...

Changes on July 23rd


Copy that.  Just wanting to make sure there wasn't a potential update from the first two days of the work week.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #117 on: 07/26/2017 06:08 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/24/2017

Posted on July 24, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Efficacy and Metabolism of Azonafide Antibody-Drug Conjugates in Microgravity (ADCs in Microgravity):  With assistance from the Payload Developer, the crew viewed ADC cells with a microscope and fixated the BioCells.  The crew also performed additional viewing of the cells with the microscope. The ADCs in Microgravity investigation evaluates new antibody-drug conjugates that combine an immune-activating drug with antibodies in order to target only cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapy and reducing its side effects.  In microgravity, cancer cells grow in three-dimensional, spheroid structures that closely resemble their form in the human body, allowing for better drug testing. This investigation may accelerate development of targeted therapies for cancer patients.

Meteor Hard Drive Swap: The crew performed a regular changeout of the Meteor hard drive located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF). The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument with the primary purpose of observing meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. Since the parent comets or asteroids for most of the meteor showers are identified, the study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids. 

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Pump Separator Replacement:  On June 30th, the crew reported that the Pump Separator was making unusual noises and running longer after they shut off the urine valve. The Pump Separator had been installed since November 2016, past its expected life of ~180 days.  Today the crew R&Rd the Pump Separator and the system is performing nominally.

Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (CEVIS) Troubleshooting #3:  On Saturday, the crew replaced the CEVIS Ergometer and Control Panel with “degraded” spares. This third round of troubleshooting was performed to determine if functionality still existed with Ergometer (S/N 1002) and Control Panel (S/N 1006). The crew had been using CEVIS with a Contingency Controller since June 3, 2017 and had recently reported that it had become cumbersome to use.  CEVIS is currently functioning nominally utilizing the spares.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #118 on: 07/26/2017 06:30 AM »
Jack Fischer@Astro2fish

Got a pic of the Progress cargo vehicle out of the ginormous Russian porthole--it's not open often, but the view is awesome when it is!


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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #119 on: 07/26/2017 06:06 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/25/2017

Posted on July 25, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Fluid Shifts:  A crew member completed the first of two days of Chibis operations in the Russian Segment for the Fluid Shifts investigation. They donned the Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP/Chibis) device while the operator, with ground support in Moscow, assisted in taking measurements for Cerebral and Cochlear Fluid Pressure (CCFP) and performed a Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) test, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), and a Tonometry examination. The Fluid Shifts experiment investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes.  Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is being evaluated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and to prevention of eye damage.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis: The crew cleaned and restocked the Animal Habitats in support of the RR-5 investigation.  Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Lighting Effects: The crew set up and configured the light meter hardware and took readings in the Cupola and the Columbus. The Lighting Effects investigation hopes to better quantify and qualify how lighting can effect habitability of spacecraft. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Crew Medical Officer (CMO) Training: FE-2 completed this training which is an onboard refresher for long duration missions. Medical procedures and hardware were reviewed to ensure continuing basic knowledge of the Health Maintenance System.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #120 on: 07/27/2017 01:44 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/26/2017

Posted on July 26, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  The crew collected saliva and body samples for the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation and placed them inside a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes that are present on ISS over a 1-year period and how they change over time. 

Efficacy and Metabolism of Azonafide Antibody-Drug Conjugates in Microgravity (ADCs in Microgravity):  The crew viewed ADC cells with a microscope and fixated the BioCells. The ADCs in Microgravity investigation evaluates new antibody-drug conjugates that combine an immune-activating drug with antibodies in order to target only cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapy and reducing its side effects.  In microgravity, cancer cells grow in three-dimensional, spheroid structures that closely resemble their form in the human body, allowing for better drug testing. This investigation may accelerate development of targeted therapies for cancer patients.

Sprint Volume of Oxygen Utilized (VO2) Maximum: The crew set up and performed a Sprint VO2 Max exercise protocol today. The subject completed their Flight Day 105 session with assistance from the other USOS crewmember.  The Sprint investigation evaluates the use of high intensity, low volume exercise training to minimize loss of muscle, bone, and cardiovascular function in ISS crewmembers during long-duration missions.

Habitability: The crew narrated a task video while they tore down the microscope hardware used for the ADCs in Microgravity investigation. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crewmembers and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Node 3 to Node 1 Sample Delivery Systems (SDS) Power Jumper Installation: The crew installed the SDS Power Jumper in the Node 1 to Node 3 Vestibule and mated the SDS Power Cable to the Node 3 bulkhead. This activity is part of the ISS Reconfiguration plan and is required to provide samples for the Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) in support of visiting vehicles berthed to Node 1.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #121 on: 07/28/2017 02:21 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/27/2017

Posted on July 27, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Fluid Shifts:  A crew member performed the second of two days of Chibis operations in the Russian Segment for the Fluid Shifts investigation. Subject donned the Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP/Chibis) device while the operator, with ground support in Moscow, assisted in the medical monitoring.  While the subject was in the LBNP and experiencing the negative pressure (pulling the fluid feetward), the Crew Medical Officer performed Ultrasound measurements. The Fluid Shifts experiment investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes.  Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is being evaluated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and to prevention of eye damage.

Two Phase Flow:  The crew deactivated the Two Phase Flow experiment in the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR).  Boiling normally removes heat by turning liquid into vapor at the heated surface, and that vapor returns to a liquid by way of a condenser which continues to cycle and make a cooling system. In the microgravity of space, the heat transfer rate must be changed because liquid and bubble behavior is drastically different than on Earth. This investigation seeks to build a database on the heat transfer efficiency of liquids in space that can be used in the design of high-performance thermal management systems for future space platforms.

Capillary Structures:  The crew performed a Capillary Structures sorbent demonstration of flow through two parallel microgravity air-liquid contactor wedges with a viscous fluid. Life-support systems on the ISS require special equipment to separate liquids and gases including rotating or moving devices that could cause contamination if they break or fail. The Capillary Structures for Exploration Life Support (Capillary Structures) investigation studies a new method using structures of specific shapes to manage fluid and gas mixtures.  The investigation studies water recycling and carbon dioxide removal, benefitting future efforts to design lightweight, more reliable life support systems for future space missions.

Plant Experiment Units (PEUs): The crew set up the PEU laptop, photographed the PEUs for checkout, attached them to the CBEF Incubator Unit and performed checkout steps. Later they removed and stowed the PEUs.  These activities are being performed to verify ISS capability to support an upcoming JAXA plant experiment.

Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Latching End Effector (LEE) Survey: Ground teams positioned the SPDM LEE near the P1 Lower Outboard External High Definition Camera (EHDC) and are currently performing a survey of the LEE. Imagery from this survey will be used to perform a SPDM LEE snare cable health assessment.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #123 on: 07/28/2017 08:45 PM »
Sony's Full-Frame Mirrorless α7S II Shoots Astonishing 4K Videos from Outer Space
First Commercial Camera Mounted Outside International Space Station

https://www.sony.net/SonyInfo/News/Press/201707/17-0768E/index.html




Immersive 4K Videos from Space Successfully Captured by α7S II

https://www.sony.com/electronics/a7sii-4k-images-kibo-iss

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #124 on: 07/28/2017 11:33 PM »
ISS config. update after Soyuz MS-05 docking

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #125 on: 07/31/2017 02:25 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/28/2017

Posted on July 28, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

51 Soyuz (51S) Launch and Dock: 51S launched today at 10:41 am CDT carrying Sergey Ryazanskiy, Paolo Nespoli and Randolph Bresnik to the ISS. Docking occurred at 4:54 pm CDT with hatch opening at 6:58 pm CDT. There will be 4 USOS crew members on the ISS until 50S undocks on September 2.

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF):  The crew exchanged sample holders in the ELF and removed a lost sample in the ELF chamber. The ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using electrostatic levitation. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  The crew set up hardware, reviewed materials and completed preparations for 4 days of operations scheduled to begin Sunday. Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  The crew collected saliva samples for the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation and placed them inside a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes that are present on ISS over a 1-year period and how they change over time.

Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (CEVIS) Ratcheting Noise: This morning the crew reported a ratcheting noise coming from CEVIS and provided audio/video of the noise for ground review.  While recording the audio/video, the noise stopped.  The crew performed a checkout using both programming and manual modes and reported nominal performance.  Teams discussed the noise and additional crew actions were requested to secure the CEVIS belt from potential slippage and to gain additional data.  CEVIS remains GO for exercise at this time.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday afternoon Robotic Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Body to perform a video and imagery survey of the SPDM Latching End Effector (LEE) snare cables using the P1 Lower Outboard (LOOB) External High Definition Camera (EHDC).  They then maneuvered the SSRMS to a translate position in preparation for the Mobile Transporter (MT) translation to Worksite 8 on July 31.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #126 on: 08/01/2017 03:12 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 7/31/2017

Posted on July 31, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  On Sunday the crew completed the first day of bone scans and sampling for RR-5.  Later today they will perform the second set of scans and sampling operations.  Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Marrow:  Over the weekend two crewmembers collected breath, air and blood samples for the Marrow investigation. They collected blood samples today as well. The blood samples are collected, processed in the centrifuge and placed in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  The Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): On Saturday the crew completed a series of interactive tasks during a FMS session. The investigation studies how the fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of the investigation is to determine how fine motor performance in microgravity varies over the duration of six-month and year-long space missions; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance varies before and after gravitational transitions, including periods of early flight adaptation and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Space Headaches:  Over the weekend the 51S USOS crewmembers completed daily questionnaires for Space Headaches.  They will complete additional questionnaires later today.  The European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Sarcolab-3: The crew set up and configured the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) facility in the Columbus module for Sarcolab-3 operations.  They installed the Ankle configuration and Electromyograph and Percutaneous Electrical Stimulation (PEMS) devices on MARES. The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus, or calf muscle, where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM):  The crew ingressed the BEAM, flipped the 10 mm thick Radiation Environment Monitor (REM) shield and photographed it. This REM Shield was previously printed on the 3D printer onboard the ISS and installed in the BEAM.  BEAM is an experimental expandable module attached to the ISS.  Expandable modules weigh less and take up less room on a rocket than a traditional module, while allowing additional space for living and working. They provide protection from solar and cosmic radiation, space debris, and other contaminants. Crews traveling to the moon, Mars, asteroids, or other destinations may be able to use them as habitable structures.

Dose Distribution Inside the ISS – 3D (DOSIS 3D): The crew installed passive radiation detectors in the Columbus module in support of European Space Agency’s (ESA’s) DOSIS 3D investigation. Data from the various active and passive radiation detectors installed in the ISS are used in the determination of the radiation field parameters absorbed doses and dose equivalents inside the ISS. A concise three dimensional (3D) dose distribution map of all the segments of the ISS will be developed, based on this data and data from JAXA and NASA monitoring devices.

Emergency Roles & Responsibilities Review: With the arrival of 51S, all crew members participated in this review. Items of discussion included crew accountability, access to escape vehicles and CDR responsibilities. Each crew member must be fully aware of procedure strategy and intent due to the complex nature of an emergency event.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #127 on: 08/02/2017 03:18 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/01/2017

Posted on August 1, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Sarcolab-3:  With assistance from a Russian operator, a USOS crewmember ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair in the Columbus module and adjusted pads and constraints for the Sarcolab-3 ankle protocol. The operator then collected ultrasound images of the subject’s right leg. Ground experts are evaluating anomalies that occurred during the investigation that prevented completion of the session.  The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis: The crew completed the third of four days of bone scans and sampling for RR-5.  Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Space Headaches:  The 51 Soyuz (51S) USOS crewmembers continued completion of daily questionnaires for the European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches investigation. The daily questionnaires are used during the first week of USOS crewmember’s arrival at the ISS. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Layer 2 Ethernet and Multiplexer (LEHX):  The crew removed and replaced the LEHX 1553B module. The LEHX has experienced communication issues since December, 2016 with an increase in their frequency over time.

Tropical Cyclone: This morning the crew took pictures of the Category 3 Typhoon Noru in the western Pacific. The Tropical Cyclone investigation is used to capture images of tropical cyclones and hurricanes that are rated at Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson scale. A pseudo-stereoscopic method is used to determine the altitudes of the cloud tops near the center (eye) of a cyclone by precisely tracking the apparent positions of cloud features with respect to the Earth and how those positions change over time as an observer (the ISS in this case) passes over the storm. The photographic images will be used to demonstrate that pseudo-spectroscopy can be used to measure the cloud altitudes to sufficient precision so that, when combined with other remote-sensing data, an accurate determination of the intensity of hurricane or cyclone can be made.

Express Rack (ER) 4 Quick Disconnect (QD) Maintenance: During a Rack Interface Controller (RIC) R&R in 2012, the crew demated umbilicals behind the rack and observed 3 different leaking QDs. A workaround was developed to contain the leaks but teams advised that QD troubleshooting and maintenance should be scheduled prior to rotating the rack again. This Thursday, the crew is scheduled to remove the Payload Ethernet Hub Bridge (PEHB) and replace it with an Improved Payload Ethernet Hub Gateway (iPEHG) which requires ER4 rotation. Today the crew performed this corrective QD maintenance ahead of Thursday’s planned activities.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #128 on: 08/03/2017 01:58 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/02/2017

Posted on August 2, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Sarcolab-3:  With assistance from an operator, a Russian crewmember ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair in the Columbus module, installed the Electromyograph and Percutaneous Electrical Stimulation (PEMS) device and adjusted pads and constraints for the Sarcolab-3 ankle protocol.  The operator then collected ultrasound images of the subject’s right leg. The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and postflight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  The crew completed the final day of bone scans and sampling for RR-5.  Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

MagVector:  The crew performed closeout and cleanup activities for science run 10 of MagVector.  The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general – the backbone of our technology.

Space Headaches:  The 51 Soyuz (51S) USOS crewmembers continued filling out daily questionnaires for the ESA Space Headaches investigation today. The questionnaires are used during the first week of the USOS crewmember’s arrival at the ISS. The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Food Acceptability:  The crew completed a Food Acceptability questionnaire. The investigation seeks to determine the impact of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system.  Results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Cooling Loop Maintenance: The crew performed ionic and particulate filtration and biocidal maintenance on EMUs 3006 and 3008 and Airlock cooling water loops. A water sample was taken for conductivity testing.

On Board Training (OBT) ISS Emergency Hardware Familiarization: The 51S crew completed this OBT to review the emergency equipment and configuration of the ISS.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Last evening, Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) outboard of the Port Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) to support troubleshooting of the P6 Long Spacer outboard spare Pump Flow Control Subassembly (PFCS). After de-mating the PFCS’s two Fluid Quick Disconnect Couplings (FQDCs) and unfastening its tie-down bolt, SPDM Orbit Replaceable Unit (ORU) Tool Changeout Mechanism 1 (OTCM1) unfastened its H4 bolt to electrically de-mated the PFCS from P6.  The Remote Power Controller for this PFCS was then closed to see if it would trip, which it did not.  After the RPC had been re-opened, OTCM1 re-mated the PFCS. The RPC was then closed again and it tripped with a true overcurrent.  OTCM1 re-fastened the PFCS tie-down bolt and then the SSRMS and SPDM were maneuvered back inboard of the SARJ and configured for the Mobile Transporter translation from Work Site (WS) 8 to WS4 scheduled later today.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #129 on: 08/03/2017 03:13 PM »
August 03, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-088

California Cub Scouts to Speak with NASA Astronaut on Space Station

Cub Scouts of the Bay Area will speak with a NASA astronaut living, working and doing research aboard the International Space Station at 1:40 p.m. EDT Monday, Aug. 7. Cub Scout Pack 643 of Lafayette, California, will host nearby Cub Scout, Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops for the 20-minute, Earth-to-space call that will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 52 Flight Engineer Jack Fischer will answer questions from scouts assembled in the Performing Arts Theater at Acalanes High School in Lafayette.

Fischer launched to the space station in April. He’s scheduled to return to Earth in September. Before joining NASA, he attended the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

For more information on the downlink, contact Keith Trimble at 510-547-3200 or keithtrimble@icloud.com. Acalanes High School is at 1200 Pleasant Hill Road in Lafayette.

The scouts of Pack 643 spent time this summer reviewing Expedition 52 mission details. They are excited for the opportunity to speak with and see a NASA astronaut living and working on the International Space Station.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA Education’s STEM on Station activity, which provides a variety of space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators.

Follow the astronauts on social media: @NASA_astronauts.

For more information, videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #130 on: 08/04/2017 12:02 AM »
Int-Ball Letter Vol. 2: Release on updated images of Kibo’s internal drone “Int-Ball”



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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #131 on: 08/04/2017 03:34 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/03/2017

Posted on August 3, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Sarcolab-3:  With assistance from an operator, a USOS crewmember ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair in the Columbus module, installed the Electromyograph and Percutaneous Electrical Stimulation (PEMS) device and adjusted pads and constraints for the Sarcolab-3 ankle protocol.  The operator then collected ultrasound images of the subject’s right leg during exercise activities. Ground experts are evaluating anomalies that occurred during the investigation that prevented completion of today’s session.  Later in the day a crewmember installed the mechanisms specific to the knee configuration for Sarcolab-3 operations tomorrow. The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess the impact of hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF): The crew replaced sample cartridges in the ELF, an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the Electrostatic Levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured, and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

NanoRacks Platforms 2 and 3: The crew installed NanoRacks Platform 2 and 3 in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) to support investigation hardware arriving on SpaceX-12.  These NanoRack platforms are multipurpose research facilities that provide power and data transfer capabilities for NanoRacks Module investigations.

Improved Payload Ethernet Hub Gateway (iPEHG):  The crew installed an iPEHG in Express Rack (ER) 4. The new iPEHG design corrects performance limitations often experienced by the older PEHGs.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday afternoon, Robotics Ground Controllers translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite 8 (WS8) to WS4. They then stowed Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) on Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 2 (PDGF2) and walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) off MBS PDGF3 onto the Lab PDGF.

Offline Fuji

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #132 on: 08/04/2017 09:01 PM »
Typhoon Noru shooting from ISS HDTV-EF2 (August 4) : more video and Photos here.
http://iss.jaxa.jp/kiboexp/news/170804_hdtv_ef2.html

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #133 on: 08/05/2017 07:25 AM »
And the installation of ExHAM#1-3 will be on July,27.
It seems, that the 27th was the schedule and it was done on the 28th(JST).
http://iss.jaxa.jp/kiboexp/plan/status/images/results_170802.pdf

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #134 on: 08/06/2017 04:23 PM »
ISS experienced an extended loss of comms via S-Band this morning, several hours long I think.  Contact was reestablished by switching from S band string 2 to string 1 a short time ago.  Ku coverage was not effected--video was visible during unsuccessful comm checks on SG1 and 2.  Houston advised that several days of trouble shooting on string 2 are expected and results will be passed to the crew.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #135 on: 08/07/2017 01:08 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/04/2017

Posted on August 4, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Sarcolab-3:  With assistance from an operator, RS and USOS crewmembers ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair in the Columbus module, installed the Electromyograph and Percutaneous Electrical Stimulation (PEMS) device and adjusted pads and constraints for the Sarcolab-3 knee protocol.  After attaching electrodes and verifying signals the operator collected ultrasound images of the subject’s right leg during exercise activities. The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess microgravity-induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Two Phase Flow:  The crew deactivated the Two Phase Flow experiment run in the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR).  Boiling normally removes heat by turning liquid into vapor at the heated surface, and that vapor returns to a liquid by way of a condenser which continues to cycle and make a cooling system. In the microgravity of space, the heat transfer rate must be changed because liquid and bubble behavior is drastically different than on Earth. This investigation seeks to build a database on the heat transfer efficiency of liquids in space that can be used in the design of high-performance thermal management systems for future space platforms.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Zero Robotics (ZR): The crew completed a dry run for the SPHERES ZR Challenge. The competition is scheduled for August 11th.  The SPHERES Zero Robotics investigation establishes an opportunity for high school students to design research for the ISS. As part of a competition, students write algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. The algorithms are tested by the SPHERES team and the best designs are selected for the competition to operate the SPHERES satellites on board the ISS.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  The crew removed and replaced fluid from sampling bags for RR-5. Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Dose Tracker:  A crewmember completed a weekly medication tracking entry in the Dose Tracker application that runs on an iPad.  Dose Tracker documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The investigation is expected to provide anecdotal evidence of medication effectiveness during flight and any unusual side effects experienced. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics is occurring during missions.

Combustion Integration Rack (CIR): The crew replaced both Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus MDCA Igniters and the Fiber Arm to support continued operations of the CIR.

Dragon Robotics On Board Training (RoBOT): In preparation for SpX-12 arrival currently planned for August 16, the crew performed this proficiency training. They reviewed procedures and crew interfaces for monitoring and commanding.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  Yesterday and overnight, Robotics Ground Controllers walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) off the Lab Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) onto the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) PDGF.  The SSRMS was then maneuvered into position to perform a survey of the 50S Soyuz.  Performing the survey was held up by issues with the Mission Critical Environment (MCE) that prevented commanding but once these were addressed, controllers were able to complete the survey and maneuver the SSRMS to a park position. The SSRMS will be walked back onto the Lab later today.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #136 on: 08/08/2017 06:21 AM »
Paolo Nespoli
 

Our solar panel
 
The fix we did 10 years ago to our solar panel is still going strong. The impossible is possible: well done STS-120 ground & space team!

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #137 on: 08/08/2017 06:32 AM »
Photos by: Sergey Ryazanskiy

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #138 on: 08/08/2017 01:48 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/07/2017

Posted on August 7, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): On Sunday a crewmember completed a series of interactive tasks during a FMS session. The FMS investigation studies how the fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of the investigation is to determine how fine motor performance in microgravity varies over the duration of six-month and year-long space missions; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance varies before and after gravitational transitions, including periods of early flight adaptation and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics 3: A 26 day run for Biophysics 3 was initiated in the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). The crew removed a Plate contained in the LMM and placed it into a Microgravity Experiment Research Locker / INcubator (MERLIN).  Using the three-dimensional structure of proteins, scientists can determine how they function and how they are involved in disease. Some proteins benefit from being crystallized in microgravity, where they can grow larger and with fewer imperfections. Access to crystals grown on the ISS supports research for a wide range of diseases, as well as microgravity-related problems such as radiation damage, bone loss and muscle atrophy. This investigation identifies which proteins would benefit from crystallization in space.

Sarcolab-3:  With assistance from an operator, a crewmember ingressed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) chair in the Columbus module and adjusted pads and constraints for the Sarcolab-3 knee protocol.  After attaching electrodes and verifying signals the operator collected ultrasound images of the subject’s right leg during exercise activities. The data collected for Sarcolab-3 will be compared to pre and post flight measurements to assess microgravity-induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus (calf muscle) where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Multi Omics-Mouse:  The crew continued preparations for the Multi-Omics Mouse investigation subjects arriving on the SpX-12. They relocated the Experiment Laptop Terminal 2 (ELT2), reconfigured cables and set up and installed the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF).

Human Research Program (HRP): A crewmember collected Flight Day 15 Biochemical Profile and Flight Day 8 Marrow urine samples.
•The Biochem Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during and after spaceflight.  Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•The Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis: Over the weekend the crew removed and replaced fluid from sampling bags for RR-5.  Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Intermittent Loss of Space to Ground (S/G) 1 and 2 Audio: Over the weekend, the ACS/UHF Audio Interface (AUAI)-1P associated with S-band String 2 started to show intermittent functionality and multiple error indications.  As a result, Space To Ground (S/G) channels 1 and 2 audio became mostly unavailable.  Ground teams performed troubleshooting on AUAI-1P with no success. A switchover to AUAI-2S restored full audio functionality through S-Band String 1.  S/G channels 3 and 4 were unaffected by the problem.  AUIA-1P has been on orbit since the US Lab was launched. There is one spare AUAI on orbit. Teams are discussing a forward plan.

Failed Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) Retrieval: Last Friday, Robotics Ground Controllers set up for retrieval of the failed MBSU from External Stowage Platform -2 (ESP-2).  Activities included a triple Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) walk off and Mobile Transporter (MT) translation to Work Site 3.  Today’s activities include unstowing the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM), retrieval of the MBSU Flight Releasable Attachment Mechanism (FRAM) from ESP-2 followed by stowing it on the SPDM Enhanced ORU Temporary Platform (EOTP). This MBSU is one of two failed units externally stowed on orbit that will be brought inside via the JEM Airlock (JEMAL) to undergo maintenance and repair.

Cupola Window Scratch Pane Replacement and Pane Audit: The crew completed the replacement of the scratch pane on Cupola Window 6 with a new spare.  They also performed an audit of the available uninstalled used panes to determine if any of them are in better condition than the currently installed scratch panes. Based on their report, crew was given to go to proceed with swapping the scratch pane on Window 1 with the best available spare.

Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #139 on: 08/10/2017 03:53 AM »
Int-Ball Letter Vol. 3: Exploring inside “Kibo”!



Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #140 on: 08/10/2017 06:39 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/08/2017

Posted on August 8, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR): The crew replaced the two FIR white lights. One was burned out and the other had high usage and was nearing its end of life.  After replacement, the rack was powered from the ground and the Payload Developer verified both lights were functioning properly. The next FIR science operations will occur next week for Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics 3.

Human Research Program (HRP):  The crew collected blood, urine and air samples to satisfy Flight Day 15 Biochemical Profile and Flight Day 8 Marrow requirements.
•The Biochem Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during and after spaceflight.  Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•The Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF): The crew swapped sample cartridges in the ELF and investigated an unidentified object on the ELF observation window that is affecting sample position control.  The ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the Electrostatic Levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured, and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

At Home In Space: The crew completed an At Home in Space questionnaire today. This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home In Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  Yesterday the crew stowed the RR-5 Habitats, completing payload operations for RR-5.  Because spaceflight has significant and rapid effects on the musculoskeletal system, it is important to investigate targeted therapies that could ameliorate some of the detrimental effects of spaceflight. The NELL-1 drug being studied in the RR-5 investigation has the potential to slow or reverse bone loss during spaceflight.

Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Communication Unit (CUCU): In preparation for SpX-12 arrival currently planned for August 16, the crew powered up and checked out the CUCU and Dragon Crew Command Panel (CCP). CUCU provides a command and telemetry communications link between ISS and Dragon during free flight operations in the vicinity of ISS. 

On Board Training (OBT) ISS Emergency Response Simulation: All crew members participated in this training exercise to practice a rapid depress and a fire emergency response based on information provided by the simulator displays. The crew also performed the following:
•Physically translated through ISS to the appropriate response locations to visualize the use of station equipment and interfaces.
•Practiced procedure execution and associated decision making based on cues provided by the simulator.
•Practiced communication and coordination with Mission Control Center (MCC)-Houston and MCC-Moscow as required for a given emergency scenario.

Following the exercise, the crew and ground teams participated in a review to discuss results and address questions and comments.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday and overnight, Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to grapple and unstow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) from Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 2 (PDGF2).  Next they rotated the SPDM Enhanced Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Temporary Platform (EOTP), then maneuvered the SSRMS and SPDM to unstow the Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) from External Stowage Platform 2 (ESP2) Site 4 and stow it on EOTP Side 2.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #141 on: 08/11/2017 12:14 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/09/2017

Posted on August 9, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Human Research Program (HRP):  The crew collected blood, urine and air samples today to satisfy Return minus 15 days (R-15) Cardio Ox, Flight Day 15 (FD 15) and R-15 Biochemical Profile and R-30 and Launch plus 12 days (L+12) Marrow requirements.
•By collecting Cardio Ox ultrasound and ECG data, along with blood and urine samples, scientists will try to determine whether biological markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after space flight and whether this results in an increased, long-term risk of atherosclerosis in astronauts.
•The Biochem Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•The Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Multi Omics-Mouse: The crew continued preparations for the Multi-Omics Mouse investigation subjects arriving on SpX-12. They removed the Mouse Habitat Cage Units from the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) and performed water nozzle checks.  They also installed batteries in the vacuum cleaner and the CO2 Valve Unit.

At Home In Space: The crew completed a At Home in Space questionnaire.This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Robonaut:  The crew continued troubleshooting the intermittent fault in Robonaut’s power supply.  Installation of a grounding jumper did not resolve the issue so additional troubleshooting steps are under development.  Robonaut is a humanoid robot designed with the versatility and dexterity to manipulate hardware, work in high risk environments, and respond safely to unexpected obstacles. It is comprised of a torso with two arms and a head, and two legs with end effectors that enable the robot to translate inside the ISS by interfacing with handrails and seat tracks.

Dragon Robotics On-Board Trainer (RoBOT): In preparation for SpX-12 berthing currently scheduled for August 16, the crew completed this training consisting of a 30 meter approach, two Capture Point hold runs and 2 meter runs.

Remote Power Controller Module (RPCM) P12B_B Trip: This RPC powers the S-Band transponder for String 2. There were no impacts to voice or telemetry as S-Band String 1 was and continues to be prime. String 2 was in hot backup for ACS/UHF Audio Interface (AUAI) troubleshooting. The trip signature indicates a Field Effect Transistor (FET) Hybrid failure which would be the first occurrence for this RPC.  Multiple closure attempts of RPC 10 were performed with no success. Two fully functional strings of ISS S-band are required per the SpaceX Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) Flight Rule. Teams met this morning to discuss and recommend a forward plan. This is an external RPCM that can be Removed and Replaced (R&R) by the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM).

Failed Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) Retrieval Status: Last night, ground teams successfully translated the Mobile Transporter from Worksite 3 to Worksite 7. The degraded MBSU was then successfully installed on the JAXA Experiment Module (JEM) Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Transfer Interface (JOTI) and the slide table was retracted into the JEM airlock. The airlock will be pressurized Thursday morning. This MBSU is one of two failed units externally stowed on orbit that will be brought inside to undergo maintenance and repair.

ISS Reboost:  An ISS reboost using 67P thrusters was successfully performed. This reboost, in combination with the next one planned for August 25th, will set up required conditions for 50S landing on September 3rd and 52S launch on September 12th.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #142 on: 08/14/2017 03:27 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/10/2017

Posted on August 10, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Circadian Rhythms:  A crewmember removed the Armband Monitor and the Thermolab Unit mounted to their belt, completing 36 hours of monitoring for the Circadian Rhythms investigation. Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crew members’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crew members’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crew members.

Utilization Preparations for SpaceX-12 Arrival:  In preparation for SpX-12 arrival scheduled for August 16th, crewmembers relocated all three Space Automated Bioproduct Lab (SABL) units and the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) Experiment Laptop Terminal. They also removed the Phase Change Heat eXchanger (PCHX) locker for return.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  The crew completed a final inventory audit for RR-5. They then stowed some items and trashed others. 

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday and overnight, Robotics Ground Controllers translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite 7 (WS7) to WS3.  The team then powered up the MSS and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) to use SPDM Arm2 to transfer the empty Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) Flight Releasable Attachment Mechanism (FRAM) from SPDM Enhanced Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Temporary Platform (EOTP) Side 2 to External Stowage Platform 2 (ESP2) Site 4.  Finally, controllers stowed the SPDM on Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 2 (PDGF2).

Ku Band Contingency Command and Telemetry (CCT) Checkout: In response to the loss of S-Band redundancy due to the loss of power to the S-Band-2 transponder, ground teams completed a checkout of the Ku-Band CCT command and voice capability.  During the test all control centers, including Sp-X Mission Control, successfully sent test commands to ISS via Ku-Band.  Additionally, Ku-Band voice between ISS and MCC-Moscow was verified in the event this is needed during the upcoming Russian Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA).   

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #143 on: 08/14/2017 03:28 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/11/2017

Posted on August 11, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Zero Robotics (ZR):  The crew provided support for a SPHERES ZR Challenge competition between students from middle schools in the United States and Russia.  As part of a competition, students write algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. The algorithms were tested by the SPHERES team and the best designs were selected for the competition today to operate the SPHERES satellites on board the ISS.

Space Headaches:  The 51 Soyuz (51S) USOS crewmembers completed weekly questionnaires for the ESA Space Headaches investigation.  The Space Headaches investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Rodent Research-5 (RR-5) Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis:  The Crew performed a final inventory audit for RR-5 and stowed or trashed applicable RR-5 items.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Last evening, Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) off Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 1 (PDGF1) and onto the Node2 PDGF.  They then maneuvered the SSRMS into position and powered up the MSS in the Hot Backup Configuration in preparation for today’s SpaceX-12 Offset Grapples Practice.  Finally the ROBOs translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite 3 (WS3) to WS4.

On-Board Training (OBT) Dragon Offset Grapple: In preparation for SpaceX-12 capture scheduled for August 16, the crew practiced Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) grapple approaches. They maneuvered the SSRMS over the pin and practiced pulling the trigger once they were in the grapple envelope. During the session the crew paid particular attention on how to best manage the volumetric constraints in the Cupola as well as how lighting conditions vary inside.

Remote Power Controller Module (RPCM) P12B_B Status: Ground teams successfully reclosed Remote Power Controller (RPC) 10 of RPCM P12B_B and the RPC remains closed as of this writing. The RPC originally tripped on Wednesday and the trip signature indicates a Field Effect Transistor (FET) Hybrid failure. This RPC powers the S-Band transponder for String 2 and is an external RPCM that can be removed and Replaced (R&R) by the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM). Planning is underway to perform this R&R no earlier than August 18th.

Command and Control (C&C)-3 Multiplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM) Transition: The primary C&C-3 MDM unexpectedly transitioned to Diagnostics mode. C&C-1 successfully transitioned to Primary with C&C-2 as the Backup. C&C-3 has been power-cycled and restarted nominally with no health flags. During the transition to C&C-1, there was a 40 minute loss of Ku-band including Space to Ground 3 and 4 as well as real-time payload science data downlink.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #144 on: 08/15/2017 01:25 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/14/2017

Posted on August 14, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

SpaceX (SpX)-12 Launch: SpX-12 launched successfully today from Kennedy Space Center at 11:31 am CDT. In addition to supplies and equipment for crew members, the vehicle will deliver investigations and instruments that study cosmic ray particles, protein crystal growth, stem cell-mediated recellularization and nanosatellite technology demonstration. Capture and berthing is scheduled for August 16 at 6:00 am CDT.

Multi-Omics-Mouse: The crew set up equipment and the Glove Box and performed an inventory for the JAXA Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation. Several studies have reported space flight effects on the human immune system, but the relationship between microbiota and immune dysfunction during flight remains unclear. In Multi-Omics-Mouse, food with and without fructooligosaccharides (FOS) will be used as prebiotics, which could improve the gut environment and immune function. After the flight, researchers will analyze the gut environment (microbiota and metabolites) and immune system of the mice by multi-omics analysis, and evaluate the effect of FOS during flight.

Rodent Research 9 (RR-9): The crew installed and configured the Animal Habitats for the RR-9 investigation. The Ground then completed a software checkout of all the Habitats. The RR-9 experiment studies how microgravity affects the immune systems, muscles and bones of rodents during extended stays aboard the ISS.  After approximately 30 days aboard the ISS, the mice will be returned to Earth where scientists on the ground will study how their time in space has affected various tissues, including brain, muscle, heart, joint, the eyes and the immune system.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics 3: A crewmember retrieved Biophysics 3 Plate 1 from a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) and allowed it to thaw before installing it in the LMM.  The LMM was then be placed into the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) for a Biophysics science run.  Using the three-dimensional structure of proteins, scientists can determine how they function and how they are involved in disease. Some proteins benefit from being crystallized in microgravity, where they can grow larger and with fewer imperfections. Access to crystals grown on the ISS supports research for a wide range of diseases, as well as microgravity-related problems such as radiation damage, bone loss and muscle atrophy. This investigation identifies which proteins would benefit from crystallization in space.

Sprint Ultrasound 2:  For their Flight Day 120 Sprint Ultrasound 2 session, a crewmember, with support from an operator, configured the Ultrasound 2, placed reference marks on the calf and thigh of their right leg, donned the thigh and calf guides, and performed thigh and calf scans with remote guidance from the Sprint ground team. Ultrasound scans are used to evaluate spaceflight-induced changes in the muscle volume. The Sprint investigation evaluates the use of high intensity, low volume exercise training to minimize loss of muscle, bone, and cardiovascular function in ISS crewmembers during long-duration missions.

Lighting Effects Vision Test:  The crew will temporarily stowed Visual Performance Test hardware in their crew quarters, set the light to the correct mode, turned all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performed a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test.  The crew then photographed the completed tests and transferred the photos to for downlink. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Habitability:  On Sunday a crewmember performed a walkthrough video in the ISS of the Combustion Integration Rack (CIR) and the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) in the US Laboratory.  Requested details for the video included work volume, impacts to translation in the module, layout, restraints, stowage, and recommendations for future designs. The Habitability investigation results will be used to assess the relationship between crew members and their environment in order to better prepare for future long-duration spaceflights. Observations recorded during 6 month and 1 year missions can help spacecraft designers determine how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): The crew completed a series of interactive tasks during a FMS session. The FMS investigation studies how the fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of the investigation is to determine how fine motor performance in microgravity varies over the duration of six-month and year-long space missions; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance varies before and after gravitational transitions, including periods of early flight adaptation and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

At Home In Space:  The crew completed an At Home in Space questionnaire. This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Remote Power Controller Module (RPCM) P12B_B Status: On Sunday, RPCM P12B_B tripped after 2 ˝ days of remaining closed. Ground teams successfully reclosed the RPC and it remains closed as of this writing. This RPC powers the S-Band transponder for String 2. The trip signature continues to indicate a Field Effect Transistor (FET) Hybrid failure. This is an external RPCM that can be Removed and Replaced (R&R) by the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM). Planning is underway to perform this R&R no earlier than August 18th.

Dragon On-Board Training (OBT): In preparation for SpX-12 arrival, the crew studied an overview of attached phase operations as well as attached phase configuration.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #145 on: 08/16/2017 01:33 PM »
Circular formation
 

Clockwise from top: ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli, NASA astronauts Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, Roscosmos cosmonaut Sergei Ryazansky, NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik and Roscosmos cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin pose for a photo in the Russian section of the International Space Station. Together they are the Expedition 52/53 crew and all the humans orbiting Earth at this time.
 
The six are positioned around the flags of the nations that built and maintain the Station: USA, Russia, France, Canada, Germany, Switzerland, Belgium, Italy, Norway, The Netherlands, UK, Spain, Sweden, Denmark and Japan.
 
The orbital outpost circles Earth every 90 minutes and offers state-of-the-art facilities for research, allowing the astronauts to run experiments in weightlessness for many weeks and even years. Research opportunities are available to scientists from all over the world – there is no other laboratory like the International Space Station.
 
Next month Fyodor, Peggy and Jack will undock from the Station in their Soyuz MS-04 spacecraft and return to Earth, leaving Paolo, Randy and Sergei, who will become Expedition 53/54 when they are joined by a new trio: cosmonaut and Soyuz commander Alexander Misurkin, and NASA astronauts Mark VandeHei and Joseph Acaba.
 
Paolo is on his third visit to the Station, a five-month mission called Vita. Follow Paolo Nespoli and his mission via paolonespoli.esa.int
 
Credit: NASA/ESA

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #146 on: 08/16/2017 03:20 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/15/2017

Posted on August 15, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Intracranial Pressure & Visual Impairment (IPVI): The crew took front and profile view pictures to check for facial edema, then completed a conference with ground experts.  The IPVI investigation studies changes to crewmembers’ eyes and optic nerves by analyzing arterial blood pressure and blood flow to the brain before and after spaceflight. The IPVI investigation uses non-invasive methods as compared to current invasive methods (e.g., spinal tap) to measure intracranial pressure.

MagVector:  The crew performed closeout and cleanup activities for the 7-day MagVector Run 11.  The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how the Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research not only helps improve future International Space Station experiments and electrical experiments, but it could offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general – the backbone of our technology.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Camera Robot:  The crew set up the JEM Camera Robot and the ground took video and photos of several scenes in the JEM module. This device is a free-flying camera robot that provides real time video downlink and photographs.  It is expected to reduce the crew time requirements to support video recording of activities, especially at the blind spot of existing JEM internal cameras.

Multi-Omics-Mouse:  The crew refilled water containers in Mouse Habitat Cage Units for the JAXA Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation. Several studies have reported space flight effects on the human immune system but the relationship between microbiota and immune dysfunction during flight remains unclear. In Multi-Omics-Mouse, food with and without fructooligosaccharides (FOS) will be used as prebiotics, which could improve the gut environment and immune function.  After the flight, researchers will analyze the gut environment (microbiota and metabolites) and immune system of the mice by multi-omics analysis, and evaluate the effect of FOS during flight.

Kubik:  The crew unstowed and set up the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Kubik 5 facility in the Columbus module.  They then performed a functional check and preheating of Kubik 5 to prepare for support of upcoming ASI Biomission investigations that will utilize the Kubik facility.  Kubik is a small controlled-temperature incubator or cooler used to study biological samples in a microgravity environment. It is equipped with removable inserts designed for self-contained, automatic experiments using seeds, cells, and small animals.

At Home in Space: The crew completed an At Home in Space questionnaire. This Canadian Space Agency experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space uses a questionnaire to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Dragon Robotics On-Board Trainer: In preparation for tomorrow’s SpX-12 capture and berthing, the crew completed 3 Capture Point Hold runs which allows the crew to practice free drift timing. They also practiced malfunction response, nominal rate approaches and 2 meter approaches.

Remote Power Controller Module (RPCM) P12B_B Status: Following successful closure of RPCM P12B_B RPC10 late Sunday evening, the RPC tripped this morning.  This RPC powers the S-Band transponder for String 2. The trip signature continues to indicate a Field Effect Transistor (FET) Hybrid failure. Ground teams will continue to attempt to reclose the RPC. This is an external RPCM that can be Removed and Replaced (R&Rd) by the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM).

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #147 on: 08/17/2017 02:11 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/16/2017

Posted on August 16, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

SpaceX (SpX)-12 Capture and Berthing: SpX-12 rendezvous and capture were successfully completed today  at 5:54 AM CDT using the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). The crew monitored Dragon’s approach from the Cupola Robotic Workstation. Vestibule outfitting, vehicle ingress and critical cargo transfer began following capture.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics 3:  The crew retrieved LMM Biophysics 3 Plate 1 from the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and placed it into a Microgravity Experiment Research Locker / INcubator (MERLIN).  The LMM was placed in the FIR on Monday to begin the science run.  Using the three-dimensional structure of proteins, scientists can determine how they function and how they are involved in disease. Some proteins benefit from being crystallized in microgravity, where they can grow larger and with fewer imperfections. Access to crystals grown on the ISS supports research for a wide range of diseases, as well as microgravity-related problems such as radiation damage, bone loss and muscle atrophy. This investigation identifies which proteins would benefit from crystallization in space.

Food Acceptability:  The crew completed a Food Acceptability questionnaire for this investigation which seeks to determine the impact of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system.  Results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions.

Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI)-1 Anomaly:  Overnight during the crew sleep period, the Electronics Unit (EU) for MELFI-1 experienced an anomaly. Following crew wake, science samples were successfully relocated to alternate MELFI units without issue.  Ground teams are working a forward plan to replace the MELFI-1 EU with an on orbit spare.

NeuroMapping: The crew was unable to perform the Neuromapping assessments today due to a software fault that caused the laptop to lock up. Ground experts are investigating the anomaly.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #148 on: 08/18/2017 02:56 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/17/2017

Posted on August 17, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Russian Extravehicular Activity (EVA) #43: Yurchikhin and Ryazanskiy performed a seven hour 30 minute EVA. Completed activities include manual deployment of 5 nanosatellites, collection of research samples and structural maintenance. During EVA ingress timeframe, Whitson and Fischer were isolated in 50 Soyuz. Bresnik and Nespoli had access to the FGB and USOS modules.

Multi-Omics-Mouse:  The crew transferred mice for the Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation from the Animal Transfer Transportation Cage Unit that arrived on SpX-12 to Mouse Habitat Cage Units in the Glove Box.  The Cage Units were then installed in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) to start the experiment.  The crew also transferred data from the Compact Flash Memory Card to a Station Support Computer (SSC).  Several studies have reported space flight effects on the human immune system, but the relationship between microbiota and immune dysfunction during flight remains unclear. In the Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation, food with and without fructooligosaccharides (FOS) will be used as prebiotics, to determine if they improve the gut environment and immune function.  After the flight, researchers will analyze the gut environment (microbiota and metabolites) and immune system of the mice by multi-omics analysis.

Kubik:  The Crew installed Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Biomission Experiment Containers into the Kubik 5 facility in the Columbus module.  They also removed one of those containers and inserted it into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) to preserve the scientific samples. Kubik 5 is supporting Biomission investigations by providing a small controlled-temperature incubator / cooler for the study of biological samples in a microgravity environment.  Kubik is equipped with removable inserts designed for self-contained, automatic experiments using seeds, cells, and small animals.

NanoRacks Module 9: The crew activated mixture tubes for NanoRacks Module 9 in support of the NanoRacks-National Center for Earth and Space Science-Casper (NanoRacks-NCESSE-Casper) investigation.  NCESSE supports various schools and student-designed experiments that address challenges of living and working in space. The program is also a key initiative for U.S. science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) that strives to educate and inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers to work on the space program.   

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2):  A crewmember set up cameras to capture the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) work volume, placed markers on their body, powered on MED-2 and performed dead lifts and rowing.  The microgravity environment of space weakens muscle and bone, so orbiting crew members spend significant amounts of time exercising with equipment that is large and bulky.  MED-2 aims to demonstrate small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions during long-duration space missions with exercise equipment that is smaller in size and mass.

Space Tango MultiLab Locker (TangoLab-1):  The crew removed one investigation from a Card in the TangoLab-1 facility and attached two new ones to it. TangoLab-1 is a reconfigurable general research facility designed for microgravity research and development and pilot manufacturing aboard the ISS.  TangoLab provides a standardized platform and open architecture for experimental modules called CubeLabs. CubeLab modules may be developed for use in 3-dimensional tissue and cell cultures.

Space Tango TangoLab-2 Locker (TangoLab-2):  The crew installed the TangoLab-2 facility into Express Rack (ER) 6 but ground controllers were unable to establish communication with the facility.  Ground experts are investigating the anomaly.

NanoRacks Platform-1:  The crew installed Modules 67 (NanoRacks-NDC-Ames for Space-Bacteria Testing) and 72a (Quberider-1) into Nanoracks Platform-1.  Module-67 determines whether bacteria mutate at a different rate in the microgravity environment of space. The experiments extend previous work on virulence in space by exposing different batches of bacteria to toxins known to cause mutations.  Automated equipment tests and photographs batches of bacteria contained within different concentrations of toxins so that the observed mutation rates can be compared with those observed from control groups on Earth.  Module-72a has a Raspberry Pi Zero board and several sensors. This is an educational payload that allows students to code their own software experiments and have them collect data on the ISS.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): A crewmember completed a series of interactive tasks for this investigation which studies how fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of the investigation is to determine how fine motor performance in microgravity varies over the duration of six-month and year-long space missions; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance varies before and after gravitational transitions, including periods of early flight adaptation and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Node 1 Port Hatch Unlatch Position: During Hatch Seal Inspections the crew was asked to recheck several of the USOS hatches for proper latch indicators. The crew confirmed that the Node 1 Port Hatch indicator was not in the “unlatched” position as expected. The crew cycled the hatch mechanism and confirmed it was physically in the “unlatched” position while the position indicator was off.  Engineering is assessing the latch indicator to determine if the hardware will need to be replaced

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #149 on: 08/21/2017 02:16 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/18/2017

Posted on August 18, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Rodent Research 9 (RR-9):  The crew activated the water lixits and installed food bars in two Animal Habitats for the RR-9 investigation today.  They then transferred 20 mice from the Transporter to the habitats after checking the health of the mice. The RR-9 experiment studies how microgravity affects the immune systems, muscles and bones of rodents during extended stays aboard the ISS.  After approximately 30 days aboard the ISS, the mice will be returned to Earth where scientists on the ground will study how their time in space has affected various tissues, including brain, muscle, heart, joint, the eyes and the immune system.

ISS Non-invasive Sample Investigation and results Transmission to ground with the Utmost easiness (In Situ):  The crew collected a saliva sample and processed it in the bioanalyzer for the In Situ investigation.  Crew members on the ISS are continually monitored for health changes, and as part of these measurements, they take saliva samples that are stored and returned to Earth. The In Situ bioanalysis uses a portable device that can check crew members’ saliva on board the ISS, enabling direct real-time analysis. The device’s first uses are to monitor stress levels and appetites among crew members.  Humans living in space experience dramatic changes to their health, from weakened bone and muscle to reduced appetites and increased stress levels. The device uses disposable cartridges that check for the presence of the stress hormone cortisol.  A miniature analytical device that can detect certain biomarkers using non-invasively collected samples would benefit health care workers on Earth, from emergency medical technicians on call, to small rural clinics in developing countries.

Vascular Echo Ultrasound:  A crewmember performed a Vascular Echo resting ultrasound of the neck, thigh and heart and collected blood pressure measurements. This Canadian Space Agency investigation examines changes in blood vessels and the heart while crew members are in space, and then upon their return to Earth. The results could provide insight into potential countermeasures to help maintain crew member health.

Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems (STaARS) Intraterrestrial Fungus (iFUNGUS):  The crew stowed a mesh bag containing iFUNGUS cryotubes at ambient air in Node 1.   STaARS-iFUNGUS cultures a rare type of fungus in the microgravity environment of space in order to search for new antibiotics. The fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum, comes from deep in the Earth’s subsurface and shows potential as a source for new antibacterial compounds. The iFUNGUS experiment transports frozen samples of fungal spores to the ISS, grows the fungus in different nutrient mixtures over different intervals, refreezes the samples and then returns them to Earth, where scientists examine how they grew and what chemicals they produced.  STaARS-iFUNGUS demonstrates how the microgravity environment of space can serve as a laboratory and production facility for new life science discoveries. Discoveries generated by this research can foster further research and production efforts that utilize low gravity conditions to create novel compounds or other products.

Tangolab-1 and -2:  During the initial card installation activity yesterday a Payload Card would not seat properly in Tangolab-2.  Using procedures developed overnight by ground teams, the crew was able today to successfully install that Payload Card in TangoLab-1.  The Payload Developer confirmed good data flow for the Card.  This card contains one experiment to study genetic mutations in fruit flies and one to study Carbon Dioxide scrubbing in cactus. 

Space Headaches:  The 51 Soyuz (51S) USOS crewmembers completed weekly questionnaires for the ESA Space Headaches investigation. The investigation collects information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crewmembers in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers that can influence performance during a space mission.

Dose Tracker:  A crewmember completed a weekly medication tracking entry today in the Dose Tracker application that runs on an iPad.  Dose Tracker documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The investigation is expected to provide anecdotal evidence of medication effectiveness during flight and any unusual side effects experienced. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics is occurring during missions.

Dragon On-Board Training (OBT): The crew reviewed SpX-12 Dragon training materials to include emergency response review and emergency hatch closure.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #150 on: 08/22/2017 09:47 AM »

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #151 on: 08/22/2017 02:09 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/21/2017

Posted on August 21, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Solar Eclipse Viewing: The crew removed scratch panes from Cupola windows #4 and #6 and cleaned the window #3 scratch pane. The crew then took both HD video and still images of the moon’s umbra on Earth from the Cupola. They also obtained images of both the sun and the moon. In addition, the P1 Lower Outboard External High Definition Camera (EHDC) was used to capture HD video of the moon’s umbra on Earth.

Lung Tissue:  On Saturday the crew set up hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) for Lung Tissue operations.  They also took samples and inserted them in to a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) and fixed media in Tissue Bags. The Lung Tissue investigation uses the microgravity environment of space to test strategies for growing new lung tissue. Using the latest bioengineering techniques, the Lung Tissue experiment cultures different types of lung cells in controlled conditions onboard the ISS. The cells are grown in a specialized framework that supplies them with critical growth factors so that scientists can observe how gravity affects growth and specialization as cells become new lung tissue.

Kubik:  On Saturday and Sunday the crew deinstalled Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Biomission experiment containers from the Kubik 5 facility in the Columbus module, completing Runs 2 and 3.  Later today they will deinstall another experiment container, completing Run 4.  Each of the containers is inserted into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) in order to preserve the scientific samples.  Kubik 5 is supporting Biomission investigations by providing a small controlled-temperature incubator / cooler for the study of biological samples in a microgravity environment.  Kubik is equipped with removable inserts designed for self-contained, automatic experiments using seeds, cells, and small animals.

ADvanced Space Experiment Processor (ADSEP):  On Saturday the crew removed Cell Culturing (CellCult) cassettes from ADSEP, inserted cells into each cassette and then reinserted them into ADSEP.  ADSEP is a thermally controlled facility that accommodates up to three cassette-based experiments that can be independently operated. Its companion hardware consists of a collection of several experiment cassettes, each doubly or triply contained, that accommodate experiments in cell technology, model organisms, multiphase fluids, solution chemistry, separation science, microencapsulation, and crystal growth.  For CellCult investigations, each cassette contains a single 50 milliliter rotating filtered bioreactor, a reservoir for fresh media, two programmable peristaltic pumps, a waste reservoir, and up to six sample-collection or reagent containers connected by manifold to the reactor. Cultures can be operated in continuous perfusion, batch fed, static, or sampling mode. Both the removal of samples and the addition of additives to the reactor volume can be programmed or teleoperated.  Aeration and humidity control are available

NanoRacks Module 9: On Saturday the crew activated mixture tubes for the NanoRacks Module 9 second operations session in support of the NanoRacks-National Center for Earth and Space Science-Casper (NanoRacks-NCESSE-Casper) investigation.  NCESSE supports various schools and student-designed experiments that address challenges of living and working in space. The program is also a key initiative for U.S. science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) that strives to educate and inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers to work on the space program.   

Lighting Effects: On Sunday a crewmember provided a sleep log entry for the Lighting Effects investigation. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. Fluorescent bulbs are being replaced with solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that have adjustable intensity and color. Investigators will determine if the new lights improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Cardio Ox:  A 50S crewmember collected blood and urine samples today to satisfy their Return minus 15 Day (R-15) Cardio Ox requirements. By collecting Cardio Ox ultrasound and ECG data, along with blood and urine samples, scientists are trying to determine whether biological markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after space flight and whether this results in an increased, long-term risk of atherosclerosis in astronauts.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): Today a 51S crewmember completed their tenth FMS session. The FMS investigation studies how the fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of the investigation is to determine how fine motor performance in microgravity varies over the duration of six-month and year-long space missions; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance varies before and after gravitational transitions, including periods of early flight adaptation and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #152 on: 08/22/2017 10:55 PM »
ISS passing in front of the sun during the eclipse

http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/interactive/2017/08/us/eclipse-photos/media/23.jpg

From here: http://www.cnn.com/interactive/2017/08/us/eclipse-photos/index.html
(3rd picture down).

Sorry if this is not the correct thread please move it where it belongs.

Edit: attaching image, in case it's removed from the source at some point in the future.
« Last Edit: 08/23/2017 02:38 PM by mn »

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #153 on: 08/23/2017 07:26 AM »
https://twitter.com/ROBO_Seagram/status/900095369593454592
Quote
More #Canadarm2 and #Dextre ops tonight and tomorrow. We will be replacing a failed power control module (RPCM)on @Space_Station.
https://twitter.com/ROBO_Seagram/status/900101502244499456
Quote
First up, #Dextre is taking a ride on the @Space_Station Mobile Transporter (MT) to get to the worksite we need to be at to access the RPCM
https://twitter.com/ROBO_Seagram/status/900144126187798528
Quote
Mission controllers @NASA_Johnson have moved #SSRMS into position to 'walkoff' and join #Dextre on the Mobile Base System (MBS)

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #154 on: 08/24/2017 06:54 AM »
Astronauts Whitson, Fischer and Bresnik talk with the new astronauts of the 2017 class (plus Canada's two new astronauts).



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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #155 on: 08/24/2017 07:14 AM »
Quick tour of the ISS by Jack Fischer



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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #156 on: 08/25/2017 11:33 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/22/2017

Posted on August 22, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass):  Last night the CREAM external payload was removed from the SpX-12 trunk by the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and handed off to the Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS), which then installed it on Exposed Facility Unit-2 (EFU-2) on the JEM Exposed Facility (JEF).  Ground controllers then commanded activation of the CREAM payload.  CREAM’s instruments measure the charges of cosmic rays over a broad energy range for a planned three years of operation on the ISS.  The origins of cosmic rays and the mechanisms that accelerate them to high speeds are among the oldest questions in modern astrophysics.  Results from CREAM are expected to bring the science community closer to answering those questions and build a stronger understanding of the fundamental structure of the universe.

Cardio Ox Ultrasound:  A 50S crewmember completed their Return minus 15 Day (R-15) ultrasound, blood pressure and Electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements for the Cardio Ox investigation.  Another crewmember provided scanning assistance after the subject crewmember donned the ECG electrodes and marked the carotid and brachial arteries for scanning.  By collecting ultrasound and ECG data, along with blood and urine samples, scientists are trying to determine whether biological markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after space flight and whether this results in an increased, long-term risk of atherosclerosis in astronauts.

ADvanced Space Experiment Processor (ADSEP):  The crew removed Cell Culturing (CellCult) cassettes from ADSEP, inserted cells into each cassette and reinserted them into ADSEP.  ADSEP is a thermally controlled facility that accommodates up to three cassette-based experiments that can be independently operated. Its companion hardware consists of a collection of several experiment cassettes that accommodate experiments in cell technology, model organisms, multiphase fluids, solution chemistry, separation science, microencapsulation, and crystal growth.  For CellCult investigations, each cassette contains a rotating filtered bioreactor, a reservoir for fresh media, two peristaltic pumps, a waste reservoir, and up to 6 sample-collection or reagent containers connected by a manifold to the reactor. Cultures can be operated in continuous perfusion, batch fed, static, or sampling mode.  The removal of samples and the addition of additives to the reactor volume can be programmed or teleoperated.

Multi-Omics-Mouse: The crew performed routine maintenance for the Multi-Omics-Mouse Cage Units, exchanging waste collection equipment and odor filters.  Several studies have reported space flight effects on the human immune system, but the relationship between microbiota and immune dysfunction during flight remains unclear. In the Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation, food with and without fructooligosaccharides (FOS) will be used as prebiotics, to determine if they improve the gut environment and immune function.  After the flight, researchers will analyze the gut environment (microbiota and metabolites) and immune system of the mice by multi-omics analysis.

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM):  The crew ingressed BEAM and collecteded air and surface microbial samples.  BEAM is an experimental expandable module attached to the ISS.  Expandable modules weigh less and take up less room on a rocket than a traditional module, while providing additional space on-orbit for living and working. Crews traveling to the moon, Mars, asteroids, or other destinations may be able to use them as habitable structures.

Treadmill 2 (T2): This afternoon the crew reported a clicking noise emanating from T2 that had not been heard previously.  The crew took video and audio which were downlinked for ground team evaluation. T2 is currently no-go for exercise.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #157 on: 08/25/2017 11:34 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/23/2017

Posted on August 23, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Multi-Omics-Mouse: The crew performed routine maintenance on the Multi-Omics-Mouse Cage Units that are being maintained in microgravity, exchanging waste collection equipment and odor filters. Several studies have reported space flight effects on the human immune system, but the relationship between microbiota and immune dysfunction during flight remains unclear. In the Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation, food with and without fructooligosaccharides (FOS) will be used as prebiotics, to determine if they improve the gut environment and immune function.  After the flight, researchers will analyze the gut environment (microbiota and metabolites) and immune system of the mice by multi-omics analysis.

Cool Flames Investigation: The crew replaced Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) Fuel Reservoir in support of continued operations for the Cool Flames investigation.  Cool Flames provides new insight into the phenomenon where some types of fuels initially burn very hot, then appear to go out, but they continue burning at a much lower temperature, with no visible flames (cool flames). Understanding cool flame combustion helps scientists develop new engines and fuels that are more efficient and less harmful to the environment.

SSRMS LEE A Unable to Latch to MBS Base 3:  Robotics operations Tuesday evening were scheduled to include an MT Translate, an SSRMS Walkoff to MBS Base 3, and an SPDM Unstow in preparation for the P12B_B RPCM R&R that was scheduled for Wednesday evening.  During the SSRMS Walkoff, ROBO was unable to latch LEE A to MBS Base 3.  High motor currents were observed as the latches on the LEE were being driven. The SSRMS is currently in a safe configuration with LEE B grappled to the Node 2 PDGF.  The SPDM is still stowed. The Robotics team is in agreement to stand down on operations until a FIT is convened to discuss the LEE latch motor current data in more detail.  It should be noted the LEE A latches are not required to support a Dragon release.  As a result of the inability to complete Tuesday evening’s planned operations, the RPCM R&R scheduled for Wednesday evening has been postponed.

On-Board Training (OBT) Medical Emergency: The 51S crew reviewed medical emergency procedures and rescuer roles during a medical event requiring Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) including emergency medical hardware configuration and determine desired deployed locations. During the training they covered crew communication and coordination of care.

Treadmill 2 (T2) Status: Yesterday the crew reported a clicking noise emanating from T2 that had not been heard previously.  The crew took video and audio which were downlinked for ground team evaluation and T2 was declared no-go for exercise. Video and audio revealed no obvious sources so the crew was directed to perform T2 annual maintenance. Again, no sources were identified so the crew was given a go to use T2 but to monitor performance and report any further clicking noises.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #158 on: 08/28/2017 07:16 AM »
Int-Ball Letter Vol. 4: Encounter with Astronaut Kanai



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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #159 on: 08/29/2017 10:38 PM »
Due to the ongoing effects of Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston, NASA has canceled an in-flight question and answer session with astronaut Peggy Whitson aboard the International Space Station. Additionally, due to a change in the crew training schedule, live satellite interviews with NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba in Russia also have been canceled.
 
NASA previously planned a 30-minute news conference with Whitson on Wednesday, Aug. 30 – her final media event before returning to Earth after spending more than nine months aboard the space station. NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, where the space station mission control is located, has been closed to all but mission essential personnel since Aug. 25, and staff will not be able to support the in-flight event.
 
Whitson launched to the space station on Nov. 17, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan and is set to return Saturday, Sept. 2. She will land in Kazakhstan at 9:22 p.m. (7:22 a.m. Kazakhstan time on Sept. 3) along with NASA’s Jack Fischer and cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin of the Russian space agency, Roscosmos. Fischer and Yurchikhin have been Whitson’s crewmates since they arrived at the station in April.
 
Live satellite interviews with Vande Hei and Acaba from the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, where the pair will make final preparations for launch, were previously planned for Friday, Sept. 1. The astronauts, along with cosmonaut Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos, will launch on a Russian Soyuz MS-06 spacecraft at 5:17 p.m. on Sept. 12. They are scheduled to return to Earth in February.
 
Learn more about the International Space Station and its crew members at:

http://www.nasa.gov/station
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #160 on: 08/31/2017 05:24 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/24/2017

Posted on August 24, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Miniature Exercise Device (MED-2):  The crew set up cameras in Node 3 and Cupola to capture video from multiple views of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and MED-2 hardware, applied body markers, performed exercises and transferred video for downlink.  The microgravity environment of space weakens muscle and bone, so orbiting crew members spend significant amounts of time exercising with equipment that is large and bulky.  MED-2 aims to demonstrate that small robotic actuators can provide motion and resistance for crew workout sessions during long-duration space missions with exercise equipment that is smaller in size and mass that equipment currently being used on the ISS.

ADvanced Space Experiment Processor (ADSEP):  The crew will removed Cell Culturing (CellCult) cassettes from ADSEP, inserted cells into each cassette and reinserted them into ADSEP.  ADSEP is a thermally controlled facility that accommodates up to three cassette-based experiments that can be independently operated.  A collection of experiment cassettes are used to accommodate experiments in cell technology, multiphase fluids, solution chemistry, separation science, microencapsulation, and crystal growth.  For CellCult investigations, each cassette contains a rotating filtered bioreactor, a reservoir for fresh media, two peristaltic pumps, a waste reservoir, and up to 6 sample-collection or reagent containers connected by a manifold to the reactor. Cultures can be operated in continuous perfusion, batch fed, static, or sampling modes.  The removal of samples and the addition of additives to the reactor volume can be programmed or teleoperated.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  The crew collected saliva samples for the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation and placed them in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes on ISS over a 1-year period and how they change over time. 

Vascular Echo Ultrasound:  With guidance from a ground expert, a crewmember performed an ultrasound of the femoral artery on their right leg after a one minute light leg exercise. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Vascular Echo investigation examines changes in blood vessels and the heart while the crew members are in space, and then upon their return to Earth. The results could provide insight into potential countermeasures to help maintain crew member health.

Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Biomission:  The crew deinstalled Biomission experiment containers from the Kubik 5 facility in the Columbus module, completing the fifth run.  Each of the containers will be placed into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) in order to preserve the scientific samples.  Kubik 5 supports Biomission investigations by providing a small controlled-temperature incubator / cooler for the study of biological samples in a microgravity environment.  Kubik is equipped with removable inserts designed for self-contained, automatic experiments using seeds, cells, and small animals.

Lighting Effects: This morning a crewmember provided a sleep log entry for the Lighting Effects investigation. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. Fluorescent bulbs are being replaced with solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that have adjustable intensity and color. Investigators will determine if the new lights improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #161 on: 08/31/2017 05:25 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/25/2017

Posted on August 25, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Lung Tissue:  The crew took samples and fixed media in Tissue Bags. They then inserted the bags in a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Lung Tissue investigation uses the microgravity environment of space to test strategies for growing new lung tissue. Using the latest bioengineering techniques, the Lung Tissue experiment cultures different types of lung cells in controlled conditions onboard the ISS. The cells are grown in a specialized framework that supplies them with critical growth factors so that scientists can observe how gravity affects growth and specialization as cells become new lung tissue.

Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems (STaARS) Intraterrestrial Fungus (iFUNGUS): The crew removed 2 sample bags from a General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER) and inserted them in the STaARS facility for incubation times of 8 and 11 hours, respectively.  The bags were later removed and stored in a MELFI. The crew repeated the above steps for 2 more sample bags but for incubation times of 18 and 23 hours.  STaARS-iFUNGUS cultures a rare type of fungus in the microgravity environment of space to support the search for new antibiotics. The fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum, comes from deep in the Earth’s subsurface and shows potential as a source for new antibacterial compounds. For the iFUNGUS experiment frozen fungal spores are transported to the ISS, fungus is grown in different nutrient mixtures over different intervals, and frozen samples are returned to Earth where scientists examine how they grew and what chemicals they produced. Discoveries generated by this research can foster further research and production efforts that utilize low gravity conditions to create novel compounds or other products.

MagVector:  The crew performed closeout and cleanup activities for the 7-day MagVector Run #12.  The European Space Agency (ESA) MagVector investigation studies how the Earth’s magnetic field interacts with an electrical conductor. Using extremely sensitive magnetic sensors placed around and above a conductor, researchers can gain insight into ways that the magnetic field influences how conductors work. This research may help improve future ISS experiments and offer insights into how magnetic fields influence electrical conductors in general.

Rodent Research 9 (RR-9):  The crew replaced old food bars and cleaned the Animal Habitats to support the ongoing RR-9 investigation which studies how microgravity affects the immune systems, muscles and bones of rodents during extended stays on the ISS.  After approximately 30 days aboard the ISS, the mice will be returned to Earth where scientists on the ground will study how their time in space has affected various tissues, including brain, muscle, heart, joints, eyes and the immune system.

SUPVIS-Justin:  The crew set up hardware for ESA’s SUPVIS-Justin investigation operations and completed a protocol operation.  SUPVIS-Justin, part of the Meteron program, aims to demonstrate that an astronaut on an orbiting space station can command a robot via a tablet PC to perform complex tasks on a planetary surface. The SUPVIS Justin experiment includes an extended supervised autonomy concept: the crew gives high level commands to the robot, which then uses its local intelligence and decision-making capability to execute a task independently, according to pre-programmed algorithms. In this sense, the responsibility of decision-making is shared between the crew and the robot.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  The crew collected saliva samples for the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation and placed them inside a MELFI.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes on ISS over a 1-year period and how they change over time.

Lighting Effects: A crewmember provided a sleep log entry for the Lighting Effects investigation. The light bulbs on the ISS are being replaced with a new system designed for improved crew health and wellness. Fluorescent bulbs are being replaced with solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that have adjustable intensity and color. Investigators will determine if the new lights improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance. Results from this investigation also have implications for people on Earth who use electric lights.

Dose Tracker:  A crewmember made a weekly medication tracking entry in the Dose Tracker application that runs on an iPad. Dose Tracker documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The investigation is expected to provide anecdotal evidence of medication effectiveness during flight and any unusual side effects experienced. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics is occurring during missions.

On-Board Training (OBT) Soyuz Descent Drill: In preparation for 50S undock, the 50S crew participated in a nominal descent drill.  In addition to the drill, they consulted with ground teams regarding returning equipment and Soyuz stowage. Undock and landing are scheduled for Saturday, September 2.

Waste & Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Urine Receptacle Remove and Replace (R&R): The crew R&Rd the WHC urine receptacle and insert filter.

Starboard Crew Quarters (CQ) Cleaning: In preparation for 50S departure from the ISS next week, the crew cleaned the starboard CQ intake and exhaust ducts as well as fans and airflow sensors.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #162 on: 09/02/2017 08:31 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 8/31/2017

Posted on August 31, 2017 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Special Daily Summary during JSC Closure

August 28th – September 1st

50S Crew Departure Preparations.  In preparation for their return to Earth this weekend, the 50S Crew cleaned their Crew Quarters, stowed returning items within the Soyuz and conducted a descent drill to review undocking procedures and timelines.  50S undock is scheduled for Saturday, September 2nd at 4:58PM with landing occurring in Kazakhstan’s Southern Landing Zone at 8:22PM. 

Space Technology and Advanced Research Systems (STaARS) Intraterrestrial Fungus (iFUNGUS): On Saturday the crew removed 2 sample bags from the STaARS facility after incubation times of 18 hours for one of the bags and 23 hours for the other.  The STaARS-iFUNGUS investigation cultures a rare type of fungus in the microgravity environment of space to support the search for new antibiotics. The fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum, comes from deep in the Earth’s subsurface and shows potential as a source for new antibacterial compounds. For the iFUNGUS experiment, frozen fungal spores are transported to the ISS, thawed and grown in different nutrient mixtures over different time intervals, and frozen samples are then returned to Earth where scientists examine how they grew and what chemicals they produced. Discoveries generated by this research can foster further research and production efforts that utilize low gravity conditions to create novel compounds or other products.

ADvanced Space Experiment Processor (ADSEP):  On Saturday the crew removed Cell Culturing (CellCult) cassettes from ADSEP and inserted the samples into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  ADSEP is a thermally controlled facility that accommodates up to three cassette-based experiments that can be independently operated.  A collection of experiment cassettes is used to accommodate experiments in cell technology, multiphase fluids, solution chemistry, separation science, microencapsulation, and crystal growth.  For CellCult investigations, each cassette contains a rotating filtered bioreactor, a reservoir for fresh media, two peristaltic pumps, a waste reservoir, and up to 6 sample-collection or reagent containers connected by a manifold to the reactor. Cultures can be operated in continuous perfusion, batch fed, static, or sampling modes.  The removal of samples and the addition of additives to the reactor volume can be programmed or teleoperated.

Multi-Omics-Mouse:  On Tuesday the crew cleaned the mouse habitats, collected fecal samples and exchanged food cartridges.  Today and tomorrow they will collect blood samples from the mice.  Several studies have reported space flight effects on the human immune system, but the relationship between microbiota and immune dysfunction during flight remains unclear. In the Multi-Omics-Mouse investigation, food with and without fructooligosaccharides (FOS) will be used as prebiotics, to determine if they improve the gut environment and immune function.  After the flight, researchers will analyze the gut environment (microbiota and metabolites) and immune system of the mice by multi-omics analysis.

Rodent Research 9 (RR-9):  Tomorrow the crew will replace old food bars and clean the Animal Habitats to support the ongoing RR-9 investigation.  RR-9 studies how microgravity affects the immune systems, muscles and bones of rodents during extended stays aboard the ISS.  After approximately 30 days aboard the ISS, the mice will be returned to Earth where scientists on the ground will study how their time in space has affected various tissues, including brain, muscle, heart, joints, eyes and the immune system.

Lung Tissue:  On Wednesday the crew collected samples and fixed media in Tissue Bags.  They inserted the bags into a Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The Lung Tissue investigation uses the microgravity environment of space to test strategies for growing new lung tissue. Using the latest bioengineering techniques, the Lung Tissue experiment cultures different types of lung cells in controlled conditions onboard the ISS. The cells are grown in a specialized framework that supplies them with critical growth factors so that scientists can observe how gravity affects growth and specialization as cells become new lung tissue.

Microbial Tracking-2 (MT-2):  On Sunday and Tuesday the crew collected saliva samples for the Microbial Tracking-2 investigation and placed them inside a MELFI.  After the samples are returned to Earth, a molecular analysis of the RNA and DNA will be conducted to identify the specific microbes that are present on ISS.  MT-2 monitors the different types of microbes on ISS over a 1-year period and how they change over time. 

Lighting Effects: Over the last week the crew has provided multiple sleep log entries for the Lighting Effects investigation. On Monday the crewmember transferred the Visual Performance Test hardware to their crew quarters, set the light to the correct mode, turned all other light sources in the crew quarters off, and performed a Numerical Verification Test and a Color Discrimination Test.  On Tuesday the crew took meter readings in the Columbus module.  Today two crewmembers completed a battery of cognitive tests on a laptop.  The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Aquapad:  Today the crew removed two Aquapad holders from an incubation bag and took pictures using the Everywear application for ground analysis.  The water that astronauts drink on the ISS is primarily from the recycling of water from the crew’s sweat, urine, and other reclaimed wastewater sources. Recycling reduces the number of supply missions needed and supports development of self-sufficient spacecraft for future missions beyond earth orbit.  Using a device that consists of a simple absorbent cotton injected with water and the laptop application, Aquapad aims to improve the speed and efficiency of water potability tests on board the ISS.

Genes in Space 3:  On Monday the crew processed samples in the Biomolecule Sequencer.  Genes in Space-3 seeks to establish a robust, user-friendly DNA sample preparation process to support biological monitoring aboard the ISS. The project joins two previously spaceflight tested molecular biology tools, Miniature Polymerase Chain Reaction (miniPCR) and the MinION, along with some additional enzymes to demonstrate DNA amplification, sample preparation for DNA sequencing, and sequencing of actual samples from the ISS. The Genes in Space-3 experiments demonstrate ways in which portable, real-time DNA sequencing can be used to assay microbial ecology, diagnose infectious diseases and monitor crew health aboard the ISS.

Genes in Space 4:  On Tuesday the crew completed two sessions for Genes in Space 4 that included processing of samples in the miniPCR.  The final session for the Genes in Space 4 investigation was completed today.  Genes in Space 4 is a high-school science experiment that examines gene expression related to special repair proteins known as heat shock proteins. Many organisms manufacture heat shock proteins to protect cells from heat, cold, radiation, or other stresses, but scientists are looking for additional insight into genetic switches that activate these proteins. Genes in Space 4 uses the well-studied worm, C. elegans, and an advanced miniaturized DNA identification system to detect genetic expression of heat shock proteins in the high-radiation microgravity environment of space.

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF): Tomorrow the crew will use a fiberscope to investigate an unidentified object in the ELF furnace chamber that is affecting sample position control.  The ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Biological Research in Canisters-22 (BRIC-22):  The crew performed actuation of four BRIC-22 canisters today.  Previous investigations have shown certain proteins regulate genetic activity in a way that protects plants from the extended physical stress of spaceflight.  BRIC-22 studies 8 different variants of thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) to determine the genetic regulation of stress responses.

ISS Non-invasive Sample Investigation and results Transmission to ground with the Utmost easiness (In Situ):  Today the crew collected a saliva sample and processed it in the bioanalyzer for the In Situ investigation.  As part of the nominal continuous monitoring of ISS crewmembers for health changes, saliva samples are taken and returned to Earth. The In Situ bioanalysis uses a portable device that can check crew members’ saliva on board the ISS, enabling direct real-time analysis. The device’s first uses are to monitor stress levels and appetites among crew members.  Humans living in space experience dramatic changes to their health, from weakened bone and muscle to reduced appetites and increased stress levels. The device uses disposable cartridges that check for the presence of the stress hormone cortisol.  A miniature analytical device that can detect certain biomarkers using non-invasively collected samples would benefit health care workers on Earth, from emergency medical technicians on call, to small rural clinics in developing countries.

Body Measures: On Monday a crewmember completed a Body Measures session with assistance from a trained operator. NASA is collecting in-flight anthropometric data to assess the impact of physical body shape and size changes on suit sizing.  Still and video imagery is captured and a tape measure is used to measure segmental length, height, depth, and circumference data for all body segments (chest, waist, hip, arms, legs, etc.) from astronauts before, during and after their flight missions.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): The crew completed multiple FMS sessions this week. The FMS investigation studies how the fine motor skills are effected by long-term microgravity exposure, different phases of microgravity adaptation, and sensorimotor recovery after returning to Earth gravity. The goal of the investigation is to determine how fine motor performance in microgravity varies over the duration of six-month and year-long space missions; how fine motor performance on orbit compares with that of a closely matched participant on Earth; and how performance varies before and after gravitational transitions, including periods of early flight adaptation and very early/near immediate post-flight periods.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N): After retrieving the eight Space Bubble Detectors from a Russian crewmember on Monday, a USOS crewmember deployed the detectors in the Columbus module for the Radi-N2 experiment. This Canadian Space Agency’s RaDI-N investigation uses the bubble detectors to measure neutron radiation levels in the ISS.

Sprint Ultrasound 2:  For a Sprint Ultrasound 2 session on Monday a crewmember, with support from an operator, configured the Ultrasound 2, placed reference marks on the calf and thigh of their right leg, donned the thigh and calf guides, and performed thigh and calf scans with remote guidance from the Sprint ground team. Ultrasound scans are used to evaluate spaceflight-induced changes in the muscle volume. The Sprint investigation evaluates the use of high intensity, low volume exercise training to minimize loss of muscle, bone, and cardiovascular function in ISS crewmembers during long-duration missions.

NeuroMapping: On Tuesday a USOS crewmember performed a Neuromapping test in “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. During the test, the crewmember executed three behavioral assessments: mental rotation, sensorimotor adaptation, and motor-cognitive dual tasking. The NeuroMapping investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, or multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.   

Circadian Rhythms:  On Wednesday a crewmember instrumented themselves with Thermolab sensors and mounted the Thermolab Unit to their belt, beginning 36 hours of monitoring for the Circadian Rhythms investigation.  Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crew members’ circadian clocks. The investigation also addresses the effects of reduced physical activity, microgravity and an artificially controlled environment. Changes in body composition and body temperature, which also occur in microgravity, can affect crew members’ circadian rhythms as well. Understanding how these phenomena affect the biological clock will improve performance and health for future crew members.

Redundant Galley Food Warmer Installation:  Today, the crew successfully installed a second Galley Food Warmer which arrived onboard SpX-12.  The new Food Warmer was installed next to the primary unit currently in use in Node 1. This Food Warmer will be used as a spare due to the fact that only one warmer can be powered at a time.

SpaceX Dragon Cargo Ops:  The crew continues to pack items for return on SpX-12.  As of Monday, approximately 21 hours of packing remained to be completed. SpX-12 is scheduled to unberth and return to earth on September 17, 2017.

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #163 on: 09/02/2017 08:31 AM »
Jack Fischer‏@Astro2fish ·

That’s all folks! Expedition 52 came to a close today as @AstroKomrade took over. Watch our journey home tomorrow, landing at 9:22 p.m. EDT.


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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #164 on: 09/03/2017 03:41 AM »
September 03, 2017
RELEASE 17-075


NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, who set multiple U.S. space records during her mission aboard the International Space Station, along with crewmates Jack Fischer of NASA and Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin of Roscosmos, safely landed on Earth at 9:21 p.m. EDT Saturday (7:21 a.m. Kazakhstan time, Sunday, Sept. 3), southeast of the remote town of Dzhezkazgan in Kazakhstan.

While living and working aboard the world’s only orbiting laboratory, Whitson and Fischer contributed to hundreds of experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science, welcomed several cargo spacecraft delivering tons of supplies and research experiments, and conducted a combined six spacewalks to perform maintenance and upgrades to the station.

Among their scientific exploits, Whitson and Fischer supported research into the physical changes to astronaut’s eyes caused by prolonged exposure to a microgravity environment. They also conducted a new lung tissue study that explored how stem cells work in the unique microgravity environment of the space station, which may pave the way for future stem cell research in space.

Additional research included an antibody investigation that could increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy drugs for cancer treatment, and the study of plant physiology and growth in space using an advanced plant habitat. NASA also attached the Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass Investigation (ISS CREAM) on the outside of the space station in August, which is now observing cosmic rays coming from across the galaxy.

The crew members received a total of seven cargo deliveries during their mission. A Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle launched to the space station in December 2016 delivering new lithium-ion batteries that were installed using a combination of robotics and spacewalks. Orbital ATK’s Cygnus spacecraft arrived at the station in April on the company's seventh commercial resupply mission. Three SpaceX Dragon spacecraft completed commercial resupply missions to the station in February, June and August. And, Russian ISS Progress cargo spacecraft docked to the station in February and June.

Whitson’s return marks the completion of a 288-day mission that began last November and spanned 122.2 million miles and 4,623 orbits of the Earth – her third long-duration mission on the station. During her latest mission, Whitson performed four spacewalks, bringing her career total to 10. With a total of 665 days in space, Whitson holds the U.S. record and places eighth on the all-time space endurance list.

Fischer, who launched in April, completed 136 days in space, during which he conducted the first and second spacewalks of his career. Yurchikhin, who launched with Fischer, now has a total of 673 days in space, putting him seventh place on the all-time endurance list.

Expedition 53 continues operating the station, with Randy Bresnik of NASA in command, and Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos and Paolo Nespoli of ESA (European Space Agency) serving as flight engineers. The three-person crew will operate the station until the arrival of NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba, and Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos. Vande Hei, Acaba and Misurkin are scheduled to launch Sept. 12 from Baikonur, Kazakhstan.

Get breaking news, images and features from the station on Instagram and Twitter at:

https://instagram.com/iss

and

https://www.twitter.com/Space_Station

-end-

Picture Credit:
NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, Russian cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin of Roscosmos, and NASA astronaut Jack Fischer undergo routine initial medical checks after returning from their mission aboard the International Space Station at 9:21 p.m. EDT Saturday (7:21 a.m. Kazakhstan time, Sunday, Sept. 3), landing southeast of the remote town of Dzhezkazgan in Kazakhstan.
Credits: NASA TV
Tony De La Rosa

Offline Space Pete

Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #165 on: 09/03/2017 10:18 PM »
This is very cool - Peggy & Paolo have recreated a photo of them both from STS-120, in exactly the same place on the ISS, just 1 month shy of exactly 10 years ago (Oct 2007).

The original image (the bottom attachment) shows Peggy & Paolo at the Node 1 Port hatchway, preparing for the first entry into Node 2 (which was temporarily berthed there at the time).

Now, they have recreated the exact same picture (although of course Node 3 is now located at N1P).

Neat.

[And for the real ISS geeks - note that the CBM hatches in both pictures are mis-aligned by 90 degrees (in the new image Peggy is holding onto a yellow handrail on the left, whereas in the original image the yellow handrail is on the top) - this is because of the 90-degree "clocking" of Node 3.] :)
« Last Edit: 09/03/2017 10:25 PM by Space Pete »
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition-52 thread (June - September 2017)
« Reply #166 on: 09/11/2017 08:11 AM »
Int-Ball Letter Vol. 5: Buddy of Astronauts



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