Author Topic: Countdown to new smallsat launchers  (Read 67709 times)

Offline savuporo

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #240 on: 03/14/2017 04:47 AM »
And one of the companies in this list has actually pulled a tiny launch stunt

Zero2Infinity, seems like ~toy-sized prototype, but hey it launched at 25km altitude, actual hardware even if subscale, and apparently validated a bunch of operational stuff.
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Offline topsphere

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #241 on: 04/10/2017 12:14 PM »
So I guess a round-up summary of small launcher developments in Q1 2017 is:


RocketLab have taken Electron vertical and are still promosing a launch in a few months.

Vector have created a test flight Vector-R which they intend to launch on a sub-orbital test flight soon.

Zero2infinity have ignited a [small] engine on their Bloostar vehicle.

Virgin Galactic have spunout LauncherOne development to Virgin Orbit.

Failure of SS-520-4.

Still just under 50 small launch vehicles in development, no signs of serious market consolidation yet (probably because there are also no signs of one company running away and leading the pack).

Offline savuporo

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #242 on: 05/04/2017 03:14 AM »
Now we can count Vector getting off the launch rail.

Rocketlab still only teasing, but presumably they have a lot more total impulse to bring.
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Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #243 on: 05/15/2017 04:37 AM »
Here's a video from Gilmour Space Technologies. Their ERIS launch vehicle (previously called Hyperion) is scheduled for first flight in 2020. They are currently looking at several launch sites, including KSC! They are using a hybrid motor with HTP oxidiser, 3D printed ABS plastic fuel and ceramic catalyst.



They've updated their website and are listing prices for cubesat launches. $900K for 100 kg suborbital to 150 km, and pricing from $25K to $38K per kg for small satellites.

http://www.gspacetech.com/satellite-launches
« Last Edit: 05/15/2017 04:43 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
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Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #244 on: 05/15/2017 12:33 PM »
Planning ahead 20-25 years. If Gilmour Space Technologies can make a solid propellant out of an aluminium or magnesium mixture then it can be used to move around the Moon. Lunar regolith contains aluminium and magnesium but very little carbon.

Offline Lars-J

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #245 on: 05/15/2017 04:23 PM »
The slide title... "Why hybrid propulsion for cost reduction".   :o ;D That statement by itself is enough for me to discount them. But maybe they can prove me wrong.

Offline savuporo

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #246 on: 06/24/2017 07:52 PM »
Table way overdue for an update

- Moonspike became Orbex http://www.parabolicarc.com/2017/06/23/orbex-reveals-rocket-factory/
- Rocketlab actually launched

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Online QuantumG

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #247 on: 06/25/2017 12:37 AM »
- Moonspike became Orbex http://www.parabolicarc.com/2017/06/23/orbex-reveals-rocket-factory/

Hmmm... I wonder if they're still pursuing cheap turbopumps.
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Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #248 on: 06/25/2017 05:27 PM »
- Moonspike became Orbex http://www.parabolicarc.com/2017/06/23/orbex-reveals-rocket-factory/

Hmmm... I wonder if they're still pursuing cheap turbopumps.
Sounds like they are more than powerpoint rocket company.

“We’ve already built ignition systems, main engines, avionics and cryotanks at our existing factory and have recently completed a series of main engine hot fire tests at our own engine test site,”

Offline old_sellsword

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #249 on: 06/26/2017 07:53 PM »
PLD Space posted a new video yesterday showing a bunch of ignition tests.



Edit: The engine is called TEPREL, and it was the development version of their ARION 1 main engine. More info on their blog.

Quote
After 2 years of testing, the European rocket company PLD Space has concluded the first sets of testing of their liquid rocket engine.


TEPREL Demo engine, was a calorimetric engine intended to demonstrate combustion stability as well as to acquire relevant information such as ignition and shut-down sequences, pressures and temperatures along the engine, thrust and propellant mass flow rates at different thrust profiles. Additionally, the engine served to test all associated hardware and software at PLD Space propulsion test facilities.

The company has posted a new video in its Youtube channel, as a tribute of those two years of engine testing. The company shows in the video this engineering and testing development focused on the startup and shut-down of the engine, the combustion stability and increase of thrust. During two years of optimizing the injection system, the company has increased the thrust of the engine from the initial value of 25kN to the current thrust of 32 kN at sea level.

TEPREL (Acronym for Spanish Launchers Propulsion Technology) testing program started in June 2015 and after dozens of tests at PLD Space´s facilities located at Teruel Airport, the company is now ready to face the next technical challenge, testing the regeneratively cooled engine called TEPREL-A.

TEPREL-A is a KeroLOX engine that will work nearly 2 minutes at full power, producing 32 kN at Sea Level, enough thrust to launch ARION 1 suborbital launcher into space.

PLD Space expect to perform this regeneratively cooled engine testing by next month. The new engine will help to close the design loop of the first flight qualification rocket engine that will boost ARION 1 test vehicle. This first test flight is currently planned for late 2018.

They did successfully test TEPREL-A, I posted that video below.
« Last Edit: 07/24/2017 06:37 PM by old_sellsword »

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Offline savuporo

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #251 on: 07/12/2017 09:53 PM »
https://www.spaceintelreport.com/50-small-satellites-seeking-launch-year-will-not-find-ride-uks-catapult-says/

Quote
PARIS — As many as 50 small satellites awaiting launch this year will remain grounded because of a lack of suitable launch-service options, and many that find a launch will end up in less-than-ideal operating orbits, according to Britain’s Satellite Applications Catapult Ltd.

But in what may be a confirmation of markets’ tendency to overreact, the Catapult’s survey found more than 50 rockets dedicated to small-satellite launches now under development
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Offline savuporo

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #252 on: 07/23/2017 09:58 PM »
Cubecab doesn't have a dedicated thread here, and it appears for a good reason.

TRMO interview with Adrian Tymes, the CEO
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULBbpAYARI8?t=1678

I'm halfway through and absolutely nothing about this sounds even remotely credible
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Offline old_sellsword

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #253 on: 07/24/2017 06:33 PM »
Another PLD Space video, this one showing a test fire of TEPREL-A, a regeneratively cooled kerolox engine that will power ARION 1.



Also, they say they their ARION 1 test launch is scheduled for late 2018. This info comes from their blog.
« Last Edit: 07/25/2017 02:42 AM by old_sellsword »

Offline LooksFlyable

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #254 on: 07/24/2017 10:10 PM »
That's awesome. So happy to see some of these small sat launchers progressing. I really think this is where cheap access to space is really going to be born out of. So many different approaches, much more exciting technology being developed and much smaller budgets to work with. They are having to dig deep for more innovative approaches as opposed to just billionaires or governments throwing money at it until it works. If even 20% of them survive, that's still a lot of new players in the game that could look into scaling up their operations.

Offline savuporo

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #255 on: 08/07/2017 02:55 AM »
https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20170805_12/

Yet another one. And not like IHI doesn't have the chops.

Quote
Four Japanese firms from different industries are planning to set up a company to develop next-generation rockets for launching small satellites.

The use of small satellites for communications and observation purposes is spreading in the United States and other countries. Some start-up companies in Japan have launched efforts to develop rockets for launching small satellites at low costs.

Industry sources say Canon Electronics, IHI Aerospace, Shimizu Corporation and the Development Bank of Japan, or DBJ, plan to launch a firm to develop next-generation mini rockets.

Both Canon and IHI have been developing satellites. Shimizu is a major construction firm and the DBJ is a government-affiliated financial institution.

The sources say the new company will aim to enter the microsatellite launching business, whose market is projected to grow globally.

The 4 companies are reportedly hoping to gather their know-how in rocket development and put the new firm into operation soon.

Japan's space industry is lagging behind that of the US and other countries.

A law was enacted last November to encourage private companies to enter the industry.

EDIT: Seems like this refers to the previously announced partnership to advance  SS-520 to commercial service, maybe with new funding ?

EDIT2: more details on partnership
http://blog.livedoor.jp/sword_bridge/archives/51834037.html
Quote
The new company will be founded on Wednesday with capital of 200 million yen ($1.8 million). Canon Electronics will take a 70% stake. The three other parties will have stakes of 10%.

The business is not expected to get underway until at least the end of fiscal 2017. When it does begin operating, it will try to meet some of the surging demand to carry small satellites into space with a small, low-cost rocket.

The partners plan to develop the rocket using technology from the SS-520 minirocket owned by JAXA, Japan's space agency.
« Last Edit: 08/07/2017 03:00 AM by savuporo »
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Offline savuporo

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #256 on: 08/09/2017 02:38 AM »
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Offline Archibald

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #257 on: 08/15/2017 11:21 AM »
that thread is amazing. Considering the last posts (like mushrooms...) does the list has been updated recently  ?

Offline savuporo

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Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #258 on: 08/15/2017 02:38 PM »
Not up to date, been collecting updates slowly but haven't updated.

Meanwhile, here are probably the most recent views in table format

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/10/03/plethora-small-sat-launchers/

https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/ast/media/2017_AST_Compendium.pdf
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Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Countdown to new smallsat launchers
« Reply #259 on: 08/15/2017 07:39 PM »
They vary in size from 4kg -300kg to SSO. There is market for few different sizes and why they may all compete for cubesat when it comes to smallsat some will have niche market.


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