Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : Spaceflight SSO-A (Sun Synch Express) : Q2 2018  (Read 46714 times)

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - SSO-A (Sun Synch Express) - late 2017
« Reply #60 on: 04/04/2017 01:04 PM »
Spaceflight Industries: Spacecraft Recontact Simulations [March 21, 2017]
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As we get closer to our SSO-A dedicated rideshare mission aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9, our preparations have moved into high gear. We’ve got an amazing team getting ready to deploy close to 90 satellites in the same orbit. To ensure a flawless mission, we’ve brought in experts from outside who are excited to be part of the mission.

As part of our preparations, Dr. Vivek Nagabhushan, Spaceflight’s Group Lead of Spacecraft Dynamics and Control, reached out to Dr. Behcet Acikmese, professor of Aerospace and Aeronautical Engineering at the University of Washington. ... He is a well- known expert at guidance, control and estimation algorithms for spacecraft. His task was to develop an analysis tool to assess different deployment strategies with Dr. Nagabhushan’s guidance. ...

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - SSO-A (Sun Synch Express) - late 2017
« Reply #61 on: 04/08/2017 08:40 PM »
Terra Bella FCC Filing
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In total, seven SkySat satellites are currently operating. Terra Bella anticipates launching SkySat8 through SkySat15—the remaining currently authorized spacecraft in the constellation—in 2017.
SkySat16 through SkySat21, for which this modification is requested, are currently under construction. Terra Bella anticipates launching these satellites as early as September 2018.
« Last Edit: 04/08/2017 08:41 PM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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Now 2018...

[May 2, 2017] Who We’re Taking to Space: KNACKSAT
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The first entirely Thai-built satellite, KNACKSAT is going to be aboard Spaceflight’s SSO-A mission in 2018...

Offline gongora

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[May 4, 2017] Spaceflight: Launch Vehicle Separation Systems 101
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Launch Vehicle Separation Systems 101
May 4, 2017 Hilary Meyerson   

Building a satellite is a costly and difficult endeavor. Getting that very expensive and sensitive payload safely on orbit is the next step. That’s where we come in. And once we get them to orbit, we need to separate them and send them on their way. So, we work with our customers to identify the right separating system to deploy their spacecraft. While sometimes customers come to us with a system chosen, more often we consider the size and shape of their spacecraft, make a recommendation and purchase it for them. There are many benefits for the customer to go this route. First of all, we’re subsystem agnostic. We choose the right system for the mission, period. We don’t sell hardware – we can pick and choose from a variety of vendors looking for the best technical solution and value to the customer. Here’s a brief rundown of the available options:

Clamp bands: These type of separation systems used two rings, held together by a clamping mechanism. One ring is attached to the spacecraft and one to Spaceflight’s mounting structure. Once the clamping mechanism is released, the rings separate and the spacecraft is flying free. Springs are used to provide a separation velocity to the spacecraft. They come in a variety of bolt circle diameters and are the most common method for separating larger spacecraft. Within the general category of clamp bands, there are different approaches to the clamping mechanism:

Motorized Light Band (MLB): The MLB is a popular separation system, which is built by Planetary Systems Corporation. It uses a motor to release an innovative modular clamping mechanism. It is very reliable, lightweight, and cost effective solution.. We are using multiple MLBs of different diameters for our SSO-A launch. It’s highly reliable and has been flight proven many times. It is lighter than a clamp band.

Marmon Clamps: Marmon clamps are classic mechanisms for holding together and releasing cylindrical structures, including the difference stages of some rockets. They consist of two rings with a V-shaped groove in them. They clamp on a corresponding V-shaped ridge that is formed when bringing the two separating halves together. The two rings are held torqued tightly in place by a bolt mechanism that can be separated by various means. For a spacecraft separation system, one side would bolt to the spacecraft and one to the launch vehicle. Traditionally, separation systems of these type used pyrotechnic (i.e. explosive) devices to cut the clamping bolt. However, the more modern systems such as Spaceflight uses, a low shock release mechanism is used to give our customers a gentle separation. They have an excellent success rate. We are using a large one, with a 1575 mm diameter from Ruag for an upcoming mission.

For CubeSats we use a variety of dispensers depending on the needs of individual Cubesats, as well as to help fit as many spacecraft as possible onto a given launch.

Quadpack: The Quadpack is built by Innovative Solutions in Space (ISIS) in Delft, Holland. They can handle up to 12U equivalent volume of cubesats. In other word, different combinations of CubeSat sizes that add up to 12Us. For example it can dispense four 3U satellites, or two 6U satellites, two 3Us plus 1 6U or a single 12U. We’re using Quadpacks on both the SSO-A mission and PSLV mission.

6U pack: This is also built by our friends in Delft. It is basically half of a Quadpack. We are using several of these on an upcoming launch on a Minotaur IV launch vehicle, as well as on the SSO-A mission.

ISI pod: We’ve also used the single 3U “ISI pod” dispenser built by the Dutch company ISIS for Soyuz missions.

PSL-P (Pico Satellite Launch Pack): This is another dispenser, similar to the Quadpack in size and capacity. It is built by German company Astro Fein. It holds up to 12U of CubeSats in different combinations. It features a clamping mechanism that holds the CubeSats firmly in place once the doors are closed prior to flight.

Canisterized Satellite Dispenser (CSD): The CSD is built by Planetary Systems Corporation, who also build the MLB separation systems discussed above. This dispenser design comes In multiple sizes, 3U, 6U, and 12U. It has a unique restraint mechanism. Instead of using rails inside the dispenser, it has tabs along the bottom of the CubeSat that are clamped in place when the door is closed. This provides a firm attachment and known load path, provide more definitive knowledge of the CubeSat dispensers.

Custom systems: Sometimes the commercial off the shelf solutions don’t work with a customer’s spacecraft or they have their own unique system. In these cases, we are flexible and adapt as needed. For the Hawkeye360’s upcoming payload, they have a special dispenser unit, that slides the satellite out for deployment. We are accommodating the unique requirements to work with this systems. In other situations, we’ve also created custom deployment units to meet unique criteria on the PSLV and the DNEPR launch vehicles.

One of the most common questions we get is about the tip off rate – how the deployment will “tip” the spacecraft or cause it to alter course from it’s path. Standard separation systems like lightbands and clamp rings will have little tip off and this rate can be adjusted based on the springs activated during deployment. Dispensers are typically less refined dynamically will have a higher tip off rate.

These are just some of the possible separation systems available. Our experts can find exactly the right one for your spacecraft – it can be like a game of Tetris making the pieces all fit. But that is why our customers rely on us to get their spacecraft safely on orbit.

Offline gongora

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[This post will be updated as we find out more payloads for SSO-A.]

Spaceflight’s 2017 Sun Synch Express mission manifest includes satellites as small as 5 kg 3U CubeSat up to 575 kg satellite. Over 20 satellites from 10 countries will be deployed during the mission. Currently at 90 percent capacity.

Terra Bella Skysat 14 & 15 (lead payload, controls schedule) (87kg each?)

Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer (COVWR or ORS-6) (Air Force) (~300kg according to Gunter)

EU:CROPIS The Eu:CROPIS spacecraft will be manifested as a commercial customer on one of five available ports on Spaceflight’s SHERPA rideshare vehicle going to a sun synchronous orbit. (250kg according to Gunter)

NEXTSat-1 satellite from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology’s (KAIST), conducting scientific missions such as star formation and space storm measurements and also technology demonstration in space. (100kg)

Iceye’s innovative SAR (synthetic aperture radar) micro-satellite for all condition imaging

HawkEye 360’s first three formation-flying satellites to detect, characterize, and geolocate various RF signals worldwide

STPSat-5 (100-150kg?) [Via Satellite March 30, 2016]"Based on the company’s SN-50 bus, STPSat 5 passed its Critical Design Review (CDR) in December 2015. Roth said the satellite is expected to launch as part of a large payload stack on a SpaceX Falcon 9 in Fall 2017. U.S. Air Force changes to the STPSat 5’s payloads delayed the mission from 2016." Fits on ESPA ring.

BlackSky Global : Gunter lists 4 of these sats on the flight

Cubesats:

Elysium Star II (1U Cubesat)

Fox-1Cliff (1U) "The launches of AMSAT satellites Fox-1Cliff and Fox-1D have been rebooked from the original Spaceflight Formosat-5/Sherpa mission aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9  on to two separate new launches...Fox-1Cliff will launch on Spaceflight’s SSO-A dedicated rideshare mission aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California in late 2017 or early 2018."

JY1SAT (1U Cubesat from Jordan)

KNACKSAT (1U Cubesat, Thailand)

Myriota (3U IOT Cubesat from Australia)

Orbital Reflector (3U Cubesat/Artwork)

edit 2017-09-11 Added Myriota
edit 2017-08-31: added Orbital Reflector
edit 2017-05-30: added JY1SAT
edit 2017-05-16: added Elysium cubesat


« Last Edit: 09/28/2017 08:41 PM by gongora »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Thanks gongora. If you make a change, can you indicate the change some way?
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline gongora

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Elysium Star II cubesat on the manifest for this flight.

Elysium Space to Launch World’s First Memorial Spacecraft on SpaceX Falcon 9 Mission
Tuesday May 16, 2017
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SAN FRANCISCO, CA – The pioneering company in memorial spaceflight, Elysium Space, is announcing today that its Elysium Star II memorial spacecraft will be on Spaceflight’s SSO-A dedicated rideshare mission aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 to be launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Last November Elysium Space announced its revolutionary partnership with Spaceflight, a leading provider of launch and mission management services, to offer annual memorial spaceflight services to families, drastically reducing waiting times from years to months.

“We are honored to assist families in achieving their dreams, riding on one of the greatest rocket in the world. This historical launch provides the perfect conditions to make this memorial spaceflight an exceptionally meaningful experience for all participants.” said Thomas Civeit, founder and CEO of Elysium Space.

The 100 participants already booked for the upcoming Elysium Star II mission include U.S. military veterans, aerospace enthusiasts, and families looking to celebrate a loved one within the poetry of the starry sky. Families are welcome to join this historical launch event at Vandenberg in Southern California, or to watch via a live stream.

The spacecraft will be deployed in a Sun-synchronous orbit, ensuring it will pass over every location in the world during its journey among the stars, which will last about 2 years before re-entering the atmosphere as a shooting star. The free iOS/Android Elysium mobile app will display the memorial spacecraft location in real time during the mission, enhancing the overall personal connection and experience. Reservations for the Elysium Star II mission are still open via the Elysium Space website, starting at $2,490.

The Elysium Space memorial spacecraft are the first dedicated satellites ever launched for this purpose, and offer the most personal experience; previous memorial spaceflights consisted in mounting participants’ capsules to a rocket upper stage or another existing satellite.

SpaceX’s Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) at Vandenberg Air Force Base has a long history dating back to the early 1960s. Originally an Atlas launch pad activated in 1962, SLC-4E was in active use until a final Titan IV launch in 2005. SpaceX’s groundbreaking was in July 2011, and the pad was completed in just 17 months later in November 2012.

“Offering dedicated rideshare missions makes it easier and more affordable for organizations like Elysium Space to execute their space missions,” said Curt Blake, President of Spaceflight’s launch division. “We are pleased to be able to play a role in their historical mission.”

This milestone allows Elysium Space to pursue its prime mission of offering exceptional tributes that are within the reach of most families; by looking into the infinite wonder of the night sky, we can remember the beauty of those who have touched our lives forever.

(found via this article: [TechCrunch]Elysium Space to launch the first ever ‘memorial spacecraft’ via SpaceX
« Last Edit: 05/16/2017 04:59 PM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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This is likely on SSO-A, and shows a February launch date.

Jordan’s First CubeSat Set for Early 2018 Launch
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05/30/2017

Jordan's first CubeSat — JY1SAT — will be launched next February. The spacecraft’s name recalls the Amateur Radio call sign of Jordan’s late King Hussein. JY1SAT will carry a FUNcube 435/145 MHz SSB/CW Amateur Radio inverting transponder and a Slow-Scan Digital Video (SSDV) system to transmit stored images.

According to The Jordan Times, a team of 16 university students has been constructing the 1U CubeSat, supervised by a group of experts and academics through weekly meetings at the Royal Jordanian Radio Amateurs Society (RJRAS). RJRAS members Nart Tahamouqa, JY5IB, and Rafiq Farmawi, JY4CI, serve as advisers to the project.

The JY1SAT team includes 24-year-old Zeid Kawar, whose 2-month internship at NASA’s Ames Research Center inspired his interest in developing his country’s first nanosatellite.

The student team will develop and operate a special ground station (JY6JY). JY1SAT will transmit stored images reflecting Jordan’s historical and cultural heritage, which will be selected in advance of the launch through a national competition.

JY1SAT applied to the IARU on May 15 to coordinate a telemetry downlink on 145.840 MHz and transponder downlink passband of 145.855-145.875 MHz with an inverting uplink on 435.100-435.120 MHz. A SpaceX flight will carry JY1SAT into orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. — Thanks to AMSAT-UK, The Jordan Times, AMSAT News Service

Offline gongora

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[SpaceNews] Rideshare demand grows despite development of small launch vehicles
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“We’re trying to provide more domestic launch capability for secondaries,” said Scott Schoneman of Spaceflight, noting that about one-third the value of that dedicated Falcon 9 launch is for U.S. government satellites that could not launch on foreign vehicles.

Offline gongora

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This appears to be a 3U cubesat, launching early/spring 2018 on a Falcon 9, ride arranged through Spaceflight, video shows it coming off an ESPA ring based carrier.  Sounds like SSO-A.  He's still raising the last $70k on Kickstarter if you want to sponsor a payload  ;)

Orbital Reflector web page

[Architectural Digest] This Is Why a Beautiful Sculpture Will Be Launched Into Outer Space
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It’s not often that we pause to think about the many satellites that roam outer space. An ambitious project from artist Trevor Paglen aims to change that, reimagining the aesthetics of aerospace engineering and our relationship with the cosmos in the process. For his work titled Orbital Reflector, a diamond-shaped silver balloon measuring 100 feet in length will be packed into a small, box-like structure known as a CubeSat and launched out of Earth’s atmosphere via a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. Once it's about 350 miles from Earth, the CubeSat will release the sculpture. The mirror-like sculpture will circle the globe for a period of two months, reflecting light as brightly as the Big Dipper does back to Earth.



[New York Times] Art for a Post-Surveillance Age
[Wired] Trevor Paglen’s satellite of art
« Last Edit: 09/06/2017 02:18 PM by gongora »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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They claim that they will be the first art satellite. I don't think they can claim that as the art satellite DESPATCH was launched on 3 December 2014 on H-IIA.

http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/despatch.htm
« Last Edit: 09/08/2017 07:14 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline gongora

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[Financial Review] Micro-satellite on Space-X to propel Myriota
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The small satellites, the first of which is earmarked to be launched in the US in February, 2018 as one of the many payloads aboard a Falcon9 rocket operated by Elon Musk's SpaceX company, are set to enable an expansion of the "affordable monitoring" service from thousands of devices across industry.
...
The nano-satellite earmarked to be launched on the SpaceX rocket has the dimensions of about 30cm x 10cm x 10cm.

The Myriota technology enables two-way communication between transmitters on the ground and the satellites, and enables monitoring of data, and asset tracking in remote locations. The company has undertaken commercial trials in monitoring water tank levels in remote areas.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Thanks Gongora. Myriota (which is based here in Adelaide) have used exactEarth satellites in the past. This is the first I've heard of Myriota launching their own satellite. The article doesn't give a name for the cubesat, but I'm going to call it Myriota 1 for the moment. This could end up being a payload on another cubesat, like what happened with Biarri Point.

http://www.exactearth.com/media-centre/recent-news/294-exactearth-invests-in-satellite-internet-of-things-technology-company
« Last Edit: 09/12/2017 04:41 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline CameronD

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Thanks Gongora. Myriota (which is based here in Adelaide) have used exactEarth satellites in the past. This is the first I've heard of Myriota launching their own satellite. The article doesn't give a name for the cubesat, but I'm going to call it Myriota 1 for the moment. This could end up being a payload on another cubesat, like what happened with Biarri Point.

http://www.exactearth.com/media-centre/recent-news/294-exactearth-invests-in-satellite-internet-of-things-technology-company

The article does mention they've undertaken "commercial trials" in the past (presumably using exactEarth hardware), so perhaps this is simply them branching out with their own hardware instead.
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Article reporting SpaceX launching cubesats from Adelaide companies Myriota and Fleet. Myriota cubesat launching "between February and April". Fleet launching in early 2018.

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/business/elon-musks-spacex-rocket-to-launch-adelaide-tech-companies-to-new-heights/news-story/570f7cc0e1953adbd10b3c497c3ac399
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline gongora

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This article has pictures and video of the SSO-A stack being assembled at Spaceflight.
[King5 News (Seattle)] Seattle's space business continues to grow
« Last Edit: 09/28/2017 03:37 PM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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This article has pictures and video of the SSO-A stack being assembled at Spaceflight.
[King5 News (Seattle)] Seattle's space business continues to grow

Here are some quotes from the article.  The videos give a nice look at the stack.  They say launch is around the middle of 2018.  Recent mentions have been from February to April (trending more towards April), so I'm guessing second quarter would be the best current estimate.

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At Seattle-based Spaceflight Industries, the size of the spacecraft continues to grow.  The new SSO-A, assembled in a tall warehouse in Auburn, stands nearly 20 feet tall.

This week, the stages of the spacecraft are bolted together and scheduled for vibration tests designed to find out if the SSO, which stands for Sun Synchronous Orbit, is ready for the violence of launch.
...
Aboard the SSO, there are attachments points and dispensers for 120 satellites
...
the satellites that will hitch a ride aboard the SSO-A come from nearly 50 private and government entities from 16 different countries.

Offline gongora

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SSO-A MISSION PREP AT AUBURN INTEGRATION FACILITY
By Jodi Sorensen
SEPTEMBER 27, 2017

We’re conducting tests this week for our 2018 SSO-A mission aboard a Falcon 9. Our new Auburn, WA Integration facility allows us to build the SSO-A stack to full height (nearly 20 feet!) while we run tests with mass simulators (structures of the same weight and size of the satellites to be launched) attached. Actual integration of customer satellites will occur in a clean room built on site. When integration is complete, the stack will be disassembled carefully in sections for shipment down to Vandenberg Air Force Base, where it will be reassembled at the launch site.

For today’s test, more than 200 accelerometers were placed around the assembly and results of the simulation were recorded.

We were happy to have Glenn Farley of King 5 News in Seattle on hand to film a short segment about the mission and the Auburn facility.

Preparations for the SSO-A mission have been running smoothly and according to schedule. We currently have 120 satellites for nearly 50 government and commercial customers from 16 countries manifested for this mission – a record-breaker! We’re looking forward to a great launch for our customers in 2018.

Offline gongora

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Tweet from Spaceflight Inc.:
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Watch us assemble our payload stack for #SSO-A in just over a minute:

Video in the tweet shows the parts of the stack being joined together.  I wonder what's going to be on the inside, I think that's where the lunar lander was going to ride when it was part of the mission.

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SPACEFLIGHT SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETES MODAL SURVEY FOR SSO-A SPACECRAFT
By Jodi Sorensen
OCTOBER 4, 2017

Test validates the accuracy of the computer model, which allows accurate predictions of launch stress

Seattle – Oct. 4, 2017 — Spaceflight, the company reinventing the model for launching small satellites into space, today announced its SSO-A Integrated Payload Stack has successfully completed a modal survey of the primary structure.

The series of tests, conducted by a third party, subjected Spaceflight’s nearly 20-foot satellite rideshare structure (flight structures with mass models to simulate critical customer spacecraft) to low-level vibration to excite the core structure. Results from these tests are used to correlate the detailed finite element model of the structure with flight structure, ultimately allowing engineers to calculate flight environments that the structure, avionics, and customer spacecraft will be exposed to during the launch.

This completes a significant milestone for the company’s first Dedicated Rideshare mission, dubbed “SSO-A,” which plans to launch many small satellites into sun-synchronous orbit from a SpaceX Falcon 9 next year. Spaceflight’s SSO-A mission will carry spacecraft from nearly 50 government and commercial organizations across 16 different countries, including Thailand, Finland, Germany, Australia and Singapore. It will deploy all of the smallsats to a sun-synchronous low-Earth orbit which is popular for Earth-imaging satellites. The mission, scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, will transport both microsats and cubesats, with 90 percent of the manifest accounted for by commercial and/or international organizations.

“This is the most complex launch we have ever designed and developed,” said Curt Blake, president of Spaceflight. “Because we’re breaking ground with such a historic mission, we need to ensure the payloads and spacecraft subsystems will withstand the turbulence and vibrations of launch. It’s a tremendous accomplishment for our team and testament to our integration expertise.”

Spaceflight provides the most launch options for customers, working with nearly every global launch vehicle provider, including the PSLV, Dnepr, Antares, Cygnus, Minotaur, Electron, Soyuz and others, to ensure organizations can access space when they want. The “rideshare service” model provides more options for organizations to reach a desired orbit at a much lower cost than buying their own launch vehicle.

Spaceflight has launched more than 120 satellites to date. The frequency of satellite launches, combined with Spaceflight’s cross-section of customers and variety of mission-applications, is a strong indicator of the growing capabilities of small satellites and the need for more timely and cost-effective access to space.




High resolution time-lapse video of stack being assembled:
https://www.spaceflightindustries.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/1-Minute-TimeLapse_h264_1080p.mp4?_=1
« Last Edit: 10/04/2017 10:34 PM by gongora »

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