Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : Spaceflight SSO-A (Sun Synch Express) : Q2 2018  (Read 52385 times)

Offline Chris Bergin

Discussion thread for Spaceflight Industries SSO-A rideshare mission.

NSF Threads for SSO-A : Discussion
NSF Articles for SSO-A :

Around April 2018 on Falcon 9 to SSO from Vandenberg SLC-4E.

List of known payloads




From Vandy I assume?

Spaceflight Purchases SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket to Provide More Frequent, Cost-Effective Rideshare Availability for Small Satellite Industry

Company expands launch services to meet growing demand for routine, predictable access to space, removing cost and access barriers for commercial and governmental organizations

 

SEATTLE (September 30, 2015)— Spaceflight, the company reinventing the model for launching small satellites into space, today announced the purchase of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and the expansion of its launch services to include dedicated rideshare missions. Spaceflight’s first dedicated rideshare mission, named the “2017 Sun Synch Express,” will launch in the second half of 2017 to a sun-synchronous low Earth orbit which is popular for earth imaging satellites.

Dedicated rideshare is a new launch alternative that blends cost-effective rideshare pricing with first-class service typically associated with buying a private rocket. Spaceflight’s dedicated rideshare missions will deliver customer spacecraft to popular destinations, such as sun-synchronous and geosynchronous transfer orbits, and provide a new solution for smaller satellites that cannot afford a complete launch vehicle.

“By purchasing and manifesting the entire SpaceX rocket, Spaceflight is well positioned to meet the smallsat industry’s growing demand for routine, reliable access to space,” said Curt Blake, President of Spaceflight’s launch business. “Our purchase of a private rocket further continues our mission of providing a customer-focused, full-service launch experience.”

Spaceflight’s dedicated rideshare routes are not tied to any particular primary satellite mission, so commercial and non-commercial smallsat operators using the service will benefit from the certainty of set launch schedules that were not previously available to rideshare customers, and can thereby avoid delays resulting from geo-political issues or primary satellite schedule changes. This enables customers with spacecraft that range in mass from 5 to 2500 kg to create long-range mission plans to Sun Synch and GTO with more dependable launch dates. Spaceflight is creating steady access to space with yearly dedicated rideshare missions planned beginning in 2017.

Spaceflight’s 2017 Sun Synch Express mission manifest includes satellites as small as 5 kg 3U CubeSat up to 575 kg satellite. Over 20 satellites will be deployed during the mission, with commercial customers pursuing a range of endeavors and government-sponsored scientific research originating from six different countries. The manifest is nearly at capacity.

“Dedicated missions for Rideshare-class payloads are an excellent way to promote space enterprise and research,” said Gwynne Shotwell, President and COO of SpaceX. “We are pleased that Spaceflight has successfully brought this multi-faceted partnership together.”

Spaceflight has launched 81 satellites to date and has over 135 satellites to deploy through 2018. The frequency of satellite launches, combined with Spaceflight’s cross-section of customers and variety of mission-applications, is a strong indicator of the growing capabilities of small satellites and the need for more timely and cost-effective access to space.

In addition to the new dedicated rideshare service, Spaceflight will continue to manifest small satellites as secondary payloads aboard several launch vehicles around the world to a variety of orbit destinations. Spaceflight is the only rideshare launch provider that publishes launch pricing and schedules online (http://www.spaceflightindustries.com/schedule-pricing/), aiming to make access to space as easy as booking an airline ticket.

About Spaceflight

Spaceflight is a next-generation, integrated space services and solutions company that is fundamentally changing how small satellites are built, launched and operated to improve access to space and enable persistent global awareness. Through its market-leading subsidiaries and service lines, including Spaceflight Systems, Spaceflight Services and Spaceflight Networks, the company provides cost-effective, comprehensive small-satellite products and services from development to launch, communications and operations. Headquartered in Seattle, Washington, Spaceflight provides its services worldwide through its global network of partners, ground stations and launch vehicle providers. For more information, please visit http://www.spaceflightindustries.com.



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)
   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles
   SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)

   L2 SpaceX Section

Offline arachnitect

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #1 on: 09/30/2015 05:12 PM »
Very interesting.

LMCLS was trying to do this with Athena.

Offline NovaSilisko

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #2 on: 09/30/2015 05:57 PM »
Presumably by "purchasing and manifesting the entire SpaceX rocket" they mean the whole available payload on a launch, not literally the rocket itself?

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #3 on: 09/30/2015 09:40 PM »
Read carefully. The press release stades:
 'a least 20 satellites` Most likely it will be more than 100 satellites.
Spaceflight industries gave a presentation at the Small Payload Rideshare Conference 2015.
I think page 6 and 14-18 contain info about this flight.
https://www.sprsa.org/sites/default/files/conference-presentation/Spaceflight%20Industries%20-%20SPRSA%202015%20-%20Q4%202015%20SHERPA%20Mission.pdf
« Last Edit: 05/06/2017 11:25 PM by gongora »

Online abaddon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #4 on: 09/30/2015 09:59 PM »
So "over 20 satellites" at roughly $60 million is something around $3 million average cost per payload plus whatever profit Spaceflight is making here.  Maybe $3.5-4 million for an average cost to the satellite owner, for a very rough estimate of cost?

Offline nadreck

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #5 on: 09/30/2015 10:11 PM »
So "over 20 satellites" at roughly $60 million is something around $3 million average cost per payload plus whatever profit Spaceflight is making here.  Maybe $3.5-4 million for an average cost to the satellite owner, for a very rough estimate of cost?

You can see the price list at http://www.spaceflightindustries.com/schedule-pricing/ note that if you scroll down to the schedule, I presume that this booked flight is the one labeled Q3 2017 launching from Vandenberg to a sun seeking orbit, note that I presume that because all possible satellite sizes are available on it.
It is all well and good to quote those things that made it past your confirmation bias that other people wrote, but this is a discussion board damnit! Let us know what you think! And why!

Offline ChrisWilson68

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #6 on: 10/01/2015 08:28 AM »
This is exactly why all those start-ups trying to build dedicated launchers for small payloads for $5-$10 million a shot are doomed to fail.

Offline docmordrid

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #7 on: 10/01/2015 11:12 AM »
This is exactly why all those start-ups trying to build dedicated launchers for small payloads for $5-$10 million a shot are doomed to fail.

At one launch/year they aren't going to steal many payloads from outfits who are planning on a shorter timeline. Especially for DoD smallsats which they may want up on demand.
DM

Offline arachnitect

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #8 on: 10/01/2015 01:21 PM »
This is exactly why all those start-ups trying to build dedicated launchers for small payloads for $5-$10 million a shot are doomed to fail.


They might be encouraged to see smallsat operators paying real money to go to useful orbits.

I'm not sure the dedicated launchers are doomed to fail, but their market is very small at best. Once a large number of smallsats want to go to the same place, they will fly on bigger rockets.
« Last Edit: 10/01/2015 01:22 PM by arachnitect »

Online abaddon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #9 on: 10/01/2015 01:34 PM »
At one launch/year they aren't going to steal many payloads from outfits who are planning on a shorter timeline. Especially for DoD smallsats which they may want up on demand.
Twenty satellites a year plus all of the others that are already manifested as secondaries on other launches?  That's a decent amount of capacity there...

Offline mhlas7

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #10 on: 10/01/2015 03:37 PM »
This is exactly why all those start-ups trying to build dedicated launchers for small payloads for $5-$10 million a shot are doomed to fail.

Price isn't the only consideration. If you need a satellite to go in a specific orbit at a specific time, you don't want other payloads to delay the launch or have to compromise on the destination orbit. The extra cost may be worth it in this situation. Even though Falcon 9 is the cheapest rocket around, it doesn't get all the commercial launches. Proton and Ariane still get customers and even the Atlas V has been getting commercial customers despite its high cost.

Also, lighter weight launchers will still have multiple payloads. Look at Rocket Lab's website (http://book.rocketlabusa.com/). You can book a spot on a shared ride for a CubeSat, and since they will be launching every ~1.5 months, the customers have more flexibility in regards to launch date versus spaceflight industries which may have 1 launch per year.

Offline MikeAtkinson

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #11 on: 10/01/2015 03:55 PM »
At > $28,000 / kg Spaceflight only need to sell ~ 3 tonnes of capacity to break even, this could be very profitable for them.

I can't find any estimates of F9 FT (v1.2) payload to SSO, but I'm guessing it is about 8 tonnes with booster flyback.

It seems that they can undercut the competition:

http://www.virgingalactic.com/satellite-launch/l1-performance/
Quote
"For a price below US $10 million, LauncherOne will now be able to launch 200 kg into the standard Sun-Synchronous Orbit"
Which is $50,000/kg.

RocketLab Electron seems to be $50,000/kg for 100 kg into SSO.

Firefly alpha seems to be about $9M for ~ 100 kg to SSO, or about $90,000 / kg

Offline Zed_Noir

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #12 on: 10/02/2015 01:03 AM »
We should re-titled this thread to SpaceX FalconBus SSO Xpress - Q3 2017   ;D

P.S. Xpress is not misspelled, remember this is SpaceX.

Offline OnWithTheShow

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #13 on: 10/02/2015 02:26 AM »
Also F9 is a real rocket that is actually flown compared to some of the others mentioned in this thread.

Offline ChrisWilson68

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #14 on: 10/02/2015 04:50 AM »
This is exactly why all those start-ups trying to build dedicated launchers for small payloads for $5-$10 million a shot are doomed to fail.

At one launch/year they aren't going to steal many payloads from outfits who are planning on a shorter timeline. Especially for DoD smallsats which they may want up on demand.

It's one dedicated launch per year already.  As the smallsat market grows, the flights become more frequent.

Also, there are opportunities as secondary payloads.  The same company offering the dedicated rideshare flight also offers opportunities as secondaries from multi-satellite secondary dispensers.

And the costs are several times lower.  How many organizations are so insensitive to price that they can pay many times as much just to launch a few months earlier?

Smallsats tend to be done by organizations that are much more constrained in their budgets than those that do larger satellites.  I think the vast majority of the smallsat market will go to ridesharing companies.

Offline guckyfan

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #15 on: 10/02/2015 07:17 AM »
Dedicated launch vehicles let you chose your orbit as well as the launch date. That may be a large advantage. However if one or two bulk launches a year take many of the customers it may undermine the business case of small launch vehicles.

Edit: there is one thing that worries me about many smallsats in sunsynchronous orbit. It is quite high and they will decay very slowly.
« Last Edit: 10/02/2015 07:22 AM by guckyfan »

Offline nadreck

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #16 on: 10/02/2015 02:07 PM »
there is one thing that worries me about many smallsats in sunsynchronous orbit. It is quite high and they will decay very slowly.

The solution here as I see it would be satellite corrals for birds that can't control themselves or have a high likelyhood of failure and as an alternative a commitment to use manoeuvring fuel to deorbit by a set date. The enforcement of the 'corral' would be with a device launched with them that can tether or net inactive sats that stray outside the corral. It would have guidance and electric propulsion. Eventually the whole corral has failed and is all tethered to the sheep dog satellite and can be deoribited together, or even if not, they are at least one monolithic piece and not 100's. The enforcement of the 'commitment' to deorbit should be a license fee and review of the likelihood of successful deorbit. If the bird fails before it deorbits the fee should have been high enough to pay for trash collection of the bird multiplied by the odds of it failing.
It is all well and good to quote those things that made it past your confirmation bias that other people wrote, but this is a discussion board damnit! Let us know what you think! And why!

Online douglas100

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #17 on: 10/02/2015 03:52 PM »
I don't think that corral is a very good analogy. There is no place like a corral in sunsynchronous orbit. Everything is in a state of flux. Either a satellite can maneuver or it can't. If it can't then it will inevitably drift in altitude and orbital plane from those which it was launched with. You could imagine launch providers refusing to launch non maneuverable satellites, but I think this is unlikely in the near future.

If your satellite can maneuver then it is only necessary that it operate in such a way that it causes no danger to others, no matter where it physically is. If it cannot, then your electrically propelled sheepdog could be part of a future solution. However policing such a service could be a major regulatory headache. For example, a US sheepdog couldn't sweep up a foreign-owned vehicle without the owner's permission.

Even the Cosmos Iridium collision didn't bring about the development of orbital clean up technology. It looks like things are going to continue as they are for some time yet.
Douglas Clark

Offline nadreck

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #18 on: 10/02/2015 06:02 PM »


If your satellite can maneuver then it is only necessary that it operate in such a way that it causes no danger to others, no matter where it physically is. If it cannot, then your electrically propelled sheepdog could be part of a future solution. However policing such a service could be a major regulatory headache. For example, a US sheepdog couldn't sweep up a foreign-owned vehicle without the owner's permission.


I see the sheepdog as going up with the launcher, and being agreed to by the client (and of course being paid for by the client as part of their launch cost). Basically adding the guidance system, capturing system, SEP, Solar panels and comms to the deployment device (SHERPA in this case)
« Last Edit: 10/02/2015 06:02 PM by nadreck »
It is all well and good to quote those things that made it past your confirmation bias that other people wrote, but this is a discussion board damnit! Let us know what you think! And why!

Offline Comga

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #19 on: 10/02/2015 07:45 PM »
there is one thing that worries me about many smallsats in sunsynchronous orbit. It is quite high and they will decay very slowly.

The solution here as I see it would be satellite corrals for birds that can't control themselves or have a high likelyhood of failure and as an alternative a commitment to use manoeuvring fuel to deorbit by a set date. The enforcement of the 'corral' would be with a device launched with them that can tether or net inactive sats that stray outside the corral. It would have guidance and electric propulsion. Eventually the whole corral has failed and is all tethered to the sheep dog satellite and can be deoribited together, or even if not, they are at least one monolithic piece and not 100's. The enforcement of the 'commitment' to deorbit should be a license fee and review of the likelihood of successful deorbit. If the bird fails before it deorbits the fee should have been high enough to pay for trash collection of the bird multiplied by the odds of it failing.

"Space is big.  Really big.  You won't believe how mind boggling big it is.  I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the Chemist, but....."

You may think the two dimensional surface of the Earth is big but increase that from two to six dimensions and it gets really big.

There is no such thing as a "corral" for satellites and no practice al way to do" trash collection".  Even if dispensed together they will disperse in all those dimensions. 

There are NSF threads and conferences discussing that. It is not clear that this is on-topic for this thread about this particular launch. 
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline nadreck

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #20 on: 10/02/2015 08:19 PM »


"Space is big.  Really big.  You won't believe how mind boggling big it is.  I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the Chemist, but....."

You may think the two dimensional surface of the Earth is big but increase that from two to six dimensions and it gets really big.

While I like the source of your quote, one of my favourite SF philosophers and one of my favourite humanists, it is non sequitor to this discussion. Where satellites go after they disperse is irrelevant if you prevent them from dispersing.


There is no such thing as a "corral" for satellites and no practice al way to do" trash collection".  Even if dispensed together they will disperse in all those dimensions. 

I am afraid I may not have been succinct, the use of the word corral was not suggesting a paddock like arrangement, but simply of establishing a parametric boundary beyond which a satellite within the virtual 'corral' would not be permitted to stray. Of course those with no control will disperse, however since the sheep dog satellite does have control, it simply snags each one as it drifts out of control, and, once it has snagged all of them then they are all considered retired and then re-entered.  People who make nano and micro sats that don't want them to have positive control, probably did not intend them to last very long.

There are NSF threads and conferences discussing that. It is not clear that this is on-topic for this thread about this particular launch.
Well the person I was responding to who thought that this sort of dedicated launch of potentially 100's of nano sats obviously thought that the threat was real.
It is all well and good to quote those things that made it past your confirmation bias that other people wrote, but this is a discussion board damnit! Let us know what you think! And why!

Online douglas100

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #21 on: 10/02/2015 08:52 PM »

I am afraid I may not have been succinct, the use of the word corral was not suggesting a paddock like arrangement, but simply of establishing a parametric boundary beyond which a satellite within the virtual 'corral' would not be permitted to stray. Of course those with no control will disperse, however since the sheep dog satellite does have control, it simply snags each one as it drifts out of control, and, once it has snagged all of them then they are all considered retired and then re-entered.  People who make nano and micro sats that don't want them to have positive control, probably did not intend them to last very long.

You could avoid the complexity of the sheepdog by having a maneuverable dispenser for the satellites, a kind of super Sherpa. Uncontrolled short lifetime satellites would be deployed in low orbits (say ISS height or lower) and would de-orbit naturally. They could be left to get on with their missions. Larger more sophisticated controlled vehicles would be deployed in higher orbits to allow them to complete their missions, provided they had onboard means to de-orbit. This would also give the customers some choice of orbit, something they don't get with current ride share launches.

I'm one of those who doesn't think overcrowding in LEO will be affected too much by Sun Synch Express-type missions for a while yet.
Douglas Clark

Offline guckyfan

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #22 on: 10/02/2015 08:52 PM »
Well the person I was responding to who thought that this sort of dedicated launch of potentially 100's of nano sats obviously thought that the threat was real.

And I think the remark was relevant to this thread. Nadrecks response and suggestion would also be related to this mass launch. Extended general discussion of that topic is probably not.

Offline nadreck

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #23 on: 10/03/2015 03:21 AM »
This is exactly why all those start-ups trying to build dedicated launchers for small payloads for $5-$10 million a shot are doomed to fail.

maybe, maybe not :P

Still the question I asked and had pulled.  Why this launch in 2017 was costing $100 million dollars?

That comes to $65 million launch costs & aprox $35 million processing. 

Where is the professed drop in price for reusable to $15 Million listed in many threads?

The costs are not going down as advertised :o

yes they are, as I read the news coverage it is $65 million that Spaceflight Industries is paying SpaceX, and, so far with only 3t over 20 spacecraft currently manifest, $100M that they are charging for the launch.
It is all well and good to quote those things that made it past your confirmation bias that other people wrote, but this is a discussion board damnit! Let us know what you think! And why!

Online A_M_Swallow

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #24 on: 10/03/2015 06:18 AM »
Are satellites on the Sun Synch Express allowed to carry propellant and thrusters?
Some primary payload customers restrict them.

Offline ChrisWilson68

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #25 on: 10/03/2015 10:16 AM »
Are satellites on the Sun Synch Express allowed to carry propellant and thrusters?
Some primary payload customers restrict them.

The Spaceflight Industries Payload User's Guide says this about satellites with propulsion (end of page 8/start of page 9):

Quote
the acceptance of the payload is subject to approval by the Launch Services Provider and Spaceflight

It also says (page 27, section 4.1 General CubeSat Requirements):

Quote
Satellite shall be in compliance with AFSPCMAN 91‐710
    o Propulsion systems, if accepted, shall be designed, integrated and tested in accordance with Volume 3.  Additionally, activation of propulsion shall have 3 inhibits.
    o Hazardous material shall be in compliance with Volume 3

So, yes, you can have thrusters, but you have to be careful with them.

http://www.spaceflightindustries.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/SPUG-RevF.pdf
« Last Edit: 10/03/2015 10:17 AM by ChrisWilson68 »

Offline Carl G

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #26 on: 10/03/2015 03:32 PM »
Thread trimmed of stupidity (uncivil posts).
« Last Edit: 10/05/2015 01:53 PM by Carl G »

Offline nadreck

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #27 on: 10/06/2015 10:26 PM »
New article in Satellite Today

Quote
The mission’s manifest includes satellites ranging from a 5kg 3U CubeSat up to a 575kg satellite.

Quote
We intend to offer annual missions to a low earth, sun synchronous orbit beginning in 2017 and to Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) beginning in 2018

Quote
Blake said Spaceflight looks forward to using a previously flown Falcon 9 rocket in the future.
It is all well and good to quote those things that made it past your confirmation bias that other people wrote, but this is a discussion board damnit! Let us know what you think! And why!

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #28 on: 10/07/2015 12:21 PM »
XPRIZE Presser:

 Israeli Google Lunar XPRIZE Team Is First to Sign Launch Agreement For Private Mission to the Moon On SpaceX Falcon 9

SpaceIL Becomes First Google Lunar XPRIZE Team to Produce a Verified Launch Contract for a 2017 Mission, Using a SpaceX Falcon 9 Launcher via Spaceflight Industries

 

JERUSALEM, Israel (October 7, 2015)  - At a press conference held in Jerusalem today, alongside Israeli President Reuven Rivlin, and Bob Weiss, vice chairman and president of XPRIZE, SpaceIL announced a significant milestone in its race to the moon: securing a “ticket to the moon” on a SpaceX Falcon 9 launcher, with a mission scheduled for the second half of 2017. With this, SpaceIL becomes the first team to produce a verified launch contract in the US$30 million Google Lunar XPRIZE competition, and aims to accomplish not only the first Israeli mission to the moon, but also the world’s first private lunar mission.

 

“We are proud to officially confirm receipt and verification of SpaceIL’s launch contract, positioning them as the first and only Google Lunar XPRIZE team to demonstrate this important achievement, thus far,” said Bob Weiss, vice chairman and president of XPRIZE. “The magnitude of this achievement cannot be overstated, representing an unprecedented and monumental commitment for a privately-funded organization, and kicks off an exciting phase of the competition in which the other 15 teams now have until the end of 2016 to produce their own verified launch contracts. It gives all of us at XPRIZE and Google the great pride to say, ‘the new space race is on!’”

 

To win the Google Lunar XPRIZE, a privately funded team must successfully place an unmanned spacecraft on the moon’s surface that explores at least 500 meters and transmits high-definition video and images back to Earth, before the mission deadline of December 31, 2017.

 

"Only three countries have ‘soft-landed’ a rover on the surface of the moon: the United States, the former Soviet Union, and China. Now the notion of the small state of Israel being added to this exclusive list look more promising than ever,” said SpaceIL CEO Eran Privman. “ Last year we made significant strides toward landing on the moon, both in terms of project financing and in terms of the engineering design and now, we are thrilled to finally secure our launch agreement.  This takes us one huge step closer to realize our vision of recreating an ‘Apollo effect’ in Israel: to inspire a new generation to pursue Science, Engineering, Technology, and Math (STEM).”

 

Signing the launch agreement was made possible due to the completion of an additional fundraising round led by the two major contributors of SpaceIL:  Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson Family Foundation and Morris Kahn’s Kahn Foundation.

 

SpaceIL has purchased launch services from Spaceflight Industries; an American space company who recently purchased a SpaceX Falcon 9 launcher and will manifest SpaceIL’s spacecraft as a co-lead spot, which will sit in a designated capsule inside the launcher, among a cluster of secondary payloads. Once the capsule separates from the launcher, it will automatically release the spacecraft, which will use advanced navigation sensors to guide it to the lunar surface, with engineers in a mission control room standing by to remotely send commands and corrections as needed.

 

“We’re excited to work closely with the SpaceIL team to help them realize their mission of getting to the moon”, said Curt Blake, president of Spaceflight’s launch business. “It’s very gratifying to play an integral part in SpaceIL’s quest to win the Google Lunar XPRIZE."

 

Also today, SpaceIL unveiled a new and improved design of its spacecraft, completed by SpaceIL engineers with consultation from world-renowned Israeli industrial designer, Alex Padwa, regarding the spacecraft’s exterior.  The first physical components of the new model are already starting to arrive at the SpaceIL integration lab.

 

Online abaddon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #29 on: 10/07/2015 02:45 PM »
So, if we assume a typical 600-800km sun-synchronous target orbit (per Wiki) for the F9 upper stage, how hard is it to get from such an orbit to the Moon, and land?  Assuming the 575kg payload is the SpaceIL spacecraft, presumably most of that is going to be fuel for the TLI burn, orbital insertion, and landing?  Seems like very thin margins, which I guess is to be expected.

Congratulations to SpaceIL on being the first Google XPrice competitor to sign a launch contract!
« Last Edit: 10/07/2015 02:47 PM by abaddon »

Offline nadreck

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #30 on: 10/07/2015 03:27 PM »
So, if we assume a typical 600-800km sun-synchronous target orbit (per Wiki) for the F9 upper stage, how hard is it to get from such an orbit to the Moon, and land?  Assuming the 575kg payload is the SpaceIL spacecraft, presumably most of that is going to be fuel for the TLI burn, orbital insertion, and landing?  Seems like very thin margins, which I guess is to be expected.

Congratulations to SpaceIL on being the first Google XPrice competitor to sign a launch contract!

According to the Spaceflight Industries schedule it is a 500-600km SSO.

More importantly the delta-V required may be significantly lower, however since only one of the many news articles covering this news story mentioned it, we may need to take this with a grain of salt until there is more confirmation:

The Verge article on the SpaceIL announcement

Quote
The team's lander, temporarily named "Sparrow," will sit in a designated capsule on the Falcon 9 rocket, among other secondary payloads. The rocket will deploy all other spacecraft aboard first, once it reaches lower Earth orbit — and Sparrow will be the last one off in the cosmic carpool. Once Sparrow is alone, the Falcon 9 will reignite the engine in its upper stage, carrying the lander a significant way toward the Moon. The lander will then detach from the rocket and propel itself the rest of the way to the lunar surface.

Of course this begs the question: "how much fuel will be left on the Falcon US?" and my guess is that depends on how many more payloads that Spaceflight Industries sells.
It is all well and good to quote those things that made it past your confirmation bias that other people wrote, but this is a discussion board damnit! Let us know what you think! And why!

Offline Comga

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #31 on: 10/07/2015 03:38 PM »
According to the Spaceflight Industries schedule it is a 500-600km SSO.

More importantly the delta-V required may be significantly lower, however since only one of the many news articles covering this news story mentioned it, we may need to take this with a grain of salt until there is more confirmation:

The Verge article on the SpaceIL announcement

Quote
The team's lander, temporarily named "Sparrow," will sit in a designated capsule on the Falcon 9 rocket, among other secondary payloads. The rocket will deploy all other spacecraft aboard first, once it reaches lower Earth orbit — and Sparrow will be the last one off in the cosmic carpool. Once Sparrow is alone, the Falcon 9 will reignite the engine in its upper stage, carrying the lander a significant way toward the Moon. The lander will then detach from the rocket and propel itself the rest of the way to the lunar surface.

Of course this begs the question: "how much fuel will be left on the Falcon US?" and my guess is that depends on how many more payloads that Spaceflight Industries sells.

Does this mean three burns for the second stage, initial launch to 500-600 km, circularization in SSO, and pseudo-TLI or even four burns?
Has any Falcon second stage done three burns?   (Inject, circularization, disposal?)

Surely someone on this forum can calculate the burn-to-depletion orbit given estimates of the combined mass of the satellites, "Sparrow", and the dispensing hardware, with either three or four burns.
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline nadreck

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #32 on: 10/07/2015 03:43 PM »



Surely someone on this forum can calculate the burn-to-depletion orbit given estimates of the combined mass of the satellites, "Sparrow", and the dispensing hardware, with either three or four burns.

With or without first stage recovery - plus is it RTLS or barge? As well, what will the weight of all the satellites launched be? Spaceflight industries is continuing to sell space on that flight.
It is all well and good to quote those things that made it past your confirmation bias that other people wrote, but this is a discussion board damnit! Let us know what you think! And why!

Offline Comga

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #33 on: 10/07/2015 03:50 PM »
Surely someone on this forum can calculate the burn-to-depletion orbit given estimates of the combined mass of the satellites, "Sparrow", and the dispensing hardware, with either three or four burns.

With or without first stage recovery - plus is it RTLS or barge? As well, what will the weight of all the satellites launched be? Spaceflight industries is continuing to sell space on that flight.

Those doing the simulation would know better, but I would guess first stage recovery on the west coast ASDS.
You have a good point that the apogee decreases with each additional spacecraft.  There could be some agreement with SpaceIL as an anchor customer for a minimum altitude.
Are you volunteering?  ;)
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline nadreck

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #34 on: 10/07/2015 03:53 PM »


Are you volunteering?  ;)

Idle curiosity will have me throw numbers around at some point, presuming I have input numbers I am comfortable with. I promise you that if I do I will post the answers along the assumptions I make to get them.
It is all well and good to quote those things that made it past your confirmation bias that other people wrote, but this is a discussion board damnit! Let us know what you think! And why!

Offline ChrisWilson68

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #35 on: 10/07/2015 06:33 PM »
More importantly the delta-V required may be significantly lower, however since only one of the many news articles covering this news story mentioned it, we may need to take this with a grain of salt until there is more confirmation:

The Verge article on the SpaceIL announcement

Quote
The team's lander, temporarily named "Sparrow," will sit in a designated capsule on the Falcon 9 rocket, among other secondary payloads. The rocket will deploy all other spacecraft aboard first, once it reaches lower Earth orbit — and Sparrow will be the last one off in the cosmic carpool. Once Sparrow is alone, the Falcon 9 will reignite the engine in its upper stage, carrying the lander a significant way toward the Moon. The lander will then detach from the rocket and propel itself the rest of the way to the lunar surface.

Of course this begs the question: "how much fuel will be left on the Falcon US?" and my guess is that depends on how many more payloads that Spaceflight Industries sells.

Cool!

Spaceflight Industries may be more limited by the slots in their dispenser than by mass.  If so, they could fill up all their slots and still leave the Falcon 9 upper stage with a lot of performance.

Anyway, SpaceX probably reserves some performance margin in case some things don't go to plan.  If that's the case, and SpaceIL is willing to take some risk (it's surely not their biggest risk!) they can count on using most of that margin.

Online abaddon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #36 on: 10/07/2015 06:58 PM »
Has any Falcon second stage done three burns?   (Inject, circularization, disposal?)
Didn't one of the early GTO launches do a final burn to depletion, presumably to validate their residuals estimations?  I seem to recall that happening...
« Last Edit: 10/07/2015 06:59 PM by abaddon »

Offline zt

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #37 on: 10/07/2015 07:11 PM »
With the limited throttle range of the Merlin 1D-Vac, if the upper stage burns to depletion to perform TLI, with sparrow as the only payload, what will the acceleration be like?
« Last Edit: 10/07/2015 07:11 PM by zt »

Offline ChrisWilson68

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #38 on: 10/07/2015 07:16 PM »
With the limited throttle range of the Merlin 1D-Vac, if the upper stage burns to depletion to perform TLI, with sparrow as the only payload, what will the acceleration be like?

I believe the dispenser will also still be there, which is probably some not-insignificant mass.

Still, you have a point -- SpaceIL will definitely need to make sure Sparrow can handle high g loads!

Offline nadreck

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #39 on: 10/07/2015 08:07 PM »
With the limited throttle range of the Merlin 1D-Vac, if the upper stage burns to depletion to perform TLI, with sparrow as the only payload, what will the acceleration be like?

I believe the dispenser will also still be there, which is probably some not-insignificant mass.

Still, you have a point -- SpaceIL will definitely need to make sure Sparrow can handle high g loads!

Presuming 934kN full thrust and 70% being minimum then  13.58g if it is just the Sparrow, no idea what the dispenser might weigh if it is still there. But if we add even 1t we get a maximum acceleration of 11.27g at 70% of full thrust.

NOTE that the if we can presume that the Sparrow (as the largest paying payload on this flight) is oriented in the attitude it is going to land with, it does need to tolerated the maximum landing force which while only transient is still going to impose a higher acceleration tolerance along that one axis that a normal microgravity craft does not otherwise need.
It is all well and good to quote those things that made it past your confirmation bias that other people wrote, but this is a discussion board damnit! Let us know what you think! And why!

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #40 on: 01/22/2016 04:33 AM »
Does this mean three burns for the second stage, initial launch to 500-600 km, circularization in SSO, and pseudo-TLI or even four burns?
Has any Falcon second stage done three burns?   (Inject, circularization, disposal?)

Not sure about previous launches but Jason-3 just had 3 upper stage burns.  Sort of flew under the radar because it came around the time that NASA got confirmation of the solar panel deployment from tracking in Alaska.
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Offline Comga

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #41 on: 01/22/2016 06:38 AM »
Does this mean three burns for the second stage, initial launch to 500-600 km, circularization in SSO, and pseudo-TLI or even four burns?
Has any Falcon second stage done three burns?   (Inject, circularization, disposal?)

Not sure about previous launches but Jason-3 just had 3 upper stage burns.  Sort of flew under the radar because it came around the time that NASA got confirmation of the solar panel deployment from tracking in Alaska.

Unless you were paying attention and following along on NSF.  ;)   We certainly read about it here.

edit:  OG2 demonstrated direct injection (single second stage burn) into a high inclination orbit around 600 km altitude.  The flight in question for my post, taking the secondary payload from SSO to or near to TLI, could be done with two burns.  However a three burn launch would be more efficient, resulting in a higher transfer apogee with a lower required delta V for the lunar mission, and now three burns have been demonstrated.
« Last Edit: 01/22/2016 06:44 AM by Comga »
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline hrissan

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #42 on: 01/22/2016 09:28 AM »
Does this mean three burns for the second stage, initial launch to 500-600 km, circularization in SSO, and pseudo-TLI or even four burns?
Has any Falcon second stage done three burns?   (Inject, circularization, disposal?)

Not sure about previous launches but Jason-3 just had 3 upper stage burns.  Sort of flew under the radar because it came around the time that NASA got confirmation of the solar panel deployment from tracking in Alaska.

Unless you were paying attention and following along on NSF.  ;)   We certainly read about it here.

edit:  OG2 demonstrated direct injection (single second stage burn) into a high inclination orbit around 600 km altitude.  The flight in question for my post, taking the secondary payload from SSO to or near to TLI, could be done with two burns.  However a three burn launch would be more efficient, resulting in a higher transfer apogee with a lower required delta V for the lunar mission, and now three burns have been demonstrated.
Might there be enough propellant in F9 upper stage to crash into moon for science and fun?

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #43 on: 06/02/2016 04:03 AM »
This seems to be one of the payloads for the flight, EU:CROPIS, a small greenhouse growing tomatoes under simulated Lunar and then Martian gravity.

May 24, 2016 Project description at DLR
Feb 5, 2016 The Space Show episode on EU:CROPIS
Jul 8, 2014 Satnews article on the launch booking


Offline kevin-rf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #44 on: 06/02/2016 02:14 PM »
This seems to be one of the payloads for the flight, EU:CROPIS, a small greenhouse growing tomatoes under simulated Lunar and then Martian gravity.

May 24, 2016 Project description at DLR
Feb 5, 2016 The Space Show episode on EU:CROPIS
Jul 8, 2014 Satnews article on the launch booking



That may well be the first bio experiment under simulated mars and lunar gravity. Wonder if they will also be growing under earth g as a control. This is very exciting. I assume they are going to spin the payload.
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Offline guckyfan

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #45 on: 06/02/2016 02:21 PM »
I assume they are going to spin the payload.

Yes. At different times with different spin rates to simulate Mars and Moon gravity.

A video I had already posted in the Mars agriculture thread.



Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #46 on: 06/03/2016 09:10 AM »
Quote
DLR: Flight-model construction, yr late, now begun on Eu:CROPIS greenhouse sat; launch late 2017 on SpaceX Falcon 9.

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/738646013427212289

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q4 2017
« Reply #47 on: 08/08/2016 02:03 PM »
Tweet from Peter B. de Selding
Quote
Spaceflight: 90-sat Sherpa tug on Q4 SpaceX launch is sold out. Space available for Q4 2017 on dedicated Falcon 9.

Sun Synch Express now Q4 2017.

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #48 on: 08/12/2016 07:07 PM »
This sounds like it might be on the Sun Synch Express...

SpaceNews: House panel irked by Air Force request for ORS-6 launch funds
Quote
...
In a letter dated July 1 to Congressional defense committees, Deborah Lee James, the secretary of the Air Force, said the Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer, would launch in September 2017 as part of a rideshare mission. The launch is part of a previously undisclosed contract with Spaceflight Industries, which arranges rideshare launches.
...
« Last Edit: 08/12/2016 07:08 PM by gongora »

Offline wxmeddler

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #49 on: 08/14/2016 03:32 AM »
This sounds like it might be on the Sun Synch Express...

SpaceNews:

This would be correct.

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #50 on: 10/11/2016 04:25 PM »


Terra Bella and Spaceflight Industries Sign Agreement for Falcon 9 Launch for Small Imaging Satellites

 

Spaceflight’s 2017 SSO-A dedicated rideshare mission at near capacity with spacecraft from 10 countries 

SEATTLE, Oct. 11, 2016 - Spaceflight Industries, a next-generation space company enabling access to space and redefining global intelligence, announced today that Terra Bella has signed an agreement with its launch services entity, Spaceflight, for a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch of Terra Bella SkySats.

 

Terra Bella will be the co-lead on Spaceflight’s SSO-A dedicated rideshare mission scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California in late 2017.

 

The SSO-A mission will transport both government and commercial microsats and cubesats, and is currently at 90 percent capacity with more than 20 payloads from 10 countries manifested aboard the rocket. Confirmed spacecraft include:

·         Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology’s (KAIST) NEXTSat-1 satellite, conducting scientific missions such as star formation and space storm measurements and also technology demonstration in space

·         Iceye’s innovative SAR (synthetic aperture radar) micro-satellite for all condition imaging

·         HawkEye 360’s first three formation-flying satellites to detect, characterize, and geolocate various RF signals worldwide

 

“We’re seeing a tide shift in the industry’s expectation for routine, reliable and affordable access to space,” said Curt Blake, president of Spaceflight. “The willingness of prominent commercial organizations to join forces for the advancement of global initiatives is very encouraging to the smallsat community, and to society as a whole.”

 

Aligning customers’ needs with available capacity and schedule, Spaceflight provides integrated launch services, including mission management, support hardware, payload integration and orbital deployment. Spaceflight has negotiated the launch of nearly 120 satellites with contracts to deploy more than 150 through 2018. The company is planning its largest launch – 89 spacecraft – to be deployed by its Sherpa tug from a Falcon 9 in 2017.

 

About Spaceflight

Spaceflight is revolutionizing the business of spaceflight by delivering a new model for accessing space. A comprehensive launch services and mission management provider, the company provides a straightforward and cost-effective suite of products and services including state-of-the-art satellite infrastructure, rideshare launch offerings, and global communications networks that enable commercial and government entities to achieve their mission goals, on time and on budget. A service offering of Spaceflight Industries in Seattle, Washington, Spaceflight provides its services through a global network of partners, ground stations and launch vehicle providers. For more information, visit www.spaceflight.com.

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #51 on: 10/11/2016 04:27 PM »
Spaceflight also pass on to us that:

Spaceflight’s SSO-A launch, the company’s first-ever dedicated rideshare mission, is scheduled to take off from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California in late 2017 aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9.

 
The mission is at 90 percent capacity and will carry both government and commercial microsats and cubesats. Other confirmed payloads include:

·         Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology’s (KAIST) NEXTSat-1 satellite

·         Iceye’s innovative SAR (synthetic aperture radar) micro-satellite

·         HawkEye 360’s first three formation-flying satellites

Offline Skyrocket

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #52 on: 10/11/2016 04:44 PM »
Any info, how many SkySats? There are two from the first batch left and six more from the second batch. So this launch can carry up to 8 satellites.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #53 on: 10/12/2016 01:03 AM »
SpaceNews: Spaceflight to launch Terra Bella satellites on Falcon 9 mission
Quote
In an Oct. 11 interview, Curt Blake, president of Spaceflight, said he couldn’t provide the number of Terra Bella satellites that will fly on the mission, at the request of the company, other than “it’s more than one.”
Quote
While the announcement said that Terra Bella will be a “co-lead” on the SSO-A mission, Blake said that the company will be the only customer with that designation on the mission, giving it more control over the launch schedule.
Quote
SpaceIL, an Israeli group competing in the Google Lunar X Prize competition, had previously been named a primary payload for the flight, but Blake said their lunar lander will fly on another, unnamed launch.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - late 2017
« Reply #54 on: 11/27/2016 11:32 AM »
Odd we all missed this blog post from spaceflight industries.
http://www.spaceflight.com/model-preparation-sso/

They reseved a plywood mock-up of a new version of the CubeStack from LoadPath/Moog. My impression is that this rideshare adapter ring can accomodate six 6U cubesat deployers. That's 1.5x the capacity of the old cubestack design. It looks lighter weight then the old design, nice improvement.

For fun I estimated the weight of a loaded 6x 6U CubeStack.
I assume a loaded 6U dispenser weight is 15kg (2x3U; 5kg + 5kg / 6U 10kg + 5kg).
Six of these 6U dispensers make 90kg (6x15 | 200lb).
I assume the CubeStack has a 38.8" diameter and a height of about 10".
On top a small EELV payload of ~5000lb /~2mT can be placed.
So I guess the total weight of the 6x 6U Cubestack is 120-180kg (275-400lb).
My impression of the old cubestack is that it weight over 180kg (400lb).

I'm wondering if they also have plans for a 4x and 6x 12U CubeStack. 
4x 12U (30kg) is 120kg payload + deployers. Total weight 180-250kg (400-550lb)
6x 12U is 180 kg. Total weight 250-300kg (550-660lb).

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - late 2017
« Reply #55 on: 11/27/2016 11:07 PM »
Odd we all missed this blog post from spaceflight industries.
http://www.spaceflight.com/model-preparation-sso/

They reseved a plywood MDF mock-up of a new version of the CubeStack from LoadPath/Moog. My impression is that this rideshare adapter ring can accomodate six 6U cubesat deployers. That's 1.5x the capacity of the old cubestack design. It looks lighter weight then the old design, nice improvement.

...
I assume the CubeStack has a 38.8" diameter and a height of about 10".
...

I'm not so sure that's the diameter, it looks bigger to me.  The original CubeStack was sized for smaller launch vehicles.  This one might be EELV adapter sized?


Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - SSO-A (Sun Synch Express) - late 2017
« Reply #56 on: 11/29/2016 06:16 PM »
Gongora, thanks for correcting me. It's indeed made out of MDF. And the ring is most likely 62" (1.5748m) instead of 38.8" (0.98552m).

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - SSO-A (Sun Synch Express) - late 2017
« Reply #57 on: 11/29/2016 08:33 PM »
Odd we all missed this blog post from spaceflight industries.
http://www.spaceflight.com/model-preparation-sso/

They reseved a plywood MDF mock-up of a new version of the CubeStack from LoadPath/Moog. My impression is that this rideshare adapter ring can accomodate six 6U cubesat deployers. That's 1.5x the capacity of the old cubestack design. It looks lighter weight then the old design, nice improvement.

...
I assume the CubeStack has a 38.8" diameter and a height of about 10".
...

I'm not so sure that's the diameter, it looks bigger to me.  The original CubeStack was sized for smaller launch vehicles.  This one might be EELV adapter sized?


SHERPA adapters are designed for EELV launchers only.

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - 2017 Sun Synch Express - Q3 2017
« Reply #58 on: 02/03/2017 07:30 AM »
Quote
DLR: Flight-model construction, yr late, now begun on Eu:CROPIS greenhouse sat; launch late 2017 on SpaceX Falcon 9.

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/738646013427212289


http://www.space.com/35533-space-greenhouses-moon-mars-greenhouse.html

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - SSO-A (Sun Synch Express) - late 2017
« Reply #59 on: 03/03/2017 02:46 AM »
Spaceflight Industries [Feb. 28, 2017]
Quote
We are well underway in preparations for our Dedicated Rideshare launch on a Falcon 9 (SSO-A). Right now, our first milestones have been met and everything is running according to schedule. Our engineers are completing dry runs on our integration activities, using our detailed mockups. We’ve done our first actuations of the system and have successfully operated the separation system with our avionics.

The ESPA ring has arrived, and we will have a full engineering model to conduct tests. Other large structures will arrive to a new build facility this summer. We’ll keep you posted as we move into final assembly!

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - SSO-A (Sun Synch Express) - late 2017
« Reply #60 on: 04/04/2017 01:04 PM »
Spaceflight Industries: Spacecraft Recontact Simulations [March 21, 2017]
Quote
As we get closer to our SSO-A dedicated rideshare mission aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9, our preparations have moved into high gear. We’ve got an amazing team getting ready to deploy close to 90 satellites in the same orbit. To ensure a flawless mission, we’ve brought in experts from outside who are excited to be part of the mission.

As part of our preparations, Dr. Vivek Nagabhushan, Spaceflight’s Group Lead of Spacecraft Dynamics and Control, reached out to Dr. Behcet Acikmese, professor of Aerospace and Aeronautical Engineering at the University of Washington. ... He is a well- known expert at guidance, control and estimation algorithms for spacecraft. His task was to develop an analysis tool to assess different deployment strategies with Dr. Nagabhushan’s guidance. ...

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 - SSO-A (Sun Synch Express) - late 2017
« Reply #61 on: 04/08/2017 08:40 PM »
Terra Bella FCC Filing
Quote
In total, seven SkySat satellites are currently operating. Terra Bella anticipates launching SkySat8 through SkySat15—the remaining currently authorized spacecraft in the constellation—in 2017.
SkySat16 through SkySat21, for which this modification is requested, are currently under construction. Terra Bella anticipates launching these satellites as early as September 2018.
« Last Edit: 04/08/2017 08:41 PM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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Now 2018...

[May 2, 2017] Who We’re Taking to Space: KNACKSAT
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The first entirely Thai-built satellite, KNACKSAT is going to be aboard Spaceflight’s SSO-A mission in 2018...

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[May 4, 2017] Spaceflight: Launch Vehicle Separation Systems 101
Quote
Launch Vehicle Separation Systems 101
May 4, 2017 Hilary Meyerson   

Building a satellite is a costly and difficult endeavor. Getting that very expensive and sensitive payload safely on orbit is the next step. That’s where we come in. And once we get them to orbit, we need to separate them and send them on their way. So, we work with our customers to identify the right separating system to deploy their spacecraft. While sometimes customers come to us with a system chosen, more often we consider the size and shape of their spacecraft, make a recommendation and purchase it for them. There are many benefits for the customer to go this route. First of all, we’re subsystem agnostic. We choose the right system for the mission, period. We don’t sell hardware – we can pick and choose from a variety of vendors looking for the best technical solution and value to the customer. Here’s a brief rundown of the available options:

Clamp bands: These type of separation systems used two rings, held together by a clamping mechanism. One ring is attached to the spacecraft and one to Spaceflight’s mounting structure. Once the clamping mechanism is released, the rings separate and the spacecraft is flying free. Springs are used to provide a separation velocity to the spacecraft. They come in a variety of bolt circle diameters and are the most common method for separating larger spacecraft. Within the general category of clamp bands, there are different approaches to the clamping mechanism:

Motorized Light Band (MLB): The MLB is a popular separation system, which is built by Planetary Systems Corporation. It uses a motor to release an innovative modular clamping mechanism. It is very reliable, lightweight, and cost effective solution.. We are using multiple MLBs of different diameters for our SSO-A launch. It’s highly reliable and has been flight proven many times. It is lighter than a clamp band.

Marmon Clamps: Marmon clamps are classic mechanisms for holding together and releasing cylindrical structures, including the difference stages of some rockets. They consist of two rings with a V-shaped groove in them. They clamp on a corresponding V-shaped ridge that is formed when bringing the two separating halves together. The two rings are held torqued tightly in place by a bolt mechanism that can be separated by various means. For a spacecraft separation system, one side would bolt to the spacecraft and one to the launch vehicle. Traditionally, separation systems of these type used pyrotechnic (i.e. explosive) devices to cut the clamping bolt. However, the more modern systems such as Spaceflight uses, a low shock release mechanism is used to give our customers a gentle separation. They have an excellent success rate. We are using a large one, with a 1575 mm diameter from Ruag for an upcoming mission.

For CubeSats we use a variety of dispensers depending on the needs of individual Cubesats, as well as to help fit as many spacecraft as possible onto a given launch.

Quadpack: The Quadpack is built by Innovative Solutions in Space (ISIS) in Delft, Holland. They can handle up to 12U equivalent volume of cubesats. In other word, different combinations of CubeSat sizes that add up to 12Us. For example it can dispense four 3U satellites, or two 6U satellites, two 3Us plus 1 6U or a single 12U. We’re using Quadpacks on both the SSO-A mission and PSLV mission.

6U pack: This is also built by our friends in Delft. It is basically half of a Quadpack. We are using several of these on an upcoming launch on a Minotaur IV launch vehicle, as well as on the SSO-A mission.

ISI pod: We’ve also used the single 3U “ISI pod” dispenser built by the Dutch company ISIS for Soyuz missions.

PSL-P (Pico Satellite Launch Pack): This is another dispenser, similar to the Quadpack in size and capacity. It is built by German company Astro Fein. It holds up to 12U of CubeSats in different combinations. It features a clamping mechanism that holds the CubeSats firmly in place once the doors are closed prior to flight.

Canisterized Satellite Dispenser (CSD): The CSD is built by Planetary Systems Corporation, who also build the MLB separation systems discussed above. This dispenser design comes In multiple sizes, 3U, 6U, and 12U. It has a unique restraint mechanism. Instead of using rails inside the dispenser, it has tabs along the bottom of the CubeSat that are clamped in place when the door is closed. This provides a firm attachment and known load path, provide more definitive knowledge of the CubeSat dispensers.

Custom systems: Sometimes the commercial off the shelf solutions don’t work with a customer’s spacecraft or they have their own unique system. In these cases, we are flexible and adapt as needed. For the Hawkeye360’s upcoming payload, they have a special dispenser unit, that slides the satellite out for deployment. We are accommodating the unique requirements to work with this systems. In other situations, we’ve also created custom deployment units to meet unique criteria on the PSLV and the DNEPR launch vehicles.

One of the most common questions we get is about the tip off rate – how the deployment will “tip” the spacecraft or cause it to alter course from it’s path. Standard separation systems like lightbands and clamp rings will have little tip off and this rate can be adjusted based on the springs activated during deployment. Dispensers are typically less refined dynamically will have a higher tip off rate.

These are just some of the possible separation systems available. Our experts can find exactly the right one for your spacecraft – it can be like a game of Tetris making the pieces all fit. But that is why our customers rely on us to get their spacecraft safely on orbit.

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[This post will be updated as we find out more payloads for SSO-A.]

Spaceflight’s 2017 Sun Synch Express mission manifest includes satellites as small as 5 kg 3U CubeSat up to 575 kg satellite. Over 20 satellites from 10 countries will be deployed during the mission. Currently at 90 percent capacity.

Terra Bella Skysat 14 & 15 (lead payload, controls schedule) (87kg each?)

Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer (COVWR or ORS-6) (Air Force) (~300kg according to Gunter)

EU:CROPIS The Eu:CROPIS spacecraft will be manifested as a commercial customer on one of five available ports on Spaceflight’s SHERPA rideshare vehicle going to a sun synchronous orbit. (250kg according to Gunter)

NEXTSat-1 satellite from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology’s (KAIST), conducting scientific missions such as star formation and space storm measurements and also technology demonstration in space. (100kg)

Iceye’s innovative SAR (synthetic aperture radar) micro-satellite for all condition imaging

HawkEye 360’s first three formation-flying satellites to detect, characterize, and geolocate various RF signals worldwide

STPSat-5 (100-150kg?) [Via Satellite March 30, 2016]"Based on the company’s SN-50 bus, STPSat 5 passed its Critical Design Review (CDR) in December 2015. Roth said the satellite is expected to launch as part of a large payload stack on a SpaceX Falcon 9 in Fall 2017. U.S. Air Force changes to the STPSat 5’s payloads delayed the mission from 2016." Fits on ESPA ring.

BlackSky Global : Gunter lists 4 of these sats on the flight

KazSTSAT?

Cubesats:

Audacy Zero (3U)

Elysium Star II (1U Cubesat)

Fox-1Cliff (1U) "The launches of AMSAT satellites Fox-1Cliff and Fox-1D have been rebooked from the original Spaceflight Formosat-5/Sherpa mission aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9  on to two separate new launches...Fox-1Cliff will launch on Spaceflight’s SSO-A dedicated rideshare mission aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California in late 2017 or early 2018."

JY1SAT (1U Cubesat from Jordan)

KNACKSAT (1U Cubesat, Thailand)

Myriota (3U IOT Cubesat from Australia)

Orbital Reflector (3U Cubesat/Artwork)

U.S. Coast Guard Polar Scout?

edit 2017-11-17 Added Audacy Zero
edit 2017-11-06 Added possible payloads KazSTSAT, Polar Scout
edit 2017-09-11 Added Myriota
edit 2017-08-31: added Orbital Reflector
edit 2017-05-30: added JY1SAT
edit 2017-05-16: added Elysium cubesat


« Last Edit: 11/17/2017 07:02 PM by gongora »

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Thanks gongora. If you make a change, can you indicate the change some way?
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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Elysium Star II cubesat on the manifest for this flight.

Elysium Space to Launch World’s First Memorial Spacecraft on SpaceX Falcon 9 Mission
Tuesday May 16, 2017
Quote
SAN FRANCISCO, CA – The pioneering company in memorial spaceflight, Elysium Space, is announcing today that its Elysium Star II memorial spacecraft will be on Spaceflight’s SSO-A dedicated rideshare mission aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 to be launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Last November Elysium Space announced its revolutionary partnership with Spaceflight, a leading provider of launch and mission management services, to offer annual memorial spaceflight services to families, drastically reducing waiting times from years to months.

“We are honored to assist families in achieving their dreams, riding on one of the greatest rocket in the world. This historical launch provides the perfect conditions to make this memorial spaceflight an exceptionally meaningful experience for all participants.” said Thomas Civeit, founder and CEO of Elysium Space.

The 100 participants already booked for the upcoming Elysium Star II mission include U.S. military veterans, aerospace enthusiasts, and families looking to celebrate a loved one within the poetry of the starry sky. Families are welcome to join this historical launch event at Vandenberg in Southern California, or to watch via a live stream.

The spacecraft will be deployed in a Sun-synchronous orbit, ensuring it will pass over every location in the world during its journey among the stars, which will last about 2 years before re-entering the atmosphere as a shooting star. The free iOS/Android Elysium mobile app will display the memorial spacecraft location in real time during the mission, enhancing the overall personal connection and experience. Reservations for the Elysium Star II mission are still open via the Elysium Space website, starting at $2,490.

The Elysium Space memorial spacecraft are the first dedicated satellites ever launched for this purpose, and offer the most personal experience; previous memorial spaceflights consisted in mounting participants’ capsules to a rocket upper stage or another existing satellite.

SpaceX’s Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) at Vandenberg Air Force Base has a long history dating back to the early 1960s. Originally an Atlas launch pad activated in 1962, SLC-4E was in active use until a final Titan IV launch in 2005. SpaceX’s groundbreaking was in July 2011, and the pad was completed in just 17 months later in November 2012.

“Offering dedicated rideshare missions makes it easier and more affordable for organizations like Elysium Space to execute their space missions,” said Curt Blake, President of Spaceflight’s launch division. “We are pleased to be able to play a role in their historical mission.”

This milestone allows Elysium Space to pursue its prime mission of offering exceptional tributes that are within the reach of most families; by looking into the infinite wonder of the night sky, we can remember the beauty of those who have touched our lives forever.

(found via this article: [TechCrunch]Elysium Space to launch the first ever ‘memorial spacecraft’ via SpaceX
« Last Edit: 05/16/2017 04:59 PM by gongora »

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This is likely on SSO-A, and shows a February launch date.

Jordan’s First CubeSat Set for Early 2018 Launch
Quote
05/30/2017

Jordan's first CubeSat — JY1SAT — will be launched next February. The spacecraft’s name recalls the Amateur Radio call sign of Jordan’s late King Hussein. JY1SAT will carry a FUNcube 435/145 MHz SSB/CW Amateur Radio inverting transponder and a Slow-Scan Digital Video (SSDV) system to transmit stored images.

According to The Jordan Times, a team of 16 university students has been constructing the 1U CubeSat, supervised by a group of experts and academics through weekly meetings at the Royal Jordanian Radio Amateurs Society (RJRAS). RJRAS members Nart Tahamouqa, JY5IB, and Rafiq Farmawi, JY4CI, serve as advisers to the project.

The JY1SAT team includes 24-year-old Zeid Kawar, whose 2-month internship at NASA’s Ames Research Center inspired his interest in developing his country’s first nanosatellite.

The student team will develop and operate a special ground station (JY6JY). JY1SAT will transmit stored images reflecting Jordan’s historical and cultural heritage, which will be selected in advance of the launch through a national competition.

JY1SAT applied to the IARU on May 15 to coordinate a telemetry downlink on 145.840 MHz and transponder downlink passband of 145.855-145.875 MHz with an inverting uplink on 435.100-435.120 MHz. A SpaceX flight will carry JY1SAT into orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. — Thanks to AMSAT-UK, The Jordan Times, AMSAT News Service

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[SpaceNews] Rideshare demand grows despite development of small launch vehicles
Quote
“We’re trying to provide more domestic launch capability for secondaries,” said Scott Schoneman of Spaceflight, noting that about one-third the value of that dedicated Falcon 9 launch is for U.S. government satellites that could not launch on foreign vehicles.

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This appears to be a 3U cubesat, launching early/spring 2018 on a Falcon 9, ride arranged through Spaceflight, video shows it coming off an ESPA ring based carrier.  Sounds like SSO-A.  He's still raising the last $70k on Kickstarter if you want to sponsor a payload  ;)

Orbital Reflector web page

[Architectural Digest] This Is Why a Beautiful Sculpture Will Be Launched Into Outer Space
Quote
It’s not often that we pause to think about the many satellites that roam outer space. An ambitious project from artist Trevor Paglen aims to change that, reimagining the aesthetics of aerospace engineering and our relationship with the cosmos in the process. For his work titled Orbital Reflector, a diamond-shaped silver balloon measuring 100 feet in length will be packed into a small, box-like structure known as a CubeSat and launched out of Earth’s atmosphere via a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. Once it's about 350 miles from Earth, the CubeSat will release the sculpture. The mirror-like sculpture will circle the globe for a period of two months, reflecting light as brightly as the Big Dipper does back to Earth.



[New York Times] Art for a Post-Surveillance Age
[Wired] Trevor Paglen’s satellite of art
« Last Edit: 09/06/2017 02:18 PM by gongora »

Online Steven Pietrobon

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They claim that they will be the first art satellite. I don't think they can claim that as the art satellite DESPATCH was launched on 3 December 2014 on H-IIA.

http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/despatch.htm
« Last Edit: 09/08/2017 07:14 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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[Financial Review] Micro-satellite on Space-X to propel Myriota
Quote
The small satellites, the first of which is earmarked to be launched in the US in February, 2018 as one of the many payloads aboard a Falcon9 rocket operated by Elon Musk's SpaceX company, are set to enable an expansion of the "affordable monitoring" service from thousands of devices across industry.
...
The nano-satellite earmarked to be launched on the SpaceX rocket has the dimensions of about 30cm x 10cm x 10cm.

The Myriota technology enables two-way communication between transmitters on the ground and the satellites, and enables monitoring of data, and asset tracking in remote locations. The company has undertaken commercial trials in monitoring water tank levels in remote areas.

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Thanks Gongora. Myriota (which is based here in Adelaide) have used exactEarth satellites in the past. This is the first I've heard of Myriota launching their own satellite. The article doesn't give a name for the cubesat, but I'm going to call it Myriota 1 for the moment. This could end up being a payload on another cubesat, like what happened with Biarri Point.

http://www.exactearth.com/media-centre/recent-news/294-exactearth-invests-in-satellite-internet-of-things-technology-company
« Last Edit: 09/12/2017 04:41 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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Thanks Gongora. Myriota (which is based here in Adelaide) have used exactEarth satellites in the past. This is the first I've heard of Myriota launching their own satellite. The article doesn't give a name for the cubesat, but I'm going to call it Myriota 1 for the moment. This could end up being a payload on another cubesat, like what happened with Biarri Point.

http://www.exactearth.com/media-centre/recent-news/294-exactearth-invests-in-satellite-internet-of-things-technology-company

The article does mention they've undertaken "commercial trials" in the past (presumably using exactEarth hardware), so perhaps this is simply them branching out with their own hardware instead.
With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine - however, this is not necessarily a good idea. It is hard to be sure where they are
going to land, and it could be dangerous sitting under them as they fly overhead.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Article reporting SpaceX launching cubesats from Adelaide companies Myriota and Fleet. Myriota cubesat launching "between February and April". Fleet launching in early 2018.

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/business/elon-musks-spacex-rocket-to-launch-adelaide-tech-companies-to-new-heights/news-story/570f7cc0e1953adbd10b3c497c3ac399
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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This article has pictures and video of the SSO-A stack being assembled at Spaceflight.
[King5 News (Seattle)] Seattle's space business continues to grow
« Last Edit: 09/28/2017 03:37 PM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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This article has pictures and video of the SSO-A stack being assembled at Spaceflight.
[King5 News (Seattle)] Seattle's space business continues to grow

Here are some quotes from the article.  The videos give a nice look at the stack.  They say launch is around the middle of 2018.  Recent mentions have been from February to April (trending more towards April), so I'm guessing second quarter would be the best current estimate.

Quote
At Seattle-based Spaceflight Industries, the size of the spacecraft continues to grow.  The new SSO-A, assembled in a tall warehouse in Auburn, stands nearly 20 feet tall.

This week, the stages of the spacecraft are bolted together and scheduled for vibration tests designed to find out if the SSO, which stands for Sun Synchronous Orbit, is ready for the violence of launch.
...
Aboard the SSO, there are attachments points and dispensers for 120 satellites
...
the satellites that will hitch a ride aboard the SSO-A come from nearly 50 private and government entities from 16 different countries.

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SSO-A MISSION PREP AT AUBURN INTEGRATION FACILITY
By Jodi Sorensen
SEPTEMBER 27, 2017

We’re conducting tests this week for our 2018 SSO-A mission aboard a Falcon 9. Our new Auburn, WA Integration facility allows us to build the SSO-A stack to full height (nearly 20 feet!) while we run tests with mass simulators (structures of the same weight and size of the satellites to be launched) attached. Actual integration of customer satellites will occur in a clean room built on site. When integration is complete, the stack will be disassembled carefully in sections for shipment down to Vandenberg Air Force Base, where it will be reassembled at the launch site.

For today’s test, more than 200 accelerometers were placed around the assembly and results of the simulation were recorded.

We were happy to have Glenn Farley of King 5 News in Seattle on hand to film a short segment about the mission and the Auburn facility.

Preparations for the SSO-A mission have been running smoothly and according to schedule. We currently have 120 satellites for nearly 50 government and commercial customers from 16 countries manifested for this mission – a record-breaker! We’re looking forward to a great launch for our customers in 2018.

Offline gongora

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Tweet from Spaceflight Inc.:
Quote
Watch us assemble our payload stack for #SSO-A in just over a minute:

Video in the tweet shows the parts of the stack being joined together.  I wonder what's going to be on the inside, I think that's where the lunar lander was going to ride when it was part of the mission.

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SPACEFLIGHT SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETES MODAL SURVEY FOR SSO-A SPACECRAFT
By Jodi Sorensen
OCTOBER 4, 2017

Test validates the accuracy of the computer model, which allows accurate predictions of launch stress

Seattle – Oct. 4, 2017 — Spaceflight, the company reinventing the model for launching small satellites into space, today announced its SSO-A Integrated Payload Stack has successfully completed a modal survey of the primary structure.

The series of tests, conducted by a third party, subjected Spaceflight’s nearly 20-foot satellite rideshare structure (flight structures with mass models to simulate critical customer spacecraft) to low-level vibration to excite the core structure. Results from these tests are used to correlate the detailed finite element model of the structure with flight structure, ultimately allowing engineers to calculate flight environments that the structure, avionics, and customer spacecraft will be exposed to during the launch.

This completes a significant milestone for the company’s first Dedicated Rideshare mission, dubbed “SSO-A,” which plans to launch many small satellites into sun-synchronous orbit from a SpaceX Falcon 9 next year. Spaceflight’s SSO-A mission will carry spacecraft from nearly 50 government and commercial organizations across 16 different countries, including Thailand, Finland, Germany, Australia and Singapore. It will deploy all of the smallsats to a sun-synchronous low-Earth orbit which is popular for Earth-imaging satellites. The mission, scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, will transport both microsats and cubesats, with 90 percent of the manifest accounted for by commercial and/or international organizations.

“This is the most complex launch we have ever designed and developed,” said Curt Blake, president of Spaceflight. “Because we’re breaking ground with such a historic mission, we need to ensure the payloads and spacecraft subsystems will withstand the turbulence and vibrations of launch. It’s a tremendous accomplishment for our team and testament to our integration expertise.”

Spaceflight provides the most launch options for customers, working with nearly every global launch vehicle provider, including the PSLV, Dnepr, Antares, Cygnus, Minotaur, Electron, Soyuz and others, to ensure organizations can access space when they want. The “rideshare service” model provides more options for organizations to reach a desired orbit at a much lower cost than buying their own launch vehicle.

Spaceflight has launched more than 120 satellites to date. The frequency of satellite launches, combined with Spaceflight’s cross-section of customers and variety of mission-applications, is a strong indicator of the growing capabilities of small satellites and the need for more timely and cost-effective access to space.




High resolution time-lapse video of stack being assembled:
https://www.spaceflightindustries.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/1-Minute-TimeLapse_h264_1080p.mp4?_=1
« Last Edit: 10/04/2017 10:34 PM by gongora »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Some details from the pictures that stand out to me.
1) Are they going to use plates with 4x24U 12U deployers on SSO-A. I didn't know these 24U deployers.
2) The 6x6U Cubestack, in replies #55 & #59 from gongora image of a mockup of this ring are shown.
3) Detail of the stack on the laptop on image 2.
It looks like they are using the ASAP-S at the bottom. Above that are a Sherpa-0 ring with the 6x6U CubeStack. Than a (moog) SoftRide ring with another Sherpa-0 24" ESPA (heavy)-ring on top. Then the adapter to the payload on top, it looks like there are several (~6) 6U dispensers mounted on this adapter structure. Very nice and complicated stack.

Edit: I watched the video added to the spaceflight modal survey article.
I noted that the bottom Sherpa looks more spherical instead of cilindrical, could this be a Sherpa with propulsion module, or did they need clearance for the payload underneath ASAP-S/ this Sherpa?

(I've removed the ugly detail images)
I just realized this was already discussed on Reddit
Final edit: Spaceflight is releasing an updated "general payload user's guide' at the end of 2017. Hopefully this will explain a lot.
« Last Edit: 11/08/2017 01:04 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline gongora

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Does anyone know if these U.S. Coast Guard "Polar Scout" cubesats will be on SSO-A?  It says launching on a SpaceX rocket in 2018.

[The Day] Can tiny satellites help the Coast Guard do its job?

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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On this SSO-A launch, a Sherpa(-0) payload carriing ring will be debuted.
This was reported in the Spacenews Q&A Curt Blake article.
Most likely the bulbous ring is the maiden Sherpa-0 (without propulsion module).
edit: And it has 6 24" mounting locations now.
« Last Edit: 10/21/2017 12:05 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline gongora

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On this SSO-A launch, a Sherpa(-0) payload carriing ring will be debuted.
This was reported in the Spacenews Q&A Curt Blake article.
Most likely the bulbous ring is the maiden Sherpa-0 (without propulsion module).

SHERPA should be the ring(s) at the top.

I wonder when/if they are going to file FCC documents like they did for the cancelled SHERPA flight.

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I assume Arkyd-6 is still flying here?
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

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I assume Arkyd-6 is still flying here?

Still?  Was Arkyd-6 supposed to be on this flight?  Gunter shows it on PSLV.
« Last Edit: 10/21/2017 01:51 PM by gongora »

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http://www.comnews.ru/content/110183/2017-10-25/kazahstan-vzyalsya-za-sozdanie-sputnikov
Google translate
Quote
Initially, KazSTSAT was planned to be launched on the Dnepr rocket, but due to the temporary collapse of the launch services operator Kosmotras, the Kazakh side opted for the US SpaceX launch vehicle. Vice Minister of Defense and Aerospace Industry of the Republic of Kazakhstan Marat Nurguzhin said at the conference "Kazakhstan's path to space 2017" that the launch is scheduled for April 2018 - simultaneously with the second Kazakhstans scientific satellite, which will be based on CubeSat technology.

Offline Mark McCombs

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"Are you sure you want to go to Red Alert, Sir? It does mean changing the bulb." - Kryten
"A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory". LLAP - Leonard Nimoy

Offline gongora

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One of the NGSO constellations that has applied to the FCC is from Audacy.  They're planning something a little different from most of the other constellations:  a data relay service operating from MEO that other satellites can use for data and TT&C communications instead of communicating directly with ground stations.

Audacy is launching a 3U test sat, and it appears to be on SSO-A.

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Mission Overview:

Audacy Zero is a 3U CubeSat demonstration mission to test out Audacy’s user communications
terminal and first ground station in the San Francisco Bay Area. The spacecraft is consistent with the
CubeSat standard with stowed dimensions of 11.12 cm x 11.12 cm x 34.05 cm (L x W x H). The total
mass is estimated to be 4.7 kg. Audacy Zero is launching to a 575 km sun-synchronous orbit, which
can lead to a total mission lifetime of 4.4 years.

Audacy Zero will utilize a prototype communications terminal operating in the K and K a bands with a
high gain and a low gain antenna. Primary data transmission will focus on telemetry, tracking, and
command (TT&C) from the communications terminal and subsystems to maintain successful
operations and analysis of the terminal hardware. Payload data includes pictures and videos taken
from an on-board camera and occasional transmissions from a secondary optical communications
payload.

Launch Vehicle: SpaceX Falcon 9

Launch Site: Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, USA

Mission Duration: Up to 4.4 years until Audacy Zero reenters via atmospheric orbital decay
assuming the expected atmospheric drag profile.

Launch and Deployment Profile: The Falcon 9 launch vehicle will launch into roughly circular 575
km 97.9° sun-synchronous orbit. Upon confirmation of final stage burn-out, the primary and
secondary payloads will be dispensed from the payload fairing. The primary payload is from Terra
Bella/Planet. Audacy Zero will deploy to the following orbit:

Apogee: 575 km

Perigee: 575 km

Inclination: 97.9°

Audacy Zero has no propulsion and will not actively change orbits or engage in a parking or transfer
orbit.

There is even a hosted payload, a 1U optical experiment for Stanford called POINTR:
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Polar Orbiting INfrared Tracking Receiver (POINTR) is an in flight demonstration of an optical receiver pointing, acquisition and tracking (PAT) system. The optical receiver payload hosted on Audacy’s 3U cubesat would be pointed to the ground to acquire and track a beacon laser sent from a suitable ground facility, currently proposed as NASA JPL’s OCTL facility. This mission would demonstrate the operational and technical requirements related to two satellites establishing an optical communications link with each other. The requirements include mission planning, command and execution of a pointing maneuver, acquisition of an incoming optical signal and tracking of the optical signal. It is planned to launch in early 2018.

(The ODAR document attached has most of the interesting info for the test sat.)

Offline gongora

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Found a mention of ORS-6 in an article:

[Defense One Nov. 19, 2017] As the US Air Force Turns Its Focus to Space, This Small Team Could Lead the Way
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...a satellite about the size of a refrigerator is being pieced together by a small team of workers wearing lab coats. It’s the ORS group’s sixth satellite. If all goes as planned, airmen here at Kirtland will use the satellite to measure the height and direction of the sea.

The satellite is being built through a unique arrangement here on a military base, not at some far-off defense contractor factory. Its bus and payload — made, respectively, by Northrop Grumman and the California Institute of Technology’s Jet Propulsion Lab — were built for other projects that didn’t materialize. A company called Millennium Engineering is putting it all together.

When it heads to orbit next year, it will launch on a SpaceX rocket with other non-military satellites, a ride-share arrangement that one Air Force official compared to taking a bus instead of driving alone in a car. The price is a mere $10 million, a fraction of what it would cost to fly on its own rocket, said Lt. Col. Eric Moomey, chief of programs in the Operationally Responsive Space office.

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