Author Topic: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates  (Read 34595 times)

Online Chris Bergin

A thread for the processing of EM-1 Orion ahead of the 2018 mission.

Orion Forum Section:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?board=38.0

Orion News Articles:
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/tag/orion/

L2 Orion:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?board=29.0

All three of those links go back 2006, back in the CEV days. Been a long road of this little spacecraft!

Please use the Orion forum section for discussion etc. Let's try and keep this thread just for updates on the construction and processing.


Offline clongton

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #2 on: 09/09/2015 05:24 PM »
Great to see Orion coming together. Thanks for the report. I'd be interested in the high rate of MMOD damage, to compare it with what Apollo suffered on its round trip to the moon.

I like the way the spacecraft is being put together in large sections. My question is whether or not each of those major sections is a solid piece of aluminum that has been machined out or were they themselves constructed of component pieces?
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Online DaveS

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #3 on: 09/15/2015 10:11 PM »
Late called teleconference announced by NASA concerning Orion progress:

Sep. 15, 2015
M15-138
NASA to Hold Teleconference to Discuss Orion Spacecraft Progress
NASA officials will hold a media teleconference at 1 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Sept. 16 to discuss the agency’s progress on the Orion spacecraft, which will carry humans on missions into deep space.

Participants in the teleconference will be Robert Lightfoot, NASA associate administrator, and William Gerstenmaier, the agency’s associate administrator for Human Exploration and Operations.

To participate, reporters must contact Kathryn Hambleton or Stephanie Schierholz at 202-358-1100, kathryn.hambleton@nasa.gov or stephanie.schierholz@nasa.gov, and provide their media affiliation no later than 11 a.m. Wednesday.

The teleconference will stream live on NASA’s website at:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio
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Online Chris Bergin

Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #5 on: 09/16/2015 05:09 PM »
September 16, 2015
RELEASE 15-185
NASA Completes Key Milestone for Orion Spacecraft in Support of Journey to Mars

NASA’s mission to send astronauts to deep space destinations where no other human has traveled has taken another important step forward with the completion of a critical milestone for the Orion spacecraft currently in production. 

Agency officials have completed a rigorous technical and programmatic review, confirming continued support of the program and establishing NASA’s commitment to the program’s technical, cost, and schedule baseline. This is the first time NASA has reached this level of progress for a spacecraft designed to take humans into deep space beyond the moon, including to an asteroid placed in lunar orbit and on the journey to Mars.

“Our work to send humans out into the solar system is progressing,” said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. “Orion is a key piece of the flexible architecture that will enable humanity to set foot on the Red Planet, and we are committed to building the spacecraft and other elements necessary to make this a reality.”

A successful test of an uncrewed Orion capsule, Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), flew in December 2014, providing important data that allowed engineers to identify risks associated with deep space flight and re-entry and use that knowledge to improve the design of Orion for its next test flights, Exploration Missions 1 and 2 (EM-1 and EM-2).

Performance data has helped to improve manufacturing processes, as well. Engineers have already incorporated many of these improvements into elements of the EM-1 design, including the crew compartment or pressure vessel, which now is in fabrication and assembly at companies across the country. The vessel is comprised of seven panels or sections, and the first two of these were welded together last week. When complete, this capsule will launch on NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket on the first fully integrated flight test, EM-1.

Astronauts will fly on Orion for the first time on EM-2. That mission will build on the results of the EM-1 flight with additional requirements that the Orion capsule includes fully integrated environmental control and life support systems; controls; and communications designed specifically for the human operation; and advanced launch and re-entry spacesuits for the crew. The recent review, culminating in what is known within NASA as Key Decision Point C (KDP-C), includes all of these technological advancements, and approval represents agency support for this work and the Orion program plan.

The decision commits NASA to a development cost baseline of $6.77 billion from October 2015 through the first crewed mission (EM-2) and a commitment to be ready for a launch with astronauts no later than April 2023. The commitment is consistent with funding levels in the president’s budget request. Conservative cost and schedule commitments outlined in the KDP-C align the Orion Program with program management best practices that account for potential technical risks and budgetary uncertainty beyond the program's control.

“As we take these steps to develop the capabilities we need to send astronauts deep into space, we’re also aligning how we manage our human exploration systems development programs to ensure we are prepared for unforeseen future hurdles,” said Robert Lightfoot, NASA associate administrator. “We’re committing to this funding and readiness level to stay on the journey we’ve outlined to get to Mars.”

Orion engineers now are executing a rigorous review of the spacecraft’s engineering design and technical progress of the vehicle systems and subsystems. This critical design review (CDR) will demonstrate Orion is ready to proceed to full-scale fabrication, assembly, integration and testing. NASA’s SLS Program recently completed this milestone, and its Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program will begin its review this fall.

“The Orion Program has done incredible work, progressing every day and meeting milestones to prepare for our next missions,” said William Gerstenmaier, the agency’s associate administrator for Human Exploration and Operations at NASA Headquarters. “The team will keep working toward an earlier readiness date for a first crewed flight, but will be ready no later than April 2023, and we will keep the spacecraft, rocket and ground systems moving at their own best possible paces.”

In the coming months, Orion will complete its CDR; see the arrival of a test version for the European Space Agency-provided service module at NASA’s Plum Brook Station near Sandusky, Ohio; perform a series of parachute tests; and complete the welding of the crew pressure vessel. Although Orion’s readiness date for EM-1 was not formally part of the KDP-C milestone commitment, engineers continue to work toward a commitment for SLS and GSDO to be ready for the uncrewed mission in fall 2018, and NASA will set an integrated launch date after GSDO’s critical design review is completed.

For more information about Orion, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/orion

Online Chris Bergin

Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #6 on: 09/16/2015 05:13 PM »
Real aim for the first crewed flight remains August 2021.

Online Chris Bergin

Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #7 on: 09/16/2015 05:18 PM »
Items such as structural test articles and software development are the potential threats to the schedule. Now noting the Service Module is an item, but they said the EM-1 SM is coming in soon and that lays the path for EM-2. EM-1 is still on track.

Online Chris Bergin

Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #8 on: 09/16/2015 05:19 PM »
Machined panels on Orion have been a problem. They "unbend" themselves over time and they have to redo that process.

Online Chris Bergin

Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #9 on: 09/16/2015 05:31 PM »
Gerst dances around the question about how far Orion will travel on Mars missions (because Orion's unlikely to be able to go to Mars).

Online Chris Bergin

Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #10 on: 09/16/2015 05:47 PM »
Mr. Lightfoot mentions an ISS resupply mission as an option for one Orion mission. That would be a crazy use of SLS/Orion. Please no! That's just silly use of SLS and Orion.

Online Chris Bergin

Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #11 on: 09/16/2015 10:34 PM »
Article for KDP-C:
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2015/09/orion-passes-kdp-c-cautious-2023-crew-debut/

Decided to cover some of the history way back to CEV (some from an old article as it covered the Ares I woes) and then into the KDP-C.

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #12 on: 09/18/2015 04:00 PM »
We are now starting to see the pressure being exuded by these programs.  Thank you for writing that article Chris.  There are so many more questions but I think the article speaks for itself.

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Offline rayleighscatter

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #13 on: 09/18/2015 09:08 PM »
Mr. Lightfoot mentions an ISS resupply mission as an option for one Orion mission. That would be a crazy use of SLS/Orion. Please no! That's just silly use of SLS and Orion.
Did he say Orion & SLS or just Orion? Sending Orion up unmanned on a cheaper rocket and then putting it through its paces on orbit and letting it loiter in the extreme environment for 2 or 3 years before going home and see how it fares doesn't seem like a terrible idea.
« Last Edit: 09/18/2015 09:09 PM by rayleighscatter »

Offline Scylla

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #14 on: 10/11/2015 05:00 PM »
Aerojet Rocketdyne Subsystems for the Orion Spacecraft Complete Major Review
http://www.rocket.com/article/aerojet-rocketdyne-subsystems-orion-spacecraft-complete-major-review

The Jettison Motor and Crew Module Reaction Control System for NASA's Orion Spacecraft Are on Track for a 2018 Launch After Completing Critical Design Reviews

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Oct. 9, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Aerojet Rocketdyne (NYSE:AJRD) announces the critical design review (CDR) completion for the jettison motor and the crew module reaction control system (RCS) on the Orion spacecraft. These two major subsystems that Aerojet Rocketdyne is building for Lockheed Martin and NASA are critical for ensuring astronaut safety and mission success.

With the successful CDR completion on the programs, Aerojet Rocketdyne is now able to begin manufacturing hardware for installation into Orion for Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), which is slated for launch readiness in 2018 and will be the first flight to the proving ground of deep space.

"Astronaut safety is paramount and the jettison motor and the crew module reaction control system will ensure that the crew begins their mission into deep space and lands at the completion without harm," said Julie Van Kleeck, vice president of Aerojet Rocketdyne's Advanced Space & Launch Programs business unit.

The jettison motor is a solid rocket motor that separates the launch abort system from the Orion spacecraft about five seconds after fairing separation, allowing the crew to continue safely on their way into deep space. In addition to its normal operations, the jettison motor serves a double duty if an anomaly occurs. Designed to assist crew escape, the jettison motor is one of three solid rocket motors on the launch abort system that will rapidly pull the capsule away from the stack in the event of an emergency.

The RCS on the crew module the company is providing for Orion is equally important to crew safety. The crew module RCS provides the only course control authority after separation from the service module. It ensures that the heat shield is properly oriented, the crew module is stable under the parachutes and that the vehicle is in the correct orientation for splashdown. The RCS started a redesign in October 2013 based on modeling and simulation demonstrations theorizing different operational environments for the system, which the Exploration Flight Test-1's (EFT-1) mission in December 2014 confirmed.

"Our crew module reaction control engines are critical to the entire Orion landing sequence," said Samuel Wiley, Aerojet Rocketdyne program director for Human Space. "The successful EFT-1 flight demonstrated the RCS technology and now we are expanding the engine capabilities to support future flights into deep space."

The crew module RCS that Aerojet Rocketdyne is now manufacturing for delivery to Lockheed Martin next year is significantly enhanced from the system flown on EFT-1. Design changes include: increasing the structural capability of the engines and support structure; increased engine nozzle temperature capability to withstand more severe aero-thermal environments during re-entry of the crew module into Earth's atmosphere; and reducing overall mass of the system. The successful CDR also verified the new design and confirmed the use of cutting-edge additive manufacturing technology in the fabrication of engine components.

"Successful critical design reviews for the jettison motor and the crew module reaction control system represent the culmination of several years of disciplined engineering and development work that required perseverance and dedication to meet the level of rigor necessary for human space flight programs," added Van Kleeck. "Sending humans beyond deep space is becoming increasingly closer as progress on Orion and the Space Launch System (SLS) continues for the 2018 launch."

EM-1 will be the first time the SLS is integrated with the Orion spacecraft. The mission will send Orion into lunar distant retrograde orbit - a wide orbit around the moon that is farther from Earth than any spacecraft built for humans has ever traveled.

In support of the EM-1 mission, the company recently completed the first verification test series of the RS-25 engine, the former space shuttle main engine, for flight aboard the SLS. The test series is verifying the engine's higher performance, new operating environments and certifying a new controller on the engine. Aerojet Rocketdyne, the prime contractor for the RS-25 engine, will continue testing of flight engines and controllers at NASA's Stennis Space Center through next year in preparation of the first flight of SLS.

Aerojet Rocketdyne is an innovative company delivering solutions that create value for its customers in the aerospace and defense markets. The company is a world-recognized aerospace and defense leader that provides propulsion and energetics to the space, missile defense and strategic systems, tactical systems and armaments areas, in support of domestic and international markets. Additional information about Aerojet Rocketdyne can be obtained by visiting our websites at www.Rocket.com and www.AerojetRocketdyne.com.
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Offline jacqmans

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #15 on: 10/14/2015 05:47 AM »
October 13, 2015
RELEASE 15-207

NASA Appoints Mark Kirasich to Serve as Orion Program Manager
 
NASA has appointed Mark Kirasich to be manager of the agency’s Orion Program. The Orion spacecraft is being developed to send astronauts to deep space destinations, such as an asteroid and ultimately to Mars, launching on the agency’s Space Launch System rocket.

Kirasich has been deputy Orion Program manager since 2006. He now will be responsible for oversight of design, development and testing of the Orion spacecraft, as well as spacecraft manufacturing already under way at locations across the country and in Europe for the ESA (European Space Agency).

“Mark brings a wealth of knowledge about NASA’s human spaceflight efforts to the Orion Program manager position,” said William Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate in Washington. “By overseeing the team and the work needed to send Orion to deep space, and working directly with our international partner ESA to provide the spacecraft’s service module, his leadership will be essential to enabling humans to pioneer farther into the solar system and continue our journey to Mars.”

Kirasich began his NASA career in 1983 at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston as a member of the space shuttle flight operations team, quickly advancing to the position of lead space shuttle payload officer in mission control. In 1996, he was selected as a flight director in charge of planning and executing NASA human spaceflight missions, serving in that capacity for multiple space shuttle missions and International Space Station expeditions.

“I have seen first-hand Mark’s impact on the Orion Program, and previously in key operations leadership roles at Johnson, and I look forward to having him help us extend the success of Orion’s 2014 flight test forward,” said Johnson Space Center Director Ellen Ochoa.

Kirasich succeeds Mark Geyer, who became Johnson’s deputy director in August.

A native of Chicago, Kirasich received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering in 1982 from the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, and a master’s degree in electrical engineering in 1983 from Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. He is the recipient of numerous awards including NASA’s Outstanding Leadership Medal and Space Flight Awareness Award, and a Johnson Space Center Director’s Commendation.

Across the country, elements of the Orion spacecraft are coming together for the first integrated mission with the Space Launch System. At NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, welding began in September on the next Orion destined for space. Next month, NASA will see the arrival of a test version of Orion’s service module, provided by ESA, for testing and analysis at the agency’s Plum Brook Station, near Sandusky, Ohio.

For more information about Orion, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/orion

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #16 on: 10/16/2015 10:50 PM »
Second Weld for Orion’s Primary Structure
Posted on October 16, 2015 at 4:19 pm by Mark Garcia

Engineers at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans continue to weld together the primary structure of the Orion spacecraft for Exploration Mission-1. Technicians recently joined the spacecraft’s barrel section, which is the round middle part of the spacecraft, to the aft bulkhead, which is the bottom portion of the crew module. Orion’s primary structure is composed of seven large pieces that are put together in detailed order. Orion’s three cone panels next will be welded together. Once completed, the structure will be shipped from Michoud to the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where Orion’s systems and subsystems will be integrated and processed before launch atop NASA’s Space Launch System rocket.

Photo: NASA / Radislav Sinyak

https://blogs.nasa.gov/orion/2015/10/16/second-weld-for-orions-primary-structure/

Offline sdsds

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #17 on: 10/17/2015 04:54 AM »
That's a great photo of the weld in progress! I don't think we get to see much of the actual flight hardware, but a bit of it is visible down inside the weld tool fixture (see attached). Am I correct in thinking the weld is being performed upside down, i.e with the aft bulkhead above the barrel section? And then, is that bit that looks different along the seam (closer to the camera than the weld apparatus) a section of the seam which has already been welded?
« Last Edit: 10/17/2015 04:55 AM by sdsds »
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Online Coastal Ron

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #18 on: 10/17/2015 06:05 AM »
That's a great photo of the weld in progress! I don't think we get to see much of the actual flight hardware, but a bit of it is visible down inside the weld tool fixture (see attached). Am I correct in thinking the weld is being performed upside down, i.e with the aft bulkhead above the barrel section? And then, is that bit that looks different along the seam (closer to the camera than the weld apparatus) a section of the seam which has already been welded?

It does look like they flipped it upside down to have top access to the weld.  And yes, it looks like that short weld is a tack weld.  They'll likely do that all the way around the perimeter to make sure everything lines up properly before starting the final continuous weld.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Offline jacqmans

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #19 on: 10/17/2015 02:55 PM »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #20 on: 10/17/2015 02:56 PM »

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #21 on: 10/23/2015 08:12 PM »
NASA Tests Crew Recovery for Orion

Published on Oct 23, 2015
NASA tested crew recovery procedures Oct. 6-8 in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at the agency's Johnson Space Center in Houston. Team members from NASA's Orion and Ground Systems Development and Operations Programs demonstrated and evaluated techniques for crew recovery.


Tony De La Rosa

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #22 on: 10/28/2015 12:38 AM »
NASA’s Orion Marks Progress With Design Review
October 26, 2015 - Mark Garcia

On Oct. 21, NASA held a review to evaluate the design readiness of the Orion spacecraft, the latest in a series of key milestones on the journey to Mars. The results of this review, known as a Critical Design Review, at the Program level will be briefed to agency leaders in the coming months.

The Orion spacecraft is being developed to send astronauts to deep space destinations, such as an asteroid and on the journey to Mars launching on the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket.

“The Orion team across the country put in many long hours preparing for and participating in this review,” said Mark Kirasich, Orion Program manager. “Every aspect of the spacecraft design was closely scrutinized.”

The Critical Design Review was carried out over the past 10 weeks by engineers at NASA and prime contractor Lockheed Martin. Clearing the Critical Design Review means that the Orion design is mature and ready to move ahead with full-scale fabrication, assembly, integration and testing. The review was supported by engineers working with the SLS and Ground Systems Development and Operations programs and in the Exploration Systems Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington, alongside an independent Standing Review Board.

The evaluation included a review of common aspects of the spacecraft for Exploration Mission (EM)-1 and the spacecraft for EM-2, the first Orion mission with astronauts, such as the spacecraft’s structures, pyrotechnics, launch abort system, guidance, navigation and control and software, among many other elements. Systems unique to EM-2 will be addressed at a later critical design review for the mission in the fall of 2017.

“This is an exciting time for Orion,” Kirasich continued. “We are making strong progress manufacturing the Exploration Mission-1 Orion vehicle. Our dedicated team is making human space exploration a reality.”

Across the country, elements of the Orion spacecraft are coming together for the first integrated mission with SLS and the ground systems at the Kennedy Space Center. At NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, welding began in September on the next Orion destined for space. Next month, NASA will see the arrival of a test version of Orion’s service module, provided by ESA, for testing and analysis at the agency’s Plum Brook Station, near Sandusky, Ohio.

http://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-s-orion-marks-progress-with-design-review

Offline woods170

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #23 on: 11/20/2015 08:45 AM »
Welding of the cone section of the EM-1 pressure vessel was completed earlier this month:

http://www.nasa.gov/feature/orion-ingenuity-improves-manufacturing-while-reducing-mass

Quote from: NASA
Technicians have finished welding together three cone panels that make up a section of the Orion crew module that will fly beyond the moon on Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1).
« Last Edit: 11/20/2015 08:46 AM by woods170 »

Offline woods170

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #24 on: 11/20/2015 09:00 AM »
Remember the times that Orion was referred to as 'Apollo on steroids'?

Well, guess what just happened? Starting to look like an Apollo CSM a little more... :)

http://www.nasa.gov/feature/engineers-refine-thermal-protection-system-for-orion-s-next-mission

Quote from: NASA
For these future Orion missions, a silver, metallic-based thermal control coating will also be bonded to the crew module’s thermal protection system back shell tiles. The coating, similar to what is used on the main heat shield, will reduce heat loss during phases when Orion is pointed to space and therefore experiencing cold temperatures, as well as limit the high temperatures the crew module will be subjected to when the spacecraft faces the sun. The coating will help Orion’s back shell maintain a temperature range from approximately -150 to 550 degrees Fahrenheit prior to entry and also will protect against electrical surface charges in space and during re-entry.

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #25 on: 12/09/2015 10:48 PM »
NASA’s Exploration Mission-1

Published on Dec 9, 2015
NASA is hard at work building the Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System rocket and the ground systems needed to send astronauts into deep space. The agency is developing the core capabilities needed to enable the journey to Mars. On Exploration Mission-1, the spacecraft will travel thousands of miles beyond the moon over the course of about a three-week mission.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline dks13827

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #26 on: 12/13/2015 03:17 PM »
Nearly 3 years until a pretty good mission will launch.  Wish it was sooner than that.

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #27 on: 12/16/2015 10:22 PM »
NASA Arc Jet Facility History

Published on Dec 16, 2015
NASA researchers used the Arc Jet Facility at Johnson Space Center for over 40 years to provide researchers with the data necessary to develop spacecraft protective systems. From the dawn the space race, through the development of the Orion spacecraft, the Arc Jet facility allowed researchers the opportunity to test and refine spacecraft material and structural designs to determine what could withstand the extreme temperature, physical and chemical changes required to penetrate the atmosphere and return safely to earth. As NASA progresses on the Journey to Mars, the groundwork laid by Arc Jet researchers will prove invaluable.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #28 on: 12/18/2015 09:37 PM »
Orion 2015 Progress Toward Exploration Mission-1

Published on Dec 18, 2015
This video shows many hardware milestones reached in 2015 to send NASA’s Orion spacecraft to deep space on Exploration Mission-1, a flight that will take the uncrewed spacecraft thousands of miles beyond the moon in the first integrated mission with NASA’s Space Launch System rocket.

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #29 on: 01/15/2016 09:55 PM »
Jan. 15, 2016
Engineers Mark Completion of [Orion EM-1] Pressure Vessel
http://www.nasa.gov/feature/engineers-mark-completion-of-orion-s-pressure-vessel
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Offline jacqmans

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #30 on: 01/21/2016 08:04 AM »
 
January 20, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-005

Media Invited to See NASA’s Orion Crew Module for its Journey to Mars

NASA’s Orion crew module will be available to media at two NASA locations Jan. 26th and in early February, as engineers continue to prepare the spacecraft to send astronauts deeper into space than ever before, including to an asteroid placed in lunar orbit and on the journey to Mars.

At 10:30 a.m. EST on Tuesday, Jan. 26, the agency’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans will host a media viewing and facility tour of the spacecraft’s recently completed pressure vessel, the underlying structure of the crew module, before it ships to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

To attend the event at Michoud, reporters must contact Chip Howat at 504-257-0478 or carl.j.howat@nasa.gov by 3 p.m. Monday, Jan. 25. International media accreditation for this event is closed.

The Orion pressure vessel provides a sealed environment for astronaut life support in future human-rated crew modules. Technicians at Michoud began welding together the seven large aluminum pieces of Orion’s primary structure in precise detail last September. At Kennedy, Orion will be outfitted with the spacecraft’s systems and subsystems, processed and integrated with NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) ahead of their first joint exploration mission, or EM-1.

Michoud also is where the massive core stage of SLS is being manufactured. Reporters will be able to view tooling and newly manufactured hardware for SLS, and hear about mission progress from personnel across NASA.

Individuals available for interviews during the tour include:
•Bill Hill, deputy associate administrator for Exploration Systems Development at NASA Headquarters in Washington
•Mike Sarafin, EM-1 mission manager at NASA Headquarters
•Mark Kirasich, Orion program manager at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston
•Scott Wilson, Orion production manager at Kennedy
•John Honeycutt, SLS program manager at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama
•Steve Doering, SLS core stage manager at Marshall
•Mike Bolger, Ground Systems Development and Operations program manager at Kennedy
•NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio
•Mike Hawes, Orion program manager for Lockheed Martin
•Jim Bray, crew module director for Lockheed Martin

Orion will depart Michoud on or about Feb. 1 and travel to Kennedy aboard NASA’s Super Guppy airplane. Additional details for Orion’s arrival at Kennedy, including media accreditation, are forthcoming.

For more information about Orion, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/orion
 
« Last Edit: 01/21/2016 08:04 AM by jacqmans »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #31 on: 01/22/2016 03:47 PM »
January 22, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M1-16

Media Invited to Orion Crew Module Arrival Events at Kennedy Space Center

Media representatives are invited to attend two events at Kennedy Space Center in Florida marking the arrival of the Orion crew module pressure vessel that will fly atop the Space Launch System rocket on the first integrated flight test, Exploration Mission-1, (EM-1). Delivery of this major Orion hardware marks an important milestone as NASA continues making progress on its journey to Mars. 

At 3 p.m. EST, Monday, February 1, Orion’s recently completed pressure vessel, or underlying structure of the crew module, is scheduled to arrive at Kennedy’s Landing Facility aboard NASA’s Super Guppy cargo aircraft. Members of the news media will have the opportunity to photograph the arrival and unloading of the spacecraft.

At 10 a.m. EST, Wednesday, February 3, media may view the spacecraft in the Neil Armstrong Operations & Checkout Facility and conduct interviews with NASA and Lockheed Martin representatives.

NASA and Lockheed Martin are tracking several milestones for Orion in 2016. The processing of Orion for flight at Kennedy will include outfitting the crew module with the spacecraft’s heat-shielding thermal protection systems, avionics and other subsystems including electrical power storage and distribution, thermal control, cabin pressure control, command and data handling, communications and tracking, guidance, navigation and control, reaction control system propulsion and flight software and computers.

To attend the event, media accreditation requests should be submitted online at:

https://media.ksc.nasa.gov

International media accreditation for this event is closed. U.S. must apply for accreditation by 4 p.m. January 29. Two forms of government-issued identification are required to receive a badge, one of which must be a photo ID such as a driver’s license or passport. Badges will be available for pick up at the Kennedy Badging Office on State Road 405 east of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Hours for the Kennedy Badging Office are 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. Questions concerning accreditation may be addressed to Jennifer Horner at 321-867-6598 or jennifer.p.horner@nasa.gov.

For the February 1 event, media should arrive at the press site by 2 p.m. for transportation to the landing facility.

Media should arrive at the press site by 9 a.m. for transportation to the event Feb. 3.

For both events, all participants must be dressed in full-length pants and shirts with sleeves, and wear flat shoes that cover the feet entirely.

Dates and times are subject to change. Updates for events are available at 321-867-2525.

The Orion spacecraft will carry astronauts farther into the solar system than ever before. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space.

For more information about Orion, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/orion


Offline jacqmans

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #33 on: 02/02/2016 10:29 AM »

Online Archibald

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #34 on: 02/02/2016 03:42 PM »
Wait, that's a Super Guppy ? With Orion similar shappe to an Apollo - back to the 60's !  :)

Offline AS-503

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #35 on: 02/02/2016 03:44 PM »
Wait, that's a Super Guppy ? With Orion similar shappe to an Apollo - back to the 60's !  :)

Hehe....but without 1960's funding levels where will she go? and what will she do?  ;)

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #36 on: 02/02/2016 07:26 PM »
Orion Loaded into Work Stand at Kennedy
‎02 ‎February ‎2016, Mark Garcia

Orion is lowered onto a work stand in the Neil Armstrong Operations & Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Engineers loaded the Orion pressure vessel, or underlying structure of the crew module, into a work stand in the Neil Armstrong Operations & Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Feb. 2. The pressure vessel’s seven large pieces were welded together at the agency’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans between September 2015 and January 2016. It will fly thousands of miles beyond the moon on Exploration Mission-1.

The pressure vessel provides a sealed environment to support astronauts and is key for future human-rated crew modules. The Orion team will test the pressure vessel to make sure it’s structurally sound and then begin outfitting it with the spacecraft’s other systems and subsystems. Over the next 18 months, more than 100,000 components will arrive to Kennedy for integration into Orion. Check out more photos of Orion’s trip to Kennedy.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/orion/2016/02/02/orion-loaded-into-work-stand-at-kennedy/


Offline Antilope7724

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #38 on: 02/04/2016 09:44 AM »
Wait, that's a Super Guppy ? With Orion similar shappe to an Apollo - back to the 60's !  :)

It's a Super Guppy built under license in France and used by AirBus to transport large assemblies between their various factories. AirBus was using 2 U.S. built Super Guppys and built 2 more under license. They were using 4 at one time. NASA now has Super Guppy Turbine N941NA (formerly F-GEAI), serial number 0004 built in 1983. AirBus replaced its Super Guppy's with the jet powered AirBus Beluga oversize transport aircraft modified from its A300 jet airliner. NASA obtained the french Super Guppy as compensation in return for launching ESA items to the ISS on the Space Shuttle.

http://jsc-aircraft-ops.jsc.nasa.gov/guppy/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aero_Spacelines_Super_Guppy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airbus_Beluga

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aero_Spacelines_Pregnant_Guppy

« Last Edit: 02/04/2016 10:34 AM by Antilope7724 »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #39 on: 02/04/2016 12:02 PM »
New and Improved Orion Crew Module Arrives at Kennedy Space Center

Milestone Marks First Major Delivery of Exploration Mission -1 Flight Hardware 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ,  Feb. 3, 2016  /PRNewswire/ -- The  Lockheed Martin  (NYSE: LMT) and NASA Orion team has secured the 2,700 lb.  Exploration Mission -1 (EM-1) Orion crew module into its structural assembly tool, also known as the "birdcage." The crew module is the living quarters for astronauts and the backbone for many of Orion's systems such as propulsion, avionics and parachutes.

"The structure shown here is 500 pounds lighter than its Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) counterpart," said  Mike Hawes , Lockheed Martin Orion vice president and program manager. "Once the final structural components such as longerons, bolts and brackets are added, total crew module structural weight savings from EFT-1 to EM-1 will total 700 pounds."

From experience gained by building test articles, building and flying EFT-1, and now building the EM-1 crew module, the  Lockheed Martin  team is learning how to shed weight, reduce costs and simplify the manufacturing process - all in an effort to improve the production time and cost of future Orions.

"Our very talented team in  Louisiana  has manufactured a great product and now they have passed the baton to  Florida ," said Hawes. "This is where we assemble, test and launch, and the fun really begins."

At  Kennedy Space Center , the crew module will undergo several tests to ensure the structure is perfectly sound before being integrated with other elements of the spacecraft. First it will undergo proof-pressure testing where the structural welds are stress tested to confirm it can withstand the environments it will experience in space. The team will then use phased array technology to inspect the welds to make sure there are no defects. Additional structural tests will follow including proof-pressure testing of the fluid system welds and subsequent x-ray inspections.

Once the crew module passes those tests it will undergo final assembly, integration and entire vehicle testing in order to prepare for EM-1, when Orion is launched atop  NASA's  Space Launch System (SLS) for the first time. The test flight will send Orion into lunar distant retrograde orbit - a wide orbit around the moon that is farther from Earth than any human-rated spacecraft has ever traveled. The mission will last about three weeks and will certify the design and safety of Orion and SLS for future human-rated exploration missions.

Offline b0objunior

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #40 on: 02/12/2016 04:34 AM »
Orion EM-1 heatshield coming along nicely.

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #41 on: 02/17/2016 07:31 PM »
Orion Spacecraft Arrives for Exploration Mission-1

Published on Feb 17, 2016
On Feb. 1, 2016, the pressure vessel for an Orion spacecraft arrived at the Shuttle Landing Facility operated by Space Florida at Kennedy. Late in 2018, this spacecraft will lift off atop NASA's Space Launch System rocket on the vehicle's maiden voyage.

Tony De La Rosa


Offline AnalogMan

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #43 on: 03/09/2016 12:05 AM »
Engineers Test New Acoustics Method on Flown Orion
March 7 - Mark Garcia

Engineers at Orion prime contractor Lockheed Martin’s facility near Denver are assessing a new acoustic test method on the space-flown Orion crew module.

Direct Field Acoustic testing uses more than 1,500 customized, high-energy speakers configured in a circle around the vehicle. This test simulates the intense acoustic loads Orion will experience during launch and ascent on the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket.  If this test method passes all necessary evaluations it will be used to verify Orion’s ability to withstand SLS acoustic loads during its next mission, Exploration Mission-1.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/orion/2016/03/07/engineers-test-new-acoustics-method-on-flown-orion/


Orion Crew Module Direct Field Acoustic Test

Direct Field Acoustic (DFA) Testing was successfully completed on the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1) Crew Module (CM) at the Lockheed-Martin (LM) Waterton Reverberant Acoustic Lab (RAL). DFA Testing is an alternative method for spacecraft module acoustic qualification and acceptance verification that is being investigated for use in the Orion program. Its portability would allow testing at KSC and eliminate the transportation risks and associated cost and schedule of performing this verification activity off-site. Two configurations were tested; one representing the future reverberant acoustic comparison test and one representing the future configuration for Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) CM. A mock-up of the Service Module (SM) without the fairings will also be tested to gather volumetric data to decide viability of performing DFA Testing on the Static Test Article (STA) SM in the 2016 Fall. Data will be used to develop predictive algorithms for future tests.

Photo Credits: Dusty Volkel / Lockheed Martin
« Last Edit: 03/09/2016 12:09 AM by AnalogMan »

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #44 on: 03/15/2016 08:22 PM »
Orion Solar Array Wing Passes First Test

Published on Mar 15, 2016
An international team of engineers deployed an Orion solar array wing at NASA Glenn’s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio on Feb. 29. The deployment of the 24-foot wing qualification model was an important first step in verifying Orion’s power system for the spacecraft’s first flight atop the agency’s Space Launch System rocket. The mission, known as Exploration Mission-1 or EM-1, will venture tens of thousands of miles beyond the moon.

See story and photos: http://go.nasa.gov/1Uw6wLD



Tony De La Rosa

Offline Retired Downrange

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #45 on: 04/04/2016 12:28 AM »
Video of controls testing in mock-up Orion:

At NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, engineer Heather Paul and astronaut Chris Cassidy put on spacesuits to test out the next generation controller for the Orion spacecraft – NASA’s deep space vehicle that will take humans on the #JourneyToMars.

The testing is providing data teams will use to make any adjustments needed to ensure future Orion crews can interact appropriately with the spacecraft’s control system when they’re inside their spacesuits during deep space missions.

http://spacecoastdaily.com/2016/04/video-look-at-nasas-next-generation-controller-for-orion-spacecraft/

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #46 on: 04/09/2016 12:33 AM »
Orion Drop Test Series Begins

NASA Langley Research Center

Published on Apr 8, 2016
APRIL 7, 2016 – Engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, kicked off a series of nine drop tests of a representative Orion crew capsule with crash test dummies inside to understand what the spacecraft and astronauts may experience when landing in the Pacific Ocean after deep-space missions.

The high-fidelity capsule, coupled with the heat shield from Orion's first flight in space, was hoisted approximately 16 feet (4.9 meters) above the water and vertically dropped into Langley’s 20-foot-deep (6.1 meters) Hydro Impact Basin.

The crash test dummies were instrumented to provide data and secured inside the capsule to help provide information engineers need to ensure astronauts will be protected from injury during splashdown.

Each test in the series simulates different scenarios for Orion’s parachute-assisted landings, wind conditions, velocities and wave heights the spacecraft may experience when touching down in the ocean.


Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #47 on: 04/28/2016 09:02 PM »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline Johnnyhinbos

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #48 on: 04/29/2016 10:44 AM »
So that's actual flight hardware and not a test article?
John Hanzl. Author, action / adventure www.johnhanzl.com

Offline b0objunior

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #49 on: 04/30/2016 04:17 AM »
So that's actual flight hardware and not a test article?
Yup.

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #50 on: 05/12/2016 12:34 AM »
Orion Passes the Pressure Test
May 11, 2016 - Linda Herridge, KSC

Engineers at Kennedy Space Center in Florida recently conducted a series of pressure tests of the Orion pressure vessel. Orion is the NASA spacecraft that will send astronauts to deep space destinations, including on the journey to Mars. The tests confirmed that the weld points of the underlying structure will contain and protect astronauts during the launch, in-space, re-entry and landing phases on the Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1), when the spacecraft performs its first uncrewed test flight atop the Space Launch System rocket.

The Orion pressure vessel contains the atmosphere that a crew would breathe during a mission. It also will provide living and working space for the crew, and withstand the loads and forces experienced during launch and landing.

In late April, Orion was lifted by crane from its assembly and tooling stand and moved to a test stand inside the proof pressure cell. The assembly and tooling stand is called the birdcage because it closely resembles a birdcage, but on a much larger scale.

To prepare for the test, technicians attached hundreds of strain gauges to the interior and exterior surfaces of the vehicle. The strain gauges were attached to provide real time data to the analysts monitoring the changes during the pressurization. The analysts were located in the control room next to the pressure cell. The large doors were closed and sealed and Orion was pressurized to over the maximum pressure it is expected to encounter on orbit.

Lockheed Martin, the manufacturer of the Orion crew module, ran the test at incremental steps over two days to reach the maximum pressure. During each step, the team pressurized the chamber and then evaluated the data to identify changes for the next test parameter. The results revealed the workmanship of the crew module pressure vessel welds and how the welds reacted to the stresses from the pressurization.

“We are very pleased with the performance of the spacecraft during proof pressure testing,” said Scott Wilson, NASA manager of production operations for the Orion Program. “The successful completion of this test represents another major step forward in our march toward completing the EM-1 spacecraft, and ultimately, our crewed missions to deep space.”

“It gives the team a lot of pride to see Orion coming together for EM-1,” said Ed Stanton, a systems engineer for Orion Production Operations in the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program.

Orion was tested inside the proof pressure cell in the high bay of the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building. After being moved back to the birdcage assembly stand, technicians will begin the intricate work of attaching hundreds of brackets to the vessel’s exterior to hold the tubing for the vehicle’s hydraulics and other systems.

Future tests include a launch simulation and power on. Orion also will be sent to NASA Glenn Research Center’s Plum Brook Station facility in Sandusky, Ohio, for acoustics and vibration tests. The uncrewed Orion will be outfitted with most of the systems needed for a crewed mission.

NASA’s Space Launch System rocket with the Orion spacecraft atop will roar into space from Kennedy’s Launch Pad 39B. EM-1 will send Orion on a path thousands of miles beyond the moon over a course of three weeks, farther into space than human spaceflight has ever travelled before. The spacecraft will return to Earth and safely splash down in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California. This mission will advance and validate capabilities required for human exploration of Mars.

http://www.nasa.gov/feature/orion-passes-the-pressure-test

Photo caption:  Lockheed Martin engineers and technicians prepare the Orion pressure vessel for a series of tests inside the proof pressure cell in the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Offline jacqmans

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #51 on: 05/12/2016 01:10 AM »
Orion Exploration Mission-1 Crew Module Pressure Tested

Date: 11-May-2016 1:03 PM

Spacecraft Approved for Assembly of Secondary Structures 

 CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. ,  May 11, 2016  /PRNewswire/ -- The  Lockheed Martin  (NYSE: LMT) and NASA Orion team has successfully proof-pressure tested the Orion spacecraft's  Exploration Mission -1 (EM-1) crew module. The crew module is the living quarters for astronauts and the backbone for many of Orion's systems such as propulsion, avionics and parachutes.

In order to certify the structural integrity of the crew module it was outfitted with approximately 850 instruments and subjected to 1.25 times the maximum pressure the capsule is expected to experience during its deep space missions. That means about 20 pounds per square inch of pressure was distributed over the entire inner surface of the spacecraft trying to burst it from within. As a next step, the team will use phased array technology to inspect all of the spacecraft's welds in order to ensure there are no defects.

Once the primary structure of the crew module has been verified, the team will begin the installation of secondary structures such as tubes, tanks and thrusters. Once those pieces are in place, the crew module will be moved into the clean room and the propulsion and environmental control and life support systems will be installed.

"Our experience building and flying Exploration Flight Test-1 has allowed us to improve the build and test process for the EM-1 crew module," said  Mike Hawes , Lockheed Martin Orion vice president and program manager. "Across the program we are establishing efficiencies that will decrease the production time and cost of future Orion spacecraft."

During EM-1 Orion will be launched atop  NASA's  Space Launch System (SLS) for the first time. The test flight will send Orion into lunar distant retrograde orbit - a wide orbit around the moon that is farther from Earth than any human-rated spacecraft has ever traveled. The mission will last about three weeks and will certify the design and safety of Orion and SLS for future human-rated exploration missions.

Offline mike robel

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #52 on: 05/12/2016 02:42 AM »
Hmmm. Do we not have the technology to cast the pressure shell rather than weld it? 

Offline Zed_Noir

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #53 on: 05/12/2016 04:13 AM »
Hmmm. Do we not have the technology to cast the pressure shell rather than weld it?

[ sarcasm ]
Because that was the way it was done in the past.  ::)
[ /sarcasm ]

Offline MKremer

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #54 on: 05/12/2016 10:15 AM »
Hmmm. Do we not have the technology to cast the pressure shell rather than weld it? 
No, but maybe in another couple of decades a 3D printed pressure vessel of the same or larger sizes will be possible.

Offline SWGlassPit

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #55 on: 05/13/2016 04:23 PM »
Hmmm. Do we not have the technology to cast the pressure shell rather than weld it?

Casting is not a very good technique to use when you're dealing with items that are fracture-critical (like, say, pressure vessels).  Objects that are cast will have microvoids from the shrinkage of the metal as it cools, and the grain structure of the resulting metal is not easily controlled, which means that the material properties of the resulting piece vary throughout the geometry.  This leaves portions that are more brittle than others as well as unpredictable regions of residual stresses built up, none of which you want when your product HAS to work.

It's far better to start from a rolled blank or a forging and form it into shape before machining the final geometry from it.

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #56 on: 06/14/2016 07:19 PM »
Orion Swing Drop at NASA Langley Research Center - June 7, 2016

NASA Langley Research Center

Published on Jun 14, 2016
A test version of the Orion spacecraft is pulled back like a pendulum and released, taking a dive into the 20-foot-deep Hydro Impact Basin at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sR2jKIzef4?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline gongora

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #57 on: 07/10/2016 11:56 PM »
Orion parachute testing
Quote
YUMA PROVING GROUND, Ariz. -- Conducting an individual test can be an unbelievably complicated undertaking, particularly when dealing with an expensive one-of-a-kind system. Late June's test of the parachutes destined for use aboard NASA's Orion spacecraft is a case in point, for it involved a vast number of complex moving parts that had to mesh together in a precise, carefully planned and thought-out manner.

These included several aircraft flying out of Edwards Air Force Base, California, additional aircraft from Laguna Army Airfield, ground tracking stations at several points at Yuma Proving Ground, and an exceptionally wide variety, dozens, of technical experts.

The parachute system for Orion is a complex system of its own, composed of 11 different parachutes which operate to slow down the spacecraft and bring it to a safe earth landing. The system's three primary parachutes are made of tough nylon and are the size of football fields.

Though NASA has conducted 17 previous parachute drops at the proving ground, planners say each deployment is slightly different.

"The parachutes are packed under thousands of pounds of pressure. It takes over a week to pack a main parachute," said Koki Nachin, NASA chief engineer for the capsule parachute assembly system. "In the final qualification phase, which we are in now, we will demonstrate that the parachute system works as expected within the predicted range of performance."

According to Nachin, NASA plans for an unmanned Orion mission to go into lunar orbit in 2018, with the first astronaut flight occurring in 2022.

Ellen Ochoa, former astronaut and current director of NASA's Johnson Space Center, was on hand to witness what was to be the eighteenth drop at Yuma Proving Ground, but it was ultimately aborted due to an oxygen system problem aboard the C-17 aircraft carrying the parachutes and payload. ...

Offline rcoppola

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #58 on: 07/27/2016 05:48 PM »
GAO Orion Report just out:

http://gao.gov/products/GAO-16-620
Sail the oceans of space and set foot upon new lands!
www.linkedin.com/in/rvcoppola/

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #59 on: 07/28/2016 03:14 PM »
GAO Orion Report just out:

http://gao.gov/products/GAO-16-620

Here's Eric Berger's write-up: http://arstechnica.com/science/2016/07/a-new-independent-review-of-the-orion-spacecraft-is-pretty-damning/, title as per URL address and summary line:

Quote
The capsule is over budget and may need seven more years before flying crews.
« Last Edit: 07/28/2016 03:18 PM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline rayleighscatter

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #60 on: 07/29/2016 10:34 PM »
TPS tile bonding for EM-1 is now taking place.

Offline Khadgars

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #61 on: 07/30/2016 02:51 AM »
Nice to see flight hardware coming together

Offline jacqmans

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #62 on: 08/03/2016 04:26 PM »
Astronauts Test Orion Docking Hatch For Future Missions

Engineers and astronauts conducted testing in a representative model of the Orion spacecraft at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston to gather the crew's feedback on the design of the docking hatch and on post-landing equipment operations. The testing, shown here with astronauts Stephanie Wilson, Karen Nyberg and Rick Mastracchio (L to R), was done to evaluate the equipment used during egress to ensure that a fully suited crew member carrying survival equipment can get out of the spacecraft through the docking hatch if necessary.

While the crew will primarily use the side hatch for entry and exit on Earth and the docking hatch to travel between Orion and a habitation module on long-duration deep space missions, the crew will need to be able to exit out of the docking hatch if wave heights in the Pacific Ocean upon splashdown are too high. The work is being done to help ensure all elements of Orion's design are safe and effective for the crew to use on future missions on the journey to Mars.

Image Credit: NASA

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #63 on: 08/04/2016 03:35 AM »
Orion Backstage: Up the Hatch with Astronauts

NASA Johnson

Published on Aug 3, 2016

Engineers and astronauts conducted testing in a representative model of the Orion spacecraft at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston to gather the crew's feedback on the design of the docking hatch and on post-landing equipment operations.

The testing, shown here with astronauts Stephanie Wilson, Karen Nyberg and Rick Mastracchio (L to R), was done to evaluate the equipment used during egress to ensure that a fully suited crew member carrying survival equipment can get out of the spacecraft through the docking hatch if necessary.

While the crew will primarily use the side hatch for entry and exit on Earth and the docking hatch to travel between Orion and a habitation module on long-duration deep space missions, the crew will need to be able to exit out of the docking hatch if wave heights in the Pacific Ocean upon splashdown are too high. The work is being done to help ensure all elements of Orion's design are safe and effective for the crew to use on future missions on the journey to Mars.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-I0katihQo?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline jacqmans

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #64 on: 08/04/2016 03:24 PM »
August 04, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-093

NASA Invites Media to Orion Water Drop Test, Update on Journey to Mars
 
 
Media are invited to watch engineers test a mockup of NASA’s Orion spacecraft in a simulated ocean splashdown Thursday, Aug. 25, at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

The test is planned for 3:30 p.m. EDT, but due to the nature of the testing, the exact time of the drop could change. Prior to the test, media will get a poolside update on the tests, as well as overall progress made in preparing Orion for NASA’s Journey to Mars.

Briefing participants will include:
•Bill Hill, deputy associate administrator for Exploration Systems Development, NASA Headquarters
•Dave Bowles, Langley director
•Lara Kearney, manager, Orion Crew and Service Module, NASA’s Johnson Space Center
•Mike Hawes, Orion program manager, Lockheed Martin

The deadline for U.S. citizens to apply for media access is noon Wednesday, Aug. 24. Interested media should contact Sasha Ellis by email at 757-864-5473 or sasha.c.ellis@nasa.gov. Media must arrive by 2:30 p.m. at the Langley badge and pass office on the day of the test. Accreditation for international media is closed.

Orion has been undergoing a series of water impact tests in the center’s Hydro Impact Basin to help engineers understand how to best protect the crew and spacecraft when they return to Earth from deep space missions. The test capsule, coupled with the heat shield from Orion’s first spaceflight, will swing like a pendulum into Langley’s 20-foot-deep basin. Inside the capsule will be two test dummies – one representing a 105-pound woman and the other, a 220-pound man -- outfitted in spacesuits equipped with sensors. These sensors will provide critical data that will help NASA understand the forces crew members could experience when they splash down in the ocean.

Water impact testing is helping NASA evaluate how the Orion spacecraft may behave when landing under its parachutes in different wind conditions and wave heights. During Orion’s next flight test, Exploration Mission-1, the uncrewed spacecraft will launch on NASA’s Space Launch System rocket, travel more than 40,000 miles beyond the moon, and return at speeds of up to 25,000 mph.

To learn more about Langley's many contributions to Orion, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/1vKhx1j
 
For more information on Orion, visit:
 
http://www.nasa.gov/orion



Offline woods170

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #67 on: 08/29/2016 07:43 AM »
Heat Shield has arrived at KSC!

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2016/08/orions-heat-shield-kennedy-em-1/

By Chris Gebhardt.
Great article again Chris G, per the usual.

Minor nit: the final image in the article is of a backshell TPS panel and has little to do with the scope of this article: the primary heatshield.

Offline woods170

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #68 on: 08/29/2016 08:43 AM »
TPS tile bonding for EM-1 is now taking place.

More info on this here: http://www.nasa.gov/feature/tile-bonding-begins-for-orion-s-first-mission-atop-space-launch-system-rocket

Interesting quote with regards to the reusability of Orion components:
Quote from: Bob Granath
Quote from:  Joy Huff
The fact that Orion lands in the ocean, requires we replace the tiles after each mission. The tiles are waterproofed to protect them from fresh water, such as rain. But during re-entry the waterproofing material burns out of the tiles so they do absorb salt water while in the ocean and that adds contaminants that would make their reuse impossible.
Installing TPS tiles will be a part of preparation for each mission. The work taking place now will help perfect the process.
« Last Edit: 08/29/2016 08:47 AM by woods170 »

Offline Oli

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #69 on: 08/29/2016 01:37 PM »
Interesting quote with regards to the reusability of Orion components:

Which suggests the rest of the vehicle can be reused. Interesting.

Offline woods170

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #70 on: 08/29/2016 03:13 PM »
Interesting quote with regards to the reusability of Orion components:

Which suggests the rest of the vehicle can be reused. Interesting.
That's exactly why I found the quotes interesting.

Offline Space Ghost 1962

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #71 on: 08/29/2016 04:46 PM »
Significant reprocessing.

Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #72 on: 08/29/2016 05:01 PM »
Significant reprocessing.

Any chance the significant reprocessing will cost less than half the cost of a new capsule?

Offline woods170

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #73 on: 08/29/2016 06:19 PM »
Significant reprocessing.
I see you master the British art of understatement.

From my sources:
After having landed in the ocean, and having spent a good number of hours floating in salt water the spacecraft will have to be stripped back to the bare pressure hull to get rid of the salt. None of the RCS engines, tankage and plumbing can be re-used due to a high likelyhood of salt water immersion into the innards of the RCS system. The same applies to just about everything else outside the pressure hull. Re-use of the backshell panels requires replacement of the tiles and re-certification of the carrier panels themselves and the backshell carrier structure. The same applies to the primary heatshield carrier structure. The folks over at SpaceX can testify to this having almost completed their efforts to "re-use" a flown Dragon 1. That particular "re-use" is basically a re-use of the pressure hull and certain stuff located inside the pressure hull. Just about everything else has been replaced with brand-new items. Re-use of Orion, if any, will walk pretty much the same path.

According to my sources the re-use of significant elements of Orion is not a serious option right now given the low projected flight-rate. The big exception is a subset of the avionics. For the rest it's cheaper to just build a brand new spacecraft.
Things could have been very different if the original plan had been followed: land Orion on land. But heck, the performance issues with Ares I threw a wrench in those plans.
For the reasons above Boeing has chosen land as the primary landing surface for CST-100 and a set of similar reasons is one of the driving forces behind SpaceX wanting to land Dragon 2 propulsively on land.
« Last Edit: 08/29/2016 06:21 PM by woods170 »

Online Archibald

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #74 on: 08/31/2016 07:13 PM »
Glad to see the Guppy is still there, just like in the old Apollo days. Good aircrafts never dies. "Hey, you little Orion,stop bragging about. I carried your grandpa Apollo in his infancy."
« Last Edit: 08/31/2016 07:14 PM by Archibald »

Offline Jim

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #75 on: 08/31/2016 07:34 PM »
Glad to see the Guppy is still there, just like in the old Apollo days. Good aircrafts never dies. "Hey, you little Orion,stop bragging about. I carried your grandpa Apollo in his infancy."

Not this Guppy.  This is an ex Airbus Super Guppy Turbine.  The original NASA Super Guppy was retired 20 years ago or so.

Offline ncb1397

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #76 on: 08/31/2016 07:35 PM »
If Orion can hit a 100 mile landing ellipse, it could land in lake superior if salt water corrosion is a problem. Helicopter recovery could reduce the time spent in water by quite some time.

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #77 on: 08/31/2016 09:01 PM »
Orion Ground Test Article drop test Aug. 25, 2016

NASA Langley Research Center

Published on Aug 25, 2016
Engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center conducted a splashdown test of the Orion Crew Module Ground Test Article on Aug. 25, 2016. The goal of this series of tests to gather data on simulated splashdowns in stressful landing scenarios. Video credit: NASA/Gary Banziger

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaV_ADVwUnE?t=001

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Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #78 on: 09/03/2016 12:03 AM »
Orion Jettison Motor Test

SciNews

Published on Sep 2, 2016
Aerojet Rocketdyne successfully tested its third development jettison motor for NASA’s Orion spacecraft, at its facility in Rancho Cordova, California, on 31 August 2016. The jettison motor is part of Orion’s Launch Abort System (LAS), assuring the separation of the crew module from the LAS so that parachutes can be deployed for a safe splashdown.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyfsSMpGsJQ?t=001

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Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #79 on: 09/29/2016 03:01 AM »
Divers Train for Orion Recovery at NASA's Johnson Space Center

 
NASAKennedy

Published on Sep 28, 2016
A team of U.S. Navy divers practiced Orion underway recovery techniques Sept. 20-22 in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to prepare for the first test flight of an uncrewed Orion spacecraft with the agency's Space Launch System rocket during Exploration Mission 1. The training will prepare the recovery team, Ground Systems Development and Operations and Orion manufacturer Lockheed Martin Underway Recovery Test 5 in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California in October.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AM40S4kJETI?t=001

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Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #80 on: 10/13/2016 06:30 PM »
Orion Vibe Test

NASA Glenn Research Center

Published on Oct 13, 2016
A full-scale test version of the Orion service module undergoes vibration tests on the world’s most powerful spacecraft shaker system at NASA Glenn’s Plum Brook Station. The tests are designed to ensure the service module can withstand the intense vibrations it will experience when it launches and travels into space aboard the powerful Space Launch System rocket. (no audio)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SX3P-foK_mw?t=001

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Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #81 on: 10/13/2016 06:31 PM »
Orion Backstage: Navy diver Beau Lontine prepares for Orion recovery

NASA Johnson

Published on Oct 13, 2016
When NASA’s Orion returns to Earth after traveling more than 40,000 miles beyond the moon during its next mission and splashes down in the Pacific Ocean, a team from the U.S. military will help secure Orion and safely return it back to land. U.S. Navy diver Beau Lontine and a team from the U.S. Navy, Coast Guard, Air Force and NASA practiced Orion recovery techniques in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at Johnson Space Center in Houston, the facility where astronauts train for spacewalks. The evaluations help the team prepare for an upcoming series of tests off the Coast of San Diego in October where they’ll check out the hardware and operations they’ll use to secure Orion after its first test flight of Orion with the agency’s Space Launch System rocket in late 2018. The testing all helps pave the way for Orion flights with astronauts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QR0orgqkLi0?t=001



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Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #82 on: 10/20/2016 11:38 PM »
Orion Spacecraft Heat Shield Leaves NASA Langley

NASA Langley Research Center

Published on Oct 20, 2016
Inside the shrink wrap is the heat shield from Orion's first flight in space. After a series of water impact tests, the heat shield left NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia for NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida where it will be assessed for future needs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjWLVEdYOYc?t=001

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Offline AnalogMan

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #83 on: 11/08/2016 05:11 PM »
Photo taken October 24, 2016 so a little dated, but posted for posterity.

KSC-20161024-PH_DNG01_0007

Tile blocks have been prefitted around the heat shield for the Orion crew module inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The heat shield is one of the most critical elements of Orion and protects it and the future astronauts inside from searing temperatures experienced during reentry through Earth's atmosphere when they return home. For Exploration Mission-1, the top layer of Orion's heat shield that is primarily responsible for helping the crew module endure reentry heat will be composed of approximately 180 blocks, which are made of an ablative material called Avcoat designed to wear away as it heats up. Orion is being prepared for its flight on the agency's Space Launch System for Exploration Mission-1 in late 2018. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to destinations not yet explored by humans, including an asteroid and NASA's Journey to Mars. It will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities.

Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #84 on: 12/15/2016 12:45 AM »
Orion Backstage: NASA's Super Guppy Takes on Heavy Lifting for Orion

NASA Johnson

Published on Dec 14, 2016
NASA's David Elliott and a team of pilots and engineers who operate the agency's Super Guppy aircraft are responsible for transporting some of the biggest elements of spacecraft to locations around the country. The Super Guppy has played an important role carrying pieces of Orion, such as the primary structure of the crew module, to Kennedy Space Center in Florida for outfitting and processing in advance of its 2018 mission that will take the uncrewed spacecraft, launched atop the Space Launch System rocket, about 40,000 miles beyond the moon.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pNQ9CTJ7Mxc?t=001

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Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #85 on: 12/21/2016 03:05 PM »
From Metal To Masterpiece: Orion's 2016 Progress

NASA Johnson

Published on Dec 21, 2016
From the beginning of assembly work on the Orion crew module at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to testing a range of the spacecraft systems, engineers made headway in 2016 in advance of the spacecraft’s 2018 mission beyond the moon. Highlights include: crew module pressure vessel manufacturing; testing to ensure the safety of Orion and its crew upon splashdown in the ocean; testing of procedures to recover Orion after its missions; outfitting and assembly work on the crew module at Kennedy and on the European service module at Airbus Defence & Space in Germany; and service module testing at NASA Glenn's Plum Brook Station in Ohio.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3gCvSPTJyHQ?t=001

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Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #86 on: 01/16/2017 01:13 AM »
Time to publish a new study showing that Orion on SLS can get astronauts to and back from a Deep Space Habitat at a Moon-Earth Lagrange Point.

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #87 on: 01/17/2017 02:09 PM »
Propulsion Qualification Model update
Posted on 17 Jan 2017 by julien

OHB in Sweden is assembling, integrating and doing initial testing of the European Service Moudle Propulsion Qualification Model (PQM) that represents the propulsion system for testing purposes. It is much heavier than the final module as it will not be launched into space. It serves an important role in the development of the Orion spacecraft as it allows engineers to show that everything works as planned.

[...]

The assembly was completed in January in Stockholm, Sweden and the model is packed up and ready for shipment to the White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico (USA).

There it will be tested extensively including “hot-firing” where the auxiliary engines will be fired for real in tests ran by Airbus DS.

http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2017/01/17/propulsion-qualification-model-update

Photo caption: Packed and ready for shipping. PQM container.

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #88 on: 02/20/2017 04:18 PM »
European Orion functional model arrives in USA for combined testing
Posted on 20 Feb 2017 by laylan

Like modern aircraft with fly-by-wire technology, spacecraft depend on reliable electrical systems to calculate scenarios and command hardware to react for a safe and successful journey. For NASA’s Orion spacecraft that will be heading beyond the Moon and back, the avionics have an enormous amount of data to process and hardware to control.

ESA is supplying the European Service Module for Orion that provides propulsion, electrical power, water and thermal control as well as maintaining the oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere for the astronauts in the crew capsule. All these functions need to be finely controlled – there is little room for error in human spaceflight: the European Service Module avionics manages the module’s hardware and the data exchange services based on instructions from the Orion flight computers in the Crew Module that are designed and developed by NASA and its contractors.

Orion has 33 engines that need to fire at precise moments to stay on course. Propellant is pushed by helium to the spacecraft’s thrusters with computers calculating timing and fuel levels. The service module has 14 fuel and supply tanks that change the spacecraft’s characteristics as the liquids empty and slosh about during Orion’s mission – each change requires new calculations and adapting thruster firings.

Testing all scenarios virtually

A functional simulator includes the replica models of the service module’s electronic units, and hardware such as valves, sensors, motors, batteries and power generation that can be programmed to reproduce any condition encountered during the missions in space.

The simulator was constructed in Les Mureaux, France and will be used to test the electrical and functional design of the service module, reproducing mission scenarios and verifying that the module will react correctly to any unexpected events that could occur.

After testing in Les Mureaux at the Airbus Defense and Space site, the functional model was shipped to Denver, USA, where it will be connected to a complete Orion spacecraft functional test facility. The avionics, the crew module and the European service module will go through another round of even more complex testing to ensure the two systems work together as planned, running virtual scenarios over and over again to ensure the software copes with all possible conditions. Unlike on your phone or computer a quick internet-update to remove any bugs is not an option when travelling in space between Earth and the Moon.

The first Orion mission is planned for 2018 without passengers, but the second will include astronauts. The crew capsule computers will work with the service module’s avionics to keep a safe environment for the astronauts as well – reacting to sensors in the capsule as well as from the astronauts themselves.

“Together with the test article that was formally handed to NASA this month, this is the second part of the system to start testing complete Orion systems” says ESA’s Philippe Deloo. "The project is coming together quickly  and it is immensely satisfying for the hundreds of people working on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean to push forward to the next phases and milestones of space exploration.”

The test campaign in Denver will run till mid-2018.

http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2017/02/20/european-orion-functional-model-arrives-in-usa-for-combined-testing/

Photo Caption: (both) Orion Lab with foreign partners from Airbus. Credit: NASA

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #89 on: 02/23/2017 06:34 PM »
February 23, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-022
NASA Invites Media to Next Test of Orion Spacecraft Parachutes
 
Orion Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) drop test using the Parachute Test Vehicle at the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona, Dec. 2012.

Credits: NASA

NASA is inviting media to attend a test of the Orion spacecraft’s parachutes on Wednesday, March 8, at the U.S. Army’s Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona. Orion is scheduled for its second airdrop test, in a series of eight, to qualify the parachute system for crewed flights.

Media will have the opportunity to interview Orion engineers, see the model up close and view the test from the drop zone. To attend, media must contact Laura Rochon at laura.a.rochon@nasa.gov by 1 p.m. EDT on Thursday, March 2.

During the test, an engineering model of the Orion spacecraft will be dropped from a C-17 aircraft flying at an altitude of 25,000 feet. This test will simulate a descent sequence astronauts might experience if they have to abort a mission after liftoff. The test sequence begins under simulated abort conditions when Orion is traveling at the relatively slow speed of about 130 mph, as compared to 310 mph for a normal end of mission Earth re-entry.

The team will focus on two primary aspects of system performance in this scenario: deployment of Orion’s two drogue parachutes at low speeds, and deployment of its three main parachutes in preparation for landing.

Orion’s parachutes are critical to the safe return of the spacecraft to Earth, whether during an abort sequence or at the end of a successful deep space mission. They help stabilize and slow the crew module to about 20 mph, enabling a safe splashdown in the ocean.

Orion is built to take astronauts farther into the solar system than ever before. The spacecraft will carry astronauts to space, provide emergency abort capabilities, sustain the crew during their mission and provide safe re-entry through Earth’s atmosphere.

Find more information about Orion at:

https://www.nasa.gov/orion

-end-
Tony De La Rosa

Offline calapine

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #90 on: 02/24/2017 09:57 PM »
Feb. 24, 2017
Orion Spacecraft Progress Continues With Installation of Module to Test Propulsion Systems

On Feb. 22, engineers successfully installed ESA’s European Service Module Propulsion Qualification Module (PQM) at NASA’s White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico that was delivered by Airbus – ESA’s prime contractor for the Service Module. The module will be equipped with a total of 21 engines to support NASA’s Orion spacecraft: one U.S. Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engine, eight auxiliary thrusters and 12 smaller thrusters produced by Airbus Safran Launchers in Germany. The all-steel PQM structure is used to test the propulsion systems on Orion, including “hot firing” of the OMS engine and thrusters.

Orion will travel more than 40,000 miles beyond the moon to test the spacecraft that will carry humans farther into the solar system than ever before. NASA will use the proving ground of space near the moon to establish the deep-space mission operations needed to for long-duration missions. These missions will incrementally decrease our reliance on the Earth for in-space operations and enable future missions on the journey to Mars.

Editor: Sarah Loff  Image Credit: NASA/Rad Sinyak
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https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/orion-spacecraft-progress-continues-with-installation-of-module-to-test-propulsion
« Last Edit: 02/24/2017 09:58 PM by calapine »

Offline AnalogMan

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #91 on: 02/26/2017 11:12 AM »
[Nominally for EM-2, but maybe seat will end up being used/tested in EM-1]

NASA Simulates Orion Spacecraft Launch Conditions for Crew
Uploaded on February 25, 2017

In a lab at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, engineers simulated conditions that astronauts in space suits would experience when the Orion spacecraft is vibrating during launch atop the agency’s powerful Space Launch System rocket on its way to deep space destinations. A series of tests occurring this month at Johnson will help human factors engineers assess how well the crew can interact with the displays and controls they will use to monitor Orion’s systems and operate the spacecraft when necessary.
 
Test subjects wore modified advanced crew escape suits that are being developed for astronauts in Orion, and sat in the latest design of the seat atop the crew impact attenuation system. This was the first time this key hardware was brought together to evaluate how launch vibrations may impact the astronaut’s ability to view the displays and controls. While Orion’s late 2018 mission will be uncrewed, engineers are hard at work performing all the necessary evaluations to make sure the spacecraft is ready for crewed missions beginning as early as 2021.
 
Image Credit: NASA/Rad Sinya

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasamarshall/32297570993/

[Photo taken Jan 19, 2017]

Offline hektor

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #92 on: 02/27/2017 02:35 PM »
A set of ESA Flickr images

Orion Service Module

Offline renclod

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #93 on: 03/09/2017 07:30 AM »
NASA Orion Spacecraft Parachute Test March 8th 2017




Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #94 on: 03/09/2017 10:42 PM »
alternate view from above...

NASA Orion parachute test, 8 March 2017

SciNews

Published on Mar 9, 2017
An engineering model of NASA's Orion spacecraft was dropped from a C-17 aircraft, flying at an altitude of 25,000 feet, to test the spacecraft’s parachutes. This was its second airdrop test, in a series of eight, to qualify the parachute system for crewed flights. The test was performed at the U.S. Army’s Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona, on 8 March 2017.
Credit: NASA
NASA’s Orion spacecraft second airdrop test
Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona
8 March 2017

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hf_fwzHDycA?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #95 on: 03/22/2017 01:33 AM »
Orion Test Article Pyroshock Test

NASA Glenn Research Center

Published on Mar 21, 2017
Orion test article underwent pyro shock tests, which simulated the shock the service module will experience as it separates from the SLS during launch.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQsIzwrfM0A?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #96 on: 04/26/2017 04:22 PM »
Quote
Orion's structural test article arrives @LockheedMartin in Colorado for testing. Thanks @NASA #superguppy for the ride.

https://twitter.com/nasa_orion/status/857261965500063744

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #97 on: 04/28/2017 02:01 PM »
Quote
Test Fire of Orbital ATK’s Attitude Control Motor for NASA’s Orion Spacecraft

Published on 28 Apr 2017

On April 27, 2017, Orbital ATK successfully completed a test fire of the company’s attitude control motor (ACM) for NASA’s Orion crew exploration vehicle. The ACM will steer the capsule’s launch abort system and crew module away from the launch vehicle in the event of an emergency. The capsule, developed by Lockheed Martin, is expected to launch aboard NASA’s Space Launch System for a test flight in 2018. Learn more about the ACM here: bit.ly/2q75Ce3


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