Author Topic: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)  (Read 38637 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #60 on: 07/13/2016 11:45 AM »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #61 on: 07/13/2016 02:11 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/12/16

Posted on July 12, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Marrow Blood, Breath, and Ambient Air Sample Collection: Upon waking this morning, the crew took the Launch plus 4 day (L+4) blood, breath, and ambient air samples for the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Marrow experiment which investigates the effect of microgravity on human bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the marrow. The extent of this effect and its recovery are of interest to space research and healthcare providers on Earth.

3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment: After two consecutive weeks of successful 3D printer operations, today the ground team remotely operated the 3D printer to produce the final 3D printed test coupons in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG).  The crew removed and stowed all but the last batch, which will remain on the print tray, which will be returned on SpaceX-9 along with the rest of the coupons. Today’s operations bring the total number of coupons printed to 34, which includes a variety of 3D printed test coupons, including calibration, tensile, compression, and layer specimen coupons. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. A 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create 3 dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the ISS is the first step toward establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

Mouse Epigenetics Setup Operations: In preparation for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment arriving on SpaceX (SpX)-9, the crew completed setup operations by reconfiguring the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) video cable from the Image Processing Unit (IPU) to Video Compression and Recording Unit 2 (VRU2) and refilling the washer fluid of the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit before removal from the CBEF. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the DNA of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that occur after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

NanoRacks Plate Reader Locker Preparation and Hardware Relocate: In preparation for the arrival of the NanoRacks payload investigations on SpX-9, the crew relocated NanoRacks hardware from the NanoRacks Plate Reader installation location before removing and stowing the locker.  NanoRacks Plate Reader is a laboratory instrument designed to detect biological, chemical or physical events of samples in micro-titer plates. Micro-plate readers are widely used in research, drug discovery, bioassay validation, quality control and manufacturing processes in the pharmaceutical and biotechnological industry and academic organizations.

Space Headaches: The crew completed the European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire to provide information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crew members which can influence performance during a space mission.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Pump Separator: Yesterday, the WHC pump separator light annunciated suggesting a malfunction of the pump. The crew brought the WHC to internal EDV and ran the separator for 3 minutes to drain any excess liquid.  Following that drain, the light cleared and WHC was nominal for 3 uses while still on internal EDV. The crew reconfigured back to Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) and performed troubleshooting where the ground teams ruled out blockage in the UPA and cleared WHC for nominal operation. This morning the crew reported a high pitch noise coming from the WHC.  Ground teams believe this could be an indication that fluid has traveled into the pump separator bearings.  Crew performed an inspection of the interior of the rack and of the pump separator, which did not reveal any leaked fluid.  The WHC continues to be go for nominal use.  The installed separator pump has been in operation since January.  Two spares are available on-orbit.  Teams continue to monitor performance.

Dragon On-Board Training (OBT): In preparation for SpX-9 arrival scheduled for July 20, the USOS crew participated in a conference with ground teams prior to performing proficiency training on the Dragon mission profile, rendezvous crew procedures and crew interfaces for monitoring and commanding.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday, Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) into position for the start of the ISS Crew SpX-9 Offset Grapples Practice on July 15.  Next they translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite 6 (WS6) to WS4. At the completion of preparing the MT for the translation, Controllers noticed that Umbilical Mating Assembly 1 (UMA1) showed a status of both mated and demated on Channel A so they performed the MT translation on Channel B.  They are investigating the issue.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #62 on: 07/14/2016 01:15 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/13/16

Posted on July 13, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N) Retrieval: A USOS crewmember retrieved all 8 of the Space Bubble Detectors that were deployed last week around the ISS for the Radi-N experiment and handed them over to the Russian crewmember to be processed in the Bubble Reader. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation measures neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS. RaDI-N uses bubble detectors as neutron monitors which have been designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

3D Printer Removal: Following two weeks of successful 3D printer operations, the crew disassembled the 3D Printer in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and stowed the hardware. A total of 34 coupons were printed including calibration, tensile, compression, and layer specimen coupons. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. A 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create three dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the ISS is the first step toward establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

Space Headaches: The crew completed the final daily European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire for this week. The Space Headaches questionnaire provides information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers which can influence performance during a space mission.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Dragon On-Board Training (OBT) and Preparation: In preparation for SpX-9 arrival planned for July 20, the USOS crew practiced a 30 meter approach, two Capture Point hold runs and two meter runs. They also installed the Crew Command Panel (CCP) and activated the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Communication Unit (CUCU).

Offline John44

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« Last Edit: 07/18/2016 05:24 AM by John44 »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #64 on: 07/19/2016 09:14 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/14/16

Posted on July 14, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

Heart Cells Hardware Gather and Setup: The crew gathered and configured the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) life science hardware to support upcoming operations for the Heart Cells investigation that will be performed inside the MSG work volume. The investigation studies the human heart, specifically how heart muscle tissue contracts, grows and changes in microgravity and how those changes vary among subjects. Understanding how heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, change in space improves efforts for studying disease, screening drugs and conducting cell replacement therapy for future space missions.

Telescience Resource Kit (TReK) Hardware Set Up: The crew set up the TReK Demonstration laptop and relocated the high definition camera to view the laptop display which will be used to provide video for Space Conferences. The TReK is a suite of software applications and libraries that can be used to monitor and control assets in space or on the ground.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking on an iPad. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Urine Processing Assembly (UPA)Separator Plumbing Assembly (SPA) Samples: The crew gathered and configured equipment in preparation for the collection of a SPA effluent sample to be returned to ground for evaluation to better understand the recent high conductivity and noise observed during UPA processing.  The setup included disconnection of the purge line from the distillate line, however, due to a mismatch with the associated fittings, the sample bag could not be installed.  The purge line will remain disconnected as part of the configuration to troubleshoot the UPA.  Ground teams will continue to investigate methods for installing the sample bag. The next UPA run is expected early next week.

Safety Video Survey: The crew completed a video of the ISS interior volume to allow ground teams to assess current vehicle configuration as well as identify any areas of concern related to ventilation blockage, flammability hazards, emergency egress paths, access to fire ports and safety equipment. This survey is performed approximately every six months.

Russian Segment (RS) Video Survey: Ground controllers completed a survey of the RS using ISS external cameras.  This imagery will be used to compare against ground models in preparation for a future Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) walkoff on to the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF).

Thermal Radiator Rotary Joint (TRRJ) S1-3 Radiator Panel Survey: Yesterday, ground teams completed the periodic video survey of the damaged panel on the Starboard TRRJ.  The face sheet on the S1-3 radiator panel 7 was discovered to be delaminated in September 2008.  Ground teams will review the imagery once available.

Systems Operations Data File (SODF) Emergency Update: The crew updated the emergency procedure for “Fire Source Location” to account for the new Mouse Habitat payload being installed in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM).

Mobile Servicing System (MSS)/Mobile Transporter Status: On July 11 during preparation for MT translation from Worksite 6 (WS6) to WS4, ground controllers noticed that Umbilical Mating Assembly 1 (UMA1) showed a status of both mated and demated on Channel A so the MT translation was performed on Channel B. The unit was power cycled but did not clear the problem. Initial indications are that the UMA 1 IMCA 1 Demate Microswitch is not operational. A workaround was implemented for the issue so there are no impacts to future operations.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #65 on: 07/19/2016 09:14 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/15/16

Posted on July 15, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Mouse Epigenetics Setup Operations: The crew continued setting up for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment by refilling the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit with water, configuring the Glove Box, and gathering supplies to prepare for the investigation arriving on SpaceX-9. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the DNA of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Gecko Gripper Setup and Operations: The crew attached the Gecko Gripper to various locations in the U.S. Lab to test a gecko-adhesive gripping device that can stick on command in the harsh environment of space. The technology promises to enable many new capabilities, including robotic crawlers that could walk along spacecraft exteriors; grippers that use a touch-to-stick method to catch and release objects; and sensor mounts that can work on any surface and be reused multiple times.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of an area or activity providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the International Space Station. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Emergency Roles & Responsibilities Review: With the arrival of the 47S crew and return to 6-crew operations, all crew members participated in this activity. Topics covered included crew accountability, escape vehicle readiness, ISS Commander responsibilities and use of the emergency response flow chart. Priorities in an emergency are safety of crew and safe configuration of the ISS.

On Board Training (OBT) Dragon Offset Grapple: In preparation for SpX-9 capture currently scheduled for July 20, the crew practiced grapple approaches. On the last approach of the session, the ground sent a safing command for the crew to practice a hot backup transition. Particular attention was given to managing volumetric constraints in the Cupola as well as lighting on the grapple fixture and how it changes.  After the OBT session, ground controllers maneuvered the SSRMS into position to be ready for next week’s SpX-9 rendezvous and capture.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Pump Separator:  Today, the WHC “Check separator” light illuminated, indicating an anomaly in the WHC system.  A power cycle of the WHC recovered operability.

S31A A CETA Light Reclose Test  – On May 11th the RPCM (RPCM S31A_A RPC 3) powering the S3-1 CETA Luminaire tripped and the DDCU 50Hz latched data indicated a real overcurrent event.  Today an attempt was made to reclose the RPC to verify the failure signature.  RPC tripped upon first attempt with same over current signature.   The go forward plan is to request R&R of the CETA luminaire.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #66 on: 07/19/2016 01:42 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/18/16

Posted on July 18, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

64 Progress (64P) Launch: 64P launched successfully from Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday at 4:41PM CDT with nominal ascent. Docking is scheduled for this evening at 7:22PM CDT.

SpaceX (SpX)-9 Launch: SpX-9 launched successfully on Sunday at 11:45PM CDT. Capture is scheduled on Wednesday, July 20 at 6:00AM CDT with berthing approximately 3.5 hours later. Ingress will occur on Thursday, July 21.

EarthKAM Service Module (SM) De-activation Removal: Over the weekend, Russian crewmembers shut down the EarthKAM payload components before disconnecting and stowing the equipment, concluding a week of imagery sessions in the SM. The objective of Sally Ride EarthKAM is to integrate Earth images with inquiry-based learning to enhance curricula in support of national and state education standards; to provide students and educators the opportunity to participate in a space mission and to develop teamwork, communication, and problem solving skills; to engage teams of students, educators, and researchers in collaborative investigations using remotely-sensed data; and to incorporate the active use of Web-based tools and resources in support of the learning process.

Marrow Blood, Breath, and Ambient Air Sample Collection: The crew completed the blood collection double spin overviews this weekend to prepare for scheduled Marrow activities today and tomorrow. Upon waking this morning, the crew measured the effects of microgravity-induced marrow fat accumulation on red and white blood cell metabolism using breath and ambient air samples to measure carbon monoxide concentration. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Marrow experiment investigates the effect of microgravity on human bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the marrow. The extent of this effect and its recovery are of interest to space research and healthcare providers on Earth.

Human Research Program (HRP) Blood and Urine Collection: The crew collected blood and urine samples and stowed them into the Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  The samples will be used to support the HRP: Biochem Profile, Repository, and Cardio Ox investigations.

Cardio Ox Overview: In preparation for Cardio Ox operations planned for tomorrow, the crew will review reference material for ultrasound scanning activities and blood pressure measurements. Crewmembers provide blood and urine samples to assess biomarkers before launch, 15 and 60 days after launch, 15 days before returning to Earth, and within days after landing. Ultrasound scans of the carotid and brachial arteries are obtained at the same time points, as well as through 5 years after landing, as an indicator of cardiovascular health.

Mouse Epigenetics Setup Operations: The crew continued setup activities for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment by replacing MSPR VRU SSD installed in Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) Video Compression and Recording Unit (VRU). The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the DNA of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Strata-1 Card Change-out: Four Strata secure digital (SD) cards were replaced and the data was downlinked.  The Strata-1 experiment investigates the properties and behavior of regolith on small, airless bodies.  Regolith is the impact-shattered “soil” found on asteroids, comets, the Moon, and other airless worlds, but it is different from soil here on Earth in that it contains no living material. Strata-1’s goal is to give us answers about how regolith behaves and moves in microgravity, how easy or difficult it is to anchor a spacecraft in regolith, how it interacts with spacecraft and spacesuit materials, and other important properties.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the International Space Station. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet were completed over the weekend for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. Crew fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) Separator Plumbing Assembly (SPA) Samples: Last week the crew configured the system with the SPA output disconnected to obtain distillate samples for return to ground to better understand the recent UPA high conductivity. The UPA will continue to process in this configuration for at least a week. A longer term configuration to connect a CWC-I to the SPA output is in work.

Waste & Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Pump Separator Remove & Replace (R&R): On July 11, the WHC Check Separator fault light illuminated. Subsequent troubleshooting steps led ground teams to conclude that the separator, which has been in operation since January of this year, was at its end of life. Today the Check Separator fault light illuminated again and the crew was directed to R&R the unit.  After completion of that activity, the WHC was successfully recovered and is go for nominal use.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #67 on: 07/21/2016 03:42 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/19/16

Posted on July 19, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
64 Progress (64P) Docking: 64P docked successfully to the ISS Docking Compartment (DC)-1 nadir port last night at 7:22PM CDT. Following hatch opening the crew transferred early unstow and US cargo items.

Skin-B Operations: The crew performed Corneometer, Tewameter and Visioscan measurements on his forearm for this experiment. The Corneometer measures the hydration level of the stratus coreum (outer layer of the skin), the Tewameter measures the skin barrier function, and the Visioscan measures the skin surface topography. Skin B is a European Space Agency (ESA) investigation that aims to improve the understanding of skin aging, which is greatly accelerated in space. The data will also be used to verify the results from previous testing for the SkinCare investigation on the ISS.

Cardio Ox Ultrasound Operations: With remote guidance from the Cardio Ox ground teams, the crew conducted an ultrasound scan after configuring the VOX, attaching the ECG Electrodes, and marking the arteries followed by blood pressure measurements using the Cardiolab Holter Arterial Blood Pressure Unit. The goal of the Cardio Ox investigation is to determine whether biological markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after space flight and whether this results in an increased, long-term risk of atherosclerosis risk in astronauts. Twelve crewmembers provide blood and urine samples to assess biomarkers before launch, 15 and 60 days after launch, 15 days before returning to Earth, and within days after landing. Ultrasound scans of the carotid and brachial arteries are obtained at the same time points, as well as through 5 years after landing, as an indicator of cardiovascular health.

Human Research Program (HRP) Generic Urine and Frozen Blood Collection Double Spin: The crew continued HRP operations by collecting urine samples for a 24-hour period, configuring the Refrigerated Centrifuge for sample load operations, then collecting and processing a set of blood samples for double spin operations using the Refrigerated Centrifuge. The samples will be stowed in the Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI).


Personal Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Monitor Installation and Operations: Before performing data collections from the Personal CO2 Monitor, the crewmember first performed a single point calibration of the Personal CO2 Monitor using the iPad app and readings from the minimum circuit amps (MCA) sample port. The Personal CO2 Monitor was then paired to the iPad, before being attached to the crewmember’s clothing, and worn for several hours. The data collected will be uploaded to the Space Station Computer via the iPad app before being powered off and stowed. The Personal CO2 Monitor demonstrates a system capable of unobtrusively collecting and downlinking individual crew members’ CO2 exposure for weeks to months. This investigation evaluates wearability principles in microgravity and also demonstrates Modular Wearable Architecture Base Board, allowing rapid certification of future wearable devices.

Marrow Blood, Breath, and Ambient Air Sample Collection: Upon waking this morning, the crew took breath and ambient air samples to measure carbon monoxide concentration for the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Marrow experiment which investigates the effect of microgravity on human bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the marrow. The extent of this effect and its recovery are of interest to space research and healthcare providers on Earth.

Space Headaches: The crew completed a European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire to provide information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crew members which can influence performance during a space mission.

Minus Eighty Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) 2 & 3 Nitrogen (N2) Pressure Checks: The crew completed nitrogen checks on MELFIs 2 and 3 to verify that the nitrogen pressure in both MELFIs is within acceptable range. The MELFI is a cold storage unit that maintains experiment samples at ultra-cold temperatures throughout a mission. It supports a wide range of life science experiments by preserving biological samples (such as blood, saliva, urine, microbial or plant samples) collected aboard ISS for later return and analysis on Earth.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #68 on: 07/21/2016 03:42 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/20/16

Posted on July 20, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
SpaceX (SpX)-9 Capture: The Dragon vehicle was successfully captured by the SSRMS at 5:56AM CDT today. Ground teams then berthed the vehicle to the Node 2 Nadir (N2N) port at approximately 9 AM, after which the crew performed vestibule pressurization and outfitting.  Thanks to the crew and ground operators getting ahead of the timeline, they were able to ingress the vehicle today instead of waiting until tomorrow as previously planned.

Thermolab Instrumentation for Circadian Rhythms: The crew began the first of a three-day European Space Agency (ESA) Circadian Rhythms experiment by performing instrumentation with the Thermolab Double sensors, mounting the Thermolab Unit in a belt and connecting and powering on the Thermolab Unit before beginning a 36 hour continuous measurement. After the measurement is complete, the data will be transferred and the hardware will be stowed. The objective of the experiment is to get a better understanding of any alterations in circadian rhythms in humans during long-term space flights. Such knowledge will not only provide important insights into the adaptations of the human autonomic nervous system in space over time, but also has significant practical implications by helping to improve physical exercise, rest and work shifts, as well as fostering adequate workplace illumination in the sense of occupational healthcare in future space missions.

Mouse Epigenetics Pre-experiment Transfer Overview: In preparation for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment that arrived on SpX-9, the crew reviewed reference material on transferring mice from the transportation Cage Unit to the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit and installing the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit to Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Incubator Unit (IU).

Double Coldbag Unpack and Polar Transfer Overview: The crew reviewed reference material and procedures to understand the timing and choreography of unpacking the Double Coldbags from SpX-9 and transferring and installing the Polars from Dragon into the Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) racks.

Offline JimO

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #69 on: 07/21/2016 08:22 PM »
Jeff recently did an interview with some religious group involved in missionary work, did anyone catch it on NASA TV  and get the name of the group and interviewer?

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #70 on: 07/22/2016 03:46 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/21/16

Posted on July 21, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Dragon Operations:  The crew was scheduled to ingress and configure Dragon for on-orbit operations today, however, these tasks were completed yesterday. Today they transferred critical cargo and unpacked double cold bags to retrieve science as well as transferring 2 “Polar” freezers from Dragon into the EXPRESS rack locations that had been prepared for them.

Mouse Epigenetics Setup Operations: Crewmembers reconfigured the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) to establish an alternate power resource from the Utility Outlet Panel (UOP) and transferred the mice from the Transportation Cage Unit (which was used to house them during launch) into the Mouse Habitat Cage Units onboard ISS. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Heart Cells Habitat Preparation and Sample Installation: Today, the Heart Cells samples were removed from the SpaceX-9 Dragon capsule and transferred to SABL 2.  The crew then prepared for operations in SABL 1 by configuring the carbon dioxide (CO2) Incubator Controller and installing hardware inside.  The samples were placed in active temperature and CO2 control when they were transferred from SABL 2 into SABL 1. The Heart Cells investigation studies the human heart, specifically how heart muscle tissue contracts, grows and changes (gene expression) in microgravity and how those changes vary between subjects. Understanding how heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, change in space improves efforts for studying disease, screening drugs and conducting cell replacement therapy for future space missions.

NanoRacks Platform-1 Module Install: Six NanoRack Modules were installed on NanoRacks Platform 1. NanoRacks Modules 41 (Awty-BE-HDPE Rad Shielding), 43 (Slime Mold), and 44 (Awty-Yeast Cell Growth in a Microgravity Environment) were configured on the left side of the NanoRack Platform and Modules 45 (Duchesne-Light Wavelengths on Algae Production), 46 (Duchesne-Plant Growth Chamber), and 69 (Silver Electrolysis/ Eagelcrest) were configured on the right side. The NanoRack Platform is a multipurpose research facility that supports NanoRacks Modules by providing power and data transfer capabilities to operate investigations in microgravity.

NanoRacks Module 9: The crew performed tasks for the NanoRack Module-9 experiment by activating, deactivating, and shaking the mixture tubes. This experiment is a collection of student research projects utilizing the NanoRacks Mixsticks. Student teams from across the United States design their own experiments using flight approved fluids and materials.

Fluids Integration Rack (FIR) RPC trip troubleshooting – RPCM LA2A3B-G RPC-2 (FIR Main Power) tripped in late June.  The payload that was running inside FIR at the time (MicroChannel Diffusion) was able to complete their operations on auxiliary power.  Troubleshooting on the RPC trip was completed today.  FIR was initially powered using auxiliary power, but gradually transitioned to main power. FIR was then deactivated and re-activated in a nominal configuration. No RPC trips were seen throughout the troubleshooting. FIR was deactivated upon completion. There are currently no liens on future use of FIR main power.


Offline JimO

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #72 on: 07/24/2016 12:38 AM »
Jeff recently did an interview with some religious group involved in missionary work, did anyone catch it on NASA TV  and get the name of the group and interviewer?

This was a teleconference on July 19 but I still can't find the time-of-day,

It was a personal call, NOT a PAO function.

Where can I search to locate this information?

There's MAJOR excitement in the woo-woo-websites and British newspapers about use of religious terms like 'gospel' and 'pray', I'm trying to produce a reality check. 

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #73 on: 07/25/2016 08:42 PM »
During the daily stowage conference Jeff mentioned that 1 (at least) EMU is packed and already in Dragon.  There was discussion about securing it while other cargo is loaded and stowed.  Any ideas on which suit is coming back?  Also did one head uphill because being down one suit doesn't sound likely?
« Last Edit: 07/25/2016 08:48 PM by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Online russianhalo117

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #74 on: 07/25/2016 10:00 PM »
Jeff recently did an interview with some religious group involved in missionary work, did anyone catch it on NASA TV  and get the name of the group and interviewer?

This was a teleconference on July 19 but I still can't find the time-of-day,

It was a personal call, NOT a PAO function.

Where can I search to locate this information?

There's MAJOR excitement in the woo-woo-websites and British newspapers about use of religious terms like 'gospel' and 'pray', I'm trying to produce a reality check. 
Since it was a personal call it would be very hard to get this info since majority of personal calls are kept NASA Internal. The only way to get around that is to email the parties involved or submit a FOIA request since the info was publish in Public media. Then its up to the involved parties to respond to your info request. I'm not aware of any other way to do it. sometimes the personal calls result in NDA's being issued to those involved. NASA has a master record of all personal and public calls and other data, but is again is kept internal only.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #75 on: 07/26/2016 12:30 AM »
During the daily stowage conference Jeff mentioned that 1 (at least) EMU is packed and already in Dragon.  There was discussion about securing it while other cargo is loaded and stowed.  Any ideas on which suit is coming back?  Also did one head uphill because being down one suit doesn't sound likely?

Question answered.  Thanks NASA.

http://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/07/25/new-spacesuit-and-science-unloaded-from-dragon/

A new U.S. spacesuit was unpacked from inside Dragon and will be used during an August spacewalk to install a Commercial Crew docking port. An older U.S. spacesuit will be returned to Earth inside the Dragon for refurbishment.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #76 on: 07/26/2016 11:23 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/22/16

Posted on July 22, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Thermolab Deinstrumentation for Circadian Rhythms: The crew removed the double sensors and Thermolab Unit before cleaning and stowing the equipment following completion of the European Space Agency (ESA) Circadian Rhythm experiment. The measurement process took 36 hours to complete.

Biological Rhythms 48 Hours Actiwatch Preparation: Today, the crew configured and donned the Actiwatch to commence the Biological Rhythms data collection.  Operations will continue with the holter donning activity on Monday.  Biological Rhythms 48 hours studies the effects of long-term microgravity exposure on heart function by analyzing an astronaut’s extended electrocardiogram.


Heart Cells Media Change Preparation: The Heart Cells Media was relocated from Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus -4 (CGBA-4) to the Space Automated Bioproduct Lab-2 (SABL-2), and one bag containing three Heart Cells Media for ops was removed and temp stowed. The crew also changed the media in the Multiwell BioCells for Heart Cells in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Work Volume. The Heart Cells investigation studies the human heart, specifically how heart muscle tissue, contracts, grows and changes (gene expression) in microgravity and how those changes vary between subjects. Understanding how heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, change in space improves efforts for studying disease, screening drugs and conducting cell replacement therapy for future space missions.

Body Measures Operations: Today two crewmembers began the Flight Day (FD) 15 Body Measures data collection session, one as the subject and the other as operator. However, due to schedule constraints, not all of the objectives were completed.  The remaining tasks will be rescheduled in the near future.  NASA is collecting in-flight anthropometric data (body measurements) to assess the impact of physical body shape and size changes on suit sizing. Still and video imagery is captured and measurements are taken of segmental length, height, depth, and circumference data of all body segments (chest, waist, hip, arms, legs, etc.) from astronauts before, during and after their flight missions.

Biological Research In Canisters (BRIC) 23 Operations: The crew performed actuation of all four BRIC 23 canisters by inserting a rod into the BRIC – Petri Dish Fixation Unit (PDFU) Actuator Tool and using the Actuator Tool to mechanically force a growth medium into the Petri dishes. After a 24-hour growth period two of the four canisters will be transferred to the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for freezing of the samples and the remaining two canisters will be transferred into the MEFLI after a 48-hour growth period. The BRIC-23 investigation studies Bacillus subtilis spores and Staphylococcus aureus cells to understand how they respond to the stressful environment of space. Results from this investigation improve the understanding of how microbes adapt to spaceflight including whether their adaptations change antibiotic effectiveness, which benefits efforts to maintain crew member health.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks was completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. Crew fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking on an iPad. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Dragon Transfer Operations: The crew has unloaded the entire center stack and port rack, all of the coldbags, a large portion of the soft-stow cargo, all powered cargo including both powered Polars and the JAXA Mouse Habitat Unit Transportation Cage Unit with 12 mice from Dragon to the ISS. Fifty seven percent of the launched cargo has been transferred.

Dragon On-Board Training (OBT):  With the arrival of SpX-9, all 6 crew members participated in an Emergency Response review including emergency hatch closure. The USOS crew also participated in a capture debrief with ground teams.

Water Processor Assembly (WPA) Successful Process: Overnight the WPA successfully completed a process run. Recently, the WPA has been continuously reprocessing due to high conductivity but has faulted out due to high pressure faults of the Microbial Check Valve (MCV). The MCV is tentatively scheduled to be removed & replaced (R&Rd) next week.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #77 on: 07/26/2016 01:32 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/25/16

Posted on July 25, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Biological Research In Canisters (BRIC) 23: Over the weekend, the crew transferred all four of the BRIC-23 canisters that were actuated last week to the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  Two of the four canisters were transferred to MELFI following a 24-hour growth period and the remaining two canisters were transferred following a 48-hour growth period. The BRIC-23 investigation studies Bacillus subtilis spores and Staphylococcus aureus cells to understand how they respond to the stressful environment of space. Results from this investigation improve the understanding of how microbes adapt to spaceflight, including whether their adaptations change antibiotic effectiveness, which benefits efforts to maintain crew member health.

NanoRacks Module 9: Over the weekend the crew completed the second session of the NanoRacks Module-9 experiment by activating, shaking, and deactivating the mixture tubes. The NanoRacks Module-9 experiment is a collection of student research projects utilizing the NanoRacks Mixsticks. Student teams from across the United States design their own experiments using flight approved fluids and materials. The investigation consists of several science experiments flown in a NanoRacks Module on board the ISS.

Biological Rhythms 48 Holter Start: Earlier this morning the crew continued the operations phase of the Biological Rhythms experiment by attaching the Digital Walk Holter Electrocardiogram (ECG) and electrodes. The objective of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Biological Rhythms 48 is to study the effects of long-term microgravity exposure on heart function by analyzing an astronaut’s electrocardiogram for 48 hours.

Mouse Epigenetics Maintenance Operations: The crew refilled water in the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit located in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF). The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Fluid Shifts: The crew conducted the first Fluid Shifts operation of this session by configuring the Refrigerated Centrifuge for sample load operations, performing body sample collections and stowing the samples in a MELFI. The crew also collected a galley water sample and stowed in the MELFI prior to ingestion of a Tracer solution from the Tracer Syringe. Fluid Shifts is a joint USOS Russian experiment that measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures.

Meteor Hard Drive Change-out: The crew removed and replaced the hard drive in the Meteor Laptop located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF). The investigation provides the first space-based measurement of meteor flux as well as monitoring of carbon-based compounds. Continuous measurement of meteor interactions with the Earth’s atmosphere could also spot previously unforeseen meteor showers.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

“Road To” Extravehicular Activity (EVA): This week begins preparation tasks for the IDA2 EVA currently scheduled for August 18. Today the crew was scheduled to complete the following EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) tasks, but only completed the first three due to scheduling constraints:
•Remove EMU 3008 from the Fwd EMU Don/Doff Assembly (EDDA) and stow in the Crew Lock (CL).
•Remove EMU 3006, which was delivered on SpX-9, from the SEMU Launch Enclosure (SLE), install on the Fwd EDDA and configure for on-orbit operations.
•Configure and install EMU 3005 in the SLE for return on SpX-9.
•Retrieve EMU 3003 from the CL and install on Aft EDDA. [Deferred]
•Remove EMU 3006 from Fwd EDDA and install EMU 3008. [Deferred]

Potable Water Dispenser Filter Maintenance: The crew R&Rd the PWD filter and cleaned the fan filter areas behind the PWD. This preventive maintenance is required every 18 months.

Transition to the Power Management Control Application (PMCA) and Photovoltaic Control Application (PVCA) R5 (PMPV R5) software suite – The X2 PMPV R5 software transition began over the weekend and will continue into Tuesday.  PMCA and PVCA R5 contains new software to manage the Li-Ion batteries that will arrive on HTV-6. In addition to the PMCA and PVCA updates, there also are updates to the Command and Control (C&C) and Portable Computer System (PCS) software.  All software has good health signatures to date.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #78 on: 07/27/2016 01:51 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/26/16

Posted on July 26, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Biological Rhythms 48 Multi Media Card Exchange: The crew stopped the first half of the 24-hour recording that began yesterday and changed out the Multi Media Card and battery of the Digital Walk Holter ECG, then began the second half of the 24-hour recording. The objective of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Biological Rhythms 48 is to study the effects of long-term microgravity exposure on heart function by analyzing an astronaut’s electrocardiogram for 48 hours.

Fluid Shifts: Crewmembers continued Fluid Shifts operations by configuring the Refrigerated Centrifuge for sample load operations, conducting body (blood, urine, and saliva) sample collections and stowing the samples in a MELFI (Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS). Fluid Shifts is a joint USOS – Russian experiment that measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures

JEM Airlock (JEM AL) Operations: With assistance from the ground team, the crew completed Airlock Control and Display Unit-Remote Control (ACDU-RC) checkout and JEM AL labeling activities. They also removed the Handhold Experiment Platform Adapter from the Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) prior to removing MPEP from the Small Fine Arm (SFA) Airlock Attachment Mechanism (SAM) which is on the JEMAL slide table. This is in preparation for next week’s planned installation of NanoRacks External Platform (NREP).

At Home in Space Questionnaire: The crew completed a questionnaire for the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) At Home in Space experiment which assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the space craft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space investigates individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Microbial Check Valve (MCV) Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Remove & Replace (R&R): The Water Processing Assembly (WPA) has been experiencing high pressure faults when in reprocess mode due to high delta pressure across the MCV. The old MCV was installed following a failed R&R in 2015 and was degraded. Today the crew replaced the MCV with a spare delivered on SpX-9. The WPA is currently in process mode and data indicates the delta pressure has returned to normal levels.

Transition to the Power Management Control Application (PMCA) and Photovoltaic Control Application (PVCA) R5 Software Suite: The X2 PMPV R5 software transition began over the weekend and continued through today.  Yesterday the software was pushed to the Backup Photovoltaic Control Unit (PVCU) Multiplexer-Demultiplexers (MDMs) [PVCU-3B, PVCU-3A, PVCU-4A and PVCU-2B], which were then transitioned to Primary.  Today the software was pushed to the remaining PVCU MDMs [PVCU-1A, PVCU-1B, PVCU-2A, and PVCU-4B]. After the software loads were completed, the MDMs were transitioned from backup to primary. This returned the MDMs in their final desired Prime/Backup configuration.

Dragon Cargo Operations: The crew has unloaded all cargo from the vehicle.  The crew completed 2.5 hours of cargo packing and loading for return.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #79 on: 07/27/2016 03:37 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/26/16

Posted on July 26, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
<snip>
Dragon Cargo Operations: The crew has unloaded all cargo from the vehicle.  The crew completed 2.5 hours of cargo packing and loading for return.
That was quick!  Or is my preconception wrong regarding how long it takes to unpack a Dragon capsule?

Are the most recent USOS crews more efficient at loading/unloading CRS vehicles than a few years ago?

Are they getting unofficial cosmonaut assistance?
« Last Edit: 07/27/2016 03:39 PM by zubenelgenubi »
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