Author Topic: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)  (Read 30008 times)

Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #120 on: 08/31/2016 02:16 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/30/2016

Posted on August 30, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Cardio Ox Ultrasound Operations: With remote guidance from the Cardio Ox ground teams, the crew conducted an ultrasound scan after they configured the VOX, attached the ECG Electrodes, and marked the arteries; followed by blood pressure measurements using the Cardiolab Holter Arterial Blood Pressure Unit. The goal of the Cardio Ox investigation is to determine whether biological markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after space flight and whether this results in an increased, long-term risk of atherosclerosis risk in astronauts. Twelve crewmembers provide blood and urine samples to assess biomarkers before launch, 15 and 60 days after launch, 15 days before returning to Earth, and within days after landing. Ultrasound scans of the carotid and brachial arteries are obtained at the same time points, as well as through 5 years after landing, as an indicator of cardiovascular health.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking on an iPad today. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks were completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmember’s fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Trailing Thermal Control Radiator (TTCR) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The EV crew continued the EVA tool configuration in preparation for the TTCR EVA on Thursday. The IV crew accessed the Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) software and completed additional robotics reviews of Space Station Remote Manipulator System support plan for the EVA.

External Television Camera Group (ETVCG) Troubleshooting:  The crew performed a procedure to verify that the heaters on the spare ETVCG Light are functional. They utilized the two jumpers that were built from pin kit materials and tested the ETVCG light and heaters. After the troubleshooting, the crew confirmed a functional camera light and heater circuit on the ETVCG. This light will be used to replace the degraded light at the P1 Lower Outboard location during Thursday’s TTCR EVA.

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #121 on: 08/31/2016 09:21 PM »
Quote
Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams and Flight Engineer Kate Rubins of NASA discussed life aboard the orbital outpost and the research they have conducted during an in-flight educational event Aug. 31 with students at the Leslie County High School in Hyden, Kentucky. Attending the event was Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Kentucky), the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee. Williams is scheduled to return to Earth on Sept. 6, U.S. time, aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft for a landing in Kazakhstan to wrap up his fourth flight in space and a total of 534 days in space over those four flights, the most by any U.S. astronaut. Rubins will remain in orbit until her return to Earth on Oct. 30, on this, her first flight in space.

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Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #122 on: 09/01/2016 03:24 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/31/2016

Posted on August 31, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Trailing Thermal Control Radiator (TTCR) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The Commander and Flight Engineer-6 completed their pre-EVA medical checkup, final EVA tool configuration and EVA timeline review earlier today.  This afternoon the crew performed a conference with EVA ground specialist to discuss any final question about tomorrow’s TTCR EVA.  The crew also prepared the Equipment Lock, EMUs and ancillary hardware to support EVA prep activities.  Crew egress of the Airlock is scheduled for 7:10 am CDT.

Multi-Omics sample collections: Flight Engineer-5 collected samples for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics experiment.  Samples were then placed into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.  Biomarkers for immune dysfunction during the crewmembers time on the ISS could be useful for the health management of astronauts.

Habitability walkthrough: The Commander performed his sixth and final Habitability walkthrough video.  Williams has been requested to focus on the windows available to the crew on the ISS, and their impact on habitability and productivity.  The Habitability investigation results will be used to assess the relationship between crew members and their environment in order to better prepare for future long-duration spaceflights. Observations recorded during 6 month and 1 year missions can help spacecraft designers determine how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): Flight Engineer-5 completed his 9th of 20 sessions of FMS.  Performing a series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet were completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmember’s fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Circadian Rhythms: After 36 hours of wear-time, Flight Engineer-5 doffed the Double Sensors and Thermolab Control Unit and stowed the equipment.  The objective of the experiment is to get a better understanding of any alterations in circadian rhythms in humans during long-term space flights. Such knowledge will not only provide important insights into the adaptations of the human autonomic nervous system in space over time, but also has significant practical implications by helping to improve physical exercise, rest- and work shifts as well as fostering adequate workplace illumination in the sense of occupational healthcare in future space missions.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #123 on: 09/02/2016 12:08 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 09/01/2016

Posted on September 1, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Trailing Thermal Control Radiator (TTCR) Extravehicular Activity (EVA): Today, CDR Williams and FE-6 Rubins completed the TTCR EVA, with Airlock egress at 6:53 am CDT. Once outside the Airlock, the crew performed the following scheduled tasks:
•Retract, cover, and cinch down the TTCR using hook straps
•Replace a failed External Television Camera Group (ETVCG) light at the Camera Port 9 (CP9) location
•Install a High Definition Camera in the CP9 location
•Re-torque the Alpha Joint Interface Structure (AJIS) Struts on the Port 4 (P4) truss
•Perform an inspection Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ)
•Port 6 (P6) Pump Flow and Control System (PFCS) Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) Tie-back

The crew was ahead on the timeline, so they were also able to install an additional High Definition Camera at the CP8 location, and perform the Port Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart Brake Handle Tie-Down task. While Williams and Rubin were outside, FE-5 Onishi operated the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and assisted with the tasks. The EVA duration was 6 hours, 48 minutes.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations for EVA:  Today Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS to support the TTCR EVA.  Once the EVA crew completed the TTCR retract, FE-5 maneuvered the SSRMS into position to install an Articulating Portable Foot Restraint (APFR) on the SSRMS Latching End Effector (LEE). CDR ingressed the APFR, and the SSRMS was maneuvered to allow CDR to change the light of the CP9 (P1 Lower Outboard (LOOB)) camera then again to position CDR to install an External High Definition Camera (EHDC) on the CP9 camera.  Once the CP9 tasks had been completed, the SSRMS was maneuvered to position CDR to install an EHDC on the CP8 (P1 Upper Outboard (UPOB)) camera.  Once this had been completed, the SSRMS was moved to a park position. MSS performance today was nominal.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #124 on: 09/06/2016 01:15 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 09/02/2016

Posted on September 2, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Trailing Thermal Control Radiator (TTCR) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Post-EVA Activities:  Today, the USOS crew had a half-duty day.  They completed their post-EVA medical checkups, and performed an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Water Recharge procedure on EMUs 3003 and 3008. The EMUs and associated equipment were then be prepared for storage.  They then participated in an EVA debrief to discuss any comments regarding preparation and execution of the EVA.

Skin-B Operations: The Skin-B investigation was conducted as FE-6 performed Corneometer, Tewameter and Visioscan measurements on his forearm. The Corneometer measures the hydration level of the stratus coreum (outer layer of the skin), the Tewameter measures the skin barrier function, and the Visioscan measures the skin surface topography. Skin B is a European Space Agency (ESA) investigation that aims to improve the understanding of skin aging, which is greatly accelerated in space. The data will also be used to verify the results from previous testing for the SkinCare investigation on the ISS. 

Space Headaches: The crew completed the ESA Space Headaches questionnaire which provides information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crew members which can influence performance during a space mission.

Habitability Walk-through: The crew recorded a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #125 on: 09/06/2016 06:18 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 09/05/2016
Posted on September 5, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) Ingress and Sampling: Flight Engineer (FE)-6 Rubins ingressed the BEAM and collected the deployed Radiation Area Monitor (RAM) dosimeters and performed Microbial Air Sampler (MAS) and Surface Sample Kit (SSK) sampling. She also performed a thorough inspection of the walls and found no moisture.  The crew also replaced all of the BEAM sensor extended life battery packs.  The MAS and SSK samples as well as the RAM dosimeters will be packed for return on 46S and analyzed in Houston.

Cardio Ox and Biochem Profile Collections:  Rubins and FE-5 Onishi performed their Flight Day 60 (FD60) urine and blood collections and inserted them into Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.  The goal of Cardio Ox is to determine whether biological markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after space flight and whether this results in an increased, long-term risk of atherosclerosis risk in astronauts.

Marrow: Rubins collected breath and ambient air samples in support of the Canadian Space Agency’s Marrow experiment.  Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on the bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the marrow. The extent of this effect, and its recovery, are of interest to space research and healthcare providers on Earth.

ISS Change of Command (COC): The entire crew discussed with Mission Control Center (MCC)-Houston and MCC-Moscow flight control teams their roles and responsibilities for the timeframe between the COC event and departure of 46S. Anatoly Ivanishin then assumed command of the ISS from Jeff Williams. Following the COC, the 47S crew became prime for emergency response.

Post Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Tasks: The crew deconfigured the Airlock following last week’s EVA operations and prepared Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) and equipment for long term stowage. They also performed EMU cooling loop maintenance on the EMUs used during the EVA (3003 and 3008).

Crew Quarters (CQ) Port Cleaning: In preparation for his departure from the ISS tomorrow Williams cleaned his CQ, including the intake and exhaust ducts, fans and airflow sensors.
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Offline catdlr

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #127 on: 09/08/2016 05:39 AM »
Expedition 48 Crew Receives a Warm Welcome in Kazakhstan

NASA

Published on Sep 7, 2016
Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams of NASA and Soyuz Commander Alexey Ovchinin and Oleg Skripochka of Roscosmos were greeted in a traditional ceremony on Sept. 7 in Kazakhstan, a few hours after returning to Earth from the International Space Station. The trio spent 172 days in space aboard the orbital laboratory.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAZfx7FQ0F8?t-001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #128 on: 09/10/2016 01:34 PM »
This photograph of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) section of the International Space Station was captured during a spacewalk conducted by NASA astronauts Jeff Williams and Kate Rubins.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #129 on: 09/12/2016 04:12 PM »
Sept. 12, 2016

Today's Topics:

  1. MEDIA ADVISORY: M16-016 - NASA?s Weekly Video Clips from
      Space Feature Crew?s Return to Earth (JSC News Releases)


NASA?s Weekly Video Clips from Space Feature Crew?s Return to Earth

NASA?s weekly video highlights for Sept. 4-Sept. 10, 2016, feature record-breaking Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams and two of his Russian crewmates returning to Earth after 172 days in space, a behind the scenes look at landing operations, and a video on Star Trek?s influence on NASA?s international cooperation.
Grab your favorite production or clips from the video archive at:

http://jscfeatures.jsc.nasa.gov/videoupdate/
Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #130 on: 09/15/2016 12:34 AM »
Record Breaking NASA Astronaut Discusses His Recent Mission

Published on Sep 14, 2016
During a live satellite interview Sept. 14 on NASA TV, astronaut and Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams spoke about his recent record-breaking mission aboard the International Space Station.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GP_ZrENMTuo?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Fuji

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #131 on: 10/30/2016 02:16 PM »
Rare on-orbit mouse video。 1G(Centrifuge) and 0G Mouse Habitat Unit video.
http://iss.jaxa.jp/kiboexp/news/20161013_mouse.html

12 male mouse were all survived and return to the ground. 
JAXA confirmed 2nd generation baby were birthed on the ground.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #132 on: 02/12/2017 03:29 AM »
The Earth: 4K Extended Edition

 
NASA Johnson

Published on Feb 11, 2017
Can’t get enough of Earth? Then this is for you: an extended playback of Ultra High Definition views of Planet Earth, captured by NASA astronaut Jeff Williams during his mission on the International Space Station in 2016. You’ll see the French Riviera and the Sahara Desert, cross North America from Texas all the way to Canada, and more—this is your source for the view of your home planet from 250 miles up!

Fire up the biggest screen you have. Then throw on your favorite music, kick back and watch.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fYKMCCPh28?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline John44

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #133 on: 03/23/2017 05:14 PM »
National Air & Space Museum Presents - What’s New in Aerospace? – With NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=10021

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