Author Topic: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)  (Read 39975 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« on: 08/10/2015 06:36 PM »
« Last Edit: 06/19/2016 12:52 PM by jacqmans »

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (May - September 2016)
« Reply #1 on: 09/30/2015 07:07 PM »
Exp 48 crew poster
---
SMS ;-).

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (May - September 2016)
« Reply #2 on: 01/19/2016 07:50 PM »
"cake ceremony" at JSC, Houston with Jeff Williams, Aleksey Ovchinin, Оleg Skripochka, Kathleen Rubins, Anatoly Ivanishin and Takuya Оnishi.
---
SMS ;-).

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (May - September 2016)
« Reply #3 on: 02/12/2016 08:27 AM »

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (May - September 2016)
« Reply #4 on: 02/16/2016 08:18 PM »
Expedition 48 crew portrait
---
SMS ;-).

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (May - September 2016)
« Reply #5 on: 02/27/2016 11:18 AM »
February 26, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-018

Media Accreditation Open for Space Station Crew News Conference, Interviews

NASA will host a news conference with a team of astronauts who will launch to the International Space Station this summer, including NASA’s Kate Rubins, at 2 p.m. EST Wednesday, March 9, at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The event will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website following a 30-minute video of crew training.

Rubins will be joined by her Expedition 48/49 crewmates, cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin of the Russian space agency Roscosmos and astronaut Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. All three crew members will be available for individual media interviews, in person or by phone, following the news conference.

To request credentials to attend, or reserve an interview opportunity, U.S. media must contact the Johnson newsroom at 281-483-5111 by 6 p.m. Monday, March 7. International media must submit credentials to the Johnson newsroom by 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 26.

Reporters who wish to participate in the news conference by telephone must contact the newsroom at least 10 minutes prior to its start. Those following the briefing on social media may ask questions using the hashtag #askNASA.

Rubins, Ivanishin and Onishi will launch to the space station aboard the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft Thursday, June 21, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The trio will join Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams of NASA, and cosmonauts Oleg Skripochka and Alexey Ovchinin of Roscosmos, already on the station conducting research.

During their four-month mission, the station crew members will facilitate approximately 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth in order to advance scientific knowledge of Earth, space, physical, and biological sciences. Science conducted on the space station continues to yield benefits for humanity and will enable future long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space, including the agency’s Journey to Mars.

The crew members are expected to be on the station for the arrivals of American cargo spacecraft the SpaceX Dragon and Orbital ATK Cygnus. The Dragon will deliver the station’s first International docking adapter to accommodate the future arrival of U.S. commercial crew spacecraft. A Japanese cargo craft also is planned to launch to the station carrying lithium ion batteries to replace the nickel-hydrogen batteries currently used on station to store electrical energy generated by the station’s solar arrays.

During her time at the space station, Rubins will participate in several science experiments. Along with physical science, Earth and space science, and technology development work, Kate will conduct several biological and human research investigations. Research into how the microbiome of a human body changes during space travel, and performing the first genetic sequencing in space are just two examples of the hundreds of experiments in which Rubins plans to take part.

Rubins was born in Farmington, Connecticut, and raised in Napa, California. She received a bachelor’s degree in molecular biology from the University of California, San Diego, and a doctorate in cancer biology from Stanford University. Before joining the astronaut corps in 2009, she worked with the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, where she helped develop the first model of smallpox infection. She also headed a laboratory of 14 researchers studying viral diseases that affect Central and West Africa. As part of that work, she researched the DNA sequencing of diseases, such as Ebola.

Follow the space station crew and mission on Instagram at:

http://instagram.com/iss

For more information about the International Space Station and its crews, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

Offline Lewis007

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (May - September 2016)
« Reply #6 on: 03/10/2016 07:05 AM »
Preflight crew news conference took place at JSC on Mar 9.
For more news: see article from Ben Evans here: http://www.americaspace.com/?p=92173
Launch seems to have slipped to June 21.

Video:



Offline Lewis007

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (May - September 2016)
« Reply #7 on: 03/10/2016 07:28 AM »
Video of crew training



Offline whitelancer64

Re: Expedition-48 thread (May - September 2016)
« Reply #8 on: 03/10/2016 05:25 PM »
Regarding the mission patch, does anyone know why Onishi's name is written with English characters rather than with Japanese?

I notice the Russian names are written with Cyrillic characters.
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline whitelancer64

Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #9 on: 03/10/2016 06:06 PM »
It seems that all NASA mission patches for Shuttle flights use romanized names for Japanese astronauts, most Soyuz mission patches do as well (like Soyuz TMA-11M, TMA-17), and for the ISS mission patches, most use Japanese characters for their names (like Expedition 20), but apparently not all.

Satoshi Furukawa even has his name done differently for two different ISS expeditions, the Expedition 28 mission patch is romanized, Expedition 29 is in Japanese characters.

I would guess, then, that other than for the NASA shuttle mission patches, it's a personal preference, rather than some institutional rule.

Does anyone know for sure?
« Last Edit: 03/11/2016 07:05 AM by jacqmans »
"One bit of advice: it is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree -- make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to." - Elon Musk
"There are lies, damned lies, and launch schedules." - Larry J

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #10 on: 03/16/2016 10:38 AM »
HR crew photo

Offline nrh

Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #11 on: 03/18/2016 09:51 AM »
I've noticed the date of birth is not available anywhere for Takuya Onishi - all sources I've found online only puts him as born 1975 - even in the official NASA biography.

Any particular reason for this lack of info?

The same also appears to be the case for Norishige Kania.

Offline catdlr

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #12 on: 04/27/2016 03:32 AM »
AXA astronaut Takuya Onishi, ISS approaching long-term stay start. A-confidence, even stronger. It may not be only in Japan. ~

Published on Apr 26, 2016
2016 summer, the International Space Station long-term stay mission of JAXA astronaut Takuya Onishi begins. As a new generation of astronauts took over the baton from both active and oil wells, Onishi aim the universe. "This can not be only in Japan what is and"? It connects the sash to the Japanese space development in the first.

Takuya Onishi astronaut ISS 48th / 49th long-term stay Overview http://iss.jaxa.jp/iss/jaxa_exp/onishi/overview/

ISS long-term stay by Takuya Onishi astronaut JAXA astronaut http://iss.jaxa.jp/iss/jaxa_exp/onishi/

Tony De La Rosa

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #13 on: 05/24/2016 08:42 PM »
May 24, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-058

NASA Astronaut Kate Rubins Available for Interviews Before Space Station Launch

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins will be available for live satellite interviews from Moscow on Wednesday, June 1, before her launch to the International Space Station. She will answer questions about her upcoming mission aboard the world’s only orbiting laboratory from 9-10 a.m. EDT, airing live on NASA Television and streaming on the agency’s website.

Rubins, who was born in Farmington, Connecticut, and raised in Napa, California, is in Moscow for final preparations prior to her launch on June 24. The interviews will be preceded at 8:30 a.m. by 30 minutes of video clips highlighting her training.

To schedule an interview, media must contact Thomas Gerczak at 281-792-7515 or thomas.j.gerczak@nasa.gov no later than 4 p.m. on Friday, May 27. Media participating in the live shots must tune to NTV-3. Satellite tuning information is available at:

http://go.nasa.gov/1pOWUhR

Rubins will launch to the space station aboard a Soyuz spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, along with her Expedition 48/49 crewmates, cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin of the Russian space agency Roscosmos and astronaut Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

Rubins was selected as an astronaut in 2009, and this will be her first spaceflight.

During her time at the space station, Rubins will participate in several science experiments. Along with physical science, Earth and space science and technology development work, she will conduct biological and human research investigations. Research into sequencing the first genome in microgravity and how the human body’s bone mass and cardiovascular systems are changed by living in space are just two examples of the many experiments in which Rubins may take part.

Rubins received a bachelor’s degree in molecular biology from the University of California, San Diego, and a doctorate in cancer biology from Stanford University. Before joining the astronaut corps in 2009, she worked with the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where she helped develop the first model of smallpox infection. She also headed a laboratory of 14 researchers studying viral diseases that affect Central and West Africa. As part of that work, she researched the gene expression responses of diseases, such as monkeypox and Ebola.

After arriving at the station on June 26, Rubins, Ivanishin and Onishi will join Expedition 48 NASA astronaut Jeff Williams, and Roscosmos cosmonauts Alexey Ovchinin and Oleg Skripochka. They are expected to be at the station for the delivery of the station’s first international docking adapter, which will accommodate the future arrival of U.S. commercial crew spacecraft. A Japanese cargo craft also is planned to launch to the station carrying lithium ion batteries to replace the nickel-hydrogen batteries currently used on the station to store electrical energy generated by the station’s solar arrays.

Rubins is scheduled to return to Earth with Ivanishin and Onishi in October.

Get the latest NASA TV schedule and video streaming information at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Follow the space station crew and mission on social media at:

http://twitter.com/space_station

http://instagram.com/iss

Offline catdlr

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #14 on: 05/27/2016 09:45 AM »
Head of Cosmonaut Training Center Yuri Lonchakov preparing ISS-48/49

Cosmonaut Training Center Yuri Gagarin

Published on May 27, 2016
"The crew will fly the new ship -" MS Union ", which will work out the latest traffic management and navigation systems, television systems, on-board radio system", - said the head of the CPC, the Hero of Russia, cosmonaut Yuri Lonchakov a briefing to journalists. Source : press service of the CPC Gagarin Video: CPC Gagarin www.gctc.ru

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUYLLDKlmgY?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline John44

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #15 on: 05/27/2016 04:44 PM »
Expedition 48-49 - Crew Qualification Training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=9857

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #16 on: 05/30/2016 09:29 PM »
---
SMS ;-).

Offline Glom

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #17 on: 05/30/2016 10:37 PM »
It seems that all NASA mission patches for Shuttle flights use romanized names for Japanese astronauts, most Soyuz mission patches do as well (like Soyuz TMA-11M, TMA-17), and for the ISS mission patches, most use Japanese characters for their names (like Expedition 20), but apparently not all.

Satoshi Furukawa even has his name done differently for two different ISS expeditions, the Expedition 28 mission patch is romanized, Expedition 29 is in Japanese characters.

I would guess, then, that other than for the NASA shuttle mission patches, it's a personal preference, rather than some institutional rule.

Does anyone know for sure?
I thought the same thing. Maybe it's like that joke about a German pilot getting annoyed about having to speak English to ATC despite being at a German airport.

Offline ras391

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #18 on: 06/01/2016 05:17 PM »
The following was posted on Novosti-Kosmonavtiki on the delay in the launch of Expedition-48
    
01.06.2016
Launch of the next expedition to the ISS rescheduled

 For technical reasons the launch space ship Soyuz MS "with the next expedition to the ISS moved with 24 June to 8 July.

 Accordingly, the launch date shifts and another cargo vessel progress MS-7 on 17 July.

Offline B. Hendrickx

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #19 on: 06/01/2016 09:11 PM »
http://tass.ru/en/science/879543


Quote
MOSCOW, June 1. /TASS/. Launch of Soyuz MS manned spacecraft, which is due to take a new expedition to the International Space Station, has been rescheduled for July 7 from June 24 due to control system flaws that may disrupt the ship's docking with the ISS, a source in the Russian aerospace industry told TASS on Wednesday.

"The launch has been rescheduled for July 7," he said. "The crew is expected to come to Baikonur (the Russian space center located is Kazakhstan TASS) on June 24."
"Experts have established the ship will be rolling as it docks the ISS and they are unable to stop this rolling motion so far," the source said.

The rescheduling of the Soyuz MS launch has necessitated postponement of the launch of the Progress MS cargo spacecraft, initially planned for July 7. Under the new schedule, it may take place on July 17, the source said.


More detail in this TASS report in Russian :
http://tass.ru/kosmos/3331715

A recommendation to delay the launch will be made on Thursday to the State Commission in charge of the launch and a final decision could follow the same day. The uncontrolled rolling motion was first believed to have been caused by a software glitch, but when the software was updated and tested in the simulator, the problem repeated itself.

http://ria.ru/space/20160601/1441714340.html

This RIA report claims the launch will be rescheduled for July 8 and says the return to Earth of Malenchenko, Peake and Kopra will also be delayed.

Offline B. Hendrickx

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #20 on: 06/02/2016 11:34 PM »
http://ria.ru/science/20160602/1442074566.html

RIA Novosti quotes specialists as saying that a delay until July 7 or 8 is now almost inevitable, but a formal decision is still pending. The landing of Malenchenko, Peake and Kopra will probably be moved to July 2. However, the dates may change depending upon the exact orbital parameters of the ISS.

Offline B. Hendrickx

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #21 on: 06/06/2016 07:58 PM »

http://tass.ru/en/science/880390

The launch delay for Soyuz-MS-01 is now official, but the landing of Soyuz TMA-19M remains on schedule.

Quote
MOSCOW, June 6. /TASS/. Russia’s government commission has made a decision to postpone the launch of the manned Soyuz MS spacecraft to the International Space Station from June 24 till July 7, the state-run space corporation Roscosmos has said.

"For enhancing the safety of the newly modified spacecraft Soyuz MS’s flight to the ISS it has been decided to carry out more tests of software. The state commission has made a decision to launch the Soyuz FG rocket carrying the Soyuz-MS spacecraft till 04:36 Moscow time on July 7, 2016," the Roscosomos press-service has said.

The launch of another cargo spacecraft, Progress MS, has been delayed, too. Originally it was due on July 7. Now it has been scheduled for July 17.

Earlier, a source in the space rocket industry told TASS there was a possibility the launch of Soyuz MS may have to be postponed. He explained that specialists advised against hurrying with the launch as there was the risk of a glitch in the control system and problems while docking the new series spacecraft to the ISS. The Soyuz MS is to deliver to the ISS Russia’s Anatoly Ivanishin, NASA’s Kathleen Rubins and Japan’s Takuya Onishi.

The State Commission has decided not to put off the return of a Soyuz-TMA-19M spaceship with 3 ISS crew members onboard to Earth from June 18 to a later date,  Roscosmos said.
"Soyuz TMA-19M is to land at 12:12 Moscow time on June 18, 2016," the press service said.
A number of media outlets reported earlier that the ISS crew could be asked to extend their stay at the station because of a possible delay of the launch of a new manned spaceship Soyuz-MS. But a source in the Russian rocket and space industry told TASS that experts had recommended not to postpone the ISS crew’s return. Soyuz TMA-19M will take Russian Yuri Malenchenko, American Timothy Copra and Briton Timothy Peak back to Earth.


More:
http://tass.ru/en/science/880390

Offline Star One

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Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #22 on: 06/06/2016 08:06 PM »
Why not delay their return surely halving the crew on ISS with no replacements on hand will impact science delivery. I would think that all sides should have a say in this not just the Russian?
« Last Edit: 06/06/2016 08:08 PM by Star One »

Offline JimO

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #23 on: 06/07/2016 02:19 AM »
Are there any good overviews of the Soyuz-MS upgrades?

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #24 on: 06/07/2016 03:57 AM »
Are there any good overviews of the Soyuz-MS upgrades?
Additional upgrades beyond those mentioned below will be introduced additional MS spacecraft as each new one is built. It is not guaranteed as to which flights will see additional upgrades applied. Soyuz MS(-01(No. 731)) is the first crewed spacecraft to have the below modifications and upgrades over the previous versions.

From ROSCOSMOS and RSC Energia press services is the following overview of the first Spacecrafts MS:
The new-series transportation spacecraft Progress MS and Soyuz MS designed and built by RSC Energia were developed as a result of a radical upgrade of Progress M and Soyuz TMA spacecraft. The onboard command radio system Kvant-B was replaced with an integrated command and telemetry system with an additional telemetry channel. The new command radio link will make it possible to receive signals via relay satellites Luch-5, which will significantly increase the radio coverage zone for the spacecraft – up to 70% of an orbit.

The new-model spacecraft are equipped with an advanced onboard radio system for rendezvous and docking Kurs-NA. As compared with an earlier model, Kurs-A, it has improved mass and dimensions parameters and makes it possible to delete from the spacecraft hardware configuration one of the three sets of radio antennas. Instead of the analog TV system Klyost, the spacecraft will use a digital TV system, which will make it possible to maintain communications between the spacecraft and the station via a space-to-space RF link.

Also included into the onboard equipment of the Soyuz MS and Progress MS series spacecraft to replace the equipment that is being phased out of production is a new Digital Backup Loop Control Unit BURK developed by RSC Energia, an upgraded Rate Sensor Unit BDUS-3A and a LED headlight SFOK. Thanks to the use of new ground and onboard radio systems, it became possible to use state-of-the-art data transmission protocols, which resulted in improved operational stability of spacecraft control system.

Most of the engineering solutions incorporated into the design of Soyuz MS and Progress MS spacecraft will be used in the design of the new-generation Crew Transportation Spacecraft (CTS), which is currently under development at RSC Energia.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - October 2016)
« Reply #25 on: 06/09/2016 12:31 AM »
Why not delay their return surely halving the crew on ISS with no replacements on hand will impact science delivery. I would think that all sides should have a say in this not just the Russian?

A cynic might say because two USOS crew members are coming home thus impacting the science and operations on that part of the station far more. 
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Online hop

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #26 on: 06/09/2016 03:19 AM »
A cynic might say because two USOS crew members are coming home thus impacting the science and operations on that part of the station far more. 
Their mission was already extended once, and there are a lot of moving parts in the ISS VV scheduling. They are also edging up on the Soyuz on-orbit lifetime limit. But hey, if the people actually running the program made a trade that isn't the "obvious" choice to casual outside observers, it's probably a malicious conspiracy, right?
« Last Edit: 06/19/2016 12:53 PM by jacqmans »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #27 on: 06/22/2016 08:13 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 06/20/16

Posted on June 20, 2016 at 5:36 pm by cosbourn.
 

Direct Current To Direct Current (DDCU) LA1A Trip: Last Thursday, DDCU LA1A tripped off due to a ~40 amp overcurrent. Parallel DDCU LA4A was already off for Battery 4A conditioning. A Failure Investigation Team (FIT) recommended the crew perform troubleshooting steps including rotation of the rack and visual inspection of the DDCUs, wire harnesses, and the Secondary Power Distribution Assembly (SPDA).  The crew also performed multimeter measurements on both DDCU outputs on the face of the DDCU as well as on the output cable leading to downstream wiring for indications of a fault. Following the troubleshooting, another FIT was held and the recommendation was to R&R DDCU LA1A which the crew completed this morning. Both DDCUs and Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)2 shell heaters were powered on and are operating nominally.  CEVIS has been reinstalled.  Ground teams have recovered most affected loads with a few remaining items to be repowered tonight.

Multi-Omics Operations:  The crew supported the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics investigation by collecting samples and inserting them in the Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

NeuroMapping Operations: The crew set up the hardware and performed this experiment, including testing in both a “strapped in” and ”free floating” body configuration. The investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to the brain, including brain structure and function, motor control, and multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it takes for the brain and body to recover from changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess changes that occur after spending an extended period on the ISS.

Ammonia Measurement Kit Chip Measurement System (CMS) Battery Changeout: The CMS draws a small amount of current even while inactive, therefore the batteries must be changed periodically to ensure the CMS will activate in an emergency. During this procedure the crew verified that the CMS would have activated using the installed batteries near end-of-life, then replaced them.

Treadmill 2 (T2) Monthly Maintenance: The crew completed this regularly scheduled maintenance to inspect the bungee shackle key mount witness marks, Y-Axis isolators, two boot snubbers, and all four snubber arms for signs of free play.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #28 on: 06/22/2016 08:13 AM »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #29 on: 06/22/2016 06:41 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 06/21/16

Posted on June 21, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

NanoRacks CubeSat Deployer- External (NRCSD-E) Operations: Following Cygnus unberth last week, today NRCSD-E conducted post departure satellite deployments prior to Cygnus re-entry tomorrow, June 22. This set of cubesats includes 3 deployment silos containing a total of 5 LEMUR satellites.  Two out of three silos (four out of five satellites) were successfully deployed. The Orbital team downlinked and reviewed imagery to ascertain why one of the CubeSats did not deploy. Further troubleshooting is ongoing. The LEMUR satellites are equipped with payloads to provide two primary data products: AIS Data (Maritime Domain Awareness) and GPS-RO Data (Weather). NRCSD-E is a mechanical separation system for small U-class satellites designed specifically to interface with the Orbital-ATK Cygnus cargo resupply vehicle. It consists of an array of up to six individual 6U deployers contained within one mechanical housing that releases the CubeSats from Cygnus after it has completed its primary mission and departed the ISS.

Multi-Omics Operations:  The crew supported the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics investigation by collecting saliva samples and inserting them into the Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Swap: In preparation for tomorrow’s loop scrub activities, the crew retrieved EMUs 3005 and 3008 from the Crewlock and temp stowed them. He then removed EMU 3010 from the forward EMU Don/Doff Assembly (EDDA) and installed EMU 3008. He removed EMU 3003 from the aft EDDA and installed EMU 3005.

Microbial In-Flight Water Operations: The crew performed analysis of water samples collected earlier to determine water quality onboard the ISS. The focus was on microbial and coliform detection.

On-Board Training (OBT) 46 Soyuz (46S) Emergency Drill: The crew completed an emergency egress drill for proficiency in the event of an ISS emergency requiring crew departure. The OBT is scheduled after 12-14 weeks aboard the ISS and once every two and one half months thereafter.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #30 on: 06/23/2016 03:01 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 06/22/16

Posted on June 22, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Cygnus Re-entry: Cygnus re-entry burn was completed today at 7:45 AM CDT following unberth last Tuesday, June 14.
•The NRCSD-E deployment planned for yesterday succeeded in deploying four of five LEMUR satellites.  Several additional attempts were made to deploy the final satellite, but were not successful.  Orbital-ATK has confirmed via imagery that the deployer’s doors did not open.
•Prior to unberth, the ReEntry Breakup Recorder- Wireless (REBR-W) was configured to activate upon sensing deorbit loads and transmit data automatically.  The REBR team has not received data as expectedas of the writing of this report.  REBR is a cost-effective system that rides a re-entering space vehicle, records data during the re-entry and breakup of the vehicle, and returns the data for analysis. Understanding how vehicles behave during atmospheric reentry gives future spacecraft developers unique information that can enhance design efficiencies and safety.

62P Thruster Test:  Russian ground teams performed a thruster test on 62P.  However, only the X axis thrusters fired, the Z and Y axis thrusters did not.  Ground teams are investigating, and a re-test of the thrusters is expected on June 27.  Following the 62P thruster test, Moscow experienced issues reintegrating the Progress into the control loop.  The maneuver back to the Torque Equalibrium Attitude (TEA) was subsequently performed using thruster configuration SM411.  Thruster configuration will remain SM411 until Moscow has a forward plan for reintegrating the Nadir Progress.  In the meantime, a 62P prop purge is planned for tomorrow.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking on an iPad today. This investigation documents the medication usage of crew members before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of an area or activity providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the International Space Station. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Maintenance: The crew spent most of his day performing the following activities to dump and fill EMU 3005, 3008 feedwater tanks to satisfy maintenance requirements for on-orbit stowage. Due to previous EMU off-nominal conditions, steps were included for trend tracking:
•Obtain a feedwater sample from EMU 3005 water tanks for future ground analysis.
•Initiate ionic and particulate filtration of the EMU and Airlock cooling water loops.
•Iodinate EMU Ion Filters and complete a 2-hour EMU iodination.
•Obtain a 250 mL sample of EMU cooling loop water to determine the effectiveness of the Ion Filter in scrubbing EMU and Airlock cooling water. 10 mL of the water sample will be used for a conductivity test. The remainder of the water will be returned to ground for chemical analysis.
•Determine a conductivity measurement for EMU water samples. Each sample will be measured once and two readings will be recorded from the Liquid Conductivity Meter display.
•Regenerate Metal Oxide (Metox) canisters by baking out CO2 in the Metox Regenerator oven.

Station Support Computer (SSC) service pack installation:  Ground controllers installed a new service pack on the SSCs onboard ISS.

Node 3 MCA anomaly:  This morning, Node 3 MCA experienced an ion pump current spike and shut down.  A system restart recovered the MCA functionality.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #31 on: 06/24/2016 10:43 AM »
Cosmonauts onboard ISS are to try out the manual control system of Progress MS

June 24, 2016

In accordance with the International Space Station (ISS) mission plan, on July 1, 2016 a trial test will be run on Progress MS cargo spacecraft of the upgraded system for remote control of the spacecraft – TORU (teleoperator control mode). The trial is necessary in order to complete the program of flight tests of Progress MS cargo spacecraft.

In the course of the scheduled tests the cargo spacecraft will depart at 08:35 Moscow Time from the docking compartment Pirs (DC-1) of the ISS to the distance of about 200 meters for a comprehensive check of TORU operation. The control of the cargo spacecraft will be assumed by the Roscosmos cosmonauts currently staying onboard the ISS Alexei OVCHININ and Oleg SKRIPOCHKA.

The final stage in the testing will be to re-attach the Progress MS to the station. The docking in the manual control mode is scheduled for July 1, 2016 at 09:10 Moscow Time to the module DC-1 Pirs of the ISS.

The TORU system is a system for remote manual control of spacecraft motion, and provides control via two joysticks and a control panel onboard the ISS.One of the joysticks controls the spacecraft translation, the other controls its attitude.The system also includes a TV camera installed on the spacecraft that is being docked.

The new-series transportation spacecraft Progress MS and Soyuz MS were developed as a result of a radical upgrade of Progress M and Soyuz TMA spacecraft.

The onboard command radio system Kvant-B was replaced with an integrated command and telemetry system with an additional telemetry channel. The new command radio link will make it possible to receive signals via relay satellites Luch-5, which will significantly increase the radio coverage zone for the spacecraft – up to 70% of an orbit.

The new-model spacecraft are equipped with an advanced onboard radio system for rendezvous and docking Kurs-NA. As compared with an earlier model, Kurs-A, it has improved mass and dimensions parameters and makes it possible to delete from the spacecraft hardware configuration one of the three radio antennas.

Instead of the analog TV system Klyost, the spacecraft will use a digital TV system, which will make it possible to maintain communications between the spacecraft and the station via a space-to-space RF link.

Also included into the onboard equipment of the Soyuz MS and Progress MS series spacecraft to replace the equipment that is being phased out of production is a new Digital Backup Loop Control Unit developed by RSC Energia, an upgraded Rate Sensor Unit BDUS-3A and a LED headlight SFOK.

Thanks to the use of new ground and onboard radio systems, it became possible to use state-of-the-art data transmission protocols, which resulted in improved operational stability of spacecraft control system.

Most of the engineering solutions incorporated into the design of Soyuz MS and Progress MS spacecraft will be used in the design of the new-generation Crew Transportation Spacecraft, which is currently under development at RSC Energia.

http://www.energia.ru/en/news/news-2016/news_06-24.html
« Last Edit: 06/24/2016 10:43 AM by jacqmans »

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #32 on: 06/24/2016 12:41 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 06/23/16

Posted on June 23, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock (JEMAL) Exposed Experiment Handrail Attachment Mechanism (ExHAM) #1-2 Operations: Following the JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) Small Fine Arm (SFA) retrieval and detachment of 14 ExHAM #1 samples from the Handhold Experiment Platform last week, today the new samples were installed. ExHAM #1-2 is the first return and sample exchange mission of the 1-year exposed ExHAM #1 which contain 17 samples and 14 will be returned on SpX-9. ExHAM is a cuboid mechanism equipped with a fixture on the upper surface for grappling by the JEMRMS SFA, and has components on the under surface for attaching the ExHAM to the handrail on the JEM Exposed Facility.

Microchannel Diffusion Glacier Sample Retrieve and Diffusion Plate Changeout: Samples were retrieved from the Glacier and temporarily stowed to allow the samples to thaw. The Diffusion Plate in the LMM (Light Microscopy Module) AFC (Auxiliary Fluids Container) was removed and exchanged with another plate. Microchannel Diffusion takes advantage of microgravity to study interactions of medicine, biology, computer science and many other fields that benefit from nanotechnology at slightly larger scales, providing a new understanding of particle flows at the nanoscale.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew completed a Habitability session by recording and submitting a walk-through video documenting observations of an area or activity providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the International Space Station. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Microbial In-Flight Water Operations: On Tuesday the crew collected water samples to determine water quality onboard the ISS with the focus on microbial and coliform detection. Today he visually analyzed Coliform Detection Bags and Microbial Capture Devices following the required 48 hours of incubation.

Offline John44

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #33 on: 06/24/2016 05:03 PM »
Expedition 48-49 - Crew’s Departure from the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=9888

Offline catdlr

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #34 on: 06/24/2016 07:52 PM »
June 24, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-075

NASA TV to Air Russian Cargo Ship Movement at Space Station
 
A Russian cargo ship currently docked to the International Space Station will undock for a short test flight on Friday, July 1. NASA Television coverage will begin at 1:15 a.m. EDT.

The Progress 62 cargo ship will automatically undock from the Pirs Docking Compartment of the space station and manually be guided in to re-dock. The maneuver will begin with undocking at 1:36 a.m. and take approximately 30 minutes, with re-docking planned for 2:10 a.m.

This activity will test a newly installed manual docking system inside the station’s Russian segment. The resupply ship will back away to a distance of about 600 feet (about 183 meters) from the station, at which point Expedition 48 cosmonauts Alexey Ovchinin and Oleg Skripochka of the Russian space agency Roscosmos will take manual control of the spacecraft. They will use a workstation in the Zvezda Service Module to “fly” the Progress back to a linkup with Pirs.

The system test will include verification of software and a new signal converter incorporated in the upgraded manual docking system for future use in both Progress and piloted Soyuz vehicles in the unlikely event the “Kurs” automated rendezvous in either craft encounters a problem.

Progress 62 arrived at the station Dec. 23, 2015 with more than three tons of food, fuel and supplies, and will undock for the final time at 11:48 p.m. Saturday, July 2. The spacecraft, loaded with trash, will be deorbited by Russian flight controllers to burn up in the Earth’s atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean.

Check out the full NASA TV schedule and video streaming information at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Keep up with the International Space Station and its research and crews, at:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

-end-
Tony De La Rosa

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #35 on: 06/24/2016 08:27 PM »
June 24, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-075

NASA TV to Air Russian Cargo Ship Movement at Space Station
 
A Russian cargo ship currently docked to the International Space Station will undock for a short test flight on Friday, July 1. NASA Television coverage will begin at 1:15 a.m. EDT.

The Progress 62 cargo ship will automatically undock from the Pirs Docking Compartment of the space station and manually be guided in to re-dock. The maneuver will begin with undocking at 1:36 a.m. and take approximately 30 minutes, with re-docking planned for 2:10 a.m.

This activity will test a newly installed manual docking system inside the station’s Russian segment. The resupply ship will back away to a distance of about 600 feet (about 183 meters) from the station, at which point Expedition 48 cosmonauts Alexey Ovchinin and Oleg Skripochka of the Russian space agency Roscosmos will take manual control of the spacecraft. They will use a workstation in the Zvezda Service Module to “fly” the Progress back to a linkup with Pirs.

The system test will include verification of software and a new signal converter incorporated in the upgraded manual docking system for future use in both Progress and piloted Soyuz vehicles in the unlikely event the “Kurs” automated rendezvous in either craft encounters a problem.

Progress 62 arrived at the station Dec. 23, 2015 with more than three tons of food, fuel and supplies, and will undock for the final time at 11:48 p.m. Saturday, July 2. The spacecraft, loaded with trash, will be deorbited by Russian flight controllers to burn up in the Earth’s atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean.

Check out the full NASA TV schedule and video streaming information at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Keep up with the International Space Station and its research and crews, at:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

-end-

Well lets hope and pray the controllers dont go fast paced on this unless they want ISS RS to turn into a repeat of the Mir Collision.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #36 on: 06/25/2016 09:07 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 06/22/16

Posted on June 22, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 


Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Maintenance: The crew spent most of his day performing the following activities to dump and fill EMU 3005, 3008 feedwater tanks to satisfy maintenance requirements for on-orbit stowage. Due to previous EMU off-nominal conditions, steps were included for trend tracking:
•Obtain a feedwater sample from EMU 3005 water tanks for future ground analysis.
•Initiate ionic and particulate filtration of the EMU and Airlock cooling water loops.
•Iodinate EMU Ion Filters and complete a 2-hour EMU iodination.
•Obtain a 250 mL sample of EMU cooling loop water to determine the effectiveness of the Ion Filter in scrubbing EMU and Airlock cooling water. 10 mL of the water sample will be used for a conductivity test. The remainder of the water will be returned to ground for chemical analysis.
•Determine a conductivity measurement for EMU water samples. Each sample will be measured once and two readings will be recorded from the Liquid Conductivity Meter display.
•Regenerate Metal Oxide (Metox) canisters by baking out CO2 in the Metox Regenerator oven.


"the crew"--otherwise known as Jeff Williams :)
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #37 on: 06/25/2016 03:48 PM »
 The mention of the Mir collision is a neat coincidence- last night on the radio I heard a fantastic BBC bit [taking a break from Brexit] with Mike Foale recounting the incident.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #38 on: 06/27/2016 01:30 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 06/24/16

Posted on June 24, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Multi-Omics: The crew checked the remaining Fructooligosaccharide (FOS) packages and stowed the Fructooligo Bag for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics investigation. The Multi-Omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack-3 Laptop Computer (ELC) Operations: The EXPRESS Laptop Release 10 disk was removed from the EXPRESS Rack-3 Laptop and installed in the EXPRESS Rack-5 Laptop in preparation for upcoming European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) maintenance activities.

Packed Bed Reactor Experiment (PBRE) Hardware Stow: Following completion of 4 weeks of PBRE operations, the crew spent the majority of his day de-configuring and stowing the PBRE hardware. The PBRE was used to study the behavior of gases and liquids when they flow simultaneously through a column filled with fixed porous media. The porous media or “packing” can be made of different shapes and materials and are used widely in chemical engineering as a means to enhance the contact between two immiscible fluid phases (e.g., liquid-gas, water-oil, etc.). Packed columns can serve as reactors, scrubbers, strippers, etc. in systems where efficient interphase contact is desired, both on Earth and in space. The next operations are planned for this December.

ISS Maneuver to Solar Attitude: Yesterday the ISS performed a CMG attitude maneuver to a slightly biased attitude that allows the Solar payload on Columbus to maintain visibility of the sun.  ISS will stay in the Solar attitude until June 27.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #39 on: 06/28/2016 02:15 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 06/27/16

Posted on June 27, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Ultrasonic Background Noise Test (UBNT): The crew replaced batteries and transmitted data by closing out the Station Support Computer (SSC’s) Distributed Impact Detection System (DIDS) software and removing the UBNT hardware. UBNT detects high-frequency sounds generated by hardware on the U.S.-built portions of the ISS. Identifying sources of noise will aid in development of a leak locating system which would detect the high-pitched sound of air leaking through a pressurized wall. To detect leaks, the system would have to differentiate between harmless background sounds and a potentially dangerous air leak.

LAB Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Mass Spectrometer Assembly (MSA) Troubleshooting: In December 2014, the crew installed new Orbital Replacement Units ORU1, ORU2, and ORU8 in the Lab MCA.  When the Lab MCA was restarted, there was no communication with ORU2.  Today the crew attempted to isolate the problem to either ORU2 or the connector it mates with on the MCA drawer.  The crew reported no visible damage to either side of the ORU2 connector interface. He performed resistance checks on sockets on the drawer side connector saver and found that four of the sockets tested had lower than expected resistances.  To address one potential cause of this problem, the crew replaced ORU4, the Low Voltage Power Supply, and repeated the resistance check on the previously failed sockets.  The resistances of the sockets did not change so the original ORU4 was reinstalled.  The rack has been closed out with ORU2 and ORU8 uninstalled. Teams are meeting to discuss the forward plan.  The Node 3 MCA is operating nominally.

Remote Power Controller RPCM LA2A3B-G RPC 2 Trip: This morning the RPC that provides power to the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Primary Power feed tripped.  At the time of the trip, ground teams were activating FIR for science operations.  The crew reported no smoke odor and Compound Specific Analyzer Combustion Products (CSA-CP) readings were zero.  A current spike high enough to trigger an RPC trip was not visible in the 50 Hz Direct Current to Direct Current Converter Unit (DDCU) current data, however, it is possible that the current spike was rapid enough to not be sampled at 50 Hz.  After analysis of the system showed that the suspect components would be isolated if the main power feed was not used, the rack was successfully repowered using the auxiliary power feed.  The auxiliary power feed will allow the MicroChannel Diffusion to achieve their science goals, and troubleshooting on the main power feed will occur after that payload’s objectives are complete.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #40 on: 06/29/2016 02:04 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 06/28/16

Posted on June 28, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment Setup: Today, the crew set up the 3D Printer in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) work volume.  The payload ground team remotely operated the device to produce two 3D printed test coupons, and the crew removed and stowed each of them. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. In general, a 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create 3 dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the ISS is the first step toward establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock (JEM A/L) Operations: In preparation for tomorrow’s EXHAM installation on the JEM Exposed Facility (JEF) the JEM A/L was depressurized and the crew performed a leak check and vented residual air. When venting was complete, the vent valve and JEM A/L backup manual valve were closed.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew completed a session of the Habitability experiment by recording and submitting a walk-through video documenting observations of an area or activity providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Health Maintenance System (HMS) Crew Medical Officer (CMO) Training: The crew completed this refresher course on some of the equipment and procedures taught in the CMO classes covering crew illness and/or injury. Lessons include text, pictures and video detailing previously learned medical procedures and hardware.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #41 on: 06/29/2016 07:27 PM »
June 29, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-076

Illinois Students Chat Live with NASA Astronaut, Space Station Commander

Students in Elgin, Illinois, will have the opportunity to speak with a NASA astronaut living and working aboard the International Space Station at 12:35 p.m. EDT Thursday, June 30. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams will answer questions from second through sixth students about his experiences as an astronaut and life aboard the world’s only orbital laboratory. The event, hosted at the Gail Borden Public Library in Elgin, will include students from Channing Memorial, Fox Meadow, Harriet Gifford, Highland, Hilltop, Huff, Lords Park, Lowrie, McKinley, Otter Creek, Ronald D. O’Neal, Timber Trails, Washington and Willard Elementary Schools.

Media interested in covering the event should contact Denise Raleigh at draleigh@gailborden.info. Gail Borden Public Library is at 270 North Grove Avenue.

Williams launched to the space station on March 18, where currently he’s conducting and participating in numerous critical science experiments until his scheduled departure in September.

This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of the NASA Office of Education’s efforts to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) teaching and learning in the United States. Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station through the Office of Education’s STEM on Station activity provides authentic, live experiences in space exploration and study, and the scientific components of space travel, while introducing the possibilities of life in space.

Watch NASA TV streaming video, and get schedule and downlink information, at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Get videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

http://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #42 on: 06/30/2016 06:26 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 06/29/16

Posted on June 29, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Exposed Experiment Handrail Attachment Mechanism (ExHAM) #1-2 Operations: Following the JEMAL depressurization, venting, and leak check yesterday, today ExHAM was installed on the JEMAL Slide Table and extended to the JEM Exposed Facility (JEF) side. ExHAM is a cuboid mechanism equipped with a grapple fixture on the upper surface for the Kibo’s robotic arm, Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System Small Fine Arm (JEMRMS SFA) for fixation to the handrail on the Kibo’s EF. There are 7 loadable experiments on the upper surface and 13 on the side surfaces.

Liberated particles:  After ExHAM installation had already been completed but while the external cameras were still configured, loose particles were observed crossing the field of view of one of the cameras in the JEM EF area.  The source of these particles is not known at this time.  Ground teams are investigating.

3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment Operations: Following yesterday’s activities to print the calibration and compression coupons in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), today the ground team remotely operated the 3D printer to produce two more 3D printed test coupons, after which the crew removed and stowed them. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. A 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create 3 dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the ISS is the first step toward establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Work Area Setup: In preparation for SPHERES maintenance operations tomorrow, the crew participated in a training session and crew conference with the payload developer before completing setup activities. The crew then configured the work area to activate and check out the hardware and the EXPRESS Laptop Computer ELC before testing begins. Upon inspection, it was found that two of the five beacons as well as the spare beacon had corrosion in their battery compartments.  Ground teams are developing a cleaning procedure.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking which documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Offline John44

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #43 on: 07/01/2016 11:47 AM »
Expedition 48 - Progress 62 Undocking and Redocking Rendezvous System Test
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=9896

Expedition 48-49 - Crew’s Pre-Launch Activities at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=9898

Offline Nicolas PILLET

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #44 on: 07/01/2016 06:48 PM »
Oleg Skripochka gave a "like" to my website's FB page from the ISS !! :D
Nicolas PILLET
Kosmonavtika : The French site on Russian Space

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #45 on: 07/02/2016 08:51 PM »
I've noticed the date of birth is not available anywhere for Takuya Onishi - all sources I've found online only puts him as born 1975 - even in the official NASA biography.

Any particular reason for this lack of info?

The same also appears to be the case for Norishige Kania.


According to: http://www.roscosmos.ru/22342/ Takuya Onishi was born on Dec 22nd, 1975 !
---
SMS ;-).

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #46 on: 07/04/2016 07:20 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 06/30/16

Posted on June 30, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
62 Progress (62P) [ТОРУ] Test: 62P will undock and redock to Docking Compartment (DC)1 as part of end-of-mission activities. Undock is scheduled for tomorrow at 12:36AM CDT. As part of the test, manual mode will be used to redock the vehicle. Final undock is scheduled for July 2, at 10:48PM CDT.

Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Maintenance Run: Yesterday during SPHERES maintenance setup, the crew discovered corrosion on the battery terminals in the battery compartments of beacons 1, 2, and the spare beacon. Today the crew successfully removed the corrosion from beacons 1 and 2 and initiated the maintenance run. The first part of the run provided data that may aide ground teams in improving communication between satellites. The second portion of the run was not completed due to a hard drive installation issue, resulting in no data collection. However the issues were resolved and teams estimate that a majority of the desired data was collected from today’s activities.  SPHERES are bowling-ball sized satellites that provide a test bed for development and research into multi-body formation flying, multi-spacecraft control algorithms and free-flying physical and material science investigations. Up to three self-contained free-flying satellites can fly within the cabin of the ISS, performing flight formations, testing of control algorithms or as a platform for investigations requiring this unique free-flying test environment. Each satellite is a self-contained unit with power, propulsion, computers, navigation equipment, and provides physical and electrical connections (via standardized expansion ports) for Principle Investigator (PI) provided hardware and sensors.

Node 2 (N2) Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA) Inlet Fan: On June 5, the N2 CCAA inlet fan failed off due to high current draw. The failure is attributed to increased mechanical resistance to rotation.  The fan was restarted and its current draw decreased.  Review of data after the failure indicated a slow rise in current over several days preceding the failure.  The fan current data is now showing a similar rise and may trigger a shutdown within 4-6 days.  Ground teams are monitoring the fan current and are prepared for the crew to replace the N2 CCAA inlet Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU), which includes the fan, if necessary.

Express Logistics Carrier (ELC) Software Update:  The software update to ELC version 4 for the ExPCAs (Express Carrier Avionics) on the 4 ELCs was completed yesterday.  The new software improves the process for modifying configurations and adds capabilities for future payloads on the ELCs.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #47 on: 07/04/2016 07:20 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/01/16

Posted on July 1, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
62 Progress (62P) Undock: 62 Progress (62P) Undock: 62P is scheduled to undock from Docking Compartment (DC) 1 tomorrow, July 2 at 10:48PM CDT. This morning, a test was performed on the TORU manual docking system when the Progress undocked from the ISS, backed to a distance of approximately 600 feet, and re-docked under manual control by the crew.

3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment Operations: After successfully printing calibration and compression coupons in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) earlier this week, today the ground team remotely operated the 3D printer to produce another 3D printed test coupon, concluding 3D printer operations for the week. 3D printer operations will resume next week. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. In general, a 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create 3 dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the International Space Station is the first step towards establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack-3 Laptop Computer (ELC) Operations: The Common Software Release 10 was successfully installed on the EXPRESS Rack-3 Laptop in preparation for European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) maintenance activities scheduled next week.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of an area or activity providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the International Space Station. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED): The crew completed this regularly scheduled quarterly maintenance to inspect the x-rotation dashpots, cycle the main arm through full range of motion, and grease the Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (VIS) rails and rollers.

Treadmill 2 (T2) Acoustic Blanket Installation: The crew installed four acoustic blankets around T2 in an effort to reduce noise levels in Node 3. Sound Level Meter (SLM) measurements were taken before, during and after installation of the blankets to verify the technology works as designed.

Global Position System (GPS) Receiver/Processor 1 (GPS R/P 1) Ring Laser Gyro (RLG) Failure –  On June 30th, during the OPM attitude maneuver to –XVV for the 62P TORU Test, the flight control team noted that the Space Integrated Global Positioning System/ Inertial Navigation System (SIGI)1 INS Y-channel (ISS Z-axis) rate differences were not tracking with those of the SIGI2 INS.  SIGI1 INS Y-channel (ISS Z-axis) rate gyro appears to be failed. The GPS systems within both SIGIs continue to output good attitude and state measurements.  Both the US GN&C attitude determination (AD) and state determination (SD) systems are behaving nominally and are not reliant on the performance of the ring laser gyros within either of the SIGIs. GNC is considered to be in a stable configuration.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #48 on: 07/06/2016 03:34 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/05/16

Posted on July 5, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

62 Progress (62P) Undock: 62P undocked successfully from the Docking Compartment (DC) 1 nadir port Saturday night at 10:48PM CDT. Deorbit burn was at 2:03AM CDT on Sunday followed by atmospheric entry and destruction.

3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment Operations: Following last week’s activities to print the calibration and compression coupons in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), today the ground team continued remotely operating the 3D printer to produce two more 3D printed test coupons, after which the crew removed and stowed both of them. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. A 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create 3 dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the ISS is the first step toward establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

Mouse Epigenetics Setup Operations: In advance of the delivery of JAXA’s Mouse Epigenetics experiment on SpaceX (SpX) 9, the crew configured the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) Laptop and cleaned inside the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) micro-gravity and 1G Incubator Units (IUs).  He then installed the Mouse Habitat Unit (MHU) Interface Units into the CBEF.  The goal of Mouse Epigenetics is to aid scientists to better understand the impacts and effects of the spaceflight environment’s long-term effects on genetic activity, from changes in gene expression in individual organs to changes in DNA that can be inherited and expressed in future generations.

Water Processing Assembly (WPA): On Sunday, the WPA shut down during reprocessing due to an Independent Shutdown Monitor (ISM) fault. Subsequent re-attempts to get the WPA’s conductivity to drop resulted in ISM faults. This has happened twice in the last 6 weeks and all were caused by increased delta pressure (dP) across the Microbial Check Valve (MCV).  A Flight Investigation Team (FIT) met today to discuss a workaround for flowing through the MCV as well as other troubleshooting options.

Node 2 (N2) Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA) Inlet Fan: The N2 CCAA inlet fan current was showing an increase prior to the weekend with the expectation of imminent failure within 4-6 days. During the weekend, the current dropped to near nominal operating current so today’s plan to replace the CCAA Fan with an on-orbit spare was deferred. The data is indicative of increased resistance on the fan’s rotating components such as a degraded bearing or Viton Pad within the fan assembly. The drop in current indicates that the fan has overcome whatever mechanical interference that caused the initial increase.  Procedures are available to replace the fan if needed.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Battery Maintenance: The crew began recharging Rechargeable EVA Battery Assembly (REBA), and Pistol Grip Tool (PGT) batteries in the Battery Stowage Assembly (BSA) via the Battery Charger Assembly (BCA). Charging will terminate on Friday.

Systems Operations Data File (SODF) Updates: The crew deployed revisions to emergency books, replaced the cue card with printed procedure and stowed discarded books and cue card.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #49 on: 07/06/2016 05:21 PM »

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #51 on: 07/07/2016 03:54 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/06/16

Posted on July 6, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

47 Soyuz (47S) Launch: 47S launched successfully at 8:36PM CDT from the Baikonur Cosmodrome with Expedition 48 crew members Anatoly Ivanishin, Takuya Onishi and Kate Rubins on board. Docking is scheduled Friday at 11:12PM CDT. With this crew’s arrival, the ISS will be in 6-crew operations until 46S return on September 6.

3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment Operations: The ground team remotely operated the 3D printer to produce three more 3D printed test coupons in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), after which the crew removed and stowed them. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. A 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create 3 dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the ISS is the first step toward establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N): After retrieving the RaDI-N hardware from Russian crewmembers, the USOS crewmember deployed all 8 Space Bubble Detectors around the ISS for the Radi-N2 experiment. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation measures neutron radiation levels on the ISS. RaDI-N uses bubble detectors as neutron monitors which have been designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) Gas Valve Open and Water Pump Tube Installation: In preparation for the arrival of the Plant Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) Regulation experiment on SpaceX-9, the EMCS gas valves were opened and three water pump tubes on each of the four Rotor Based Life Support System (RBLSS) modules were installed, for a total of twelve water pump tube installs. The EMCS is a European Space Agency (ESA) experiment facility that is dedicated to studying plant biology in a reduced gravity environment. It supports the cultivation, stimulation, and crew-assisted operation of biological experiments under controlled conditions (e.g. temperature, atmospheric composition, water supply, illumination, observation, and gravity). The facility has performed multi-generation (seed-to-seed) experiments and studies the effects of gravity and light on early development and growth, signal perception and transduction in plant tropisms.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Stowage Configuration: The crew relocated cargo that will be used frequently during SpX-9 docked ops from the Japanese Experiment Logistics Module-Pressurized Section (JLP) and JEM Pressurized Module (JPM). He also made room to stow cargo arriving on SpX-9 that is planned for frequent use.

Water Processing Assembly (WPA) Status: The WPA continues to experience faults of the Independent Shutdown Monitor (ISM) which causes WPA to isolate the potable water delivery system. The faults are due to increased delta pressure across the microbial check valve.  In addition, the Reactor Health Sensor conductivity has risen, causing the WPA to remain in Recycle and at higher risk for ISM faults.  Teams met and recommended to further reduce the process and low flow rates to lower the system pressure.  This can be accomplished by ground commanding only.  Reducing the flow rates would not prevent Independent Shutdown Monitor (ISM) faults, however, it will provide more margin and reduce the frequency of faults.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #53 on: 07/10/2016 11:17 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/07/16

Posted on July 7, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
47 Soyuz (47S) Launch: 47S launched successfully last night at 8:36 PM CDT from the Baikonur Cosmodrome with Expedition 48 crew members Anatoly Ivanishin, Takuya Onishi and Kate Rubins on board. Docking is scheduled Friday at 11:12 PM CDT. With this crew’s arrival, the ISS will be in 6-crew operations until 46S return on September 6.

Meteor Setup Configuration: Meteor was configured in the US Lab’s Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) rack, enabling ground teams to proceed with checkout and operations.  The Meteor scientists plan to collect images of the Southern δ-Aquarid (mid-July to mid-August) and Perseid meteor (peak in mid-August) showers.  The Meteor investigation provides the first space-based measurement of meteor flux. It also allows for the monitoring of carbon-based compounds. Continuous measurement of meteor interactions with the Earth’s atmosphere could also spot previously unseen meteor showers.

3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment Operations: The ground team remotely operated the 3D printer to produce three more 3D printed test coupons in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), after which the crew removed and stow them. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. A 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create 3 dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the ISS is the first step toward establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Reconfiguration: In preparation for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment arrival on SpaceX (SpX)-9, a 120 to 24 volt direct current (DC) converter and CBEF temperature controller was installed in the Saibo rack. The CBEF is a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) sub-rack facility located in the Saibo (living cell) Experiment Rack. The CBEF is used in various life science experiments, such as cultivating cells and plants in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) and consists of an incubator and control equipment for control and communications.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Lab Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) Troubleshooting: The Lab MCA was successfully activated this morning following installation of a spare Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU)2 (Mass Spectrometer) and reinstallation of the previously installed ORU8 (Verification Gas Assembly).  The was an issue during connection of the utilities when the vacuum line could not be fully seated due to an off-set with the vacuum connection on the drawer. This was corrected by adjusting the bracket that secures the vacuum line to the rack. The vacuum line was successfully connected and confirmed fully seated. The Lab MCA will remain powered and in IDLE state until crew time can be scheduled to connect the vacuum hose to pump down the ORU2 prior to being used operationally. The previously installed ORU2 is considered suspect and will be returned to ground.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #54 on: 07/11/2016 07:55 AM »
The new crew woke up this morning ready to start work and a problem familiar to those with new guests reared it's ugly head, the toilet stopped working.  A pump separator light means the US toilet is down and installation of the last spare pump separator is in work.  The Russians have graciously offered their facility for in the mean time, just like a good neighbor would.  A six pack of beer is reportedly headed up on the Dragon, allegedly :)
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #55 on: 07/11/2016 01:24 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/08/16

Posted on July 8, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

47 Soyuz (47S) Docking: 47S is scheduled to dock to the ISS tonight at 11:12PM CDT. With the arrival of Expedition 48 crew members Anatoly Ivanishin, Takuya Onishi and Kate Rubins, the ISS will be in 6-crew operations until 46S return on September 6.

Mouse Epigenetics Setup Operations: In preparation of the Mouse Epigenetics experiment arriving on SpaceX (SpX)-9, the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) laptop was relocated, the medical laptop was configured, and a converter was set up in the Experiment Laptop Terminal 2 (ELT2) and the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF). The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the DNA of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment: The ground team continued remotely operating the 3D printer to produce 3D printed test coupons in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), after which the crew removed and stowed them. This second week of printing has produced a variety of 3D printed test coupons including calibration, tensile, compression, and layer specimen coupons. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. A 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create 3 dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the ISS is the first step toward establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack-3 Locker Removal: In preparation for SpX-9 Polar 3 installation, the EXPRESS Rack locker was removed and the vent closeout panel was installed. EXPRESS Racks are multipurpose payload rack systems that store and support research aboard the ISS. They can support science experiments in any discipline by providing structural interfaces, power, data, cooling, water, and other items needed to operate science experiments in space and provide simple, standard interfaces to accommodate up to 10 small payloads, resulting in a total capability to operate up to 80 experiments.

Lab Robotic Work Station (RWS) Monitor R&R:  Today the ISS crew replaced Lab RWS Monitor 3 with an on-orbit spare.  That monitor was observed to have failed on the morning of the recent Cygnus release.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #56 on: 07/12/2016 09:21 AM »

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #57 on: 07/12/2016 01:15 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/11/16

Posted on July 11, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
47 Soyuz (47S) Docking: 47S successfully docked to the ISS at 11:06 PM CDT last Friday. The arrival of Expedition 48 crew members Anatoly Ivanishin, Takuya Onishi and Kate Rubins, the ISS will be in 6-crew operations until 46S return on September 6.

Dose Distribution Inside the ISS – 3D (DOSIS 3D): Over the weekend, the crew installed passive radiation detectors in the Columbus module in support of European Space Agency’s (ESA’s) DOSIS 3D investigation.  Data from the various active and passive radiation detectors installed in the ISS are used in the determination of the radiation field parameters absorbed doses and dose equivalents inside the ISS.  A concise three dimensional (3D) dose distribution map of all the segments of the ISS will be developed based on this data as well as data from JAXA and NASA monitoring devices.

Space Headaches: Over the weekend and today, the European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire was completed to provide information to help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crew members which can influence performance during a space mission.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet were completed over the weekend and today for the Fine Motor Skills investigation.  This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly for those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. Crew fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Marrow Blood, Breath, and Ambient Air Sample Collection: Today the crew took blood, breath, and ambient air samples for the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Marrow experiment which investigates the effect of microgravity on human bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the marrow. The extent of this effect and its recovery are of interest to space research and healthcare providers on Earth.

Mouse Epigenetics Setup Operations: In preparation for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment which arrives on SpaceX-9, the crew set up the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit and installed the food cartridge, odor Filter, water fill-up, and the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) filter caser. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the DNA of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

EarthKAM Module Installation and Activation in Service Module (SM): The Russian crew set up the EarthKAM payload components in SM which begins a week-long imaging session. The objective of Sally Ride EarthKAM is to integrate Earth images with inquiry-based learning to enhance curricula in support of national and state education standards; to provide students and educators the opportunity to participate in a space mission and to develop teamwork, communication, and problem solving skills; to engage teams of students, educators, and researchers in collaborative investigations using remotely-sensed data; and to incorporate the active use of Web-based tools and resources in support of the learning process.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of an area or activity providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

47S Crew On Board Training (OBT): The newly arrived crew reviewed and practiced emergency mask don and purge technique. They also performed emergency hardware familiarization to review locations of equipment and valve positions in the event of an emergency. During these training sessions the crew consulted and coordinated with specialists from all control centers.

SSRMS Mobilt Transporter (MT) Translate:  Today, the MT was translated from worksite 4 to worksite 6 in preparation for SpaceX-9 arrival OBT and capture.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #58 on: 07/12/2016 05:02 PM »
The new crew woke up this morning ready to start work and a problem familiar to those with new guests reared it's ugly head, the toilet stopped working.  A pump separator light means the US toilet is down and installation of the last spare pump separator is in work.  The Russians have graciously offered their facility for in the mean time, just like a good neighbor would.  A six pack of beer is reportedly headed up on the Dragon, allegedly :)

With careful controls configuration and operating procedures, the toilet (WHC) is back operation but the crew reported an increase/change in the sound during operations this morning.  MCC-H just informed Jeff they believe pre-treated urine may now have a path to the pump separator bearings, causing the sound change.  The WHC is good to go for continued operations but that situation cannot be good for the long term life of the pump which only has one spare on-board.
« Last Edit: 07/12/2016 05:04 PM by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #59 on: 07/13/2016 11:41 AM »

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #60 on: 07/13/2016 11:45 AM »

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #61 on: 07/13/2016 02:11 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/12/16

Posted on July 12, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Marrow Blood, Breath, and Ambient Air Sample Collection: Upon waking this morning, the crew took the Launch plus 4 day (L+4) blood, breath, and ambient air samples for the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Marrow experiment which investigates the effect of microgravity on human bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the marrow. The extent of this effect and its recovery are of interest to space research and healthcare providers on Earth.

3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment: After two consecutive weeks of successful 3D printer operations, today the ground team remotely operated the 3D printer to produce the final 3D printed test coupons in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG).  The crew removed and stowed all but the last batch, which will remain on the print tray, which will be returned on SpaceX-9 along with the rest of the coupons. Today’s operations bring the total number of coupons printed to 34, which includes a variety of 3D printed test coupons, including calibration, tensile, compression, and layer specimen coupons. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. A 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create 3 dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the ISS is the first step toward establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

Mouse Epigenetics Setup Operations: In preparation for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment arriving on SpaceX (SpX)-9, the crew completed setup operations by reconfiguring the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) video cable from the Image Processing Unit (IPU) to Video Compression and Recording Unit 2 (VRU2) and refilling the washer fluid of the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit before removal from the CBEF. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the DNA of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that occur after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

NanoRacks Plate Reader Locker Preparation and Hardware Relocate: In preparation for the arrival of the NanoRacks payload investigations on SpX-9, the crew relocated NanoRacks hardware from the NanoRacks Plate Reader installation location before removing and stowing the locker.  NanoRacks Plate Reader is a laboratory instrument designed to detect biological, chemical or physical events of samples in micro-titer plates. Micro-plate readers are widely used in research, drug discovery, bioassay validation, quality control and manufacturing processes in the pharmaceutical and biotechnological industry and academic organizations.

Space Headaches: The crew completed the European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire to provide information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crew members which can influence performance during a space mission.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Pump Separator: Yesterday, the WHC pump separator light annunciated suggesting a malfunction of the pump. The crew brought the WHC to internal EDV and ran the separator for 3 minutes to drain any excess liquid.  Following that drain, the light cleared and WHC was nominal for 3 uses while still on internal EDV. The crew reconfigured back to Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) and performed troubleshooting where the ground teams ruled out blockage in the UPA and cleared WHC for nominal operation. This morning the crew reported a high pitch noise coming from the WHC.  Ground teams believe this could be an indication that fluid has traveled into the pump separator bearings.  Crew performed an inspection of the interior of the rack and of the pump separator, which did not reveal any leaked fluid.  The WHC continues to be go for nominal use.  The installed separator pump has been in operation since January.  Two spares are available on-orbit.  Teams continue to monitor performance.

Dragon On-Board Training (OBT): In preparation for SpX-9 arrival scheduled for July 20, the USOS crew participated in a conference with ground teams prior to performing proficiency training on the Dragon mission profile, rendezvous crew procedures and crew interfaces for monitoring and commanding.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday, Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) into position for the start of the ISS Crew SpX-9 Offset Grapples Practice on July 15.  Next they translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite 6 (WS6) to WS4. At the completion of preparing the MT for the translation, Controllers noticed that Umbilical Mating Assembly 1 (UMA1) showed a status of both mated and demated on Channel A so they performed the MT translation on Channel B.  They are investigating the issue.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #62 on: 07/14/2016 01:15 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/13/16

Posted on July 13, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutron (RaDI-N) Retrieval: A USOS crewmember retrieved all 8 of the Space Bubble Detectors that were deployed last week around the ISS for the Radi-N experiment and handed them over to the Russian crewmember to be processed in the Bubble Reader. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) RaDI-N investigation measures neutron radiation levels while onboard the ISS. RaDI-N uses bubble detectors as neutron monitors which have been designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

3D Printer Removal: Following two weeks of successful 3D printer operations, the crew disassembled the 3D Printer in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and stowed the hardware. A total of 34 coupons were printed including calibration, tensile, compression, and layer specimen coupons. The 3D Printing In Zero-G experiment demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. A 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create three dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the ISS is the first step toward establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

Space Headaches: The crew completed the final daily European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire for this week. The Space Headaches questionnaire provides information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crewmembers which can influence performance during a space mission.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Dragon On-Board Training (OBT) and Preparation: In preparation for SpX-9 arrival planned for July 20, the USOS crew practiced a 30 meter approach, two Capture Point hold runs and two meter runs. They also installed the Crew Command Panel (CCP) and activated the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Communication Unit (CUCU).

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« Last Edit: 07/18/2016 05:24 AM by John44 »

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #64 on: 07/19/2016 09:14 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/14/16

Posted on July 14, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

Heart Cells Hardware Gather and Setup: The crew gathered and configured the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) life science hardware to support upcoming operations for the Heart Cells investigation that will be performed inside the MSG work volume. The investigation studies the human heart, specifically how heart muscle tissue contracts, grows and changes in microgravity and how those changes vary among subjects. Understanding how heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, change in space improves efforts for studying disease, screening drugs and conducting cell replacement therapy for future space missions.

Telescience Resource Kit (TReK) Hardware Set Up: The crew set up the TReK Demonstration laptop and relocated the high definition camera to view the laptop display which will be used to provide video for Space Conferences. The TReK is a suite of software applications and libraries that can be used to monitor and control assets in space or on the ground.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking on an iPad. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Urine Processing Assembly (UPA)Separator Plumbing Assembly (SPA) Samples: The crew gathered and configured equipment in preparation for the collection of a SPA effluent sample to be returned to ground for evaluation to better understand the recent high conductivity and noise observed during UPA processing.  The setup included disconnection of the purge line from the distillate line, however, due to a mismatch with the associated fittings, the sample bag could not be installed.  The purge line will remain disconnected as part of the configuration to troubleshoot the UPA.  Ground teams will continue to investigate methods for installing the sample bag. The next UPA run is expected early next week.

Safety Video Survey: The crew completed a video of the ISS interior volume to allow ground teams to assess current vehicle configuration as well as identify any areas of concern related to ventilation blockage, flammability hazards, emergency egress paths, access to fire ports and safety equipment. This survey is performed approximately every six months.

Russian Segment (RS) Video Survey: Ground controllers completed a survey of the RS using ISS external cameras.  This imagery will be used to compare against ground models in preparation for a future Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) walkoff on to the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF).

Thermal Radiator Rotary Joint (TRRJ) S1-3 Radiator Panel Survey: Yesterday, ground teams completed the periodic video survey of the damaged panel on the Starboard TRRJ.  The face sheet on the S1-3 radiator panel 7 was discovered to be delaminated in September 2008.  Ground teams will review the imagery once available.

Systems Operations Data File (SODF) Emergency Update: The crew updated the emergency procedure for “Fire Source Location” to account for the new Mouse Habitat payload being installed in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM).

Mobile Servicing System (MSS)/Mobile Transporter Status: On July 11 during preparation for MT translation from Worksite 6 (WS6) to WS4, ground controllers noticed that Umbilical Mating Assembly 1 (UMA1) showed a status of both mated and demated on Channel A so the MT translation was performed on Channel B. The unit was power cycled but did not clear the problem. Initial indications are that the UMA 1 IMCA 1 Demate Microswitch is not operational. A workaround was implemented for the issue so there are no impacts to future operations.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #65 on: 07/19/2016 09:14 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/15/16

Posted on July 15, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Mouse Epigenetics Setup Operations: The crew continued setting up for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment by refilling the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit with water, configuring the Glove Box, and gathering supplies to prepare for the investigation arriving on SpaceX-9. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the DNA of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Gecko Gripper Setup and Operations: The crew attached the Gecko Gripper to various locations in the U.S. Lab to test a gecko-adhesive gripping device that can stick on command in the harsh environment of space. The technology promises to enable many new capabilities, including robotic crawlers that could walk along spacecraft exteriors; grippers that use a touch-to-stick method to catch and release objects; and sensor mounts that can work on any surface and be reused multiple times.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of an area or activity providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the International Space Station. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Emergency Roles & Responsibilities Review: With the arrival of the 47S crew and return to 6-crew operations, all crew members participated in this activity. Topics covered included crew accountability, escape vehicle readiness, ISS Commander responsibilities and use of the emergency response flow chart. Priorities in an emergency are safety of crew and safe configuration of the ISS.

On Board Training (OBT) Dragon Offset Grapple: In preparation for SpX-9 capture currently scheduled for July 20, the crew practiced grapple approaches. On the last approach of the session, the ground sent a safing command for the crew to practice a hot backup transition. Particular attention was given to managing volumetric constraints in the Cupola as well as lighting on the grapple fixture and how it changes.  After the OBT session, ground controllers maneuvered the SSRMS into position to be ready for next week’s SpX-9 rendezvous and capture.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Pump Separator:  Today, the WHC “Check separator” light illuminated, indicating an anomaly in the WHC system.  A power cycle of the WHC recovered operability.

S31A A CETA Light Reclose Test  – On May 11th the RPCM (RPCM S31A_A RPC 3) powering the S3-1 CETA Luminaire tripped and the DDCU 50Hz latched data indicated a real overcurrent event.  Today an attempt was made to reclose the RPC to verify the failure signature.  RPC tripped upon first attempt with same over current signature.   The go forward plan is to request R&R of the CETA luminaire.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #66 on: 07/19/2016 01:42 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/18/16

Posted on July 18, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

64 Progress (64P) Launch: 64P launched successfully from Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday at 4:41PM CDT with nominal ascent. Docking is scheduled for this evening at 7:22PM CDT.

SpaceX (SpX)-9 Launch: SpX-9 launched successfully on Sunday at 11:45PM CDT. Capture is scheduled on Wednesday, July 20 at 6:00AM CDT with berthing approximately 3.5 hours later. Ingress will occur on Thursday, July 21.

EarthKAM Service Module (SM) De-activation Removal: Over the weekend, Russian crewmembers shut down the EarthKAM payload components before disconnecting and stowing the equipment, concluding a week of imagery sessions in the SM. The objective of Sally Ride EarthKAM is to integrate Earth images with inquiry-based learning to enhance curricula in support of national and state education standards; to provide students and educators the opportunity to participate in a space mission and to develop teamwork, communication, and problem solving skills; to engage teams of students, educators, and researchers in collaborative investigations using remotely-sensed data; and to incorporate the active use of Web-based tools and resources in support of the learning process.

Marrow Blood, Breath, and Ambient Air Sample Collection: The crew completed the blood collection double spin overviews this weekend to prepare for scheduled Marrow activities today and tomorrow. Upon waking this morning, the crew measured the effects of microgravity-induced marrow fat accumulation on red and white blood cell metabolism using breath and ambient air samples to measure carbon monoxide concentration. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Marrow experiment investigates the effect of microgravity on human bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the marrow. The extent of this effect and its recovery are of interest to space research and healthcare providers on Earth.

Human Research Program (HRP) Blood and Urine Collection: The crew collected blood and urine samples and stowed them into the Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  The samples will be used to support the HRP: Biochem Profile, Repository, and Cardio Ox investigations.

Cardio Ox Overview: In preparation for Cardio Ox operations planned for tomorrow, the crew will review reference material for ultrasound scanning activities and blood pressure measurements. Crewmembers provide blood and urine samples to assess biomarkers before launch, 15 and 60 days after launch, 15 days before returning to Earth, and within days after landing. Ultrasound scans of the carotid and brachial arteries are obtained at the same time points, as well as through 5 years after landing, as an indicator of cardiovascular health.

Mouse Epigenetics Setup Operations: The crew continued setup activities for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment by replacing MSPR VRU SSD installed in Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) Video Compression and Recording Unit (VRU). The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the DNA of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Strata-1 Card Change-out: Four Strata secure digital (SD) cards were replaced and the data was downlinked.  The Strata-1 experiment investigates the properties and behavior of regolith on small, airless bodies.  Regolith is the impact-shattered “soil” found on asteroids, comets, the Moon, and other airless worlds, but it is different from soil here on Earth in that it contains no living material. Strata-1’s goal is to give us answers about how regolith behaves and moves in microgravity, how easy or difficult it is to anchor a spacecraft in regolith, how it interacts with spacecraft and spacesuit materials, and other important properties.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the International Space Station. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet were completed over the weekend for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. Crew fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) Separator Plumbing Assembly (SPA) Samples: Last week the crew configured the system with the SPA output disconnected to obtain distillate samples for return to ground to better understand the recent UPA high conductivity. The UPA will continue to process in this configuration for at least a week. A longer term configuration to connect a CWC-I to the SPA output is in work.

Waste & Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Pump Separator Remove & Replace (R&R): On July 11, the WHC Check Separator fault light illuminated. Subsequent troubleshooting steps led ground teams to conclude that the separator, which has been in operation since January of this year, was at its end of life. Today the Check Separator fault light illuminated again and the crew was directed to R&R the unit.  After completion of that activity, the WHC was successfully recovered and is go for nominal use.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #67 on: 07/21/2016 03:42 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/19/16

Posted on July 19, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
64 Progress (64P) Docking: 64P docked successfully to the ISS Docking Compartment (DC)-1 nadir port last night at 7:22PM CDT. Following hatch opening the crew transferred early unstow and US cargo items.

Skin-B Operations: The crew performed Corneometer, Tewameter and Visioscan measurements on his forearm for this experiment. The Corneometer measures the hydration level of the stratus coreum (outer layer of the skin), the Tewameter measures the skin barrier function, and the Visioscan measures the skin surface topography. Skin B is a European Space Agency (ESA) investigation that aims to improve the understanding of skin aging, which is greatly accelerated in space. The data will also be used to verify the results from previous testing for the SkinCare investigation on the ISS.

Cardio Ox Ultrasound Operations: With remote guidance from the Cardio Ox ground teams, the crew conducted an ultrasound scan after configuring the VOX, attaching the ECG Electrodes, and marking the arteries followed by blood pressure measurements using the Cardiolab Holter Arterial Blood Pressure Unit. The goal of the Cardio Ox investigation is to determine whether biological markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after space flight and whether this results in an increased, long-term risk of atherosclerosis risk in astronauts. Twelve crewmembers provide blood and urine samples to assess biomarkers before launch, 15 and 60 days after launch, 15 days before returning to Earth, and within days after landing. Ultrasound scans of the carotid and brachial arteries are obtained at the same time points, as well as through 5 years after landing, as an indicator of cardiovascular health.

Human Research Program (HRP) Generic Urine and Frozen Blood Collection Double Spin: The crew continued HRP operations by collecting urine samples for a 24-hour period, configuring the Refrigerated Centrifuge for sample load operations, then collecting and processing a set of blood samples for double spin operations using the Refrigerated Centrifuge. The samples will be stowed in the Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI).


Personal Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Monitor Installation and Operations: Before performing data collections from the Personal CO2 Monitor, the crewmember first performed a single point calibration of the Personal CO2 Monitor using the iPad app and readings from the minimum circuit amps (MCA) sample port. The Personal CO2 Monitor was then paired to the iPad, before being attached to the crewmember’s clothing, and worn for several hours. The data collected will be uploaded to the Space Station Computer via the iPad app before being powered off and stowed. The Personal CO2 Monitor demonstrates a system capable of unobtrusively collecting and downlinking individual crew members’ CO2 exposure for weeks to months. This investigation evaluates wearability principles in microgravity and also demonstrates Modular Wearable Architecture Base Board, allowing rapid certification of future wearable devices.

Marrow Blood, Breath, and Ambient Air Sample Collection: Upon waking this morning, the crew took breath and ambient air samples to measure carbon monoxide concentration for the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Marrow experiment which investigates the effect of microgravity on human bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the marrow. The extent of this effect and its recovery are of interest to space research and healthcare providers on Earth.

Space Headaches: The crew completed a European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire to provide information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crew members which can influence performance during a space mission.

Minus Eighty Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) 2 & 3 Nitrogen (N2) Pressure Checks: The crew completed nitrogen checks on MELFIs 2 and 3 to verify that the nitrogen pressure in both MELFIs is within acceptable range. The MELFI is a cold storage unit that maintains experiment samples at ultra-cold temperatures throughout a mission. It supports a wide range of life science experiments by preserving biological samples (such as blood, saliva, urine, microbial or plant samples) collected aboard ISS for later return and analysis on Earth.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #68 on: 07/21/2016 03:42 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/20/16

Posted on July 20, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
SpaceX (SpX)-9 Capture: The Dragon vehicle was successfully captured by the SSRMS at 5:56AM CDT today. Ground teams then berthed the vehicle to the Node 2 Nadir (N2N) port at approximately 9 AM, after which the crew performed vestibule pressurization and outfitting.  Thanks to the crew and ground operators getting ahead of the timeline, they were able to ingress the vehicle today instead of waiting until tomorrow as previously planned.

Thermolab Instrumentation for Circadian Rhythms: The crew began the first of a three-day European Space Agency (ESA) Circadian Rhythms experiment by performing instrumentation with the Thermolab Double sensors, mounting the Thermolab Unit in a belt and connecting and powering on the Thermolab Unit before beginning a 36 hour continuous measurement. After the measurement is complete, the data will be transferred and the hardware will be stowed. The objective of the experiment is to get a better understanding of any alterations in circadian rhythms in humans during long-term space flights. Such knowledge will not only provide important insights into the adaptations of the human autonomic nervous system in space over time, but also has significant practical implications by helping to improve physical exercise, rest and work shifts, as well as fostering adequate workplace illumination in the sense of occupational healthcare in future space missions.

Mouse Epigenetics Pre-experiment Transfer Overview: In preparation for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment that arrived on SpX-9, the crew reviewed reference material on transferring mice from the transportation Cage Unit to the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit and installing the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit to Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Incubator Unit (IU).

Double Coldbag Unpack and Polar Transfer Overview: The crew reviewed reference material and procedures to understand the timing and choreography of unpacking the Double Coldbags from SpX-9 and transferring and installing the Polars from Dragon into the Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) racks.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #69 on: 07/21/2016 08:22 PM »
Jeff recently did an interview with some religious group involved in missionary work, did anyone catch it on NASA TV  and get the name of the group and interviewer?

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #70 on: 07/22/2016 03:46 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/21/16

Posted on July 21, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Dragon Operations:  The crew was scheduled to ingress and configure Dragon for on-orbit operations today, however, these tasks were completed yesterday. Today they transferred critical cargo and unpacked double cold bags to retrieve science as well as transferring 2 “Polar” freezers from Dragon into the EXPRESS rack locations that had been prepared for them.

Mouse Epigenetics Setup Operations: Crewmembers reconfigured the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) to establish an alternate power resource from the Utility Outlet Panel (UOP) and transferred the mice from the Transportation Cage Unit (which was used to house them during launch) into the Mouse Habitat Cage Units onboard ISS. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Heart Cells Habitat Preparation and Sample Installation: Today, the Heart Cells samples were removed from the SpaceX-9 Dragon capsule and transferred to SABL 2.  The crew then prepared for operations in SABL 1 by configuring the carbon dioxide (CO2) Incubator Controller and installing hardware inside.  The samples were placed in active temperature and CO2 control when they were transferred from SABL 2 into SABL 1. The Heart Cells investigation studies the human heart, specifically how heart muscle tissue contracts, grows and changes (gene expression) in microgravity and how those changes vary between subjects. Understanding how heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, change in space improves efforts for studying disease, screening drugs and conducting cell replacement therapy for future space missions.

NanoRacks Platform-1 Module Install: Six NanoRack Modules were installed on NanoRacks Platform 1. NanoRacks Modules 41 (Awty-BE-HDPE Rad Shielding), 43 (Slime Mold), and 44 (Awty-Yeast Cell Growth in a Microgravity Environment) were configured on the left side of the NanoRack Platform and Modules 45 (Duchesne-Light Wavelengths on Algae Production), 46 (Duchesne-Plant Growth Chamber), and 69 (Silver Electrolysis/ Eagelcrest) were configured on the right side. The NanoRack Platform is a multipurpose research facility that supports NanoRacks Modules by providing power and data transfer capabilities to operate investigations in microgravity.

NanoRacks Module 9: The crew performed tasks for the NanoRack Module-9 experiment by activating, deactivating, and shaking the mixture tubes. This experiment is a collection of student research projects utilizing the NanoRacks Mixsticks. Student teams from across the United States design their own experiments using flight approved fluids and materials.

Fluids Integration Rack (FIR) RPC trip troubleshooting – RPCM LA2A3B-G RPC-2 (FIR Main Power) tripped in late June.  The payload that was running inside FIR at the time (MicroChannel Diffusion) was able to complete their operations on auxiliary power.  Troubleshooting on the RPC trip was completed today.  FIR was initially powered using auxiliary power, but gradually transitioned to main power. FIR was then deactivated and re-activated in a nominal configuration. No RPC trips were seen throughout the troubleshooting. FIR was deactivated upon completion. There are currently no liens on future use of FIR main power.


Offline JimO

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #72 on: 07/24/2016 12:38 AM »
Jeff recently did an interview with some religious group involved in missionary work, did anyone catch it on NASA TV  and get the name of the group and interviewer?

This was a teleconference on July 19 but I still can't find the time-of-day,

It was a personal call, NOT a PAO function.

Where can I search to locate this information?

There's MAJOR excitement in the woo-woo-websites and British newspapers about use of religious terms like 'gospel' and 'pray', I'm trying to produce a reality check. 

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #73 on: 07/25/2016 08:42 PM »
During the daily stowage conference Jeff mentioned that 1 (at least) EMU is packed and already in Dragon.  There was discussion about securing it while other cargo is loaded and stowed.  Any ideas on which suit is coming back?  Also did one head uphill because being down one suit doesn't sound likely?
« Last Edit: 07/25/2016 08:48 PM by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #74 on: 07/25/2016 10:00 PM »
Jeff recently did an interview with some religious group involved in missionary work, did anyone catch it on NASA TV  and get the name of the group and interviewer?

This was a teleconference on July 19 but I still can't find the time-of-day,

It was a personal call, NOT a PAO function.

Where can I search to locate this information?

There's MAJOR excitement in the woo-woo-websites and British newspapers about use of religious terms like 'gospel' and 'pray', I'm trying to produce a reality check. 
Since it was a personal call it would be very hard to get this info since majority of personal calls are kept NASA Internal. The only way to get around that is to email the parties involved or submit a FOIA request since the info was publish in Public media. Then its up to the involved parties to respond to your info request. I'm not aware of any other way to do it. sometimes the personal calls result in NDA's being issued to those involved. NASA has a master record of all personal and public calls and other data, but is again is kept internal only.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #75 on: 07/26/2016 12:30 AM »
During the daily stowage conference Jeff mentioned that 1 (at least) EMU is packed and already in Dragon.  There was discussion about securing it while other cargo is loaded and stowed.  Any ideas on which suit is coming back?  Also did one head uphill because being down one suit doesn't sound likely?

Question answered.  Thanks NASA.

http://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2016/07/25/new-spacesuit-and-science-unloaded-from-dragon/

A new U.S. spacesuit was unpacked from inside Dragon and will be used during an August spacewalk to install a Commercial Crew docking port. An older U.S. spacesuit will be returned to Earth inside the Dragon for refurbishment.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #76 on: 07/26/2016 11:23 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/22/16

Posted on July 22, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Thermolab Deinstrumentation for Circadian Rhythms: The crew removed the double sensors and Thermolab Unit before cleaning and stowing the equipment following completion of the European Space Agency (ESA) Circadian Rhythm experiment. The measurement process took 36 hours to complete.

Biological Rhythms 48 Hours Actiwatch Preparation: Today, the crew configured and donned the Actiwatch to commence the Biological Rhythms data collection.  Operations will continue with the holter donning activity on Monday.  Biological Rhythms 48 hours studies the effects of long-term microgravity exposure on heart function by analyzing an astronaut’s extended electrocardiogram.


Heart Cells Media Change Preparation: The Heart Cells Media was relocated from Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus -4 (CGBA-4) to the Space Automated Bioproduct Lab-2 (SABL-2), and one bag containing three Heart Cells Media for ops was removed and temp stowed. The crew also changed the media in the Multiwell BioCells for Heart Cells in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Work Volume. The Heart Cells investigation studies the human heart, specifically how heart muscle tissue, contracts, grows and changes (gene expression) in microgravity and how those changes vary between subjects. Understanding how heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, change in space improves efforts for studying disease, screening drugs and conducting cell replacement therapy for future space missions.

Body Measures Operations: Today two crewmembers began the Flight Day (FD) 15 Body Measures data collection session, one as the subject and the other as operator. However, due to schedule constraints, not all of the objectives were completed.  The remaining tasks will be rescheduled in the near future.  NASA is collecting in-flight anthropometric data (body measurements) to assess the impact of physical body shape and size changes on suit sizing. Still and video imagery is captured and measurements are taken of segmental length, height, depth, and circumference data of all body segments (chest, waist, hip, arms, legs, etc.) from astronauts before, during and after their flight missions.

Biological Research In Canisters (BRIC) 23 Operations: The crew performed actuation of all four BRIC 23 canisters by inserting a rod into the BRIC – Petri Dish Fixation Unit (PDFU) Actuator Tool and using the Actuator Tool to mechanically force a growth medium into the Petri dishes. After a 24-hour growth period two of the four canisters will be transferred to the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for freezing of the samples and the remaining two canisters will be transferred into the MEFLI after a 48-hour growth period. The BRIC-23 investigation studies Bacillus subtilis spores and Staphylococcus aureus cells to understand how they respond to the stressful environment of space. Results from this investigation improve the understanding of how microbes adapt to spaceflight including whether their adaptations change antibiotic effectiveness, which benefits efforts to maintain crew member health.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks was completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. Crew fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking on an iPad. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Dragon Transfer Operations: The crew has unloaded the entire center stack and port rack, all of the coldbags, a large portion of the soft-stow cargo, all powered cargo including both powered Polars and the JAXA Mouse Habitat Unit Transportation Cage Unit with 12 mice from Dragon to the ISS. Fifty seven percent of the launched cargo has been transferred.

Dragon On-Board Training (OBT):  With the arrival of SpX-9, all 6 crew members participated in an Emergency Response review including emergency hatch closure. The USOS crew also participated in a capture debrief with ground teams.

Water Processor Assembly (WPA) Successful Process: Overnight the WPA successfully completed a process run. Recently, the WPA has been continuously reprocessing due to high conductivity but has faulted out due to high pressure faults of the Microbial Check Valve (MCV). The MCV is tentatively scheduled to be removed & replaced (R&Rd) next week.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #77 on: 07/26/2016 01:32 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/25/16

Posted on July 25, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Biological Research In Canisters (BRIC) 23: Over the weekend, the crew transferred all four of the BRIC-23 canisters that were actuated last week to the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  Two of the four canisters were transferred to MELFI following a 24-hour growth period and the remaining two canisters were transferred following a 48-hour growth period. The BRIC-23 investigation studies Bacillus subtilis spores and Staphylococcus aureus cells to understand how they respond to the stressful environment of space. Results from this investigation improve the understanding of how microbes adapt to spaceflight, including whether their adaptations change antibiotic effectiveness, which benefits efforts to maintain crew member health.

NanoRacks Module 9: Over the weekend the crew completed the second session of the NanoRacks Module-9 experiment by activating, shaking, and deactivating the mixture tubes. The NanoRacks Module-9 experiment is a collection of student research projects utilizing the NanoRacks Mixsticks. Student teams from across the United States design their own experiments using flight approved fluids and materials. The investigation consists of several science experiments flown in a NanoRacks Module on board the ISS.

Biological Rhythms 48 Holter Start: Earlier this morning the crew continued the operations phase of the Biological Rhythms experiment by attaching the Digital Walk Holter Electrocardiogram (ECG) and electrodes. The objective of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Biological Rhythms 48 is to study the effects of long-term microgravity exposure on heart function by analyzing an astronaut’s electrocardiogram for 48 hours.

Mouse Epigenetics Maintenance Operations: The crew refilled water in the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit located in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF). The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Fluid Shifts: The crew conducted the first Fluid Shifts operation of this session by configuring the Refrigerated Centrifuge for sample load operations, performing body sample collections and stowing the samples in a MELFI. The crew also collected a galley water sample and stowed in the MELFI prior to ingestion of a Tracer solution from the Tracer Syringe. Fluid Shifts is a joint USOS Russian experiment that measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures.

Meteor Hard Drive Change-out: The crew removed and replaced the hard drive in the Meteor Laptop located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF). The investigation provides the first space-based measurement of meteor flux as well as monitoring of carbon-based compounds. Continuous measurement of meteor interactions with the Earth’s atmosphere could also spot previously unforeseen meteor showers.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

“Road To” Extravehicular Activity (EVA): This week begins preparation tasks for the IDA2 EVA currently scheduled for August 18. Today the crew was scheduled to complete the following EVA Mobility Unit (EMU) tasks, but only completed the first three due to scheduling constraints:
•Remove EMU 3008 from the Fwd EMU Don/Doff Assembly (EDDA) and stow in the Crew Lock (CL).
•Remove EMU 3006, which was delivered on SpX-9, from the SEMU Launch Enclosure (SLE), install on the Fwd EDDA and configure for on-orbit operations.
•Configure and install EMU 3005 in the SLE for return on SpX-9.
•Retrieve EMU 3003 from the CL and install on Aft EDDA. [Deferred]
•Remove EMU 3006 from Fwd EDDA and install EMU 3008. [Deferred]

Potable Water Dispenser Filter Maintenance: The crew R&Rd the PWD filter and cleaned the fan filter areas behind the PWD. This preventive maintenance is required every 18 months.

Transition to the Power Management Control Application (PMCA) and Photovoltaic Control Application (PVCA) R5 (PMPV R5) software suite – The X2 PMPV R5 software transition began over the weekend and will continue into Tuesday.  PMCA and PVCA R5 contains new software to manage the Li-Ion batteries that will arrive on HTV-6. In addition to the PMCA and PVCA updates, there also are updates to the Command and Control (C&C) and Portable Computer System (PCS) software.  All software has good health signatures to date.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #78 on: 07/27/2016 01:51 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/26/16

Posted on July 26, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Biological Rhythms 48 Multi Media Card Exchange: The crew stopped the first half of the 24-hour recording that began yesterday and changed out the Multi Media Card and battery of the Digital Walk Holter ECG, then began the second half of the 24-hour recording. The objective of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Biological Rhythms 48 is to study the effects of long-term microgravity exposure on heart function by analyzing an astronaut’s electrocardiogram for 48 hours.

Fluid Shifts: Crewmembers continued Fluid Shifts operations by configuring the Refrigerated Centrifuge for sample load operations, conducting body (blood, urine, and saliva) sample collections and stowing the samples in a MELFI (Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS). Fluid Shifts is a joint USOS – Russian experiment that measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures

JEM Airlock (JEM AL) Operations: With assistance from the ground team, the crew completed Airlock Control and Display Unit-Remote Control (ACDU-RC) checkout and JEM AL labeling activities. They also removed the Handhold Experiment Platform Adapter from the Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) prior to removing MPEP from the Small Fine Arm (SFA) Airlock Attachment Mechanism (SAM) which is on the JEMAL slide table. This is in preparation for next week’s planned installation of NanoRacks External Platform (NREP).

At Home in Space Questionnaire: The crew completed a questionnaire for the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) At Home in Space experiment which assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the space craft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space investigates individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Microbial Check Valve (MCV) Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Remove & Replace (R&R): The Water Processing Assembly (WPA) has been experiencing high pressure faults when in reprocess mode due to high delta pressure across the MCV. The old MCV was installed following a failed R&R in 2015 and was degraded. Today the crew replaced the MCV with a spare delivered on SpX-9. The WPA is currently in process mode and data indicates the delta pressure has returned to normal levels.

Transition to the Power Management Control Application (PMCA) and Photovoltaic Control Application (PVCA) R5 Software Suite: The X2 PMPV R5 software transition began over the weekend and continued through today.  Yesterday the software was pushed to the Backup Photovoltaic Control Unit (PVCU) Multiplexer-Demultiplexers (MDMs) [PVCU-3B, PVCU-3A, PVCU-4A and PVCU-2B], which were then transitioned to Primary.  Today the software was pushed to the remaining PVCU MDMs [PVCU-1A, PVCU-1B, PVCU-2A, and PVCU-4B]. After the software loads were completed, the MDMs were transitioned from backup to primary. This returned the MDMs in their final desired Prime/Backup configuration.

Dragon Cargo Operations: The crew has unloaded all cargo from the vehicle.  The crew completed 2.5 hours of cargo packing and loading for return.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #79 on: 07/27/2016 03:37 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/26/16

Posted on July 26, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
<snip>
Dragon Cargo Operations: The crew has unloaded all cargo from the vehicle.  The crew completed 2.5 hours of cargo packing and loading for return.
That was quick!  Or is my preconception wrong regarding how long it takes to unpack a Dragon capsule?

Are the most recent USOS crews more efficient at loading/unloading CRS vehicles than a few years ago?

Are they getting unofficial cosmonaut assistance?
« Last Edit: 07/27/2016 03:39 PM by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium!

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #80 on: 07/29/2016 07:36 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/27/16

Posted on July 27, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Biological Rhythms 48 Holter and Actiwatch Removal and Data Save: Upon completion of the Biological Rhythms recording session, today the crewmember removed the Digital Walk Holter Electrocardiogram (ECG) and the Actiwatch Spectrum from his body and saved the data collected from the holter and the multi-media card to the medical laptop. This concluded a series of activities for the Biological Rhythms experiment where two separate 24-hour Actiwatch measurement sessions were performed to study the effects of long-term microgravity exposure on heart functions by analyzing an astronaut’s electrocardiogram for 48 hours.

Fluid Shifts Operations: With operator assistance from the ground team, crewmembers continued the first week of the Fluid Shifts experiment run by configuring the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) hardware, the Cerebral and Cochlear Fluid Pressure (CCFP) analyzer, and the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) hardware, before completing a DPOAE test, OCT exam, Tonometry exam, and a CCFP test. The Fluids Shift investigation is divided into three segments: Dilution Measures, Baseline Imaging, and Baseline Imaging using the Russian Chibis Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) device. The experiment measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures.

Heart Cells Microscope Operations: The crew set up the Heart Cells microscope and removed the BioCell Habitat from the Space Automated Bioproduct Lab (SABL) and the Multiwell BioCell from the BioCell Habitat. These items were inserted into the microscope before conducting Heart Cells operations and placing the Multiwell BioCell back into BioCell Habitat and stowing the BioCell habitat inside SABL-1. The investigation studies the human heart, specifically how heart muscle tissue, contracts, grows and changes (gene expression) in microgravity and how those changes vary between subjects. Understanding how heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, change in space improves efforts for studying disease, screening drugs and conducting cell replacement therapy for future space missions.

Mouse Epigenetics Maintenance Operations: The crew conducted standard maintenance operations by exchanging the food cartridge of the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit and completing Transportation Cage Unit dryout activities. The investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space as well as changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet were completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmember’s fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Portable Emergency Provisions (PEPS) Inspection: The crew inspected and confirmed that the Portable Fire Extinguishers (PFEs), Extension Hose Tee Kits (EHTKs), Portable Breathing Apparatuses (PBAs) and Pre-Breathe Masks are all free of damage. This maintenance is scheduled every 45 days to ensure continuous functionality of the units.

SSRMS Operations for Pressurized Mating Adapter 2 (PMA2) Androgynous Peripheral Attachment System (APAS) Inspection – SSRMS ungrappled from SpaceX-9 and used the SSRMS Latch End Effector (LEE) camera to complete the PMA2 APAS inspection in preparation for the International Docking Adapter (IDA) ExtraVehicular Activity (EVA) installation in August. No significant items were noted in the inspection. The PMA2 APAS is Go for IDA installation. Following the PMA2 APAS inspection, the SSRMS was maneuvered to its park position at the pre-grapple for Dragon Flight Release Grapple Fixture (FRGF).

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #81 on: 07/29/2016 02:05 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 07/28/16

Posted on July 28, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Mouse Epigenetics Cage Unit Maintenance: The Mouse Cage Units containing the mice were transferred to the glove box from the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) while the crew conducted standard cleaning and maintenance on the Mouse Habitat Cage Units. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Fluid Shifts Operations: With guidance from the ground teams, crewmembers continued the first week of the Fluid Shifts experiment run by performing a Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) test, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Tonometry exams, Cerebral Cochlear Fluid Pressure (CCFP) test and an ultrasound scan. The Fluids Shift investigation is divided into three segments: Dilution Measures, Baseline Imaging, and Baseline Imaging using the Russian Chibis Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) device. The experiment measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures.

European Crew Personal Active Dosimeter (EUCPAD) Installation: The crew retrieved and inserted the ESA Active Dosimeter Mobile Units into the personal storage device.  The European Crew Personal Active Dosimeter is a device worn by crew members on orbit to measure radiation exposure. This device, coupled with other dosimeters in the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Columbus Laboratory, provides radiation dosage information that can be used to support risk assessment and dose management. The goal is to enable verification of radiation monitoring systems for future medical monitoring of crew members in space.

Maritime Awareness Radio Installation: The crew installed the Maritime Awareness Radio drawer into EXPRESS rack 3 and connected it to the Vessel ID antenna. Nearly all commercial ships on the world’s oceans are being tracked and monitored using the Automatic Identification System (AIS) but the curvature of the Earth blocks the signals when ships are far from shore. The Global AIS on Space Station (GLASS) (Maritime Awareness) investigation uses a space-based AIS receiver system on ISS to acquire and disseminate ship information. During a 12-month test period, the system’s ability to continuously monitor ships for use in commercial, safety and security, environmental and educational applications will be investigated.

Airway Monitoring Overview and Setup: In preparation for the European Space Agency (ESA) Airway Monitoring experiment scheduled to begin next week, the crew reviewed reference material and began setup activities in the Airlock.  With dust particles in the ISS atmosphere, Airway Monitoring studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This helps to highlight any health impacts and to maintain crewmember wellbeing on future human spaceflight missions, especially longer-duration missions to the Moon and Mars where crewmembers must be more self-sufficient in highlighting and avoiding such conditions.


Space Headaches: The crew completed the European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire to provide information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crew members which can influence performance during a space mission.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking on an iPad. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator 3 (MERLIN-3) Failure to Power On Fully: Yesterday, ground teams reported that the MERLIN-3 file count was not incrementing. Based on similarity to a previous anomaly ground teams attempted a reboot to recover but did not see Health & Status (H&S) indications. Ground teams then power cycled the Locker 6 power and data but MERLIN-3 did not fully power back up. Teams noted the power draw went from 5.5A to less than 0.5A. MERLIN-3 lost its cooling capacity so science was moved from MERLIN-3 to MERLIN-1.  Ground teams are working additional troubleshooting plans. If MERLIN-3 cannot be recovered it may be returned on SpX-9. Additional MERLIN capacity is not required until SpX-10.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Resize:  Preparation activities for the EVA currently planned for August 18 continued today. The crew resized EMU 3003 to fit Williams and EMU 3008 was resized to fit Rubins. The crew also gathered suit components to be returned to ground and replaced a frayed Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment on one of the EVA Helmet Interchangeable Portable Lights (EHIP).

Cyclic Load Management (CLM) Not Being Applied to Shell Heaters Following Software Transition: As part of the Software Transition that occurred on Sunday July 24, an update was made for Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) Day/Night Cycling and Shell Heater Cyclic Load Delta to be avoided during periods of high beta. Prior to the software transition, a delta would be applied to adjust set points which allowed the heaters to use more power when it was available to warm the shell heaters. Temperatures are currently maintaining above dew point and there is no concern that will change, but there could be an impact for extended power downs.

Remote Power Control Modules (RPCM) S11A-C and S14B-G Checkout: To restore capability to integrate S1 radiator flow path using S1-3-1 Integrated Motor Controller Assembly (IMCA) there are plans to robotically perform a swap of RPCM S11A_C with S14B_G. In order to verify that the swapped RPCMs will properly operate in the new positions, ground teams performed a checkout of the affected RPCMs that are presently in active slot positions. This activity screens for an RPCM Field Effect Transistor (FET) Controller Hybrid (FCH) failure which can occur without any external indication from the RPCM (no trip, RPCM Power-On Reset (POR), etc.), should that FCH be controlling an unused RPCM output which has occurred on orbit in the past. The checkout was completed nominally with no issues reported.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #82 on: 08/03/2016 01:06 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/01/2016

Posted on August 1, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Airway Monitoring Ambient and Reduced Pressure Operations: The crew completed part of today’s session of the European Space Agency (ESA) Airway Monitoring experiment in the US Airlock.
•The protocol was successfully performed at ambient pressure. The crew was scheduled to repeat the protocol at a low pressure (10.2 psi) during which oxygen concentration in the Airlock would be increased to 27.5% but the low pressure portion was not performed and will be rescheduled.
•The second part of the experiment was to be performed at a pressure of 10.2 psi (700 mbar) with closed hatch. Both crew members would wear an Oxygen Finger Clip on the index finger prior to hatch closure for monitoring heart rate and oxygen saturation (SpO2) in the blood and the clip would not removed until the hatch was reopened.  This portion of the experiment was not completed and will be rescheduled.

Airway Monitoring is the first experiment to use the US Airlock as a hypobaric facility for performing science which allows unique opportunities for the study of gravity, ambient pressure interactions, and their effect on the Human Body. This investigation studies the occurrence and indicators of airway inflammation in crewmembers using ultra-sensitive gas analyzers to analyze exhaled air. This helps to highlight health impacts and to maintain crewmember well-being on future human spaceflight missions, especially longer-duration missions to the Moon and Mars, where crewmembers will have to be more self-sufficient in highlighting and avoiding such conditions.

Multi-Omics Operations:  The crew supported the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics investigation by collecting human samples and inserting them into a Box Module in the Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Zero Robotics: A USOS crewmember and a Russian crewmember participated in a conference with the SPHERES Principal Investigator and configured the SPHERES work area to activate and check out the hardware before completing test runs on the Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites. The investigation establishes an opportunity for high school students to design research for the ISS. As part of a competition, students write algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. The algorithms are tested by the SPHERES team and the best designs are selected for the competition to operate the SPHERES satellites on board the ISS.

Fluid Shifts Hardware Transfer and Service Module Setup: To prepare for Ultrasound activities in the Service Module this week, the crew transferred and setup hardware that supports the Fluid Shifts investigation from the US Segment to the Russian Segment. The experiment measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures.

Onboard Training (OBT) Emergency Event: All six crewmembers participated in this training covering required response during depress, ammonia, US fire and Russian Segment fire events. The crew practiced procedure management, equipment gather (what would be used and from where), hatch closures and communication with the ground. This is in preparation for tomorrow’s planned OBT ISS emergency simulation.

Water Processor Assembly (WPA) Microbial Check Valve (MCV) Intermittent Checking: On July 26th, the MCV in the WPA was Removed and Replaced (R&Rd). The WPA had been experiencing high pressure faults when in reprocess mode due to high delta-pressure (dP) values across the MCV. After the second processing run following the R&R, the newly installed MCV began experiencing intermittent checking. This is an issue that the previously installed MCV also encountered. Over the weekend, the Flight Control Team successfully implemented a workaround in which the 3-way valve upstream of the MCV was cycled to relieve enough pressure that the MCV was able to check. Since the new MCV was installed, the WPA has not experienced any high dP faults.

Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) Reconfiguration and Samples: In an attempt to understand the root cause of high conductivity observed in the distillate, the engineering team requested a series of return-to-ground samples be taken from the UPA during various times during two separate Recycle Tank concentration cycles. The first of the activities supporting these samples was performed this afternoon. The crew reconfigured the UPA back to the nominal configuration by tearing down the CWC-I setup that has been in place to collect Separator Plumbing Assembly (SPA) effluent, and reconnecting the SPA. Additionally, the 100 Micron Distillate Filter was R&Rd. Both the CWC-I and Distillate Filter will be returned on SpX-9 for analysis.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #83 on: 08/03/2016 01:07 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/02/2016

Posted on August 2, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Fluid Shifts Imaging with Chibis in the Service Module (SM): With assistance from the ground team two crewmembers began the second week of the Fluid Shifts experiment run by configuring the Ultrasound 2 hardware prior to performing ultrasound scans on in the SM while using the Chibis.  Poor video quality of the Ultrasound scan for the first crewmember only allowed 50% of the test points to be completed.  Operations for the second crewmember were deferred to allow ground teams to troubleshoot.  Two simultaneous issues were found:  an encoder misconfiguration issue and a loose cable onboard.  A reboot of the encoder by ground teams and adjustment of the cable by the crew resolved the problem.  Fluid Shifts operations will resume tomorrow and today’s activities will be rescheduled.  The Fluids Shift investigation is divided into three segments: Dilution Measures, Baseline Imaging, and Baseline Imaging using the Russian Chibis Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) device. The experiment measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures.

Frozen in Time, Jeff Williams and MELFI: Ten years ago today, then Flight Engineer Jeff Williams placed the first science samples into the Minus Eighty Degree Laboratory Freezer for the International Space Station (MELFI) Flight Unit 1 (FU1) in the U.S. Laboratory/Destiny during Expedition 13.  MELFI is a cold storage unit that maintains experiment samples at temperatures ranging from just above freezing to ultra-cold.  Expedition 13 was the beginning of many years of science collaboration between Williams and MELFI.  Williams arrived at the ISS on April 1, 2006, and the MELFI FU1 arrived on July 6 of the same year.  Jeff then activated MELFI for the first time on July 19.  As Flight Engineer during Expedition 21, Williams performed maintenance on MELFI by replacing a failed Electronics Unit.  Now, as commander of Expedition 48, he is using all three MELFI flight units onboard ISS to further the science goals of ISS.  Over the last ten years, Williams and MELFI have provided a wide range of support to life science experiments and enhanced research capabilities on the ISS.  To say the least, Jeff has had an interesting 10 year history with MELFI.

Mouse Epigenetics Cage Unit Maintenance: The crew performed maintenance activities for the Mouse Epigenetics Habitat Cage Units by transferring the mice from one habitat cage unit to another and refilling the cage units with water. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet were completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmember’s fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

NanoRacks (NR) Plate Reader 2 Module-29 Test Plate Removal: Following last week’s analysis of the NanoRacks Module-29 (NanoRacks-Fluorescent Polarization in Microgravity) test plates, today the crew removed the fifth test plate from the sample tray and discarded all NR Module 29 hardware. The analysis was performed by sequentially inserting and removing five individual NR Module -29 test plates to and from the sample tray which allows scientists to study chemical reactions using fluorescence polarization which produces changes in light when molecules bind together. This technique enables researchers to measure the interactions of proteins with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), or antibodies, and many other biomedical functions. NanoRacks Module -29 validates a commercial Plate Reader instrument that detects changes in light for these types of reactions in a multiwell plate, a flat plate with 384 wells or tiny test tubes, to examine microgravity’s effect on fluorescent polarization, which paves the way for advanced biology research and drug development in space.

Microgravity Experiment Research Locker/INcubator-5 (MERLIN 5) Transfer to Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack 5 (ER5): The MERLIN-5 was removed from ER7 and installed in ER5 to support samples for the Heart Cells investigation returning on SpX-9.  ER7 has a failed power control module, which prevents the MERLIN from being powered on.  Moving it to ER5 will allow MERLIN to be powered on in time to support the SpaceX-9 return.  The MERLIN provides a single middeck locker EXPRESS Rack compatible freezer/refrigerator or incubator that can be used for a variety of experiments.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparation: In preparation for US EVA #35 currently scheduled for August 19, the crew inspected Retractable Equipment Tethers (RETs) for damaged cords. Each RET cord must be inspected prio to EVA use, then stowed in a protective bag to prevent potential damage.

On Board Training (OBT) ISS Emergency Simulation: Following yesterday’s training review covering depress, ammonia, US fire and Russian Segment fire events, today all crew members, with support from ground teams, completed a training exercise with the following objectives:
•Practice ISS emergency response with crew and ground roles based on information provided by simulator displays.
•Physically translate through ISS to the appropriate response locations to visualize the use of Station equipment and interfaces.
•Practice procedure execution and associated decision making based on cues provided by simulator.
•Practice communication and coordination with Houston and Moscow Control Centers as required for a given emergency scenario.

Upon completion of the training session, the crew and ground teams participated in a debrief to discuss results and address comments and questions.

Deck Crew Quarters Fan Fault – The Deck Crew Quarters (CQ) annunciated a single fan failure fault yesterday. The crew reported that they found no blockage at the inlets and were asked to take the fan from low to high, which cleared the caution. The fan was brought to medium overnight and will be taken to low on Wednesday morning to test it out. Each CQ rack is outfitted with two fans, although one fan operating in the lowest flow setting provides sufficient flow for smoke detection and CO2 removal. This type of caution has been seen in the past when debris has impeded the flow sensors. Cleaning is nominally performed every 6 months, and was last performed on May 13th. Teams will continue to monitor in order to determine whether or not additional actions are required.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #84 on: 08/04/2016 03:29 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/03/2016

Posted on August 3, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Fluid Shifts Operations In the Service Module: With ground team assistance, crewmembers configured the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) hardware, the Cerebral and Cochlear Fluid Pressure (CCFP) analyzer, and the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) hardware before conducting a DPOAE test, OCT exam, and the Tonometry exam. The scheduled CCFP test was not completed due to software issues that could not be resolved during the Chibis session. However ground teams confirmed that the OCT, Tonometry and DPOAE exams were successfully completed. The purpose of this investigation is to characterize the space flight-induced fluid shift, including intra- and extravascular shifts, intra- and extracellular shifts, changes in total body water and lower vs. upper body shifts. Noninvasive techniques are used to assess arterial and venous dimensions and flow parameters, ocular pressure and structure, and changes in intracranial pressure. Lower body negative pressure is being investigated for its ability to mitigate some of the effects of the space flight-induced fluid shift. Results from this investigation are expected to help define the causes of the ocular structure and vision changes associated with long duration space flight and assist in the development of countermeasures.

Heart Cells Microscope Operations: The crew set up the Heart Cells microscope, removed the BioCell Habitat from the Space Automated Bioproduct Lab (SABL) and the Multiwell BioCell from the BioCell Habitat and inserted into the microscope before completing Heart Cells operations. The Heart Cells investigation studies the human heart, specifically how heart muscle tissue, contracts, grows and changes (gene expression) in microgravity and how those changes vary between subjects. Understanding how heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, change in space improves efforts for studying disease, screening drugs and conducting cell replacement therapy for future space missions.

Mouse Epigenetics Cage Unit Maintenance: The crew completed standard maintenance activities for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment by exchanging the food cartridge of the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit which is located in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF). The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking today. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

NanoRacks External Platform (NREP) Preparation: In preparation for tomorrow’s NREP installation operations on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock (JEMAL) Slide Table, the crew reviewed operation information and gathered hardware to support NREP assembly activities.

Extravehicular Activity Mobility Unit (EMU) checkout: The crew retrieved Extravehicular Activity Mobility Unit (EMU) 3006 which was delivered on SpX-9 and installed it on the Forward EMU Don/Doff Assembly (EDDA). The crew then performed an initial checkout of EMU systems to confirm suit 3006 as a viable spare prior to returning the previous spare (EMU 3005) on SpaceX-9.

Patch Uplink for ETCS Loop Startup Freeze Protection:  Ground teams uplinked a patch to the EXT and S0 MDMs.  This patch provides a Fault Detection, Isolation, & Recovery (FDIR) to limit the amount of time that cold ammonia can flow through the External Thermal Control System (ETCS) during startup, to prevent the Interface Heat Exchanger (IFHX) from freezing if there is cold ammonia flowing through the ETCS with stagnant water present in the IFHX. The new FDIR will cut power to the pumps when this timer expires and stop the flow of ammonia. The new FDIR has been enabled.

Wastewater Storage Tank Assembly (WSTA) Drain and Multifiltration (MF) Bed #2 Effluent Sample

The Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) WSTA was drained into an EDV and subsequently refilled. A sample will be taken from this EDV later this week to address high conductivity seen in the UPA. The Water Processor Assembly (WPA) MF bed was also drained so that a sample could be taken to address high conductivity in the WPA. After the sample was collected, WPA was put back in standby. Both samples will be returned to ground on SpaceX-9.

On Board Training (OBT) Medical Emergency: The 47S crew participated in this training which provides the opportunity to review procedures, hardware and communication methods necessary to manage a medical emergency. Specific topics covered included:
•Emergency medical hardware configuration and desired deployment locations.
•Individual preference for performing chest compressions in microgravity.
•Crew communication and coordination of care during an emergency medical event.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #85 on: 08/04/2016 03:30 PM »
.
« Last Edit: 08/04/2016 03:30 PM by jacqmans »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #86 on: 08/05/2016 01:28 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/04/2016

Posted on August 4, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Fluid Shifts Operations In the Service Module: With ground team assistance, crewmembers continued supporting Fluid Shifts Imaging exams that began yesterday by configuring the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) hardware before completing a DPOAE test, OCT exam, and a Tonometry exam. The purpose of this investigation is to characterize the space flight-induced fluid shift, including intra- and extravascular shifts, intra- and extracellular shifts, changes in total body water and lower vs. upper body shifts. Noninvasive techniques are used to assess arterial and venous dimensions and flow parameters, ocular pressure and structure, and changes in intracranial pressure. Lower body negative pressure is being investigated for its ability to mitigate some of the effects of the space flight-induced fluid shift. Results from this investigation are expected to help define the causes of the ocular structure and vision changes associated with long duration space flight, and assist in the development of countermeasures.

NanoRacks External Platform (NREP) and Gumstix Installation: The NREP was prepared for installation on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock (JEMAL) Slide Table.  During the NREP assembly, the NanoRacks-Gumstix experiment was installed onto the NREP.  Two crewmembers installed NREP on JEMAL Slide Table. One crewmember held NREP in place to keep the capture cones aligned with the NREP receptacles and the other operated the capture mechanism.  The Slide Table was then retracted from the JEM Pressurized Module (JPM) side into the JEMAL and the inner hatch was closed. The NanoRacks External Platform represents the first external commercial research capability for the testing of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.  The NanoRacks External Platform will be installed on a payload required basis on the outside of the ISS on the JEM External Facility (JEM-EF).  The NanoRacks-Evaluation of Gumstix Performance in Low-Earth Orbit (NanoRacks-Gumstix) investigation tests small computers called Gumstix modules, which are based on open-source software, as an alternative off-the-shelf option for use in space. The investigation studies whether the Gumstix microprocessors can withstand the radiation environment on board the ISS.  The NREP will be deployed from the JEMAL and installed on the JEM-EF tomorrow.

Multi-Omics Operations:  The crew supported the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics investigation by collecting saliva samples and inserting them into a Box Module in the Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Space Headaches: The crew completed the European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire to provide information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crew members which can influence performance during a space mission.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Tool Configuration: In preparation for the EVA currently planned for August 19, the crew gathered and configured required tools.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #87 on: 08/06/2016 09:03 AM »
https://twitter.com/airbusdshouston/status/761590148526120960

Quote
The NREP is fully docked on the JEM-EF on slot 4!
08:50 - 5. Aug. 2016

Offline yoichi

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #88 on: 08/08/2016 12:37 AM »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #89 on: 08/08/2016 02:07 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/05/2016

Posted on August 5, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Vascular Echo Resting Ultrasound Scan and Blood Pressure Operations: With support from the Vascular Echo ground team, the crew installed the Ultrasound 2 probe and ECG Cable, configured the Ultrasound 2 software and the VOX before attaching the ECG Electrodes, marking the arteries, and performing the ultrasound scans. The crew also performed 3 consecutive blood pressure measurements using the Cardiolab (CDL) Holter Arterial Blood Pressure (BP) Unit. This Canadian Space Agency (CSA) investigation examines changes in blood vessels and the heart while the crew members are in space, and then follow their recovery on return to Earth. The results could provide insight into potential countermeasures to help maintain crew member health, and quality of life for everyone.

Fluid Shifts: Crewmembers configured the Refrigerated Centrifuge for sample load operations, conducted body (blood, urine, and saliva) sample collections and stowed the samples within MELFI (Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS). The crew also collected a galley water sample and stowed it in MELFI prior to ingestion of a tracer solution from the Tracer Syringe. Fluid Shifts is a joint USOS -Russian experiment that measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures.

Heart Cells Media Change Operations: The crew changed the media in the Multiwell BioCell for Heart Cells in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) work volume to provide nutrients to the Heart Cells and encourage continued cell health. The investigation studies the human heart, specifically how heart muscle tissue contracts, grows and changes (gene expression) in microgravity and how those changes vary among subjects. Understanding how heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, change in space improves efforts for studying disease, screening drugs and conducting cell replacement therapy for future space missions.

Mouse Epigenetics Cage Unit Maintenance: The crew completed maintenance on the Mouse Epigenetics Habitat Cage Units by transferring the mice from one habitat cage unit to another and refilling the cage units with water. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Zero Robotics Dry Run: The Russian crew set up the SPHERES hardware and executed a dry run for the Zero Robotics competition scheduled next week. The SPHERES Zero Robotics investigation establishes an opportunity for high school students to design research for the ISS. As part of a competition, students write algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. The algorithms are tested by the SPHERES team and the best designs are selected for the competition to operate the SPHERES satellites on board the ISS.

Skin-B Operations: A crewmember performed Corneometer, Tewameter and Visioscan measurements on the forearm. The Corneometer measures the hydration level of the stratus coreum (outer layer of the skin), the Tewameter measures the skin barrier function, and the Visioscan measures the skin surface topography. Skin B is a European Space Agency (ESA) investigation that aims to improve the understanding of skin aging, which is greatly accelerated in space. The data will also be used to verify the results from previous testing for the SkinCare investigation on the ISS.

Fine Motor Skills: The Fine Motor Skills investigation activities for today were postponed till tomorrow to allow the crew time today to perform troubleshooting of the Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator II (MERLIN) 3, which is not cooling properly.

Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator II (MERLIN) 3 troubleshooting:  MERLIN 3 failed to keep its temperature control operating last week.  Today, the crew executed reboot and recovery steps to attempt recovery of the unit.  When MERLIN 3 remained unresponsive, the unit was declared failed and it will be returned on SpaceX-9 for refurbishment and return to ISS.

Space Headaches: The crew completed the European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire to provide information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crew members which can influence performance during a space mission.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

European Crew Personal Active Dosimeter (EuCPAD) Mobile Unit Check-out and De-installation: The crew completed closeout activities and de-installed the mobile units that were installed and activated last week. The EuCPAD is an active device worn by crewmembers in orbit to measure radiation exposure. This device, coupled with other dosimeters in the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Columbus Laboratory, provides radiation dosage information that can be used to support risk assessment and dose management. The future goal is to enable the verification of radiation monitoring systems for future medical monitoring of crew members in space.

NanoRacks External Platform (NREP) Operations: Following yesterday’s installation of the NanoRacks-Gumstix experiment onto NREP, and the installation of NREP on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock (JEM A/L) slide table, today NREP was deployed from the JEM A/L, installed on the JEM Exposed Facility (JEF), and activated. NREP then connected to the External Wireless Communication (EWC) for communicating wirelessly to ISS data handling system.  This represents the first usage of the EWC since its initial activation in May.  The NanoRacks External Platform represents the first external commercial research capability for the testing of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.  The NanoRacks-Evaluation of Gumstix Performance in Low-Earth Orbit (NanoRacks-Gumstix) investigation tests small computers called Gumstix modules which are based on open-source software as an alternative off-the-shelf option for use in space. The investigation studies whether the Gumstix microprocessors can withstand the radiation environment on board the ISS.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The crew continued preparation for the EVA planned for August 19 by performing the following:
•Cooling loop maintenance on EMUs 3003 and 3008 including ionic and particulate filtration (scrubbing) and biocidal maintenance (iodination). A water sample was taken from the loops for subsequent conductivity testing.
•Continued tool gather and config.
•Inspected EMU sublimator for water leakage using water test strips.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #90 on: 08/08/2016 02:18 PM »
Rio de Janeiro from the ISS, a few hours before start of Olympic Games. Photo by cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka.

----------------

Rio de Janiero, Brazil from the International Space Station
 
Astronaut Kate Rubins captured this image of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from the International Space Station and wrote on Twitter, "We just flew over Rio and are all getting very excited for the Rio Olympics up here.”

Offline Artyom.

Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #91 on: 08/09/2016 07:29 AM »
Many new photos from cosmonaut Oleg Skripochka - http://www.roscosmos.ru/22519/.

In high resolution on Flickr - https://www.flickr.com/photos/roscosmos/.
"Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot live in a cradle forever." - Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #92 on: 08/09/2016 01:28 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/08/2016

Posted on August 8, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Fluid Shifts Imaging with Chibis in the Service Module (SM): Over the weekend, the Commander and FE-1, with ground team assistance, configured the Ultrasound 2 hardware before completing their Ultrasound scans in the SM while using the Chibis for the Fluid Shifts experiment run. The Fluids Shift investigation is divided into three segments: Dilution Measures, Baseline Imaging, and Baseline Imaging using the Russian Chibis Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) device. The experiment measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures.

Fluid Shifts Dilution Measurements: FE-4 and FE-5 performed their Flight Day 45 (FD45) Fluid Shifts operations by configuring the Refrigerated Centrifuge for sample load operations, conducting body (blood, urine, and saliva) sample collections and stowing the samples in a MELFI (Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS). They also collected a galley water sample and stowed in the MELFI prior to ingestion of a Tracer solution.   Additionally, CDR and FE-6 conducted troubleshooting of the Cerebral and Cochlear Fluid Pressure (CCFP) which was not operating as expected on Friday.  Ground specialists continue to evaluate the data obtained during the troubleshooting.  CCFP measurements are scheduled for tomorrow’s Baseline Data Collections. 

Mouse Epigenetics Cage Unit Maintenance: Over the weekend the crew replaced a Mouse Habitat Cage unit for food containment issues.  Today the crew refilled the water in the Mouse Habitat Cage Units. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Fine Motor Skills: Over the weekend the crew completed a series of interactive tasks for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmembers’ fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: In preparation for the IDA2 EVA, the crew performed the following:
•Started and configured the Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) software to receive and display real time Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) joint angle telemetry from a Portable Computer System (PCS) laptop. They also configured the system without real time SSRMS joint angle telemetry.
•Procedures review including detailed timeline, overall IDA2 installation plan and tool config.
•Procedures conference with ground teams.

Tonometer Eye Simulator Cornea – This morning the crew successfully replaced the artificial cornea in the Tonometer Eye Simulator and all subsequent eye exams were completed nominally. The Tonometer Eye Simulator failed to hold pressure on August 5th, requiring a replacement of the cornea. The eye simulator is used by the on-orbit Chief Medical Officer to practice their tonometry technique before performing exams on another crewmate’s eye.

N3 MCA Ion Pump Spikes – On Friday, ground teams reported an increase in frequency and amplitude of the ion pump spikes for the past 2 months. The FDIR limit has not yet been exceeded. Trend data of previous units has indicated that once the ion pump spikes began, a failure of the Mass Spectrometer (ORU2) will likely occur within several months. N3 MCA ORU2 has been in operation for ~3 years, which is twice the average lifetime of the unit. There is currently one spare ORU2 on-orbit. The Lab MCA was successfully activated at the beginning of July post an R&R of ORU2, however it still requires a pump down of prior to startup and calibration.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #93 on: 08/10/2016 02:14 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/09/2016

Posted on August 9, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

Fluid Shifts Operations in the Service Module: With ground team assistance, Russian and USOS crew members supported Fluid Shifts Imaging exams by conducting the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) exam, Ultrasound scans, the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) tests, and a Tonometry exam. The purpose of this investigation is to characterize the space flight-induced fluid shift, including intra- and extravascular shifts, intra- and extracellular shifts, changes in total body water and lower vs. upper body shifts. Results from this investigation are expected to help define the causes of the ocular structure and vision changes associated with long duration space flight, and assist in the development of countermeasures.

Mouse Epigenetics Cage Unit Maintenance: Today, the Mouse Habitat Unit #3 was cleaned, and the crew exchanged filters and collected samples.  The food cartridges were exchanged and the MHU was returned to its stowage location The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Dose Tracker: The Dose Tracker app was configured and the crewmember completed entries for medication tracking on an iPad. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The crew completed the following in preparation for the IDA2 EVA planned on August 19:
•Prepared the Equipment Lock (EL), Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) and ancillary hardware to support EVA prep activities.
•Verified that the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) is functional.
•Continued configuring required tools.

Offline Fuji

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #94 on: 08/10/2016 02:26 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/05/2016

NanoRacks External Platform (NREP) Operations: Following yesterday’s installation of the NanoRacks-Gumstix experiment onto NREP, and the installation of NREP on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock (JEM A/L) slide table, today NREP was deployed from the JEM A/L, installed on the JEM Exposed Facility (JEF)

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #95 on: 08/11/2016 01:54 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/10/2016

Posted on August 10, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Fluid Shifts Operations in the Service Module: With ground team assistance, crewmembers continued Fluid Shifts Imaging exams by conducting the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) exam, Ultrasound scans, the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) tests, and a Tonometry exam. This investigation characterizes the space flight-induced fluid shift, including intra- and extravascular shifts, intra- and extracellular shifts, changes in total body water and lower vs. upper body shifts. Results from this investigation are expected to help define the causes of the ocular structure and vision changes associated with long duration space flight, and assist in the development of countermeasures.

Mouse Epigenetics Cage Unit Maintenance: The crew completed standard maintenance activities for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment by refilling the water in the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit located in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF). The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Heart Cells Microscope Operations: The crew set up the Heart Cells microscope, removed the BioCell Habitat from the Space Automated Bioproduct Lab (SABL) and the Multiwell BioCell from the BioCell Habitat and inserted into the microscope before conducting Heart Cells operations. The Heart Cells investigation studies the human heart, specifically how heart muscle tissue, contracts, grows and changes (gene expression) in microgravity and how those changes vary between subjects. Understanding how heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, change in space improves efforts for studying disease, screening drugs and conducting cell replacement therapy for future space missions.

Meteor Hard Drive Change: The crew R&Rd the hard drive in the Meteor Laptop located in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) in preparation for upcoming meteor showers. The Meteor investigation provides the first space-based measurement of meteor flux. It also allows for the monitoring of carbon-based compounds. Continuous measurement of meteor interactions with the Earth’s atmosphere could also spot previously unforeseen meteor showers.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

MSG Video File Transfer Issues – Yesterday, the Microgravity Sciences Glovebox (MSG) experienced an issue with the Video Unit Equipment (VUE). Ground teams were unable to access the solid state storage devices during HeartCell video downlink operations. A soft reboot was attempted with no success. A power cycle was then conducted and the drives were recovered. In addition, ground teams are having difficulties in downlinking large files associated with the payload. The HeartCell data is being recorded, so no loss of science at this time. If required, the current work-around is to have the crew utilize a thumb drive to allow the files to be downlink. Currently, the VUE is functional except for downlinking large files. Ground teams are investigating.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The crew continued preparations for the IDA2 EVA scheduled on August 19. This morning they performed pressurized Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) On Orbit Fit Check Verification (OFV) of EMUs 3003 and 3008 to assess fit and feel of the suits prior to the EVA.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #96 on: 08/15/2016 02:26 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/12/2016

Posted on August 12, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Zero Robotics (ZR) Competition: A USOS and Russian crewmember set up the SPHERES hardware and executed the SPHERES Zero Robotics tests with participation from students on the ground. The investigation provides an opportunity for high school students to design research for the ISS. As part of a competition, students write algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. The algorithms are tested by the SPHERES team and the best designs are selected for the competition to operate the SPHERES satellites on board the ISS.

Thermolab Deinstrumentation for Circadian Rhythms: The crew removed the double sensors and the Thermolab Unit before cleaning and stowing the equipment following completion of the European Space Agency’s (ESA’s) Circadian Rhythm experiment measurement process which took 36 hours over a three day period to complete. The objective of the experiment is to get a better basic understanding of alterations in circadian rhythms in humans during long-term space flights.

Mouse Epigenetics Cage Unit Maintenance: The crew performed standard maintenance activities for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment by exchanging the food cartridge of the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit and checking the fan and LED light of the Transportation Cage Unit). The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

NeuroMapping Operations: The crew set up the NeuroMapping hardware before performing the experiment including testing in both a “strapped in” and ”free floating” body configuration. The investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to the brain including brain structure and function, motor control, and multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Heart Cells Media Change: The crew changed the media in the Multiwell BioCell for Heart Cells in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) to provide nutrients to the cells and encourage continued cell health. Later in the day, atmospheric conditions inside SABL2 exceeded the acceptable levels and the cells were moved to SABL1 in an effort to save the science.  The investigation studies the human heart, specifically how heart muscle tissue contracts, grows and changes (gene expression) in microgravity and how those changes vary among subjects. Understanding how heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, change in space improves efforts for studying disease, screening drugs and conducting cell replacement therapy for future space missions.

NanoRacks Module 9: The NanoRacks Module 9 experiment session 3 of 5 was completed today. The crew activated, deactivated, and shook the mixture tubes to facilitate the experiment. Module-9 is a collection of student research projects utilizing the NanoRacks Mixsticks. Student teams from across the United States design their own experiments using flight approved fluids and materials. The investigation consists of several science experiments flown in a NanoRacks Module on board the ISS.

Space Headaches: The crew completed the European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire to provide information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crew members which can influence performance during a space mission.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet were completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmember’s fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Waste Storage Tank Assembly (WSTA) Sample – Last week, the contents of the WSTA was emptied into a ЕДВ for the purpose of obtaining a sample for return on SpaceX 9.  Today, the crew successfully obtained a sample from the ЕДВ.  This sample is part of an overall plan for troubleshooting the elevated conductivity of the Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) water. 

Lab Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Activation – The Lab CDRA was activated to provide supplemental  CO2 removal during a Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) session today.  The SPHEREs payload uses CO2 for propulsion and in order to maintain desired 24hour ppCO2 average, the Lab CDRA can be activated as necessary.  Today’s activation is also being used as the periodic activation of Lab CDRA (required every 30 days).  The Node3 CDRA has been brought to standby and the Lab CDRA will be run for 24 hours.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #97 on: 08/15/2016 08:10 PM »

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #98 on: 08/16/2016 01:18 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/15/2016

Posted on August 15, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Mouse Epigenetics Cage Unit Maintenance: The crew completed standard maintenance for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment by refilling the Transportation Cage Units and Mouse Habitat Cage Unit with water and checking the water nozzles of the individual cages. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

NanoRacks Platforms-1 Module Removal: Four NanoRacks Modules were removed from NanoRacks Platform 1 and installed in the Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  NanoRacks Modules 43 (Slime Mold), 44 (Awty-Yeast Cell Growth in a Microgravity Environment), 45 (Duchesne-Light Wavelengths on Algae Production), and 46 (Duchesne-Plant Growth Chamber) will remain in MELFI until they return on SpX-9.

At Home in Space Questionnaire: The CDR completed a questionnaire for the At Home in Space investigation. This Canadian Space Agency (CSA) experiment assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the space craft by creating a home in space.

NeuroMapping Operations: The crew performed testing in both a “strapped in” and ”free floating” body configuration for this investigation which studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to the brain, including brain structure and function, motor control, and multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it would take for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation performs structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Fluid Shifts Hardware Transfer and Service Module Setup: To prepare for Ultrasound activities in the Service Module (SM) this week, the crew transferred and set up hardware that supports the Fluid Shifts investigation from the Russian Segment. The experiment measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet was completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation which tests skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmember’s fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The crew completed a procedures review in preparation for next Friday’s planned International Docking Adapter (IDA)2 EVA. Topics covered included prebreathe protocol review, Equipment Lock activities and suit donning plan, egress/ingress plan and EVA extension considerations. Following the review the crew participatet in a debrief with ground teams to discuss questions or concerns. The crew also verified that the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) glove heaters are functional and that the EMU TV is receiving power from the Rechargeable EVA Battery Assembly (REBA).

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC): This morning the crew reported the WHC fan powered off during use which was followed by a “Check Separator Light” illumination. The crew performed the standard troubleshooting procedure to clear the Check Separator Light. The WHC was returned to normal use upon completion of the malfunction procedure.  Additionally, the crew reported they have been seeing the “Check Separator Light” on previous use. The engineering team has scheduled a coordination meeting tomorrow to discuss these developments.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Mobile Transporter (MT) Translation:  Today, ground controllers moved the MSS MT from work station 4 to workstation 6 in preparation for the removal of IDA2 from the SpaceX-9 trunk on Wednesday, and the installation of IDA2 onto PMA2 during the EVA on Friday.

LA Multiplexer/De-multiplexer (MDM) Patch – Ground Controllers successfully loaded a patch to the LA 1 MDM in preparation for IDA installation.

Payload MDM Transition – Ground Controllers were performing a scheduled PLMDM-2 High Rate Data Link (HRDL) reset which resulted in a complete lockup of the PLMDM-2 HRDL card.  To recover from the HRDL card lockup, ground controllers performed a PLMDM transition.  PLMDM-1 was subsequently powered ON and reconfigured as the primary PLMDM.  All payload Health and Status (H&S) indications pre- and post-recovery were nominal.  The PLMDM transition resulted in a loss of Health and Status for ~57 minutes.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #99 on: 08/17/2016 06:54 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/16/2016

Posted on August 16, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Fluid Shifts Imaging with Chibis in the Service Module (SM): With ground team assistance, crewmembers continued the final week of this set of Fluid Shifts operations by configuring the Ultrasound 2 hardware prior to performing ultrasound scans in the SM while using the Chibis. The Fluids Shift investigation is divided into three segments: Dilution Measures, Baseline Imaging, and Baseline Imaging using the Russian Chibis Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) device. The experiment measures how much fluid shifts from the lower body to the upper body, in or out of cells and blood vessels, and determines the impact these shifts have on fluid pressure in the head, changes in vision and eye structures.

Mouse Epigenetics Habitat Cage Unit Maintenance:  The food cartridges of Mouse Habitat Cage Units were exchanged and then the cage units containing the mice were transferred to and from the glove box located in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) to complete standard maintenance activities. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Advanced Colloids Experiment Temperature control-1 (ACE-T1) Configuration: The crew accessed the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and removed the Micro-channel Diffusion Plate and Bio Base from inside the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Auxiliary Fluids Container (ACE) before installing the LMM Control Base, ACE Module, and Constrained Vapor Bubble (CVB) surveillance camera in preparation for the ACE-T1 experiment.  ACE-T-1 studies tiny suspended particles designed by scientists to connect themselves in a specific way to form organized structures in water. Materials having complex structures and unique properties potentially can be made with more knowledge of how these particles are joined together and the conditions which control their behaviors. The microgravity environment on the ISS provides researchers insight into the fundamental physics of micro particle self-assembly and the kinds of colloidal structures that are possible to fabricate. This in turn helps manufacturers on Earth in choosing which high-value material is worth investigating.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Fuel Oxidizer Management Assembly (FOMA) Calibration: The crew performed the FOMA Calibration by closing the bottle valves and relieving the pressure in the manifolds. The FOMA Calibration Unit (FCU) was powered to collect pressure transducer data with the bottle pressure transducers at ambient pressure and the rack was powered down. The crew then opened the bottle valves before closing up the rack. CIR provides sustained, systematic microgravity combustion research and it houses hardware capable of performing combustion experiments to further research of combustion in microgravity.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet were completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmember’s fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a narrated task video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #100 on: 08/18/2016 02:01 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/17/2016

Posted on August 17, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Fluid Shifts Operations In the Service Module: With ground team assistance, crewmembers performed Fluid Shifts Imaging exams by configuring the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission (DPOAE) hardware, before completing a DPOAE test, OCT exam, and a Tonometry exam. The purpose of this investigation is to characterize the space flight-induced fluid shift, including intra- and extravascular shifts, intra- and extracellular shifts, changes in total body water and lower vs. upper body shifts. Results from this investigation are expected to help define the causes of the ocular structure and vision changes associated with long duration space flight, and assist in the development of countermeasures.

Biological Research in Canisters Natural Products (BRIC-NP) Cold Stowage Preparation: The crew retrieved the BRIC-NP canisters from EXPRESS Rack 2 and inserted them in the Glacier for return on SpX-9. The BRIC-NP investigation, radiation-tolerant fungal strains isolated from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant are exposed to spaceflight conditions on board the ISS, then screened for the biological production of beneficial medical or agricultural substances.

eValuatIon And monitoring of microBiofiLms insidE the ISS (ViABLE) Payload Return:  The crew photographed all four ViABLE Bags inside the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) locker before removing and inserting each one into separate ViABLE Return Bags and placing them into Ziploc bags for return on SpX-9. ViABLE involves the evaluation of microbial biofilm development on metallic and textile space materials located inside and on the cover of Nomex pouches. Microbial biofilms are known for causing damage and contamination on the Mir space station and the ISS.  The potential application of novel methodologies and products to treat space materials may lead to improvements in the environmental quality of confined human habitats in space and on earth.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Dose Tracker: The Dose Tracker app was configured and the crew completed entries for medication tracking on an iPad. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Oxygen Generation System (OGS) Hydrogen (H2) Sensor Remove & Replace (R&R): The crew completed OGS H2 sensor Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) purge adapter operations, R&R of the H2 sensor ORU and AAA cleaning with inlet inspection and cleaning. This activity was scheduled due to ORU end-of-life.

Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) Sample Collection: The UPA Distillate Filter and Purge Filter were removed and replaced for return samples in support of the UPA elevated conductivity investigation.  The preceding UPA process cycle had elevated conductivity levels and the samples will help ground teams understand the difference in conductivity with the purge line reconnected.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Check Separator Light: To isolate the cause of Check Separator Light illumination, the crew performed an inspection of the hoses and electrical connections on the Urine Receptacle. They reported that the electrical cable on the Urine Receptacle was coiled tightly and may be kinked. They removed the zip tie that was holding the cable together to allow more slack and demated/remated the XT2 connector. Additional troubleshooting steps are in work for the crew to perform as a result of yesterday’s Flight Investigation Team (FIT) recommendations.

Extravehicular Robotics Operations: Yesterday afternoon, Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to unstow the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM).  Following SPDM unstow, they maneuvered the SSRMS to position it over the SpX-9 Dragon Trunk and configured the SPDM to extract the International Docking Adapter 2 (IDA2) from the trunk later today. SPDM checkouts were also completed in preparation for the IDA2 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) this Friday.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #101 on: 08/18/2016 07:23 PM »
Sounds like there was a smoke alarm warning in the US segment during an LOS.  Jeff reports all readings for fire by products (CSACP) are negative and there are no indications of an actual fire.  They have ID'd the suspect area but have not investigated further pending instructions from the ground and a lack of fire indications.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #102 on: 08/18/2016 07:32 PM »
Merlin 1 has been ID'd as the culprit.  The rack is in a safe config and a data dump is ongoing to clarify the situation. Merlin 1 was powered down automatically.  Transfer of the contents to Merlin 2 is pending ground direction.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #103 on: 08/18/2016 08:14 PM »
After MCC-H called up with a update that they needed more time to assess the situation, Jeff politely, but strongly suggested that since there was nothing critical in Merlin that couldn't survive overnight and through a successful EVA that the ground stop assessing and leave the situation as is.  I'm guessing Jeff was pre-empting the NASA tendency to enter paralysis through analysis and allow the crew to get to sleep in preparation for a long day tomorrow.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #104 on: 08/19/2016 03:26 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/18/2016

Posted on August 18, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Mouse Epigenetics Cage Unit Maintenance: The crew completed standard maintenance activities for the Mouse Epigenetics experiment by refilling the Transportation Cage Units with water and checking the water nozzles of the individual cages. The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The crew spent most of the day preparing for tomorrow’s EVA,  completing the following:
•Configured/audited tools and prepared the Equipment Lock (EL), Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) and ancillary hardware.
•Removed/relocated stowage from the Node 2 forward port endcone to access the forward International Docking Adapter (IDA) control panel.
•Set up the IDA control panel and 2 multimeters for the Modified Androgynous Peripheral Attachment System (MAPAS) installation.
•Copied EMU/Airlock contingency procedures to their iPads in the event the Station Support Computer (SSC) goes down.
•Pre-EVA health check.
•Pre-EVA conference with ground teams.

International Docking Adapter (IDA): Ground controllers used the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to inspect the sealing surface of IDA2, and then successfully extracted the IDA from the Dragon trunk overnight.   There was a delay in the removal when a tethered pyro bolt from the Latch B Flight Support Equipment (FSE) floated very close to the IDA handrail.  A video inspection of the handrail confirmed that the tether was not looped around or through the handrail.  The ground team continued with the IDA extraction but the FSE bolt interfered with the bottom of the handrail and the IDA structure.   The FSE bolt was freed after a sequence of adjustments with the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) robotic arm.  The adjustments were very minor and positive margin between the IDA and Dragon were verified prior to each adjustments.  The IDA was maneuvered to position for the installation on Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA) 2 during the spacewalk tomorrow morning.

MERLIN-1 False Fire Indication:  MERLIN-1 was unpowered following a false fire indication.  Crew members took Compound Specific Analyzer- Combustion Products (CSA-CP) readings which were all zero.  Ground teams are investigating the cause.  No loss of science was incurred, as MERLIN-1 is located in the Node 1 Galley area and is used primarily for crew preference items.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #105 on: 08/19/2016 07:58 PM »
Interesting update from CAPCOM to the crew.  The ground has no temperature or humidity control in the Columbus module.  The crew was told to expect a temperature drop and asked to limit time in Columbus because of the humidity issue.  The SSC the crew would use to control Columbus is also down. The were no details on the cause. 
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #106 on: 08/22/2016 01:59 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/19/2016

Posted on August 19, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

U.S. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) #36: Williams (EV-1) and Rubins (EV-2) completed the following activities to install the International Docking Adapter (IDA)2 with Intravehicular (IV) support from FE-5:
•Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 setup
•Preliminary IDA installation
•Initial IDA cable installation
•PMA-2 hemi reflector cover installation
•Final IDA cable installation
•IDA outfitting
•IDA cleanup
•IDA3 cable routing
•Multiplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM) ethernet cable connection
•MDM ethernet cable routing
•Station/Shuttle Power Transfer System (SSPTS) cap removal

Tomorrow the crew will perform post-EVA cleanup activities and a post-EVA debrief with ground teams.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #107 on: 08/22/2016 03:32 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/19/2016

Posted on August 19, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

U.S. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) #36: Williams (EV-1) and Rubins (EV-2) completed the following activities to install the International Docking Adapter (IDA)2 with Intravehicular (IV) support from FE-5:
•Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 setup
•Preliminary IDA installation
•Initial IDA cable installation
•PMA-2 hemi reflector cover installation
•Final IDA cable installation
•IDA outfitting
•IDA cleanup
•IDA3 cable routing
•Multiplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM) ethernet cable connection
•MDM ethernet cable routing
•Station/Shuttle Power Transfer System (SSPTS) cap removal

Tomorrow the crew will perform post-EVA cleanup activities and a post-EVA debrief with ground teams.

If I recall correctly the SSPTS caps are on the connectors that were intended to supply SSPTS capability for Node-3/PMA-3 when Node-3/PMA-3 was originally to be mounted on Node-1 Nadir.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #108 on: 08/23/2016 08:35 PM »


Quote
NASA Public Affairs Officer Rob Navias conducted an in-flight interview July 26, 2016 with International Space Station Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams and Flight Engineer Kate Rubins of NASA. Topics of discussion including their spacewalk Aug. 19 to install the first International Docking Adapter on the ISS for future use by U.S. commercial crew vehicles, station research work and the upcoming milestone on Aug. 24 when Williams surpasses former astronaut Scott Kelly’s record of 520 days in space, the most by an American astronaut.
« Last Edit: 08/23/2016 08:35 PM by SMS »
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SMS ;-).

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #109 on: 08/24/2016 08:58 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/22/2016

Posted on August 22, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Command and Control (C&C) Multiplexer Demultiplexer (MDM) Transition : The ground executed a planned C&C MDM transition today.  C&C 2 MDM was transitioned to primary with C&C 3 MDM in backup and C&C 1 MDM in standby.  The transition supports the desired configuration for OA-5, ensuring that the primary Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) MDM and the primary C&C MDM are not on the same power channels.

Columbus Power Distribution Unit 1 (PDU-1) Repower: Last Friday the Columbus Module experienced a power anomaly with Power Distribution Unit 1 (PDU-1), and a subset of the loads on PDU-1 lost power.  Systems were automatically safed.  All downstream loads have since been repowered with the exception of RapidScat.  During an attempt to reactivate RapidScat, outlet 3 on PDU-1 tripped.  The only two items downstream of this outlet are RapidScat and Solar Monitoring Observatory (SOLAR), which was deactivated at the time of the trip.  RapidScat has active heater power and is able to stay deactivated indefinitely without hardware impact.  Ground teams are investigating the cause of the outlet 3 trip.

Payload Activities Completed Over the Weekend:
•Mouse Epigenetics Habitat Cage Unit Maintenance:  The crew completed standard maintenance activities by exchanging the food cartridges and refilling the water of Mouse Habitat Cage Units which is located in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF).
•Heart Cells Media Change Operations: The crew changed the media in the Multiwell BioCell for Heart Cells and repaired one of the Multiwell BioCells within the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) work volume to provide nutrients to the Heart Cells.
•Biological Rhythms 48 Hours Actiwatch Preparation: In preparation for upcoming Biological Rhythms activities this week, the crew configured of the Actiwatch using the Actiware Software and Medical Laptop.
•NanoRack Module 9: Session 4 of 5 for the NanoRack Module 9 experiment was completed when the crew activated, deactivated, and shook the mixture tubes to facilitate the experiment.
•Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet were completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation.
•Space Headaches: The crew completed the European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire.
•Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Hard Drive Change: The crew swapped the AMS hard drives in the UltraBay Adapter in the AMS laptop, which is completed every six months.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #110 on: 08/24/2016 01:16 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/23/2016

Posted on August 23, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
SpaceX-9 Dragon Pack: In preparation for SpX-9 return this Friday the crew completed the following:
•Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) to Polar Sample Transfer: Samples were transferred from the MELFI to the Polars.
•Space Automated Bioproduct Lab (SABL) CO2 Controller Removal: SABL-1’s CO2 Incubator Controller was removed for return on SpaceX-9.
•SPHERES Blue Satellite: The CO2 tank in the SPHERES blue satellite was removed, vented, and packed.
•Meteor Hard Drive Retrieval: The Meteor Laptop hard drive was retrieved.

Mouse Epigenetics Habitat Cage Unit Maintenance:  The Mouse Cage Units containing the mice were transferred from the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) to the glove box to conduct food cartridge exchanges and cleaning activities. The crew also performed troubleshooting activities on the Transportation Cage Units (TCU) by performing individual cover replacements, cage block replacements, and TCU exchanges to prepare for return on SpX-9. The Mouse Cage Units were then returned to CBEF.  The Mouse Epigenetics investigation studies altered gene expression patterns in the organs of male mice that spend one month in space, and also examines changes in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of their offspring. Results from the investigation identify genetic alterations that happen after exposure to the microgravity environment of space.

Biomolecule Sequencer Surface Pro 3 Hardware Checkout: The crew set up and connected Surface Pro 3 tablets to the wireless network before completing checkout activities to support upcoming Biomolecule Sequencer operations later this week. The Biomolecule Sequencer investigation seeks to demonstrate for the first time that DNA sequencing is feasible in an orbiting spacecraft. A space-based DNA sequencer could identify microbes, diagnose diseases and understand crew member health and potentially help detect DNA-based life elsewhere in the solar system.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet was completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmember’s fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking on an iPad today. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Columbus Payload Power Switching Box (PPSB) – SDX Switch 1 Reconfiguration: The crew reconfigured the SDX 1 switch on the PPSB1 for RapidScat in Columbus in preparation for tomorrow’s 63P reboost.

Columbus Power Distribution Unit 1 (PDU-1) Troubleshooting: On Monday, ground teams were unable to repower the COL’s PDU-1  Outlet 3 which provides operational power to RapidScat and Solar Monitoring Observatory (SOLAR) payloads.  Today, ground teams successfully repowered SOLAR from Outlet 3 by turning OFF the Columbus Payload Power Switching Box (PPSB) – SDX switch 1 to isolate RapidScat from the power feed.  RapidScat has active heater power and can remain deactivated with no impact to hardware.  Ground teams continue to investigate the anomaly.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Last night Robotics Ground Controllers stowed the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) on Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture #2 (PDGF2). At the end of rigidizing its Latching End Effector (LEE) on MBS PDGF2, the SPDM safed, which has been observed previously. Controllers performed the necessary recovery steps and latched and mated the SPDM LEE to the PDGF. The SSRMS was then maneuvered to grapple the SpX-9 Flight Releasable Grapple Fixture (FRGF) in preparation of the SpX-9 release on Friday.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #111 on: 08/24/2016 08:02 PM »
Scott Kelly made an appearance at Mission Control and called up to Jeff and congratulated him on surpassing his record.  He also asked Jeff a question.  "Are you up for another 190?"  Referring to matching Scott's 340 day stay on ISS.  Jeff's answer "ask my wife."
« Last Edit: 08/24/2016 09:35 PM by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #112 on: 08/25/2016 02:20 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/24/2016

Posted on August 24, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

ISS Reboost: This morning, an ISS reboost was performed using 63P R&D thrusters. This reboost was to set up for 46S landing.

Biological Rhythms 48 Holter Start: The crew began the operations phase of the Biological Rhythms experiment by attaching the Digital Walk Holter Electrocardiogram (ECG) and electrodes and initiating the first of two 24-hour measurements. The objective of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Biological Rhythms 48 is to study the effects of long-term microgravity exposure on heart function by analyzing an astronaut’s electrocardiogram for 48 hours.

Mouse Epigenetics Transfer and Reconfiguration Operations: Crewmembers detached the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit from the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Incubator Unit (IU) Micro-G and 1G and transferred mice from Mouse Habitat Cage Unit to Transportation Cage Unit. The crew also reconfigured the CBEF video cables for the Image Processing Unit (IPU) and the Video Compression and Recording Unit 2 (VRU2).

NanoRack Module 9: The crew completed the last of the 5 NanoRack Module 9 experiment sessions by activating, deactivating, and shaking the mixture tubes to facilitate the experiment. Module-9 is a collection of student research projects utilizing the NanoRacks Mixsticks. Student teams from across the United States design their own experiments using flight approved fluids and materials. The investigation consists of several science experiments flown in a NanoRacks Module on board the ISS.

Plant Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) Regulation Preparation: To prepare for the Plant RNA Regulation investigation run that begins next month, the experiment containers on the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) Rotors A and B were replaced with new experiment containers. Plant RNA Regulation studies the first steps of gene expression involved in development of roots and shoots. Scientists expect to find new molecules that play a role in how plants adapt and respond to the microgravity environment of space, providing new insight into growing plants for food and oxygen supplies on long-duration missions.

Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN)1: Last week MERLIN 1 was automatically safed after a false Payload Potential Fire warning annunciated due to out of limit temperature sensors. Today MERLIN 1 was repowered for troubleshooting. The temperature sensors are now in the expected range and will be monitored for 24 hours. Assuming no anomalous signatures during the monitoring period, the unit will be configured to an operational state tomorrow.

Dragon Packing:
•Polars 2 & 4 ISS to Dragon Transfer: The crew uninstalled and transferred Polars 2 and 4 from the EXPRESS Rack and install into Dragon.
•Payload Card Multilab Card Cube Removal: The crew removed the Multilab card(s) from the Payload Card Multilab facility for return.
•Lithium HydrOxide (LiOH) R&R:  The crew replaced LiOH bags on Dragon in preparation for life support operations after ISS departure.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: In preparation for the Trailing Thermal Control Radiator (TTCR) EVA planned for September 1, the CDR and FE-6 completed a procedures review. Following the review, the crew participated in a conference with ground teams.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #113 on: 08/27/2016 01:58 AM »
A new debris object 1998-067KD has been cataloged, currently 5 min ahead of ISS and 5 min below. Not clear if it is associated with EVA-36 or the recent orbit raise manuever. No deliberate recent object jettison/deploys as far as I know
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #114 on: 08/29/2016 12:10 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/25/2016

Posted on August 25, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

SpaceX (SpX)-9 Unberth: The crew packed critical items and egressed the vehicle in preparation for Dragon departure.  Dragon was unberthed from the ISS via ground commanding at 4 PM CDT today. The vehicle will be maneuvered via ground commanding to an overnight park position in preparation for release tomorrow at 5:11 AM CDT with splashdown approximately 5 hours later.
•Polar 1 ISS to Dragon Transfer: Polar 1 was powered down, de-cabled, and removed from the EXPRESS Rack and transferred to the starboard powered payload location of SpX-9. A second crew member concurrently installed and powered the Polar and Transportation Cage Unit of the Mouse Epigenetics investigation into the Dragon.
•Double Coldbag Pack: The crew transferred cold samples and required Ice Bricks from MELFI-2, MELFI-3, Glacier 2, MERLIN 5, and SABL S/N 2 into Double Coldbags in preparation for Dragon descent.

Biological Rhythms 48 Multi Media Card Exchange: The crew stopped the 24-hour recording that began yesterday, changed out the Multi Media Card and battery of the Digital Walk Holter ECG, and began the second 24-hour recording. The objective of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Biological Rhythms 48 is to study the effects of long-term microgravity exposure on heart function by analyzing an astronaut’s electrocardiogram for 48 hours.

Mouse Epigenetics Transfer and Closeout Operations: The crew prepared all twelve of theTransportation Cage Units (TCU) before removing the Mouse Habitat Cage Units from the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) and transferring the mice into the TCUs in the Glove Box for return. The crew also transferred the food cartridges and disconnected the supporting Glove Box hardware.

LS-1 Server Issues: Last night the LS-1 server had to be rebooted multiple times and continued to experience issues this morning. There are no major impacts at this time. The server will be rebooted as necessary. The server will be reconfigured to set up for the possibility of rebuilding a new server overnight to protect tomorrow’s SpX-9 departure.

Robotics Operations: Last night Robotics Ground Controllers actuated the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) to unstow Robot Micro Conical Tool #2 (RMCT2) from the SPDM Tool Holster Assembly (THA) in preparation for the Remote Power Control Module (RPCM) P12B_A change out operations this Friday and Saturday.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #115 on: 08/29/2016 03:21 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/26/2016

Posted on August 26, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

SpaceX (SpX)-9 Release: Following the unberth of Dragon yesterday afternoon, the crew used the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to release Dragon at 5:11 AM Central Time for its return to Earth.  The Dragon capsule executed a de-orbit burn shortly after 10 AM Central Time, and splashed down in the Pacific Ocean approximately 45 minutes later.  SpaceX-9 returned cargo and science samples which were processed onboard the ISS for analysis on the ground.

Biological Rhythms 48 Holter and Actiwatch Removal and Data Save: Following two consecutive days of Biological Rhythms recording sessions, the crew removed the Digital Walk Holter Electrocardiogram (ECG) and the Actiwatch Spectrum and saved the collected data to the medical laptop. This concluded the Biological Rhythms experiment where two separate 24-hour Actiwatch measurements were performed to study the effects of long-term microgravity exposure on heart functions by analyzing an astronaut’s electrocardiogram for 48 hours.

Biomolecule Sequencer Hardware Setup and Sample Initialization: The crew retrieved the Flow Cell and the Media Syringe Tube from Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI) before using the syringe to inject the sample into the Biomolecule Sequencer, which began the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequencing process. The Biomolecule Sequencer investigation seeks to demonstrate for the first time that DNA sequencing is feasible in an orbiting spacecraft. A space-based DNA sequencer could identify microbes, diagnose diseases and understand crew member health, and potentially help detect DNA-based life elsewhere in the solar system.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Manifold Bottle Replacement: The crew R&Rd a CIR manifold bottle on one of the four CIR Manifolds in support of upcoming Flex 2 payload investigation activities.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet were completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmembers’ fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Space Headaches: The crew completed the European Space Agency (ESA) Space Headaches questionnaire which provides information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space.

LS-1 Server Issues: Following the recent issues with the LS-1 server, the crew performed a laptop shell swap (motherboard, processor, memory) and retained only the hard drives. The LS-1 came back online without any issues.

LAB RWS Monitor Display Issue: Prior to Dragon release, the SSRMS Lab Robotic Work Station (RWS) Monitor 1 was observed to be very dim, with the image shifted, and it seemed to be a negative image.  The crew tried the brightness adjustment and checked the cables with no success.  The video feed was moved from the degraded display Monitor 1 to a Monitor 3 which was operating nominally.  The release and departure monitoring were completed nominally and on time. The LAB RWS Monitor 1 was later recovered by power cycling the Control Electronic Unit (CEU).  The root cause is still under investigation. 

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #116 on: 08/29/2016 07:43 PM »
August 29, 2016
MEDIA ADVISORY M16-105

Kentucky Students Talk Live with NASA Astronauts on Space Station

Students in Hyden, Kentucky, will have the opportunity to speak with two NASA astronauts currently living and working aboard the International Space Station at 1:10 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Aug. 31. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams and Flight Engineer Kate Rubins will answer questions from students of Leslie County High School at the Hazard Community & Technical College’s (HCTC) School of Bluegrass and Traditional Music in Hyden.

Rep. Hal Rogers of Kentucky will kick-off the event, joined by NASA astronaut Tim Kopra, who returned from the space station June 18.

Media interested in covering the event should contact Danielle Smoot at danielle.smoot@mail.house.gov or 606-679-8346. The HCTC School of Bluegrass and Traditional Music is located at 108 Maple St.

Williams launched to the space station March 18 and is scheduled to depart Sept. 6. Rubins launched July 6 and will return home in October.

This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of the NASA Office of Education’s efforts to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) teaching and learning in the United States. Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station through the Education Office’s STEM on Station activity provides authentic, live experiences in space exploration, space study and the scientific components of space travel, while introducing the possibilities of life in space.

For NASA TV streaming video, schedule and downlink information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

For more information, videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/education/stemonstation

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #117 on: 08/30/2016 03:52 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/29/2016

Posted on August 29, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Biomolecule Sequencer WIFI Reconnection and Sample Sequence Completion: Over the weekend the crew completed the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequencing process that began last week and transferred the screenshots to the Surface Pro 3 tablet for downlink. The Biomolecule Sequencer investigation seeks to demonstrate for the first time that DNA sequencing is feasible in an orbiting spacecraft. A space-based DNA sequencer could identify microbes, diagnose diseases and understand crew member health, and potentially help detect DNA-based life elsewhere in the solar system.

Marrow Blood, Breath, and Ambient Air Sample Collection: Over the weekend the crew set up the Marrow air sample collection hardware in the crew quarters and today upon waking the crew took breath and ambient air samples to measure carbon monoxide concentration for the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Marrow experiment. Marrow investigates the effect of microgravity on human bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the marrow. The extent of this effect and its recovery are of interest to space research and healthcare providers on Earth.

Human Research Program (HRP) Generic Urine and Frozen Blood Collection Double Spin: The crew continued HRP operations that began over the weekend by collecting saliva and urine samples for 24-hours and processing a set of blood samples for double spin operations using the Refrigerated Centrifuge. The samples were stowed in the Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS MELFI.

Mouse Epigenetics Closeout and Reconfiguration Operations: The crew performed Mouse Epigenetics closeout and reconfiguration activities to clean up and disassemble the Glove Box before removing the Mouse Habitat Cage Unit from the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF). The crew also changed the CBEF video output cable configuration from multiple channel cable to single channel cable and disconnect the CBEF Multiple Video Cable between CBEF and Image Processing Unit (IPU) as well as the CBEF and Video compression and Recording Unit 2 (VRU2) on Multi-purpose Small PayloadRack2 (MSPR2).

Thermolab Instrumentation for Circadian Rhythms: The crew began the first of a three-day European Space Agency (ESA) Circadian Rhythms experiment by performing instrumentation with the Thermolab Double sensors, mounting the Thermolab Unit in the belt, connecting and powering on the Thermolab Unit before beginning a 36 hour continuous measurement. After the measurement was completed, the data was transferred and hardware stowed. The objective of the experiment is to get a better understanding of alterations in circadian rhythms in humans during long-term space flights. Such knowledge will not only provide important insights into the adaptations of the human autonomic nervous system in space over time, but also has significant practical implications by helping to improve physical exercise, rest and work shifts as well as fostering adequate workplace illumination in the sense of occupational healthcare in future space missions.

Multi-Omics Operations: Today the crew supported the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics investigation by collecting body samples and inserting them into a Box Module in the Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS (MELFI). The investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew will recorded and submited a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Trailing Thermal Control Radiator (TTCR) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The Extravehicular (EV) crew conducted a review of procedures that cover the suit donning plan, pre-breathe protocol, Equipment Lock activities, egress  and detailed EVA timeline. Following the review they participated in a conference with ground teams. The Intravehicular (IV) crew accessed the Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) software and completed a robotics review of Space Station Remote Manipulator System support plan for US EVA #37 this Thursday.

External Television Camera Group (ETVCG) Troubleshooting Test Lead Build:  The crew performed part 1 of a procedure to verify the heaters on the spare ETVCG Light are functional. They built two jumpers from pin kit materials for use in tomorrow’s task.

Remote Power Control Module (RPCM) Remove & Replace (R&R):  Over the weekend, Robotics Ground Controllers unstowed the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) from Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF)2.  At the end of re-rigidizing the SPDM Latching End Effector (LEE) for SPDM unstow, the SPDM safed, which has been observed previously. Controllers performed the necessary recovery steps and released the SPDM LEE from MBS PDGF2. Once the SPDM had been unstowed, controllers maneuvered the SSRMS and SPDM to position SPDM Arm2 to use Robot Micro Conical Tool #2 (RMCT2) to demate and remove RPCM P12B_A from its slot which was previously attempted on June 14, 2016 without success.  Today, after numerous pull and wiggle attempts, the RPCM came out of its slot.  Both the RPCM and its slot were inspected and nothing was seen that would preclude pressing with stowing the RPCM in a spare slot and installing another RPCM in Slot P12B_A.  This RPCM was then stowed in Spare Slot P13A_H.  Controllers commanded the SPDM Arm 2 On-Orbit Replaceable Unit (ORU) Tool Change-out Mechanism (OTCM) handling the RMCT2 to release the Failed RPCM (removed from P12B_A slot) in the P13A_H  slot.  They then maneuvered the SSRMS and SPDM to position SPDM Arm2 to align RMCT2 with the spare RPCM located in P11A_D to demate and remove it from its slot.  This RPCM was then moved to the P12B_A slot. It was successfully inserted and bolted to P12B_A worksite after being pushed with the maximum force allowed of 200 N.  SPDM Arm 2 released the spare RPCM in P12B_A and ground teams confirmed it was functioning nominally. 

46 Soyuz Survey:  Following the RPCM R&R, controllers walked the SSRMS off MBS PDGF3 onto the Node 2 PDGF then onto the Lab PDGF and finally onto the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) PDGF.  From there, the SSRMS was used to perform a survey of the 46S Soyuz using the Tip LEE.  When the survey was completed they walked the SSRMS off the FGB PDGF onto the Lab PDGF, then off the Lab PDGF onto MBS PDGF3.  Finally, the SSRMS was maneuvered to its start position for the Trailing Thermal Control Radiator (TTCR) Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) scheduled this Thursday.

Offline Sesquipedalian

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #118 on: 08/30/2016 11:50 PM »
46 Soyuz Survey:  Following the RPCM R&R, controllers walked the SSRMS off MBS PDGF3 onto the Node 2 PDGF then onto the Lab PDGF and finally onto the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) PDGF.  From there, the SSRMS was used to perform a survey of the 46S Soyuz using the Tip LEE.

Is this the first use of the FGB PDGF?

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #119 on: 08/31/2016 01:00 AM »
46 Soyuz Survey:  Following the RPCM R&R, controllers walked the SSRMS off MBS PDGF3 onto the Node 2 PDGF then onto the Lab PDGF and finally onto the Functional Cargo Block (FGB) PDGF.  From there, the SSRMS was used to perform a survey of the 46S Soyuz using the Tip LEE.

Is this the first use of the FGB PDGF?
no, but it is the first operational use of FGB PDGF where one end of the SSRMS is not attached to the Lab or Unity PDGF's.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #120 on: 08/31/2016 02:16 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/30/2016

Posted on August 30, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Cardio Ox Ultrasound Operations: With remote guidance from the Cardio Ox ground teams, the crew conducted an ultrasound scan after they configured the VOX, attached the ECG Electrodes, and marked the arteries; followed by blood pressure measurements using the Cardiolab Holter Arterial Blood Pressure Unit. The goal of the Cardio Ox investigation is to determine whether biological markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after space flight and whether this results in an increased, long-term risk of atherosclerosis risk in astronauts. Twelve crewmembers provide blood and urine samples to assess biomarkers before launch, 15 and 60 days after launch, 15 days before returning to Earth, and within days after landing. Ultrasound scans of the carotid and brachial arteries are obtained at the same time points, as well as through 5 years after landing, as an indicator of cardiovascular health.

Dose Tracker: The crew completed entries for medication tracking on an iPad today. This investigation documents the medication usage of crewmembers before and during their missions by capturing data regarding medication use during spaceflight, including side effect qualities, frequencies and severities. The data is expected to either support or counter anecdotal evidence of medication ineffectiveness during flight and unusual side effects experienced during flight. It is also expected that specific, near-real-time questioning about symptom relief and side effects will provide the data required to establish whether spaceflight-associated alterations in pharmacokinetics (PK) or pharmacodynamics (PD) is occurring during missions.

Fine Motor Skills: A series of interactive tasks were completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmember’s fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Habitability Human Factors Directed Observations: The crew recorded and submitted a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Trailing Thermal Control Radiator (TTCR) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The EV crew continued the EVA tool configuration in preparation for the TTCR EVA on Thursday. The IV crew accessed the Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) software and completed additional robotics reviews of Space Station Remote Manipulator System support plan for the EVA.

External Television Camera Group (ETVCG) Troubleshooting:  The crew performed a procedure to verify that the heaters on the spare ETVCG Light are functional. They utilized the two jumpers that were built from pin kit materials and tested the ETVCG light and heaters. After the troubleshooting, the crew confirmed a functional camera light and heater circuit on the ETVCG. This light will be used to replace the degraded light at the P1 Lower Outboard location during Thursday’s TTCR EVA.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #121 on: 08/31/2016 09:21 PM »
Quote
Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams and Flight Engineer Kate Rubins of NASA discussed life aboard the orbital outpost and the research they have conducted during an in-flight educational event Aug. 31 with students at the Leslie County High School in Hyden, Kentucky. Attending the event was Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Kentucky), the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee. Williams is scheduled to return to Earth on Sept. 6, U.S. time, aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft for a landing in Kazakhstan to wrap up his fourth flight in space and a total of 534 days in space over those four flights, the most by any U.S. astronaut. Rubins will remain in orbit until her return to Earth on Oct. 30, on this, her first flight in space.

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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #122 on: 09/01/2016 03:24 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 08/31/2016

Posted on August 31, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Trailing Thermal Control Radiator (TTCR) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Preparations: The Commander and Flight Engineer-6 completed their pre-EVA medical checkup, final EVA tool configuration and EVA timeline review earlier today.  This afternoon the crew performed a conference with EVA ground specialist to discuss any final question about tomorrow’s TTCR EVA.  The crew also prepared the Equipment Lock, EMUs and ancillary hardware to support EVA prep activities.  Crew egress of the Airlock is scheduled for 7:10 am CDT.

Multi-Omics sample collections: Flight Engineer-5 collected samples for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Multi-Omics experiment.  Samples were then placed into the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  The Multi-omics analysis of human microbial-metabolic cross-talk in the space ecosystem (Multi-Omics) investigation evaluates the impacts of space environment and prebiotics on astronauts’ immune function, by combining the data obtained from the measurements of changes in the gut microbiological composition, metabolites profiles, and the immune system.  Biomarkers for immune dysfunction during the crewmembers time on the ISS could be useful for the health management of astronauts.

Habitability walkthrough: The Commander performed his sixth and final Habitability walkthrough video.  Williams has been requested to focus on the windows available to the crew on the ISS, and their impact on habitability and productivity.  The Habitability investigation results will be used to assess the relationship between crew members and their environment in order to better prepare for future long-duration spaceflights. Observations recorded during 6 month and 1 year missions can help spacecraft designers determine how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): Flight Engineer-5 completed his 9th of 20 sessions of FMS.  Performing a series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet were completed for the Fine Motor Skills investigation. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmember’s fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

Circadian Rhythms: After 36 hours of wear-time, Flight Engineer-5 doffed the Double Sensors and Thermolab Control Unit and stowed the equipment.  The objective of the experiment is to get a better understanding of any alterations in circadian rhythms in humans during long-term space flights. Such knowledge will not only provide important insights into the adaptations of the human autonomic nervous system in space over time, but also has significant practical implications by helping to improve physical exercise, rest- and work shifts as well as fostering adequate workplace illumination in the sense of occupational healthcare in future space missions.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #123 on: 09/02/2016 12:08 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 09/01/2016

Posted on September 1, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Trailing Thermal Control Radiator (TTCR) Extravehicular Activity (EVA): Today, CDR Williams and FE-6 Rubins completed the TTCR EVA, with Airlock egress at 6:53 am CDT. Once outside the Airlock, the crew performed the following scheduled tasks:
•Retract, cover, and cinch down the TTCR using hook straps
•Replace a failed External Television Camera Group (ETVCG) light at the Camera Port 9 (CP9) location
•Install a High Definition Camera in the CP9 location
•Re-torque the Alpha Joint Interface Structure (AJIS) Struts on the Port 4 (P4) truss
•Perform an inspection Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ)
•Port 6 (P6) Pump Flow and Control System (PFCS) Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) Tie-back

The crew was ahead on the timeline, so they were also able to install an additional High Definition Camera at the CP8 location, and perform the Port Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart Brake Handle Tie-Down task. While Williams and Rubin were outside, FE-5 Onishi operated the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and assisted with the tasks. The EVA duration was 6 hours, 48 minutes.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations for EVA:  Today Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS to support the TTCR EVA.  Once the EVA crew completed the TTCR retract, FE-5 maneuvered the SSRMS into position to install an Articulating Portable Foot Restraint (APFR) on the SSRMS Latching End Effector (LEE). CDR ingressed the APFR, and the SSRMS was maneuvered to allow CDR to change the light of the CP9 (P1 Lower Outboard (LOOB)) camera then again to position CDR to install an External High Definition Camera (EHDC) on the CP9 camera.  Once the CP9 tasks had been completed, the SSRMS was maneuvered to position CDR to install an EHDC on the CP8 (P1 Upper Outboard (UPOB)) camera.  Once this had been completed, the SSRMS was moved to a park position. MSS performance today was nominal.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #124 on: 09/06/2016 01:15 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 09/02/2016

Posted on September 2, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Trailing Thermal Control Radiator (TTCR) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Post-EVA Activities:  Today, the USOS crew had a half-duty day.  They completed their post-EVA medical checkups, and performed an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Water Recharge procedure on EMUs 3003 and 3008. The EMUs and associated equipment were then be prepared for storage.  They then participated in an EVA debrief to discuss any comments regarding preparation and execution of the EVA.

Skin-B Operations: The Skin-B investigation was conducted as FE-6 performed Corneometer, Tewameter and Visioscan measurements on his forearm. The Corneometer measures the hydration level of the stratus coreum (outer layer of the skin), the Tewameter measures the skin barrier function, and the Visioscan measures the skin surface topography. Skin B is a European Space Agency (ESA) investigation that aims to improve the understanding of skin aging, which is greatly accelerated in space. The data will also be used to verify the results from previous testing for the SkinCare investigation on the ISS. 

Space Headaches: The crew completed the ESA Space Headaches questionnaire which provides information that may help in the development of methods to alleviate associated symptoms and improvement in the well-being and performance of crew members in space. Headaches during space flight can negatively affect mental and physical capacities of crew members which can influence performance during a space mission.

Habitability Walk-through: The crew recorded a walk-through video documenting observations of life onboard ISS, providing insight related to human factors and habitability. The Habitability investigation collects observations about the relationship between crew members and their environment on the ISS. Observations can help spacecraft designers understand how much habitable volume is required, and whether a mission’s duration impacts how much space crew members need.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #125 on: 09/06/2016 06:18 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 09/05/2016
Posted on September 5, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) Ingress and Sampling: Flight Engineer (FE)-6 Rubins ingressed the BEAM and collected the deployed Radiation Area Monitor (RAM) dosimeters and performed Microbial Air Sampler (MAS) and Surface Sample Kit (SSK) sampling. She also performed a thorough inspection of the walls and found no moisture.  The crew also replaced all of the BEAM sensor extended life battery packs.  The MAS and SSK samples as well as the RAM dosimeters will be packed for return on 46S and analyzed in Houston.

Cardio Ox and Biochem Profile Collections:  Rubins and FE-5 Onishi performed their Flight Day 60 (FD60) urine and blood collections and inserted them into Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.  The goal of Cardio Ox is to determine whether biological markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after space flight and whether this results in an increased, long-term risk of atherosclerosis risk in astronauts.

Marrow: Rubins collected breath and ambient air samples in support of the Canadian Space Agency’s Marrow experiment.  Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on the bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the marrow. The extent of this effect, and its recovery, are of interest to space research and healthcare providers on Earth.

ISS Change of Command (COC): The entire crew discussed with Mission Control Center (MCC)-Houston and MCC-Moscow flight control teams their roles and responsibilities for the timeframe between the COC event and departure of 46S. Anatoly Ivanishin then assumed command of the ISS from Jeff Williams. Following the COC, the 47S crew became prime for emergency response.

Post Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Tasks: The crew deconfigured the Airlock following last week’s EVA operations and prepared Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) and equipment for long term stowage. They also performed EMU cooling loop maintenance on the EMUs used during the EVA (3003 and 3008).

Crew Quarters (CQ) Port Cleaning: In preparation for his departure from the ISS tomorrow Williams cleaned his CQ, including the intake and exhaust ducts, fans and airflow sensors.
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SMS ;-).

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #127 on: 09/08/2016 05:39 AM »
Expedition 48 Crew Receives a Warm Welcome in Kazakhstan

NASA

Published on Sep 7, 2016
Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams of NASA and Soyuz Commander Alexey Ovchinin and Oleg Skripochka of Roscosmos were greeted in a traditional ceremony on Sept. 7 in Kazakhstan, a few hours after returning to Earth from the International Space Station. The trio spent 172 days in space aboard the orbital laboratory.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAZfx7FQ0F8?t-001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #128 on: 09/10/2016 01:34 PM »
This photograph of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) section of the International Space Station was captured during a spacewalk conducted by NASA astronauts Jeff Williams and Kate Rubins.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #129 on: 09/12/2016 04:12 PM »
Sept. 12, 2016

Today's Topics:

  1. MEDIA ADVISORY: M16-016 - NASA?s Weekly Video Clips from
      Space Feature Crew?s Return to Earth (JSC News Releases)


NASA?s Weekly Video Clips from Space Feature Crew?s Return to Earth

NASA?s weekly video highlights for Sept. 4-Sept. 10, 2016, feature record-breaking Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams and two of his Russian crewmates returning to Earth after 172 days in space, a behind the scenes look at landing operations, and a video on Star Trek?s influence on NASA?s international cooperation.
Grab your favorite production or clips from the video archive at:

http://jscfeatures.jsc.nasa.gov/videoupdate/
Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #130 on: 09/15/2016 12:34 AM »
Record Breaking NASA Astronaut Discusses His Recent Mission

Published on Sep 14, 2016
During a live satellite interview Sept. 14 on NASA TV, astronaut and Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams spoke about his recent record-breaking mission aboard the International Space Station.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GP_ZrENMTuo?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Fuji

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #131 on: 10/30/2016 02:16 PM »
Rare on-orbit mouse video。 1G(Centrifuge) and 0G Mouse Habitat Unit video.
http://iss.jaxa.jp/kiboexp/news/20161013_mouse.html

12 male mouse were all survived and return to the ground. 
JAXA confirmed 2nd generation baby were birthed on the ground.

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #132 on: 02/12/2017 03:29 AM »
The Earth: 4K Extended Edition

 
NASA Johnson

Published on Feb 11, 2017
Can’t get enough of Earth? Then this is for you: an extended playback of Ultra High Definition views of Planet Earth, captured by NASA astronaut Jeff Williams during his mission on the International Space Station in 2016. You’ll see the French Riviera and the Sahara Desert, cross North America from Texas all the way to Canada, and more—this is your source for the view of your home planet from 250 miles up!

Fire up the biggest screen you have. Then throw on your favorite music, kick back and watch.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fYKMCCPh28?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline John44

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Re: Expedition-48 thread (June - September 2016)
« Reply #133 on: 03/23/2017 05:14 PM »
National Air & Space Museum Presents - What’s New in Aerospace? – With NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=10021

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