Author Topic: South Korean space developments  (Read 14082 times)

Offline savuporo

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South Korean space developments
« on: 08/10/2015 03:35 PM »
When i look at international launch manifests i always feel like there is a gap where something should say "South Korea"
The country is obviously a technological and industrial powerhouse, so i'm surprised that the likes of Samsung, LG and Hyundai chaebols, who otherwise have their hands in pretty much everything from microelectronics to shipbuilding are not looking at launch markets.

So i refreshed my background reading:
KSLV-II update from July 30 this year :
 http://www.koreatimesus.com/s-korea-to-begin-2nd-stage-of-space-rocket-development/
Quote
The 300-ton space rocket, named the Korea Space Launch Vehicle 2 (KSLV-II), will be test-fired during the third and final stage of the space program that will commence in April 2018.
The first stage of the 1.96 trillion-won (US$1.68 billion) program began in March 2010, in which the country successfully built and test-fired a 7-ton thrust engine, the ministry said

Wow, $1.7B for a 7-ton engine ? Thats a .. steep asking price. Rocketry is hard and expensive, but you dont have to invent everything from scratch these days.

Then i found this thread with lots of pretty pictures:
http://www.orbiter-forum.com/showthread.php?t=35515
(rocket pr0n)

Here is a backgrounder from 2013 written after the first successful Naro-1 launch:
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/2230/1

EDIT: Whoops, of course there was a previous thread that i should have found: https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=18193.msg453094
And this:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33272.0


« Last Edit: 08/10/2015 03:47 PM by savuporo »
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Offline zotiraki

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #1 on: 10/15/2015 08:26 PM »
I'm a little surprised there isn't more about South Korea's space program in this forum.  Maybe there's a thread I'm missing?
The attached file is a copy of a 3 Jan 2014 file from KARI (I believe).  I used google to translate the Korean so it's not perfect.  Seems to me there should be an update to this somewhere but couldn't find it.  Probably have to conduct a search in Korean.

Cheers,

Mike

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #2 on: 10/16/2015 03:38 AM »
I'm a little surprised there isn't more about South Korea's space program in this forum.  Maybe there's a thread I'm missing?
The attached file is a copy of a 3 Jan 2014 file from KARI (I believe).  I used google to translate the Korean so it's not perfect.  Seems to me there should be an update to this somewhere but couldn't find it.  Probably have to conduct a search in Korean.

Cheers,

Mike
Here for starters:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=32355.0
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33272.0
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=27497.0
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=18193.0
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=21079.0
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=5954.0
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=1945.0
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=1784.0

Offline zotiraki

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #3 on: 10/16/2015 02:21 PM »
Thanks for the info, but still nothing very current. 

Cheers,

Mike

Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #4 on: 10/16/2015 04:58 PM »
There simply isnt much info in english. This was most recent somewhat surprising bit:

https://twitter.com/elakdawalla/status/623621668548816896
Quote
MT @barbylon S Korea lunar orbiter "pathfinder" mission to launch in 2018, construction of a Korean DSN node, science payload development.

MT @barbylon S Korea will seek instruments for lunar orbiter through AO in "early 2016", open to international participants #nesf2015

I wonder if this is a translation error, as i though the plan was to get KSLV-II flying first, which is not going to happen that soon.
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Offline zotiraki

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #5 on: 10/16/2015 08:18 PM »
Check out http://eng.kari.re.kr/sub01_02_101 Lunar Pathfinder precedes Lunar Orbiter/Lander apparently.

Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #6 on: 10/16/2015 08:32 PM »
Check out http://eng.kari.re.kr/sub01_02_101 Lunar Pathfinder precedes Lunar Orbiter/Lander apparently.

Thats interesting.
This was what KARI was showing a year ago, thats the lander.


I remember reading something about re-organization and re-budgeting of the entire national space effort in Korea, including some vague references to political scandals, but dont have english references at hand. Would be interesting to know if there is actually a new direction.
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Offline zotiraki

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #7 on: 10/17/2015 04:00 PM »
Best I can tell no new direction.  It looks like they are executing their space plan IAW the leaflet I attached a few posts ago.
There is a 2015 Space Plan but it's in Korean.  I suspect it lays out specific projects and budgets for this year.  Too bad we don't have a Korean speaker interested in keeping this updated.

Cheers,

Mike

Offline Star One

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #8 on: 12/30/2015 02:35 PM »
S. Korea to push moon exploration through 2020

Quote
SEOUL, Dec. 30 (Yonhap) -- South Korea's science ministry said Wednesday it plans to launch a lunar exploration project next year, eventually seeking to send a landing vessel by 2020.

Under the first stage of the project that will run from 2016 to 2018, the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning will allocate 197.8 billion won (US$169 million) to conduct research and send an orbiter.

The ministry said it has already secured a 20 billion-won budget for 2016.

South Korea plans to develop the orbiter and the ground station independently with its own technologies, the ministry added.

It will also seek cooperation with overseas researchers, such as the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), to develop payloads.

For the second phase of the project, the ministry will send a landing vessel to the moon with its own developed launch vehicle.

The ministry added it will make efforts to utilize its prior experiences in developing satellites.

colin@yna.co.kr

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/business/2015/12/30/0504000000AEN20151230002200320.html

Offline wesley

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #9 on: 02/01/2016 12:36 AM »
Too bad we don't have a Korean speaker interested in keeping this updated.

Well, I'm a Korean speaker, so... here it is.

I've been following the KARI Facebook page for some time and there have been some recent developments worth noting. Sadly for international readers, it's all in Korean as you'd expect. So I'll provide some condensed info here.

Quick recap on the KSLV-II rocket:

1st stage: 75-Ton (735kN) engine x 4
2nd stage: 75-Ton engine x 1
3rd stage: 7-Ton (69kN) engine x 1

The engines are currently being developed more or less from scratch (apart from the sounding rocket development in the 1990s with the KSR program) because Korea had hoped to get some technology transfers from Russia by using the RD-191 engine in the KSLV-I Naro last decade, but did not go as planned.

Engine build and test facilities have been completed last year (2015) near the site of the KSLV-I Naro launch at Oenarodo, Goheung-gun, South Jeolla Province.

On December 2015, the 7-Ton engine successfully completed a 100-second burn test:

https://www.youtube.com/embed/9YaubKHRYZ0

What's being planned now according to KARI?

7-Ton engine:
- 160 iterations of further testing
- Lengthen burn time up to 500 seconds

75-Ton engine
- First burn test in 1st quarter of 2016
- 220 iterations of testing

First test launch vehicle
- 75-Ton engine proving platform with one engine in the first stage (KSLV-II has four, as mentioned)
- Launched planned at the end of 2017

KSLV-II's first official launch is still slated for 2020.


If anyone is interested in this development, I'll try to update this from time to time as new stuff comes up.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #10 on: 02/01/2016 04:25 AM »
Thanks wesley. Can you let us know what the propellants are for each stage?
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline wesley

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #11 on: 02/03/2016 12:50 AM »
Thanks wesley. Can you let us know what the propellants are for each stage?

Drawing from the KSLV-2 official project site: http://www.kslv2.or.kr/sub0406

1st Stage
- 4 x 75-Ton LOX/Kerosene Turbo Pump Engine
- Isogrid Propellant Tank
- Propellant Mass: 130 Tons
- 3-Axis Control using Propellant - Hydraulic Nozzle Gimballing

2nd Stage
- 1 x 75-Ton LOX/Kerosene Turbo Pump Engine
- Propellant Mass: 35.6 Tons
- Pitch & Yaw Control using Propellant - Hydraulic Nozzle Gimballing
- Roll Control using Gas Generator Exhaust

3rd Stage
- 1 x 7-Ton LOX/Kerosene Turbo Pump Engine
- Propellant Mass: 10.7 Tons
- Pitch & Yaw Control using Electromechanical Nozzle Gimballing
- Roll Control using Cold Gas Thrusters

Payload Fairing
- Diameter: 3.05m
- Length: 8.0m
- Clean Separation System
- Customer-Specified Access Door

Payload Loading
- Mission Control System
- Telemetry System
- Tracking & Flight Safety System
- Power Supply System

The drawing also shows interstages between 1st/2nd and 2nd/3rd.

I suppose this answers some of the questions about the specifications of the rocket.
« Last Edit: 02/03/2016 12:51 AM by wesley »

Offline wesley

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #12 on: 02/03/2016 01:11 AM »
Wow, $1.7B for a 7-ton engine ? Thats a .. steep asking price. Rocketry is hard and expensive, but you dont have to invent everything from scratch these days.
This is an interesting point to note. The fact is that South Korea is wedged between Russia, China, Japan and... North Korea. Now consider, would any of those countries be willing to cooperate on enabling South Korea to build a rocket... which can also be potentially be used as an ICBM? Japan invaded and annexed Korean peninsula for 35 years in the first half of the 20th century, so the diplomatic relations always carry some tension at best. The other three countries stood on the opposite side during the cold war, so that's icky as well.

Russians did come close because they needed money after the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 90s, but the cooperation fell apart as I mentioned earlier.

Meanwhile, United States used to impose rocket development ban on South Korea for quite some time as part of the military protection agreement, which includes stationing of a significant number of American troops in SK, acting as a deterrent for the North Korean invasion. This ostensibly was to prevent escalation of arms race between South-North Korean situation, but it's evident that North Korea just went ahead and built their own ICBM anyway. So what happened was that this was relaxed so that non-military, liquid propellant rocket development could proceed. But US had no intention of providing any underlying technology.

As a result, South Korea was practically left to invent rockets from scratch. And this is why there's no solid propellant stage in their indigenous rockets, and that there's a ton of money being thrown in.

If you ask me, KSLV-2 would've come to fruition a lot earlier without the Russian semi-cooperation. KSLV-1 would've been built using the indigenous KSR-3 technology according to the original plans. But now it's just a historical what-if. I just hope things go as planned with what were left with.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #13 on: 02/03/2016 02:47 AM »
Any payload masses for LEO and TLI?

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #14 on: 02/03/2016 04:53 AM »
Some other images. Looks like they are using different diameters for the second and third stage.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #15 on: 02/03/2016 05:39 AM »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online Steven Pietrobon

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #16 on: 02/03/2016 05:47 AM »
Lots of nice images here.

http://www.kslv2.or.kr/sub0404/articles/index/tableid/kslv-ii_photo/page/1

If you have trouble accessing an image, continuously keep on clicking on the image.
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Offline wesley

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #17 on: 02/03/2016 06:02 AM »
Any payload masses for LEO and TLI?
[Please note that the links are all in Korean except for the eoPortal one - I will be translating the relevant bits into this post]

The official site mentions that it will be able to put 1,500kg of payload into orbit at 600 to 800km altitude. This has been repeated practically ad nauseam in Korea on pretty much every press release related to this project.

Launch profiles mentioned in the site includes "sun-synchronous orbit" at the main page and "polar orbit" in the FAQ.

http://www.kslv2.or.kr/sub0601/articles/view/tableid/faq/id/213

I believe it's referring to the same thing because this rocket's launch profile is strongly modeled after the ones used for Korea's own KOMPSAT (a.k.a. Arirang) series of multi-purpose satellites that use near-polar sun-synchronous orbits.

https://directory.eoportal.org/web/eoportal/satellite-missions/k/kompsat-5

You'll see that the latest version, KOMPSAT-5, launched in 2013 using a Russian launcher, has a total mass of about 1,400kg and is in a sun-synchronous orbit with a mean altitude of 550km.

The FAQ also mentions that the upper stages may be upgraded to send a 500kg payload to Moon. This is highly likely a reference to the Korean Moon exploration program currently under way as a part of the pledge by the current president (Ms. Park Geun-hye). The payload is expected to include an orbiter and a lander, and it's hoped to be launched by 2020 atop KSLV-2, or if the project fails to deliver a working launcher, an American one.

http://www.hani.co.kr/arti/science/science_general/607152.html

This news article from 2013 mentions how that "upgrade" will work. The KSLV-2 will have a 4th stage added, which uses a kick motor developed with KSLV-1, which I believe refers to KSLV-1's 2nd stage. Once KSLV-2 reaches a parking orbit at 300km altitude, the 4th stage will start up, add 3.1+km/s delta-v and break free of the Earth's gravitational pull.

The article also specifies that the orbiter+lander payload is targeted to be 550kg and the lander will include a robot weighing 20kg.

http://www.hankookilbo.com/v/c3cdecb1f0c0414c86d4fe8f99f9ef9f

This news article from October 2015 has some further tidbits about the Moon program. The 2020 deadline is still on track, while 2018 will supposedly see a preliminary lunar orbiter launch, with the help from NASA. While it does not mention what launch vehicle is to be used, it'll be highly likely to be a foreign one - KSLV-2 will only see a test launch of a single 75-Ton engine prototype by the end of 2017 as noted in the earlier post.

Offline Stan-1967

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #18 on: 02/03/2016 06:04 AM »
Very interesting to see the roadmap from the single engine, then 2, then 4, then 9.   I think they have been paying attention to another successful entrant into the global launch market.   They are working on a M1-D class G.G engine and similar engine configurations further down their roadmap.   The KSLV IV looks pretty darn close to the SpaceX FH, and if I interpreted the figures right, they say it will get 64t to LEO.   I also think I am seeing a 4.4m core & 47m tall vehicle called out in the picture.  So its a bit more squatty than FH.  They also look to be trying to gain some staging efficiency with the 3 stage configuration.   I'd be interested in the mass fractions they are projecting for the various stages of the KSLV-IV.

Offline wesley

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #19 on: 02/03/2016 06:17 AM »
One personal thing to note - launch site for both KSLV-1 and KSLV-2 are situated only about 90km (56mi) southeast from where I live. I've personally visited the place before, as well. So I'm keeping an eye on these projects from not so far away, so to speak. :)

Here's the scale model (after assembly) of the KSLV-1 Naro that I bought at the souvenir shop near the launch site.
« Last Edit: 02/03/2016 06:20 AM by wesley »

Offline wesley

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #20 on: 02/03/2016 06:23 AM »
Very interesting to see the roadmap from the single engine, then 2, then 4, then 9.   I think they have been paying attention to another successful entrant into the global launch market.   They are working on a M1-D class G.G engine and similar engine configurations further down their roadmap.   The KSLV IV looks pretty darn close to the SpaceX FH, and if I interpreted the figures right, they say it will get 64t to LEO.   I also think I am seeing a 4.4m core & 47m tall vehicle called out in the picture.  So its a bit more squatty than FH.  They also look to be trying to gain some staging efficiency with the 3 stage configuration.   I'd be interested in the mass fractions they are projecting for the various stages of the KSLV-IV.
You've interpreted the number correctly. KSLV-4 is still quite far away, so we'll have to see how that pans out.

Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #21 on: 04/01/2016 11:07 PM »
Some recent news on this. Maybe more appropriately belonging here : https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33272.0


Yonhap News 2016/01/31
Quote
On the country's plans to send a unmanned probe to the moon, KARI said that the program involves a locally built probe being sent to the Moon on a foreign-made rocket in 2018. It said the moon mission and the KSLV-2 are not linked at present.


Yonhap News 2015/12/30
Quote
South Korea's science ministry said Wednesday it plans to launch a lunar exploration project next year, eventually seeking to send a landing vessel by 2020.
Under the first stage of the project that will run from 2016 to 2018, the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning will allocate 197.8 billion won (US$169 million) to conduct research and send an orbiter.
The ministry said it has already secured a 20 billion-won budget for 2016.

Korea Herald, 2016-02-28
Quote
South Korea will spend a total of 746.4 billion won ($603 million) on its space program this year, as part of efforts to realize its long-cherished goal of reaching the moon.
The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning said Sunday that it has also agreed with relevant ministries to allocate 200 billion won for the next three years to launch its first lunar exploration

LPSC2016, March
Quote
As part of the national space promotion plan and presidential national agen-das, South Korea’s institutes and agencies under the auspices of the Ministry of Science, Information and Communication Technology and Future Planning (MSIP) are currently working on a phase-A study for a Korean Lunar Exploration Program (KLEP) [1]. A Korean pathfinder lunar orbiter (KPLO) is to be fol-lowed by a Korean Lunar Explorer (KLE) which con-stitutes an orbiter and a lander unit equipped with a small rover with a mass of approximately 20 kg

KPLO’s main scientific return is considered to be composed of visual and spectral image data, space environmental measurements and data related to lunar resources. For the exploration of lunar resources two major exploration areas need to be considered: (1) resources in polar regions for the potential establish-ment of lunar bases or (2) future energy resources such as Helium-3 and precious rare earth elements along with radioactive resources like Uranium. KPLO is planned to operate in a circular polar orbit at an orbit altitude of 100 km. Its size will be 1.9 x 1.7 x 2.3 (m) with a dry mass of 550 kg. The total science payload mass will amount to approximately 40 kg with instru-ments contributed by the Korean Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and other Korean research institutes and centers, as well as NASA. The development peri-ods for KPLO and KLE are considered to be 2016–2018 and 2017–2020, respectively [1].


Also, one more 2015 poster:
http://nesf2015.arc.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/downloads/pdf/10.pdf

From this it seems that the orbiter project for 2018 is definitely funded and going seriously ahead in 2016. It also seems to have an official KPLO name now. The timeline of course is ambitious, as it seems to involve indigenous ground tracking infrastructure build-out etc, plus a launch on foreign launch vehicle.
« Last Edit: 04/01/2016 11:16 PM by savuporo »
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Online Galactic Penguin SST

Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #22 on: 04/02/2016 09:54 AM »
Some recent news on this. Maybe more appropriately belonging here : https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33272.0


Yonhap News 2016/01/31
Quote
On the country's plans to send a unmanned probe to the moon, KARI said that the program involves a locally built probe being sent to the Moon on a foreign-made rocket in 2018. It said the moon mission and the KSLV-2 are not linked at present.


Yonhap News 2015/12/30
Quote
South Korea's science ministry said Wednesday it plans to launch a lunar exploration project next year, eventually seeking to send a landing vessel by 2020.
Under the first stage of the project that will run from 2016 to 2018, the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning will allocate 197.8 billion won (US$169 million) to conduct research and send an orbiter.
The ministry said it has already secured a 20 billion-won budget for 2016.

Korea Herald, 2016-02-28
Quote
South Korea will spend a total of 746.4 billion won ($603 million) on its space program this year, as part of efforts to realize its long-cherished goal of reaching the moon.
The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning said Sunday that it has also agreed with relevant ministries to allocate 200 billion won for the next three years to launch its first lunar exploration

LPSC2016, March
Quote
As part of the national space promotion plan and presidential national agen-das, South Korea’s institutes and agencies under the auspices of the Ministry of Science, Information and Communication Technology and Future Planning (MSIP) are currently working on a phase-A study for a Korean Lunar Exploration Program (KLEP) [1]. A Korean pathfinder lunar orbiter (KPLO) is to be fol-lowed by a Korean Lunar Explorer (KLE) which con-stitutes an orbiter and a lander unit equipped with a small rover with a mass of approximately 20 kg

KPLO’s main scientific return is considered to be composed of visual and spectral image data, space environmental measurements and data related to lunar resources. For the exploration of lunar resources two major exploration areas need to be considered: (1) resources in polar regions for the potential establish-ment of lunar bases or (2) future energy resources such as Helium-3 and precious rare earth elements along with radioactive resources like Uranium. KPLO is planned to operate in a circular polar orbit at an orbit altitude of 100 km. Its size will be 1.9 x 1.7 x 2.3 (m) with a dry mass of 550 kg. The total science payload mass will amount to approximately 40 kg with instru-ments contributed by the Korean Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and other Korean research institutes and centers, as well as NASA. The development peri-ods for KPLO and KLE are considered to be 2016–2018 and 2017–2020, respectively [1].


Also, one more 2015 poster:
http://nesf2015.arc.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/downloads/pdf/10.pdf

From this it seems that the orbiter project for 2018 is definitely funded and going seriously ahead in 2016. It also seems to have an official KPLO name now. The timeline of course is ambitious, as it seems to involve indigenous ground tracking infrastructure build-out etc, plus a launch on foreign launch vehicle.

IIRC wasn't it supposed to be LADEE-based since I remember KARI has an agreement with NASA signed in the past?
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #23 on: 04/02/2016 03:40 PM »
IIRC wasn't it supposed to be LADEE-based since I remember KARI has an agreement with NASA signed in the past?

Do you have a source for that ? Because both the timeline and scope of the recently signed LOUis and MOUs do not seem to indicate anything as extensive in collaboration, and would also likely run into ITAR and other technology transfer issues. They seem to have signed a 'technical assistance agreement' with JPL, whereas LADEE was Ames and GSFC. And that TAA i would guess is more about tracking and operations.

Also see this article published by KARI this year:
Getting the facts about the Korea-US Space Cooperation Agreement
Quote
2. Does it include direct technology transfer related to the development of a launch vehicle and lunar exploration?

This agreement comprehensively stipulates the content of and procedure for cooperation on projects, but technology transfer is neither a prerequisite nor the purpose of the agreement

But the timelines they are talking about do seem highly accelerated, call for instrument proposals in Jan 2016 and launch in 2018

EDIT: Just out of interest. There is this Cubesat mission collaboration between NASA and Kari
http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasa-engineer-awaits-launch-of-cubesat-mission-demonstrating-virtual-telescope-tech

KARI providing spacecraft, Goddard experiments, launch on SpaceX

EDIT2: Further guess. The spacecraft will be based on KOMPSAT, the payload masses seem similar:

https://directory.eoportal.org/web/eoportal/satellite-missions/k/kompsat-5
« Last Edit: 04/02/2016 04:17 PM by savuporo »
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Offline ImpMK

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #24 on: 04/03/2016 06:52 AM »
EDIT2: Further guess. The spacecraft will be based on KOMPSAT, the payload masses seem similar:

https://directory.eoportal.org/web/eoportal/satellite-missions/k/kompsat-5

The launch mass of KPLO will be about 550 kg, and its mass budget for scientific payloads is expected to be about 60-70 kg. But the launch mass of KOMPSAT-5 is 1,315 kg...

Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #25 on: 09/12/2016 02:41 AM »
http://sservi.nasa.gov/articles/salmon-2-opportunity-for-korea-pathfinder-lunar-orbiter-kplo-instruments/
Quote
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) Advanced Explorations Systems (AES) Division anticipates making opportunities available for a limited number of instruments to be Ride Share Payloads on the Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter (KPLO).

Supported by their National Policy plan, the Republic of South Korea, through the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI), has created a goal to robotically explore the moon and has established a lunar program called Korea Lunar Exploration Program (KLEP). KARI intends on launching KPLO followed by a lunar lander including a lunar surface rover, and another orbiter by 2020. The first mission would be the launch of the KPLO in December 2018 on a technology demonstration and science mission into lunar orbit. KARI is in partnership with NASA to provide ride share for NASA-sponsored payloads on the KPLO mission.
..

Who came up with the backronym for this ..

EDIT: also
http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2016-2419
The Lunar Space Communications Architecture From The KARI-NASA Joint Study
Includes this nice table of upcoming lunar missions, below.

More, a CubeSat impartor is being considered as one of the payloads

Two other papers, funded by KPLO activities, over last few months:

http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2016-2311
Preliminary Design of LUDOLP: the Flight Dynamics Subsystem for the Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter Mission

http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.2016-2603
Conceptual Design and Implementation of an Integrated  Database for Automatic State Synchronization between  Spacecraft and Simulator

« Last Edit: 09/12/2016 03:20 AM by savuporo »
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Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #26 on: 01/17/2017 04:21 AM »
A lot of KPLO related briefs in here

An Introduction to Mission Concept of Operations of KPLO
Quote
KPLO is the first mission of the Korean lunar exploration program. The mission objectives of the KPLO are 1) development of key technologies for lunar exploration, 2) scientific investigation of the Moon and lunar environment, and 3) realization and validation of new space technology. The mission concept of operations of KPLO is the key system-level design to provide various mission concepts, spacecraft description, instruments overview, and preliminary operations concepts for the KPLO mission. In this research, the operation concepts of recent foreign lunar orbiters are explained briefly. And then, System architecture, instruments overview, trajectory overview, and mission phases overview of KPLO are described compared to the foreign lunar missions. Each mission phase include operational concepts of KPLO. Mission concept of operations of KPLO is not defined yet, but it will be updated and matured concurrently with the system design.

Also, NASA hosted KPLO proposals were due in Nov 18

https://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={AF44B73B-7DBF-5540-1793-4C5491CFFE7C}&path=init
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Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #27 on: 03/14/2017 05:56 AM »
KSLV-2 75-ton engine 145 second test fire,  Nov 29, 2016



Same thing from the business end:
« Last Edit: 03/14/2017 05:57 AM by savuporo »
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Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #28 on: 03/14/2017 06:01 AM »
Propellant tanks of engineering model of KSLV being integrated

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Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #29 on: 03/14/2017 06:48 AM »
Also, the videos above are actually from May 4th, 2016 according to this more recent update

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/news/2016/12/22/0200000000AEN20161222008200320.html

Dec 22, 2016
Quote
SEOUL, Dec. 22 (Yonhap) -- South Korea's planned test-launch of its homegrown engine for a space rocket was delayed by 10 months to late 2018, because more time is needed to address some technical glitches, officials said Thursday.

The delay was formally endorsed at a meeting of space-related officials earlier in the day, said the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning.

South Korea had previously planned to test-launch the 75-ton engine in December next year, but the test is now expected to be launched in October 2018, ministry officials said.

As part of a long-term project to produce an indigenous three-stage KSLV-2 rocket, the government had pushed for the development of a two-stage test rocket by the end of 2017. But, the Korea Aerospace Research Institute said in a report earlier this year that it will have to delay the test-launch by about 10 months, citing a problem in the combustion of the engine and more trouble in the welding of a fuel tank.

 South Korea aims to launch a moon orbiter as early as 2020.

"If a test-launch of the 75-ton engine fails or technical problems are found, it will take more time to build the three-stage KSLV-2 rocket," said Bae Tae-min, a senior official at the ministry's large-scale public research policy division.

Bae indicated that the timeframe for developing a homegrown space rocket could be affected, depending on the result of the test-launch.

EDIT: Nah, pic in the article was from May 4th, the full duration burn apparently still from later date, as per:
http://spaceflight101.com/south-korea-advances-rocket-engine-development-testing-for-kslv-ii-rocket/
« Last Edit: 03/14/2017 06:52 AM by savuporo »
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Offline savuporo

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Re: South Korean space developments
« Reply #30 on: 04/08/2017 07:27 AM »
75-ton engine TVC test



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