Author Topic: Fly Me to the Moon on an SLS Block II  (Read 8439 times)

Offline MP99

Re: Fly Me to the Moon on an SLS Block II
« Reply #20 on: 08/01/2015 09:52 AM »
Quote
So why develop block II if not needed for Lunar?

That's what Congress wants. If the aim is Block II, then that is what should be developed. Once developed, it can be flown in a Block IB configuration if desired.

Block 1B would mean going back to using RSRMVs, which I think is unlikely.

I think the config with EUS and advanced boosters, but without LUS (which I assume you meant) would be better called Block 2B.

Cheers, Martin

Offline Brovane

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Re: Fly Me to the Moon on an SLS Block II
« Reply #21 on: 09/07/2015 09:34 PM »
@RocketmanUS

While I somewhat agree that NASA should try to avoid "building" rockets, what commercial options do they have for the payload mass they're talking about? Should they wait for SpaceX's BFR? What happens if it doesn't come to fruition, and if it does, what kind of political fallout would ensue in the event that it's a failure? Besides that, they have no other options.

While I do think the SLS is unwarranted for the time being as it doesn't even have any definitive missions, nevermind the extreme cost, I do understand why NASA wants to design a rocket to their spec (and of course you have some in congress demanding it). Sure, they could pour that money in expediting BFR development, but there would be [somewhat understandable] cries coming from all corners of aerospace and government regarding such subsidies of one company, and I doubt SpaceX would want to share development with anyone else on that project.

Why do you assume that Commercial option means that NASA's budget doesn't pay for any of the hardware development?   With the COTS development contracts we have seen both Private and Public money being put in to develop the hardware that NASA needs.  You could save development money by simply moving away from Cost-Plus contracts to Fixed Cost contracts still using FAR regulations.  We don't need a cost-plus contract to develop a HLV, there isn't that many unknown-unknowns that a contractor cannot adequately plan for the development risks. 
"Look at that! If anybody ever said, "you'll be sitting in a spacecraft naked with a 134-pound backpack on your knees charging it", I'd have said "Aw, get serious". - John Young - Apollo-16

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Fly Me to the Moon on an SLS Block II
« Reply #22 on: 04/27/2017 06:40 AM »
I submitted my paper to the IAC congress being held in Adelaide this year. I got a reply today saying my paper was accepted!
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline carmelo

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Re: Fly Me to the Moon on an SLS Block II
« Reply #23 on: 04/27/2017 06:42 PM »
Thanks Steven!
You have answered to this my old question:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=42711.0

Yes,we can.

Offline Patchouli

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Re: Fly Me to the Moon on an SLS Block II
« Reply #24 on: 04/30/2017 04:35 PM »
I wonder how high risk would refueling the EUS be as that could greatly increase the TLI payload?

Another option if it's fully operational by then launch part of the hardware on a Falcon Heavy and do all staging of the mission in LEO vs L1.

I'm assuming that FH actually can lift 53 tons as that would be enough for an Altair class lander plus a few tons for a payload interface.
« Last Edit: 04/30/2017 04:37 PM by Patchouli »

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Fly Me to the Moon on an SLS Block II
« Reply #25 on: 05/01/2017 01:46 AM »


I wonder how high risk would refueling the EUS be as that could greatly increase the TLI payload?



If ULA's distributed lift proves successful then an upgraded EUS to support refuelling could be easy upgrade to SLS. Switching EUS to ULA flight proven (by then) IVF would be low risk upgrade with huge payload benefits.

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