Author Topic: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)  (Read 51588 times)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #40 on: 11/19/2016 10:59 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/17/2016

Posted on November 17, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
49 Soyuz (49S) Launch: 49S launched successfully from the Baikonur Cosmodrome at 2:20 pm CST this afternoon, with Peggy Whitson, Thomas Pesquet, and Oleg Novitskiy. Docking is scheduled for Saturday, November 19th at 4:01 pm CST. Once docked, the ISS crew complement will increase from 3 to 6 crewmembers.

Human Research Facility (HRF) Software Upgrades: Today the crew initiated the final day of HRF software transitions to the HRF Rack 2 Personal Computer (PC).  The HRF Racks provide an on-orbit laboratory that enables scientists conducting human life science research to evaluate the physiological, behavioral, and chemical changes induced by space flight. Research performed using the capabilities within the racks provide data to help scientists understand how the human body adapts to long-duration space flight.

Story Time From Space: The crew recorded a video while reading the book I, Humanity by Jeffrey Bennett.  Story Time From Space combines science literacy outreach with simple demonstrations recorded aboard the ISS. Crew members read five science, technology, engineering and mathematics-related children’s books in orbit, and complete simple science concept experiments. Crew members videotape themselves reading the books and completing demonstrations. Video and data collected during the demonstrations are downlinked to the ground and posted in a video library with accompanying educational materials.

Cygnus Departure Preparations: Today the crew began configuring the Cygnus vehicle for departure. Today’s activities included relocating PCS computers to support Cygnus release, and egressing the Cygnus vehicle.  During the Cygnus egress procedure the crew installed the Air Revitalization System (ARS) sample line cap, derouted and stowed the Intermodular Ventilation (IMV) supply duct, removed handrails and radial port closeout, and closed the Cygnus hatch. The IMV supply duct was stowed in a mission-specific configuration to support Spacecraft Fire Experiment (SAFFIRE) operations after Cygnus unberthing.

Urine Processing Assembly (UPA): The crew demated the connection between the Fluid Control and Pump Assembly (FCPA) at Quick Disconnect (QD) 27 on the recently replaced Pressure Control and Pump Assembly (PCPA). This activity will allow teams to determine if the FCPA is the source of elevated conductivity in the UPA distillate. Troubleshooting involve disconnecting QD27 for two Advanced Recycle Filter Tank Assembly (ARFTA) concentration cycles to isolate the FCPA housing from the purge distillate. If conductivity significantly improves in this configuration, this could potentially implicate the FCPA.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #41 on: 11/20/2016 09:02 AM »
Press Release
N°46-2016

Paris, 20 November 2016


Call for Media: Talk to Thomas Pesquet on the Space Station


ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet entered the International Space Station together with crewmates Oleg Novitsky and Peggy Whitson in the early hours of today to begin his six-month mission on the orbital
complex. 
On Wednesday, 23 November, Thomas will call the European Astronaut Centre from the Space Station for a live video conference with media at 13:00-15:00 GMT (14:00-16:00 CET). 

Media are invited to take part and visit ESA's astronaut training facility in Cologne, Germany. 

The event will also be streamed live via the web at www.esa.int/ProximaLive

Accreditation
Media wishing to attend should register via alessandra.vallo@esa.int

Proxima
Thomas' Proxima mission is the ninth long-duration mission for an ESA astronaut. It is named after the closest star to the Sun - continuing a tradition of naming missions with French astronauts
after stars and constellations.

Thomas will perform more than 50 scientific experiments for ESA and France's CNES space agency, as well as take part in many research activities for the other Station partners. 

Education and inspiring youngsters is an important part of his mission. Thomas is determined to make Proxima an exciting adventure for all his followers and work as an ambassador for science- and
space-based careers. 


Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #42 on: 11/21/2016 10:33 AM »
Thomas Pesquet

Space is amazing
 
The International Space Station is amazing: better than in my best dreams. I wish everybody could get the chance to come up here!
 
L’ISS est géniale, encore mieux que dans mes rêves ! J’aimerais que tout le monde ait la chance d'aller dans l'espace !
 
Credits: ESA/NASA

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #43 on: 11/21/2016 01:39 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/18/2016

Posted on November 18, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

Preparation for Cygnus Unberth and Release: The crew completed configuring the Cygnus and the Node 1 vestibule in preparation for Cygnus departure on Monday, November 21st. Today’s task included removing Intermodule Ventilation and Power/Data Jumpers, installing the Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Center Disk Cover and four CBM Controller Panel Assemblies (CPAs) onto an Active CBM bulkhead, and then closing the Node 1 nadir hatch.

49S Status:  Soyuz 49S launched on time at GMT 322/20:20 with a nominal separation from the launch vehicle at 20:29 GMT.  Ascent was nominal and all appendages were deployed.  On Orbit 1 the Motion Control System and the Kurs-NA system were tested with nominal results and the docking probe was extended nominally.  Rendezvous maneuvers DV1, DV2 and DV3 were completed nominally on Orbits 3, 4 and 17 respectively.  49S is scheduled to dock to the ISS at the MRM1 Nadir port on Saturday at 22:01 GMT.

Educational Public Affairs Opportunity (PAO) Event:  The ISS crew participated in an educational PAO event with Wheat Ridge High School in Wheat Ridge, Colorado.  During this event the ISS crew answered questions submitted by the students addressing day-to-day life onboard the ISS and astronaut education/career experiences.

Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL)/Geoflow-2: Ground teams were able to recover the communication issues between the FSL and Multi-purpose Computer and Communications (MPCC) today, enabling the planned start of Geoflow-2 next week.  Geoflow-2 studies heat and fluid flow currents within the Earth’s mantle. Geoflow-2 aims to improve computational methods that scientists and engineers use to understand and predict the processes in the Earth’s mantle that lead to volcanic eruptions, plate tectonics and earthquakes.

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #44 on: 11/21/2016 01:43 PM »

Offline John44

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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #46 on: 11/26/2016 02:20 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/21/2016

Posted on November 21, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) Potential Wastewater Storage Tank Assembly (WSTA) Leak: This morning an unexpected caution indicating “UPA Potential WSTA leak” annunciated following use of the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC). The crew isolated the UPA and WHC was configured to internal [EDV] to isolate the system. An on-orbit inspection by the crew showed pretreated urine on the urine valve block. The crew cleaned up the pretreated urine and closed out the WHC. WHC is No-Go for use and ground specialists are working the follow-on plan.  The crew has been authorized to use the Russian toilet.  Due to the leak, the planned WSTA leak was aborted.

Cygnus Departure: Cygnus was unberthed nominally from the ISS at 5:23 AM CST and was released at 7:22 AM CST. Post departure science objectives for Cygnus including Saffire-II and NanoRacks CubeSat deployments.  Cygnus re-entry is planned for November 27.
•Later today, Saffire-II will initiate and conduct a roughly 2-hour experiment session, followed by multi-day data downlinks. The Saffire-II experiment attempts to quantify the flammability of several materials in microgravity, and compares them to flammability limits in normal gravity.
•The NanoRacks CubeSat Deployer – External (NRCSD-E) deploy is planned November 25, at which time the Cygnus will be 100 km above the ISS, this will be the the first time NRCSDs deploy above the ISS. A total of 4 LEMUR-2 satellites will deploy from the Cygnus vehicle.  The NanoRacks-LEMUR-2 satellites are part of a remote sensing satellite constellation that proves global ship tracking and weather monitoring.

Marrow Collections: The crew performed their first blood collections in support of the Canadian Space Agency’s (CSA’s) Marrow experiment.  After collecting, the blood was spun in the Refrigerated Centrifuge and stored in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).   The Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on the bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Fine Motor Skills (FMS): The 49Soyuz USOS crew performed their first FMS sessions this morning.  FMS is performed regularly during the crews’ on-orbit stay, with several sessions within the first week, then as the mission progresses, more time elapses between sessions.  Each FMS session involves the crew performing a series of interactive tasks on a touchscreen tablet. This investigation is critical during long-duration space missions, particularly those skills needed to interact with technologies required in next-generation space vehicles, spacesuits, and habitats. The crewmember’s fine motor skills are also necessary for performing tasks in transit or on a planetary surface, such as information access, just-in-time training, subsystem maintenance, and medical treatment.

MATISS Installation: The crew installed four MATISS sample holders in the Columbus module. The MATISS experiment investigates the antibacterial properties of materials in space to see if future spacecraft could be made easier to clean. The experiment aims to understand the mechanisms of attachment of biofilms in microgravity conditions. The optimization of the internal surfaces of the International Space Station (ISS) is a challenge. The first objective is to simplify MATISS decontamination operations to save time crew. The second objective relates to space exploration: the validation of these innovative surfaces would indeed have new assets for the development of future spacecraft, including in the context of long journeys.

Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL) Sample Cartridge Assembly (SCA) Installation: The crew inserted a new cartridge in the MSL, located in the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR), today.  The sample processing date is scheduled for later in the increment.  The Batch-2b of the Materials Science Laboratory Sample Cartridge Assemblies (MSL SCA-Batch 2b-ESA) serves two projects investigating how different phases organize in a structure when metallic alloys are solidified. The METCOMP project studies the phase formed by the reaction of the remaining liquid phase with an already formed solid, to form a second solid phase on cooling. For this purpose, Bronze (Copper-Tin Alloys) of different compositions will be processed. The other project, Solidification along a Eutectic path in Ternary Alloys (SETA), looks at how two phases that form together organize into lamellar, or fibre, structures when cooling Aluminium (Copper-Silver Alloys). Both projects will provide benchmark samples that will enable to test numerical models that aim to predict these structures.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  Following the successful Cygnus unberth and release, the Robotics Ground Controllers performed a video survey of the Node 1 Nadir Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM).  They then walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) off Node 2 onto Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 3 (PDGF3) and maneuvered the SSRMS to a Mobile Transporter (MT) translation configuration.  Currently the Robotics Ground Controllers are performing additional troubleshooting of the SSRMS End B Camera Light Pan/Tilt Unit (PTU) Assembly (CLPA).

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #47 on: 11/26/2016 02:20 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/22/2016

Posted on November 22, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Maintenance:  Ground specialists met to discuss the WHC leak that occurred yesterday.  Based on review of the imagery the crew took during the cleanup, the ground specialists determined the most likely source of the leak to be a hydroconnector on the Urine Valve Block, but determined that since all of the contaminated hardware would need to be replaced there was not a significant benefit to performing troubleshooting to isolate the root cause of the leak.  Today, the crew replaced the Pump Separator, Urine Valve Block, several hoses and a data cable.  The WHC was activated, checked out and is go for nominal operations.

Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment (Fluid Shifts): Today, a 48S crewmember began the first part of the Flight Day 45 (FD-45) Fluid Shifts data collection.  Upon wakeup he collected baseline saliva, urine, and with another crewmember acting as operator collected blood samples that were inserted into Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) prior to ingesting a Sodium Bromide (NaBr) tracer.  Throughout the day, the crew will perform more urine, blood, and saliva collections, inserting those samples into MELFI as well.  Fluid Shifts investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes. Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is investigated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and eye damage.

Water Monitoring Suite (WMS) and Aquapad Sampling: In coordination with regular Environmental Health System (EHS) water sampling, the crew is scheduled to perform the ESA sponsored Aquapad (Paper Analytical Device) technological demonstration and sampling using the Microbial Monitoring System (MMS) portion of the WMS experiment.  By using the same water collected for the EHS sample, ground teams can evaluate the capabilities of the new hardware.  For the MMS, the crew reviewed an On-Board Training (OBT) video then configured the hardware to sample a low and high DNA concentration sample using the Razor Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Microbial Monitoring System.  The WMS is a set of hardware that monitors microbes, silica and organic material in the water supply on the ISS. The hardware ensures crew members can test and monitor the safety of their water supplies on future space missions, especially on long-duration missions to Mars, asteroids or other destinations where Earth-based testing would be difficult or impossible. Aquapad is a new approach developed by France’s CNES space agency: paper impregnated with powdered growth medium creates a 3D petri dish. When water is added, the microbes form colored spots revealing their locations. Using a tablet computer application the crew will photograph the dots to calculate precisely how many bacteria are present.

GeoFlow-2: The crew activated the Multi-purpose Computer and Communications (MPCC) laptop, Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL) rack, installed Anti Vibration Mount (AVM) brackets then released the Facility Core Element in preparation for free-floating microgravity science inside the FSL.  Geoflow-2 studies heat and fluid flow currents within the Earth’s mantle. Geoflow-2 aims to improve computational methods that scientists and engineers use to understand and predict the processes in the Earth’s mantle that lead to volcanic eruptions, plate tectonics and earthquakes.

Spacecraft Fire Safety (Saffire)-II: Operations started onboard Cygnus about 2325 GMT yesterday and wrapped up about 0230 GMT when the post-test flow visualization completed. Preliminary telemetry indicated that data and images were recorded as expected for all 9 samples and flow visualization. The Saffire-II hardware performed nominally with no apparent issues.  The team is downlinking the sensor and image data and begin analysis of the dataset later today.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Stowage Wire Kit Installation:  The crew started the activities to install the JEM Stowage Wire Kit.  This Kit will make additional stowage available in the area under the JEM Airlock (JEMAL).  The crew completed the activity to gather the hardware, but the rest of the activity was deferred due to work on the WHC.

Emergency Role/Responsibility Review:  The crew performed a review of the Emergency General Instructions for response to emergencies and roles of each crew member.  This review included a discussion of roles of Soyuz Commander, ISS Commander and each crewmember and strategies for working through the response to Emergencies.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  The Robotics Ground Controllers translated the Mobile Transporter (MT) from Worksite (WS) 6 to WS7.  Controllers will walk-off the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) from Mobile Base System (MBS) 3 to the MBS 1 grapple fixture.  They will then unstow Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM).  These activities are in preparation for Robotic External Leak Locator (RELL) operations planned to start Monday 28-November.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #48 on: 11/26/2016 02:35 PM »
The French flag is now floating in Columbus, my new office and the home of Europe in space! The Columbus laboratory was launched to the International Space Station in 2008 and installed with the help of ESA astronaut Léopold Eyrhats. It has five racks to run science experiments from biology to metals and medicine in space!
 
Credits: ESA/NASA

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #49 on: 11/28/2016 06:12 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/23/2016

Posted on November 23, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Marrow Air Sampling: The crew performed their first Marrow air sampling collection today.  A breath sample and ambient air sample were collected and stowed for return on a later flight. The Marrow investigation looks at the effect of microgravity on the bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Fluid Shifts Cerebral and Cochlear Fluid Pressure (CCFP) Checkout: The crew performed a checkout of the CCFP that arrived on the 48Soyuz vehicle. The crew configured the device and performed a functional checkout including setup and data transfer in advance of the integrated Baseline Data Collection measurements tomorrow.  The CCFP device is being evaluated as a method for indirectly measuring Intracranial Pressure (ICP).  The CCFP comprises a headset onto which is mounted an air-flow sensor which measures the amount of air pushed from the ear canal or drawn into the ear canal when the Tympanic Membrane (TM) moves.  By this method, volume displacements of the TM as small as a nanoliter (1×10-9 L) can be measured by the CCFP.   The scientists will take the CCFP data collected inflight and compare it to data collected on the ground to identify any difference in the ICP during the different flight phases and then include that with the rest of the Fluid Shifts measures to correlate the Fluid Shifts phenomenon to ICP changes.

OnBoard Training (OBT) ISS Emergency Hardware Fam and EMER Mask review:  The crew performed a review and practice session for donning Emergency masks and practicing purge technique.  They also performed a familiarization session with the emergency hardware to ensure they are familiar with the locations of equipment and the positions of valves used in emergencies.  The crew identified some deltas from the expected locations and reported those to the ground specialists so that the documentation can be updated.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Stowage Wire Kit Installation:  The crew continued the activities to install the JEM Stowage Wire Kit.  This Kit makes additional stowage available in the area under the JEM Airlock (JEMAL).  Today’s activities included removing the closeout panels and installing protective panels over the shell heaters.  The crew installed wire frames in the area directly below the JEMAL and moved four 1.0 Cargo Transfer Bags (CTBs) into that location.  The crew will be scheduled later to install additional wire frames and CTBs deck locations forward and aft of the JEMAL.   

Eye Exams:  The crew will be performing routine eye exams using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and fundoscopy hardware. OCT hardware is used to measure retinal thickness, volume, and retinal nerve fiber layer. Fundoscope exam is performed to obtain images of the retinal surface. 

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  Overnight, the Robotics Ground Controllers walked-off the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) from Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) 3 to the MBS PDGF1.  They unstowed Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) from MBS PDGF 2.  These activities are in preparation for Robotic External Leak Locator (RELL) operations planned to start Monday 28-November.

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #50 on: 11/28/2016 06:13 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/24/2016

Posted on November 24, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) Centrifuge Remove and Replace (R&R): The crew was scheduled to remove the 1G centrifuge from the CBEF and install a new centrifuge.  However, the bag with the new centrifuge could not be found.  Teams are investigating impacts to downstream science and opportunities to launch replacement hardware.  The CBEF is a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) subrack facility located in the Saibo (living cell) Experiment Rack. The CBEF is used in various life science experiments, such as cultivating cells and plants in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM).

Fluid Shifts: Today, FE-1 performed his Flight Day 45 baseline imaging for the Fluid Shifts experiment.  With assistance from another crewmember as the onboard imager and ground remote guidance, ultrasound imaging was taken of arterial and venous measures of the head and neck, cardiac, ophthalmic and portal vein, and tissue thickness of lower and upper body.  Additional measurements using the Cerebral and Cochlear Fluid Pressure (CCFP), Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAE), Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), ESA’s Cardiolab (CDL) Holter Arterial Blood Pressure Device, and Intraocular Pressure (IOP) using the tonometer were taken as well.  Fluid Shifts is a joint NASA-Russian experiment that investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes. Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is investigated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and eye damage.

Portable Emergency Provisions (PEPS) Inspection: The crew inspected and confirmed that the Portable Fire Extinguishers (PFEs), Extension Hose Tee Kits (EHTKs), Portable Breathing Apparatuses (PBAs) and Pre-Breathe Masks are all free of damage. This maintenance is scheduled every 45 days to ensure continuous functionality of the units.

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #51 on: 11/28/2016 06:13 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/25/2016

Posted on November 25, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

FLame EXtinguishment (FLEX)-2 Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus (MDCA) Exchange: This morning, the crew was scheduled to perform a Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) MDCA replacement in preparation for the FLEX-2 experiment.  The Crew was unable to remove the MDCA Chamber Insert Assembly (CIA) from the Combustion Integration Rack (CIR) Combustion Chamber.  Ground teams will meet to determine additional troubleshooting to assist in removing the MDCA.  FLEX-2 is the second experiment to fly on the ISS which uses small droplets of fuel to study the special spherical characteristics of burning fuel droplets in space. The FLEX-2 experiment studies how quickly fuel burns, the conditions required for soot to form, and how mixtures of fuels evaporate before burning. Understanding these processes could lead to the production of a safer spacecraft as well as increased fuel efficiency for engines using liquid fuel on Earth.

HRP Collections: The crew performed their Flight Day 30 (FD30) blood draw in support of the Biochemical Profile and Repository experiments. Collected samples were placed in Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for return at a later date. The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body. Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Robotic External Leak Locator (RELL) Preparations:  The Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock (JEMAL) was depressurized to prepare for deploying RELL via the slidetable next week.  RELL is an instrumentation package that is maneuvered externally by the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS)/Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) to detect local pressure variations to help in locating a leak.  For this demonstration, a predetermined scan/survey procedure will be executed that characterized the ISS environment and scans various ISS elements containing ammonia lines and systems.  Operations next week will also attempt to identify the source of the “white flakes” that have recently been noticed on downlink video.

Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Stowage Wire Kit Installation:  Overnight, the crew completed the activities to install the JEM Stowage Wire Kit.  This Kit makes additional stowage available in the area under the JEM Airlock (JEMAL).  They installed additional wire frames and CTBs in the deck locations forward and aft of the JEMAL.  A total of 7.0 Cargo Transfer Bag Equivalent (CTBE) of stowage was gained through this JEM Stowage Wire Kit upgrade.


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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #53 on: 11/29/2016 05:57 AM »
November 28, 2016
RELEASE 16-110

NASA’s ISS-RapidScat Earth Science Mission Ends

NASA’s International Space Station Rapid Scatterometer (ISS-RapidScat) Earth science instrument has ended operations following a successful two-year mission aboard the space station. The mission launched Sept. 21, 2014, and had recently passed its original decommissioning date.

ISS-ISS-RapidScat used the unique vantage point of the space station to provide near-real-time monitoring of ocean winds, which are critical in determining regional weather patterns. Its measurements of wind speed and direction over the ocean surface have been used by agencies worldwide for weather and marine forecasting and tropical cyclone monitoring. Its location on the space station made it the first space-borne scatterometer that could observe how winds evolve throughout the course of a day.

“As a first-of-its-kind mission, ISS-RapidScat proved successful in providing researchers and forecasters with a low-cost eye on winds over remote areas of Earth's oceans,” said Michael Freilich, director of NASA’s Earth Science Division. “The data from ISS-RapidScat will help researchers contribute to an improved understanding of fundamental weather and climate processes, such as how tropical weather systems form and evolve.”

The agencies that routinely used ISS-RapidScat's data for forecasting and monitoring operations include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the U.S. Navy, along with European and Indian weather agencies. It provided more complete coverage of wind patterns far out to sea that could build into dangerous storms. Even if these storms never reach land, they can bring devastating wave impacts to coastal areas far away.

“The unique coverage of ISS-RapidScat allowed us to see the rate of change or evolution in key wind features along mid-latitude storm tracks, which happen to intersect major shipping routes,” said Paul Chang, Ocean Surface Winds Science team lead at NOAA's Center for Satellite Applications and Research. “ISS-RapidScat observations improved situational awareness of marine weather conditions, which aid optimal ship routing and hazard avoidance, and marine forecasts and warnings.“

During its mission, ISS-RapidScat also provided new insights into research questions such as how changing winds over the Pacific drove changes in sea surface temperature during the 2015-2016 El Niño event. Due to its unique ability to sample winds at different times of day, its data will be useful to scientists for years to come.

ISS-RapidScat was born out of ingenuity, expertise and a need for speed. It was constructed in less than two years to replace its widely valued predecessor, NASA's decade-old QuikScat scatterometer satellite, at a fraction of the cost of the original – largely by adapting spare parts from QuikScat.

On Aug. 19, a power distribution unit for the space station’s Columbus module failed, resulting in a power loss to ISS-RapidScat. Later that day, as the mission operations team from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, attempted to reactivate the instrument, one of the outlets on the power distribution unit experienced an electrical overload. In the following weeks, multiple attempts to restore ISS-RapidScat to normal operations were not successful, including a final attempt on Oct. 17.

NASA currently does not plan to launch another scatterometer mission. However, the loss of ISS-RapidScat data will be partially mitigated by the newly launched ScatSat ocean wind sensor, a mission of the Indian Space Research Organization.

ISS-RapidScat was the first continuous Earth-observing instrument specifically designed and developed to operate on the International Space Station exterior, but it’s no longer the only one. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) joined the space station in January 2015 to provide cost-effective measurements of atmospheric aerosols and clouds in Earth's atmosphere. Two more instruments are scheduled to launch to the space station in 2017 – one that will allow scientists to monitor the ozone layer’s gradually improving health, and another to observe lightning over Earth's tropics and mid-latitudes. Following that, two additional Earth science instruments are scheduled for launch in 2018 and 2019.

ISS-RapidScat was a partnership between JPL and the International Space Station Program Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, with support from the Earth Science Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Other mission partners include the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida and its Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama; the European Space Agency; and SpaceX.

NASA collects data from space, air, land and sea to increase our understanding of our home planet, improve lives and safeguard our future. NASA develops new ways to observe and study Earth's interconnected natural systems with long-term data records. The agency freely shares this unique knowledge and works with institutions around the world to gain new insights into how our planet is changing.

To access ISS-RapidScat data, or for more information, visit:

http://winds.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/RapidScat

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #54 on: 11/30/2016 12:17 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/28/2016

Posted on November 28, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Device for the study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization High Temperature Insert-Reflight (DECLIC-HTI-R) Installation: Today the crew installed and connected the Electronics Locker and Experiment locker cables for the DECLIC facility, before installing the HTI-R experiment insert. During operations, 400 milliliters of water leaked during the quick disconnect connection, but connecting the cables in reverse order proved to resolve the problem and the DECLIC-HTI-R was activated successfully. There was no JEM impact to the water leak. DECLIC is an apparatus developed by CNES for a NASA Express rack to support the study of material growth and the behavior of liquids near their critical point. It provides all subsystems required to operate an experiment dedicated insert installed on an optical bench. HTI is one of the modules that have been developed for DECLIC. The science of HTI is based on the analysis of optical and thermal properties of H20 near the critical points. HTI is intended to enable the study of near-critical water, and later of other super-critical fluids. It is installed on orbit in the Experiment Locker of the DECLIC instrument. It provides the environment and stimuli (quench, temperature gradient, heat pulse, optical observations) for the cell containing the sample under study. The mechanical part accommodating the fluid cell is called SCU (Sample Cell Unit).

Marangoni Deformation 30 Surf Removal: Following the successful run of Dynamic Surf/Marangoni Deformation, today the crew removed the Marangoni experiment from the Fluid Physics Experiment Facility (FPEF) within the Ryutai Rack. The Dynamic Surf investigation is part of a series of JAXA experiments that Marangoni convection driven by the presence of surface tension gradient as produced by a temperature difference at a liquid/gas interface. Fluid convection observations of a silicone oil liquid bridge that is generated by heating the one disc higher than the other within the Fluid Physics Experiment Facility (FPEF). By observing and understanding how such fluids move researchers can learn about how heat is transferred in microgravity, and ultimately drive the design and development of more efficient fluid flow based systems and devices.

Sarcolab-3: Today the crew completed the setup phase of the joint-NASA-ESA-Russia Sarcolab experiment, by deploying and configuring the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) in the Columbus module. Tomorrow’s activities will be the beginning of the three day operations phase of the experiment. Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus, or calf muscle, where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Human Research Program (HRP) Collections: This morning, a crewmember conducted the first run of Biochemistry Profile and Repository and the second session of Marrow urine collections.  The shared samples were placed in Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI) for storage and return on a future flight. The Biochemical Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body. Repository is a storage bank used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This repository supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Robotic External Leak Locator (RELL) Operations:  In preparation for RELL operations the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Arm #2 ORU Tool Changeout Mechanism (OTCM) was powered up while grasped to Robot Micro Conical Tool (RMCT) 2.  After power up, the payload status came up in an unexpected configuration as reported in telemetry.  The OTCM showed captured and the Payload status showed Unloaded.  Since SPDM Arm 2 was holding RMCT 2 the Payload Status should have shown Secured.  Today’s operations were performed using a new software version.  The ground teams performed some non-evasive troubleshooting in attempt correct the issue with no success.  The teams agreed to stand down and retract the RELL back into the JEM Airlock (JEMAL). RELL will remain in the JEMAL until teams determine the go forward plan.

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #55 on: 11/30/2016 12:17 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/29/2016

Posted on November 29, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Robotic External Leak Locator (RELL) Operations: On GMT 333, upon powering up the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) for RELL ops, the Dexterous Manipulator Control Software (DMCS) Payload Status showed “Unloaded” for ORU Tool Changeout Mechanism (OTCM) 2 instead of “Secure” which was unexpected since it was captured to Robotic Micro Conical Tool (RMCT) 2. Root cause was traced to software changes made with the “Mount Logan” software patch. Ground teams agreed to completely rolling back the original software MSS 8.3 software version (pre-Mt Logan). Overnight the team successfully re-installed a pre-Mt. Logan version of MSS software, and reinitialized the SPDM. OTCM2 is now showing “secure” (versus the earlier improper “unloaded” signature). This allowed ground controllers to perform the RELL operations that were originally planned yesterday. The Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Airlock (JEMAL) slide table with the RELL package was extended. Ground Controllers then grasped the RELL with the SPDM and began the checkout by pointing RELL towards deep space in order to scan a clean environment as a baseline, and data is being collected. Tomorrow will begin the planned surveys. RELL is an instrumentation package that is maneuvered externally by the SSRMS/SPDM to detect local pressure variations to help in locating a leak. For this demonstration, a predetermined scan/survey procedure will be executed that characterized the ISS environment and scans various ISS elements containing ammonia lines and systems. Planned operations later this week will also attempt to identify the source of the “white flakes” that have been noticed on downlink video.

Marangoni Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler-2 (UVP2) Installation: The crew began the installation activities for the next Marangoni experiment in the Fluid Physics Experiment Facility (FPEF) within the Japanese Experiment Module’s (JEM’s) Ryutai Rack. The crew cleaned the FPEF Infrared (IR) Imager forward and downward mirrors, then installed the Marangoni-UVP-2 cassette. The crew then connected cables and performed leak checks. Spatio-temporal Flow Structure in Marangoni Convection (Marangoni-UVP) investigates the fundamental physics of surface tension where liquid and gas meet. Specifically, it investigates a phenomenon known as Marangoni convection, a type of flow that is driven by temperature differences at the liquid and gas interface. The FPEF enables observations of liquid and gas flow in three dimensions, and the microgravity environment on the ISS provides an ideal setting to study convection. Improved understanding of liquid flow physics could lead to more efficient industrial processes, semiconductors, optical materials and biological materials for use in space and on Earth.

Sarcolab-3: After successfully configuring the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) in the Columbus module yesterday, today the crew will begin the three day operations phase of joint-NASA-ESA-Russia Sarcolab experiment. Today the subject ingressed MARES, followed by the operator performing ultrasound measurements of the right calf muscle, with remote guidance and direction assistance from ground specialists.  The subject then donned Percutaneus Electrical Muscle Stimulator (PEMS), for electrical stimulation at rest and during voluntary muscle contraction, and Electromyography (EMG) electrodes to measure calf muscle and tendon response at the ankle (calf muscle insertion). The MARES equipment and software is used to measure calf strength during spaceflight; the inflight data will then be compared to preflight and postflight measurements to measure the impact of a hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss. The goal of the Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigation is to advance the understanding of muscle function and atrophy in space. Results will contribute to further improvement of countermeasures for long duration spaceflight.

Aerosol Sampler Deployment: The crew will deploy seven passive and two active Aerosol Samplers in various locations around the ISS. Aerosols are small particles suspended in the air, and in Earth’s atmosphere, aerosols include soot, dust, pollen and a wide range of other natural and human-made materials. But smoke does not rise and dust does not settle in microgravity the way they do on Earth, causing aerosols to behave differently and pose hazards for crew members breathing the air. The Aerosol Sampling Experiment (Aerosol Sampler) collects airborne particles in the International Space Station’s (ISS) cabin air, and returns them to Earth so scientists can study the particles with powerful microscopes. For this experiment, particles collected on the cabin air samples are analyzed using a variety of microscopic techniques including: light microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, computer controlled scanning electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy.

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #56 on: 11/30/2016 02:08 PM »
Mares machine
 

The Muscle Atrophy Research and Exercise System, or Mares for short, is a three-in-one muscle-measurement machine on the International Space Station to monitor astronauts’ muscles as they work out.
 
Muscle strength drops during spaceflight and researchers need to know why this happens in order to prepare for long missions and safe space tourism. Mares is an exercise bench that offers detailed information about how muscles behave in space.
 
Looking at muscle contraction at a single moment gives little information but Mares provides a full overview of muscle speed and force as an elbow or knee joint bends.
 
Our bodies are amazing machines that perform wonderful feats daily without us even noticing. Hold a glass in your hand and fill it with water and your arm muscles will automatically hold the glass steady and stable despite the changing weight as it fills.
 
Mares can chart this fine motor control as well as give a precise overview of muscle torque and speed. Astronauts move their joints to follow a graph or dot on a screen as a motor generates counterforce.
 
This week, ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet is installing the machine in Europe’s Columbus space laboratory and he will be the first test subject for researchers on Earth. Thomas’ fellow ESA astronauts Andreas Mogensen, Samantha Cristoforetti and Tim Peake, tested the machine to make sure it works correctly ready for use.
 
Thomas is one week into his six-month Proxima mission on the International Space Station. Follow him and his adventure in space via thomaspesquet.esa.int
 
Credit: ESA/NASA

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #57 on: 12/02/2016 08:20 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/30/2016

Posted on November 30, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 

Robotic External Leak Locator (RELL) Operations: Yesterday, Ground Controllers used the SPDM to remove the RELL from the JEMAL Slide Table. A checkout was performed by pointing RELL towards deep space in order to scan a clean environment as a baseline. Today, RELL performed background scans along the Port 1 (P1) truss segment in order to establish a baseline for the ISS environment. Overnight, RELL will be pointed near truss radiators to characterize the ISS environment near structure. RELL is an instrumentation package that is maneuvered externally by the SSRMS/SPDM to detect local pressure variations to help in locating a leak. For this demonstration, a predetermined scan/survey procedure will be executed that characterized the ISS environment and scans various ISS elements containing ammonia lines and systems. Planned operations later this week will also attempt to identify the source of the “white flakes” that have been noticed on downlink video.

Marangoni Setup: The crew performed the third day of Marangoni setup for the Marangoni Ultrasonic Velocity Profilers (UVP2) experiment.  Today’s operations included a Strobolamp exchange within the Ryutai Rack’s Fluid Physics Experiment Facility (FPEF) followed by configuration of the 2-Dimensional (2-D) and 3-D cameras within the FPEF.  Spatio-temporal Flow Structure in Marangoni Convection (Marangoni-UVP) investigates the fundamental physics of surface tension where liquid and gas meet. Specifically, it investigates a phenomenon known as Marangoni convection, a type of flow that is driven by temperature differences at the liquid and gas interface. The FPEF enables observations of liquid and gas flow in three dimensions, and the microgravity environment on the ISS provides an ideal setting to study convection. Improved understanding of liquid flow physics could lead to more efficient industrial processes, semiconductors, optical materials and biological materials for use in space and on Earth.

Selectable Optical Diagnostics Instrument Experiment Diffusion Coefficient Mixture (SODI DCMix)-3 Stow: Following the successful completion of the SODI DCMix-3 experiment the crew removed the experiment from the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and returned the MSG to its nominal configuration. Tomorrow the crew will install the Packed Bed Reactor Experiment (PBRE) in the MSG. The SODI DCMix-3 investigation measures the diffusion coefficients of selected ternary mixtures taking advantage of the reduced gravity environment available on board the ISS. A combination of different and complementary techniques are used to characterize flight candidate samples among water-based and hydrocarbon mixtures. Experimental results from space experiments, performed in the Selectable Optical Diagnostic Instrument, are used to test thermodiffusion theories and develop physical and mathematical models for the estimation of thermo-diffusion coefficients.

Sarcolab-3: The second operational day for the Sarcolab-3 experiment began with converting the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES) from the ankle measurement configuration to the knee measurement configuration.  Once the setup was completed the subject donned the Percutaneus Electrical Muscle Stimulator (PEMS) and Electromyography (EMG) electrodes, to stimulate and measure calf muscle and tendon response at the back of the knee (calf muscle origin). During the knee joint evaluation, the subject sat on the MARES dynamometer with the chair and pantograph set to obtain knee flexion and extension from 90 degree knee angle to full extension with the knee torque adapter securely fixed to the shin. The inflight data will be compared to preflight and postflight measurements to measure the impact of a hypothesized microgravity induced muscle loss.  Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus, or calf muscle, where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) Emergency Health Maintenance System Contingency Drill Training:  During this onboard training session the crew reviewed procedures, hardware and communication methods necessary to manage a medical emergency onboard ISS. Emergency medical equipment was deployed during the training session for the crew to practice Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) positioning to ensure familiarity with procedure execution should a medical emergency occur.

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #58 on: 12/05/2016 02:15 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/01/2016

Posted on December 1, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.

65 Progress (65P) Launch:  65P launched from the Baikonur, Kazakhstan Cosmodrome today at 8:51 am CST.  Telemetry indicated that the 3rd stage separation occurred a little more than 2 minutes early.  Telemetry over Russian Ground Sites (RGS) was lost earlier than expected.  Communication with the vehicle was never reacquired with the vehicle.  The 65P vehicle and all cargo is considered lost.  A Russian State Commission will convene to investigate the anomaly.

Robotic External Leak Locator (RELL) Operations: Today, RELL checkout and demonstration continues with scans of the Port 1 Truss (P1) Truss Radiator Beam Valve Modules (RBVMs), and the P1 Ammonia (NH3). RELL is an instrumentation package that is maneuvered externally by the SSRMS/SPDM to detect local pressure variations to help in locating a leak. For this demonstration, a predetermined scan/survey procedure will be executed that characterized the ISS environment and scans various ISS elements containing ammonia lines and systems. Planned operations later this week will also attempt to identify the source of the “white flakes” that have been noticed on downlink video.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites Tether Demonstration (SPHERES Tether Demo): The crew conducted a conference with the ground team then setup and checkout the SPHERES, the work area in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), and the EXpedite PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Laptop Computer (ELC) prior to testing. The crew loaded the test specific software to the satellites and executed the first of two test sessions with ground support teams. The goal of the SPHERES Tether Demo is to study the dynamics of a tethered capture object and a “space tug” chase vehicle, improving computer programs and modeling needed for removing space debris as well as capturing scientific samples from other planets.

Sarcolab-3 Deconfigure and Stow: After the successful completion of the Flight Day (FD) 5-10 sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday, the crew deconfigured and stowed the Muscle Atrophy Research & Exercise System (MARES). Today, the crew verified and downlinked the data and stowed the remaining ancillary Sarcolab-3 hardware. The next session will be in the FD 30-60 window. Myotendinous and Neuromuscular Adaptation to Long-term Spaceflight (Sarcolab) investigates the adaptation and deterioration of the soleus, or calf muscle, where it joins the Achilles tendon, which links it to the heel and carries loads from the entire body. Muscle fiber samples are taken from crew members before and after flight, and analyzed for changes in structural and chemical properties. MRI and ultrasound tests and electrode stimulation are conducted to help assess muscle and tendon changes caused by microgravity exposure.

Aerosol Sampler: The crew closed the drawers on the passive samplers located in the various USOS modules. The Aerosol Sampling Experiment (Aerosol Sampler) collects airborne particles in the ISS cabin air, and is returned to Earth so scientists can study the particles with powerful microscopes. For this experiment, particles collected on the cabin air samples are analyzed using a variety of microscopic techniques including: light microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, computer controlled scanning electron microscopy; and scanning transmission electron microscopy.

Packed Bed Reactor Experiment (PBRE) Setup: The crew configured the PBRE hardware components and connected the hoses and cables within the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). This module is scheduled to run for approximately three weeks in the MSG. PBRE studies the behavior of gases and liquids when they flow simultaneously through a column filled with fixed porous media. The porous media or “packing” can be made of different shapes and materials and are used widely in chemical engineering as a means to enhance the contact between two immiscible fluid phases (e.g., liquid-gas, water-oil, etc.). Packed columns can serve as reactors, scrubbers, strippers, etc. in systems where efficient interphase contact is desired, both on Earth and in space.

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Re: Expedition-50 thread (Nov. 2016 - March 2017)
« Reply #59 on: 12/05/2016 07:35 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/02/2016

Posted on December 2, 2016 at 4:00 pm by HQ.
 
Robotic External Leak Locator (RELL) Operations: Overnight, RELL checkout and demonstration was performed by performing scans of the Port 1 Truss (P1) Truss Radiator Beam Valve Modules (RBVMs), and the P1 Ammonia (NH3) Vent. Today the Robotics Ground Controllers are performing the Pump Flow and Control Subsystem (PFCS) survey. Once the PFCS survey is complete, the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) will be maneuvered to a translation configuration. The Mobile Transporter (MT) will then be translated to Worksite 6 in order for RELL to perform a survey of the Zenith 1 (Z1) truss segment. RELL is an instrumentation package that is maneuvered externally by the SSRMS/SPDM to detect local pressure variations to help in locating a leak. For this demonstration, a predetermined scan/survey procedure will be executed that characterized the ISS environment and scans various ISS elements containing ammonia lines and systems. Planned operations will attempt to identify the source of the “white flakes” that have been noticed on downlink video.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) Multi-user Droplet Combustion Apparatus Chamber (MDCA) Troubleshooting: On Friday, November 25th (GMT 330), the crew attempted to perform a Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) MDCA component replacement in preparation for upcoming science, however the crew was unable to remove the Chamber Insert Assembly (CIA). Today the crew performed investigative troubleshooting to determine the location of the obstruction. The troubleshooting consisted of utilizing a fiberscope to view down the rails of the CIA, and a tool to slide down the rail to determine the location of the obstruction.

Veg-03: The crew performed their first harvest of Outredgeous Red Romaine Lettuce from the Veggie facility. This first of four harvests is part of a new paradigm of harvesting entitled “Cut and Come Again” were the astronaut will only harvest the outer leaves allowing for an attempt at a longer growth of the plants. After wiping the leaves with a food-grade antibacterial wipe, the crew consumed the leaves. The four harvests will occur over a 60-day growth period. The overall goal of Veg-03 is to further demonstrate proof-of concept for the Veggie plant growth chamber and the planting pillows using ‘Outregous’ Red Romaine lettuce. Future long-duration missions into the solar system, will require a fresh food supply to supplement crew diets, which means growing crops in space. Previous investigations focused on improving productivity in controlled environments, but the limited quarters of the space shuttle and ISS made it difficult to conduct large-scale crop production tests. Veg-03 expands on previous validation tests of the new Veggie hardware, which crew members will soon use to grow cabbage, lettuce and other fresh vegetables in space. Tests determine which types of microorganisms are present in space-grown cabbage, providing baseline data for future crop-growing efforts. Behavioral health surveys assess the impact of growing plants on crew morale and mood.

Human Research Program (HRP) Blood Collection: The crew performed their Flight Day 15 blood collections and then stowed them into the Minus Eighty-degree Freezer for ISS (MELF). These sample collections will be used to support the Biochem Profile, Repository, and Cardio Ox investigations.
•The Biochem Profile experiment tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.
•Repository is a storage bank that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. This investigation archives biosamples for use as a resource for future space flight related research.
•Cardio Ox determines whether biological markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress are elevated during and after space flight and whether this results in an increased, long-term risk of atherosclerosis in astronauts.

Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF) Operations: The crew removed the samples from the ELF work volume then cleaned the internal chamber of sample residue. ELF was then put back into an operational configuration. The Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF) is an experimental facility designed to levitate/melt/solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the Electrostatic Levitation method. With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured, and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved. The ELF is located in the JEM Multipurpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) in Kibo.

Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL2) CO2 Controller Installation: The crew installed the Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Incubator Controller brought up by OA-5 into the SABL. Following the installation, ground controllers performed checkout operations of the new hardware. SABL supports a wide variety of experiments in the life, physical and material sciences with a focus on supporting research of biological systems and processes. It has over 23 liters of temperature controlled volume with LED lighting for scientific hardware and experiments. It can be fitted to provide 5% CO2 for cell cultures and has 2 USB 2.0 ports and 2 ethernet LAN connections. It also has switchable 28vdc and 5vdc power supplies for experiment use.

On-board Training (OBT) HII Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Rendezvous Review: In preparation for HTV-6 arrival scheduled for later this month, the crew participated in a conference with ground teams to discuss the training session and address any questions. The crew then performed their proficiency training session, covering the mission profile, the rendezvous crew procedures and crew interfaces for monitoring and commanding.

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